Bloglikes - Psychology https://www.bloglikes.com/c/psychology en-US Thu, 15 Apr 2021 17:45:27 +0000 Sat, 06 Apr 2013 00:00:00 +0000 FeedWriter Magic mushrooms show promise in treatment for depression, study says https://www.theguardian.com/society/2021/apr/14/magic-mushroom-psilocybin-show-promise-treatment-depression-clinical-trial-finds Trial suggests psilocybin combined with psychological therapy is as effective as antidepressant drug

Magic mushrooms have a long and rich history. Now scientists say they could play an important role in the future, with their active ingredient a promising treatment for depression.

The results from a small, phase two clinical trial have revealed that two doses of psilocybin appears to be as effective as the common antidepressant escitalopram in treating moderate to severe major depressive disorder, at least when combined with psychological therapy.

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Wed, 14 Apr 2021 17:00:17 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Depression Medical research Science UK news Psychology Drugs Society
What to Do When Your Toddler Is a Biter https://offspring.lifehacker.com/what-to-do-when-your-toddler-is-a-biter-1846672640

There are lots of unpleasant behaviors our young children will display over the course of their childhood, but biting—which not only can leave marks, bruises, and break the skin, but also freaking hurts—is one we all hope our kids will never adopt. Unfortunately, there’s a fairly good chance they’ll chomp down on…

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Tue, 13 Apr 2021 12:30:00 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Psychology Childhood Toddler Human Behavior Mind Lifehacks Allen Sammy Habit Behaviorism Biting Ethology Sarah Levin Nail Biting Sydni Ellis
Why Do I Feel Like I'm Dying During a Panic Attack? https://gizmodo.com/why-do-i-feel-like-im-dying-during-a-panic-attack-1846618805

If you would like to know what it feels like to die, while at the same time continuing to live, you have a number of solid options. You can eat fast food quickly on a 90-degree day; you can lay awake all night mentally rehearsing your greatest failures and then board a packed bus to work; you can experiment, for days…

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Mon, 12 Apr 2021 07:30:00 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Psychology Science Psychiatry Anxiety Fear Emotions Mind Panic Attack Panic Panic Disorder Chronic Stress Phobias Albert Einstein College of Medicine Craig Barr Health Medical Pharma Shortness Of Breath Phobophobia Sue Varma David H Barlow Barbara Milrod Rachel Ginsberg Attributions
The healthy child who wouldn’t wake up: the strange truth of ‘mystery illnesses’ https://www.theguardian.com/books/2021/apr/12/the-healthy-child-who-wouldnt-wake-up-the-strange-truth-of-mystery-illnesses Dizzy diplomats, twitching schoolgirls, children in comas ... psychosomatic illnesses are not always as unexplainable as they seem, writes neurologist Suzanne O’Sullivan

I cannot resist a news headline that refers to a mystery illness and there is no shortage to keep me interested. “Mystery of 18 twitching teenagers in New York”; “Mysterious sleeping sickness spreads in Kazakhstani village”; “200 Colombian girls fall ill with a mysterious illness”; “The Mystery of the Havana Syndrome”. One medical disorder seems to attract this description more than any other: psychosomatic illness. That the body is the mouthpiece of the mind is evident in our posture, in the smiles on our faces, in the tremor of our nervous hands. But, still, when the body speaks too explicitly, when the power of the mind leads to physical disability, it can be hard to understand why. This perplexity is most apparent when psychosomatic disorders affect groups, spreading from person to person like a social virus, in a phenomenon often referred to as mass hysteria.

We are currently caught in a pandemic. We have been ordered to hide and to search our bodies for symptoms. If there was ever a time for a psychosomatic disorder to spread through anxiety and suggestion, this is it. The threat of a virus can affect health in more ways than one. Since 2018 I have been visiting communities affected by suspected contagions of psychosomatic illness. I have seen what fear can do to our physical health. I have also seen the curative effect of hope.

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Mon, 12 Apr 2021 04:00:59 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Psychology Books New York Medical Research Culture Infectious Diseases Science and nature books Society books Suzanne O'SullivanI Kazakhstani village
VR experiments manipulate how people feel about coffee http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/EndlessInnovation/~3/5CTiT4dYlFA/vr-changes-perception-of-coffee-premiumness
  • Images can affect how people perceive the quality of a product.
  • In a new study, researchers show using virtual reality that images of farms positively influence the subjects' experience of coffee.
  • The results provide insights on the psychology and power of marketing.

Are coffee consumers influenced by the imagery and story around the production of the drink? Such was one of the central questions of a new study that explored the power of marketing on how "premium" aficionados consider coffee to be.

The researchers set out to explore whether the origins of the coffee can affect the perception of its quality in the minds of the drinkers. In particular, they focused on the concept of terroir, the special characteristics conferred upon the coffee by the specific terrain in which it was grown.

"Terroir is more than a mere geographical link between product and land," write the authors. "It relates to the idea that products are a unique expression of different environmental and sociocultural characteristics of a specific place." Thus, focusing a customer's attention on the environment in which the coffee was grown might make the product seem more authentic and of better quality.

Therefore, the researchers examined the effect of images on the coffee-drinking experience in three experiments. The study was carried out by the food scientist Francisco Barbosa Escobar from Aarhus University in Denmark and marketing experts Olivia Petit from the Kedge Business School in Marseille, France, and Carlos Velasco from the BI Norwegian Business School in Oslo, Norway. Incidentally, Norwegians are among the world's top coffee consumers, with an average Norwegian adult consuming around 4 cups of coffee a day, reports Statistics Norway.

The first experiment involved 770 non-expert participants from the UK. They were shown online images and descriptions of four different specialty coffees, traded by a Norwegian coffee company. The researchers found that coffees with pictures of farms were rated higher in premiumness by the subjects than coffees with pictures of cities.

For the second and third experiments, the study used virtual reality environments of Times Square in New York City and a farm in Kenya as well as a control setting of a white room. The second experiment engaged 143 non-expert participants recruited via a behavioral studies platform at the BI Norwegian Business School in Oslo, Norway. The participants were asked to smell a sample of quality ground coffee from Kenya while at the same time traversing a virtual reality atmosphere. The subjects were then asked to rate the coffee.


Image (A) shows the instruments used in Experiment 2: Oculus GO virtual reality (VR) headset and sample coffee bag. The other panels show the VR environments used in the study - (B) farm, (C) city, and (D) control.Credit: Escobar / Petit / Velasco, Frontiers in Psychology


Compared to the control (white room), subjects in the farm VR atmosphere rated the coffee as more acidic. Conversely, subjects rated coffee as sweeter when inside the control VR atmosphere compared to the city VR atmosphere. Furthermore, coffee was considered more premium when subjects were in the farm VR atmosphere compared to the control, but there was no difference in premiumness score between farm and city.

For the third experiment, the research team involved 34 people who were professionals in the coffee industry. They were asked to taste and score Kenyan coffee while being in the same city and farm VR environments used in the previous experiment. The results revealed a strong effect of atmosphere on how much the experts enjoyed their experience, with a much greater preference for the farm setting versus the control environment of a white room.

But the different VR atmospheres had little effect on how the experts rated the premiumness of the coffee. The researchers believe that "given their specialized knowledge, coffee professionals examined more objective attributes of the coffee and could discriminate intrinsic factors relevant for the assessment of the coffee from irrelevant extrinsic cues."

The researchers think their results can lead to developing more immersive marketing experiences in virtual reality, which could be groundbreaking in many industries. A premium experience can lead to customers paying premium prices.

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Sun, 11 Apr 2021 12:10:18 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Psychology Coffee UK Technology New York City Brain Innovation Vr Virtual Reality Kenya Addiction Denmark Norway Mind Times Square Marseille France Oslo Norway Aarhus University Carlos Velasco Kedge Business School BI Norwegian Business School Francisco Barbosa Escobar Escobar Petit Velasco Frontiers
Kintsugi helped me to understand my brother's death https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2021/apr/10/kintsugi-helped-me-to-understand-my-brothers-death The Japanese artform, based on a belief that a repaired pot can be stronger, taught me about tragedy and the ability to overcome it

My brother died at the age of 10, when I was eight. When I was nine, I shushed my best friend for mentioning him. At 11, I forced myself to stop turning my head away when we drove past a cemetery. And at 16 I spoke his name aloud for the first time, although it was many more years before I could actually talk about him.

“The world breaks everyone and afterward many are strong at the broken places,” wrote Ernest Hemingway. Decades after my brother died I found a way to understand this, and that way was through the metaphor of kintsugi (kin=gold + tsugi=joining), the Japanese repair technique that puts a broken pot back together but reveals the breaks and scars by highlighting the seams with pure gold. A shattered pot becomes a new entity, one that says out loud: I was broken, but now, even though I am not perfect, I am more beautiful and stronger than ever.

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Sat, 10 Apr 2021 10:00:09 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Psychology Science Life and style Health & wellbeing Craft Bereavement Ernest Hemingway Kintsugi
Remember to Thank Your Partner, You Ungrateful Bastard https://lifehacker.com/remember-to-tell-your-partner-thank-you-you-ungrateful-1846612305

In longterm relationships, it can sometimes seem like the gratitude between the people involved runs thin. Amid the rigors of daily life, it’s easy to take someone else’s favors or generosity for granted. Making dinner most nights, making the bed every morning, cleaning the floors, or scheduling doctors’ appointments…

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Fri, 09 Apr 2021 16:45:00 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Psychology Emotions Human Behavior Mind Lifehacks Positive Psychology Thank You Gratitude Carol Peletier Lydia Dishman Positive Mental Attitude Letter Of Thanks Jeff Human Sara B Algoe
Despite social pressure, boys and girls still prefer gender-typical toys http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/EndlessInnovation/~3/n-1je0l4CMU/gender-stereotyped-toys
  • A recent meta-analysis overviewed 75 studies on children's gender-related toy preferences.
  • The results found that "gender-related toy preferences may be considered a well-established finding."
  • It's a controversial topic: Some people argue that these preferences stem from social pressure, while others say they're at least partly rooted in biology.

There's more gender equality in Western societies today than in the past. Inequalities still exist, of course, but research shows a general uptrend in women joining and , obtaining degrees, and earning more money. The social expectations of men and women also seemed to have changed; this is harder to measure empirically, but it seems safe to say that our ideas about gender roles are more fluid today than they were, in say, the 1950s.

So, have these changes affected a crucial part of children's development: play? More specifically, as gender roles have become more fluid, have children's preferences toward gender-typed toys become more fluid, too?

The short answer seems to be no. For decades, studies have shown that boys and girls generally prefer playing with toys typically associated with their biological sex: toy trucks for boys and dolls for girls, to give a rough example.

These results have remained remarkably stable over the past 50 years, according to a 2020 meta-analysis of research on gender differences in toy preferences. Published in Archives of Sexual Behavior and titled "The Magnitude of Children's Gender‐Related Toy Interests Has Remained Stable Over 50 Years of Research," the analysis examined 75 previous studies, 113 effect sizes, and a range of toy preference measurements.

The authors, Jac T. M. Davis and Melissa Hines, found "a broad consistency of results across the large body of research on children's gender-related toy preferences: children showed large and reliable preferences for toys that were related to their own gender. Thus, according to our review, gender-related toy preferences may be considered a well-established finding."

A letter to the editor in the same journal sought to challenge these findings in a separate analysis, which concluded that children actually spend less time playing with gender-typical toys these days.

The authors of that analysis speculated that the reason for this decline "might reflect social pressures in recent times for children to be less gender-typical in their behavior." In other words, the decline stems from parents wanting to be more in line with progressive ideas about gender fluidity.

However, Davis and Hines disagreed, proposing that the supposed decline appeared in the analysis only because of the specific methodology employed by the researchers. What's more, they noted that toy advertisers have been using more gender stereotypes to boost sales in recent decades—a finding that potentially complicates the claim that social pressures are causing kids to spend less time playing with gender-typical toys.

Davis and Hines concluded:

"It may be tempting to think that social changes over time might be reducing children's play with gender-related toys, given arguments that play with a broader set of toys would be beneficial for both boys and girls. Unfortunately, however, broad change in the social roles of men and women do not seem to have influenced children's toy choices, perhaps because they have been counteracted by stronger marketing of different toys to girls and boys over recent time. If society wants girls and boys to play with the full range of toys, more targeted action is probably required."

Little boy playing mathematics wooden toy at nursery Little boy playing mathematics wooden toy at nurseryCredit: Rawpixel.com via Adobe Stock


Why are we so concerned about which toys kids play with?

But does society really want kids to play with less gender-typical toys? Some research suggests the answer is yes. A 2017 survey from Pew Research Center found that a majority of Americans considered it a "somewhat or very good thing" to steer kids toward toys and activities traditionally associated with the opposite gender (though respondents were less enthusiastic about doing so for boys than girls).

Encouraging kids to play with a wider range of toys could yield benefits. For example, a 2020 study published in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience found that when both boys and girls play with dolls, they experience heightened activation within brain regions associated with empathy and perspective-taking.

But no matter what society wants, it's worth noting that there seems to be some biological drivers behind children's preferences for gender-typical toys.

For example, studies have shown that babies tend to prefer toys oriented to their own gender, a finding that suggests their preference is innate because they're in the pre-socialization stage of development. Supporting that argument are studies showing that baby monkeys also display gender-typical toy preferences.

Still, it's easy to see how social pressures might affect kids' toy preferences as they grow up. So, the question of why kids prefer the toys that they do likely boils down to a familiar answer: a tangled mix of environmental and biological factors.

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    Fri, 09 Apr 2021 10:36:24 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Psychology Parenting Children Innovation Davis Pew Research Center Social Change Jac Hines Melissa Hines
    What To Expect When Venus Squares Pluto http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Elsaelsacom/~3/uV8EBag_Efg/ venus marleneVenus will square Pluto on April 12th. Yes, you can expect old lovers to show up. I call them “corpses” as in “Step away from the corpse”. It’s common to want to breathe life into a dead thing but it’s … Read More... ]]> Wed, 07 Apr 2021 08:04:50 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Psychology Pluto Venus Astrology Obsession Real Life Relating Venus-Pluto The four moral judgments you make everyday http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/EndlessInnovation/~3/H66h3P5lCBQ/moral-judgments-psychology
    • Moral psychology studies how we process moral questions and come to be moral beings.
    • A new framework says there are four kinds of moral judgment we all make.
    • Understanding how we evaluate moral or immoral actions can help us make better choices.

    Moral psychology is the study of how we process moral ideas in our minds, how we become moral creatures, and how our brains handle moral issues. Variations of it date back to Plato and Confucius, and the area is currently enjoying a tremendous amount of attention as thinkers from a variety of fields, including philosophy, psychology, and neuroscience, consider the different aspects that go into making moral judgments.

    But what is a moral judgment? Is there only one kind of judgment, or do we use different kinds in different situations? Are they all the same at the cognitive level?

    A new article by Dr. Bertram F. Malle of Brown University offers a framework for understanding how people make moral judgments and what factors go into those judgments.

    You are judgmental

    The first type of judgment is dubbed "evaluations." These are the simple evaluations we make of things being good, bad, positive, or negative. We do this for just about everything, including in non-moral situations like when evaluating writing, and our brains are very good at doing it quickly. Some studies suggest that our brains begin to evaluate for goodness or badness within half a second of getting the information. This first pass doesn't have all the data the other kinds of judgments do, but it helps set the stage for more complicated moral judgments.

    The second type is "norm judgments." This expansive category involves deciding if some action or thing is allowed, permissible, taboo, or otherwise acceptable. This determination is related to, but not dependent on, how we evaluate something. While evaluations can be done on any thing or action, norm judgments are limited to actions and often to future ones. Less reactive than the other judgments, this one can be applied before any action is taken and is often used to help determine what should be done before anything happens. Often invoking abstract notions of virtue and value, this category can be a bit more deliberative than the others.

    The third kind is "wrongness judgments." These combine elements of the previous two to identify intentional violations of norms that are considered egregious. Our brains can do this fairly accurately in less than half a second. In experiments asking test subjects to identify actions as morally wrong or neutral, the accuracy rate neared 90% when given a little more time to do it.

    While they are similar, a wrongness judgment is not the same as a norm judgment. Studies asking people to rank actions in terms of permissibility and wrongness find that people will often consider an action to be both wrong and permissible, such as pulling a lever to save five people at the cost of another person's life in the classic trolley problem.

    Likewise, these judgments differ from evaluations in that wrongness is an entirely moral trait. While we might evaluate a "dad joke" as "bad," we likely won't consider it "wrong" unless it's sexist, racist, or otherwise egregious.

    Last is "blame judgment." If wrongness judgments combine evaluations and norm judgments in a new way, then blame judgments combine all three. This is the most complex of the judgment categories. It includes factors of intentionality and justification -- most people blame somebody for accidentally spilling milk less than they'd blame them for intentionally pouring a gallon on the floor.

    Like the other reactive judgments, this one is carried out quickly. Our brains start to place blame in less than two seconds. Blame is not only a social tool; it can help us understand who did what but can also help us regulate our moral behavior in the future.

    What use does this have? Can I use this to understand my behavior?

    Perhaps most striking is how quickly our brains process moral information. Within less than two seconds of seeing an action with a moral dimension to it, your brain has already made a basic judgment on if it was good or bad, morally wrong or not, and who to blame for it. Importantly, some of these quick decisions will be erroneous because they rely on preexisting biases and limited information.

    The four-category framework can also help us understand that every moral situation can be considered from various angles and that holding beliefs on a single issue that are contradictory is entirely natural.

    Something can be "bad" and "wrong," like letting a person die by being hit by a trolley car, and also "permissible," since the alternative in most trolley considerations is to let five other people get hit. The person who pulls the lever in the trolley problem might be "blameworthy" in this case, but not in the same way as a person who pushes a man on the tracks to stop the trolley.

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    Mon, 05 Apr 2021 12:41:44 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Psychology Brown University Innovation Philosophy Morality Plato Cognative science Bertram F Malle
    The four moral judgments you make every day http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/EndlessInnovation/~3/H66h3P5lCBQ/moral-judgments-psychology
    • Moral psychology studies how we process moral questions and come to be moral beings.
    • A new framework says there are four kinds of moral judgment we all make.
    • Understanding how we evaluate moral or immoral actions can help us make better choices.

    Moral psychology is the study of how we process moral ideas in our minds, how we become moral creatures, and how our brains handle moral issues. Variations of it date back to Plato and Confucius, and the area is currently enjoying a tremendous amount of attention as thinkers from a variety of fields, including philosophy, psychology, and neuroscience, consider the different aspects that go into making moral judgments.

    But what is a moral judgment? Is there only one kind of judgment, or do we use different kinds in different situations? Are they all the same at the cognitive level?

    A new article by Dr. Bertram F. Malle of Brown University offers a framework for understanding how people make moral judgments and what factors go into those judgments.

    You are judgmental

    The first type of judgment is dubbed "evaluations." These are the simple evaluations we make of things being good, bad, positive, or negative. We do this for just about everything, including in non-moral situations like when evaluating writing, and our brains are very good at doing it quickly. Some studies suggest that our brains begin to evaluate for goodness or badness within half a second of getting the information. This first pass doesn't have all the data the other kinds of judgments do, but it helps set the stage for more complicated moral judgments.

    The second type is "norm judgments." This expansive category involves deciding if some action or thing is allowed, permissible, taboo, or otherwise acceptable. This determination is related to, but not dependent on, how we evaluate something. While evaluations can be done on any thing or action, norm judgments are limited to actions and often to future ones. Less reactive than the other judgments, this one can be applied before any action is taken and is often used to help determine what should be done before anything happens. Often invoking abstract notions of virtue and value, this category can be a bit more deliberative than the others.

    The third kind is "wrongness judgments." These combine elements of the previous two to identify intentional violations of norms that are considered egregious. Our brains can do this fairly accurately in less than half a second. In experiments asking test subjects to identify actions as morally wrong or neutral, the accuracy rate neared 90% when given a little more time to do it.

    While they are similar, a wrongness judgment is not the same as a norm judgment. Studies asking people to rank actions in terms of permissibility and wrongness find that people will often consider an action to be both wrong and permissible, such as pulling a lever to save five people at the cost of another person's life in the classic trolley problem.

    Likewise, these judgments differ from evaluations in that wrongness is an entirely moral trait. While we might evaluate a "dad joke" as "bad," we likely won't consider it "wrong" unless it's sexist, racist, or otherwise egregious.

    Last is "blame judgment." If wrongness judgments combine evaluations and norm judgments in a new way, then blame judgments combine all three. This is the most complex of the judgment categories. It includes factors of intentionality and justification -- most people blame somebody for accidentally spilling milk less than they'd blame them for intentionally pouring a gallon on the floor.

    Like the other reactive judgments, this one is carried out quickly. Our brains start to place blame in less than two seconds. Blame is not only a social tool; it can help us understand who did what but can also help us regulate our moral behavior in the future.

    What use does this have? Can I use this to understand my behavior?

    Perhaps most striking is how quickly our brains process moral information. Within less than two seconds of seeing an action with a moral dimension to it, your brain has already made a basic judgment on if it was good or bad, morally wrong or not, and who to blame for it. Importantly, some of these quick decisions will be erroneous because they rely on preexisting biases and limited information.

    The four-category framework can also help us understand that every moral situation can be considered from various angles and that holding beliefs on a single issue that are contradictory is entirely natural.

    Something can be "bad" and "wrong," like letting a person die by being hit by a trolley car, and also "permissible," since the alternative in most trolley considerations is to let five other people get hit. The person who pulls the lever in the trolley problem might be "blameworthy" in this case, but not in the same way as a person who pushes a man on the tracks to stop the trolley.

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    Mon, 05 Apr 2021 12:41:44 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Psychology Brown University Innovation Philosophy Morality Plato Cognative science Bertram F Malle
    Scientists create online games to show risks of AI emotion recognition https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2021/apr/04/online-games-ai-emotion-recognition-emojify Public can try pulling faces to trick the technology, while critics highlight human rights concerns

    It is a technology that has been frowned upon by ethicists: now researchers are hoping to unmask the reality of emotion recognition systems in an effort to boost public debate.

    Technology designed to identify human emotions using machine learning algorithms is a huge industry, with claims it could prove valuable in myriad situations, from road safety to market research. But critics say the technology not only raises privacy concerns, but is inaccurate and racially biased.

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    Sun, 04 Apr 2021 09:54:01 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Psychology Science Technology Privacy UK News Computing Consciousness University of Cambridge Facial Recognition Artificial intelligence (AI
    My rock’n’roll friendship with Lindy Morrison https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2021/apr/04/my-rocknroll-friendship-with-lindy-morrison She was in the Go-Betweens, Tracey Thorn was in the Marine Girls, their 30-year friendship enhanced both their lives

    On 31 March 1983, she burst into my dressing room, asking at the top of her voice, “Has anyone here got a lipstick I can borrow?” I looked up to see a tall woman in a Lurex dress, with a mass of blonde hair. Our two bands, Marine Girls and the Go-Betweens, were on the same bill at the Lyceum in London. I was 20, and she was 31. I was a tentative singer, she was a loud, outspoken drummer. I was from suburbia, she was from Brisbane, Australia. And I was still a student, while she had already been a social worker, then joined a feminist punk band called Xero. She’d hitchhiked across Europe with a girlfriend, she’d seen every art film, read every avant-garde book. She’d slept at Shakespeare and Co in Paris, she’d swum with Roger Moore, she could recite Kate Millett’s Sexual Politics. But I didn’t know any of this. I just knew that she looked like self-belief in a minidress, and that she had arrived in my life. “Who was that?” I asked when she had gone. “That,” came the reply, “was Lindy Morrison.”

    It took a couple of years for us to become friends. We were opposites in many ways, and at different stages of life, but there were similarities: we both lived with the boyfriend we were in a band with; we had strong opinions about everything – feminism, love and art; we liked Marilyn Monroe, Bette Davis, Patti Smith, Simone de Beauvoir, and we had no time for a lot of the men who surrounded us in the music business. I’d watch her on stage, fierce and sweating behind the drum kit, long hair flying in her face, all energy, all concentration, and I was proud to be her friend.

    Continue reading...]]>
    Sun, 04 Apr 2021 07:00:05 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Psychology Europe Books Music Science London Friendship Women Life and style Culture Health & wellbeing Paris Roger Moore Brisbane Australia Tracey Thorn Shakespeare and Co Lindy Morrison Kate Millett Lyceum
    "There were a number of prominent theologians during the years that I was going through the seminary who watered down the Resurrection, arguing that it was a symbol..." http://althouse.blogspot.com/2021/04/there-were-number-of-prominent.html "... for the conviction that the cause of Jesus goes on, or a metaphor for the fact that his followers, even after his horrific death, felt forgiven by their Lord. But this is utterly incommensurate with the sheer excitement on display in the Resurrection narratives and in the preaching of the first Christians. Can one really imagine St. Paul tearing into Corinth and breathlessly proclaiming that the righteous cause of a crucified criminal endures? Can one credibly hold that the apostles of Jesus went careering around the Mediterranean and to their deaths with the message that they felt forgiven? Another strategy of domestication, employed by thinkers from the 19th century to today, is to reduce the Resurrection of Jesus to a myth or an archetype. There are numberless stories of dying and rising gods in the mythologies of the world, and the narrative of Jesus' death and resurrection can look like just one more iteration of the pattern. Like those of Dionysus, Osiris, Adonis and Persephone, the 'resurrection' of Jesus is, on this reading, a symbolic evocation of the cycle of nature. In a Jungian psychological framework, the story of Jesus dying and coming back to life is an instance of the classic hero's journey from order through chaos to greater order.... Declaring a man's sins forgiven, referring to himself as greater than the Temple, claiming lordship over the Sabbath and authority over the Torah, insisting that his followers love him more than their mothers and fathers, more than their very lives, Jesus assumed a divine prerogative. And it was precisely this apparently blasphemous pretension that led so many of his contemporaries to oppose him. After his awful death on an instrument of torture, even his closest followers became convinced that he must have been delusional and misguided. But when his band of Apostles saw him alive again after his death, they came to believe that he is who he said he was...."

    From "Recovering the Strangeness of Easter/For Christians, the holiday is about recapturing the surprise and excitement that the Resurrection brought to Jesus' first followers" by Bishop Robert Barron (Wall Street Journal).

    [Author: noreply@blogger.com (Ann Althouse)]

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    Sun, 04 Apr 2021 06:49:39 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Psychology Law Mythology Christianity Jesus Easter Mediterranean St Paul Corinth Ann Althouse Dionysus Osiris Adonis Bishop Robert Barron Wall Street Journal
    "Alone in my apartment... I was surprised by how much my gender instead seemed to almost evaporate." http://althouse.blogspot.com/2021/04/alone-in-my-apartment-i-was-surprised.html What I saw was by Alex Marzano-Lesnevich (NYT).

    [Author: noreply@blogger.com (Ann Althouse)]

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    Fri, 02 Apr 2021 13:12:11 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Psychology Minnesota Law Minneapolis Transgender Plastic Surgery Ann Althouse Coronavirus Tygra Slarii Slarii Mx Slarii Alex Marzano Lesnevich
    "Kipling Williams has studied the effects of the silent treatment for more than 36 years, meeting hundreds of victims and perpetrators in the process..." http://althouse.blogspot.com/2021/03/kipling-williams-has-studied-effects-of.html "A grown woman whose father refused to speak with her for six months at a time as punishment throughout her life. 'Her father died during one of those dreaded periods... When she visited him at the hospital shortly before his death, he turned away from her and wouldn’t break his silence even to say goodbye.' A father who stopped talking to his teenage son and couldn’t start again, despite the harm he knew he was causing. 'The isolation made my son change from a happy, vibrant boy to a spineless jellyfish, and I knew I was the cause,' the father said to Williams. A wife whose husband severed communication with her early in their marriage. 'She endured four decades of silence that started with a minor disagreement and only ended when her husband died,' Williams said. Forty years of eating meals by herself, watching television by herself—40 years of being invisible. 'When I asked her why she stayed with him for all that time... she answered simply, "Because at least he kept a roof over my head."'" 

    From "What You’re Saying When You Give Someone the Silent Treatment/Social ostracism has been a common punishment for millennia. But freezing someone out harms both the victim and the perpetrator" by Daryl Austin (The Atlantic)(paywall challenge to overcome).

    [Author: noreply@blogger.com (Ann Althouse)]

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    Tue, 30 Mar 2021 13:19:33 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Psychology Law Relationships Atlantic Williams Unsaid Things Ann Althouse Daryl Austin Kipling Williams
    Is It OK to Ask Your Therapist Personal Questions? https://lifehacker.com/is-it-ok-to-ask-your-therapist-personal-questions-1846574915

    As a client in talk therapy, it can feel like there’s an unspoken boundary between you and your therapist concerning what questions you’re allowed to ask about their personal life. Can you ask them if they are married or single, or if they have kids, or about their political beliefs? Should you?

    Read more...

    ]]>
    Mon, 29 Mar 2021 16:45:00 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Psychology Articles Psychotherapy Mind Lifehacks Human Interest Justin Lioi Randy Withers Self Disclosure
    Pluto – Energy Is Neutral Until Directed http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Elsaelsacom/~3/WJRvRlnKIB8/ knifeMara writes on Anti-Bitch “If someone has a twisted Pluto, the predatory instinct will surface. But if someone had learned Pluto lessons, this person can help other people trough hell and back, without hurting the other even more… Is that … Read More... ]]> Mon, 29 Mar 2021 08:04:44 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Psychology Advice Anger Mars Pluto Astrology Real Life Mara Pantry moths who eat each other prove a key principle of evolution http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/EndlessInnovation/~3/wi44SsBNR1o/cannibal-moths-selfishness-evolution-societies-study
    • Researchers studied cannibalism among commonly-found moths to test an evolutionary principle.
    • The scientists concluded that moths with more sibling interaction were less selfish.
    • The principle applies to humans and other animals.


    A common moth, found in pantries, could explain a crucial link between society and selfishness, according to a new study. Researchers showed that an increase in sibling interaction resulted in less selfish behavior in Indian meal moth caterpillars. In particular, the scientists observed an effect on cannibalism, a behavior some times observed in the moths.

    While the experiments dealt with insects, the researchers claim its evolutionary principle conclusions can be extrapolated to humans.


    Known also as pantry or weevil moths, the Indian meal moths tend to be a nuisance, laying eggs in cereals, flour and other foods. What's noteworthy is that they sometimes eat each other, including members of their own brood.

    The researchers were able to affect the rates of cannibalism in these moths by controlling how much individual insects could travel from each other. This had an impact on whether sibling moth larvae interacted with each other. The more interaction, the less selfish behavior like cannibalism was observed within 10 moth generations.

    The study was carried out by the Rice University biologist Volker Rudolf, Mike Boots of the University of California, as well as Dylan Childs, Hannah Tidbury, and Jessica Crossmore from U.K.'s University of Sheffield.



    Volker explained why cannibalism, which has been found in over 1,000 species, was worth studying:

    "At one end of the continuum are altruistic behaviors, where an individual may be giving up its chance to survive or reproduce to increase reproduction of others," said Rudolf. "Cannibalism is at the other extreme. An individual increases its own survival and reproduction by literally consuming its own kind."

    The study supported a 2010 theoretical prediction by Rudolf and Boots, providing experimental proof of a key idea from evolutionary theory. The scientists proposed that as local interactions would increase, the pressure to avoid selfish behaviors would also increase.


    "Families that were highly cannibalistic just didn't do as well in that system," shared Rudolf. "Families that were less cannibalistic had much less mortality and produced more offspring."

    Applying their conclusions to humans, Rudolf claims that in societies where people live in large family units, there'd be less selfish behavior to find. In more isolated groups, however, where people are separated from their families and live among strangers (because of moving, for example), the reverse would be true.


    Eating your own kind can also be influenced by food options, with Rufold suggesting that "If food conditions are poor, cannibalism provides additional benefits, which could push for more selfish behavior."

    Another factor affecting this type of phenomena – spotting your relatives. If an animal recognizes kin, "that limits the cost of cannibalism" but also means "you can afford to be a lot more cannibalistic in a mixed population, which can have evolutionary benefits," proposed Rufolf.

    The scientists plan to study further how cannibalism functions in animal groups.

    Check out their paper published in Ecology Letters.

    ]]>
    Sun, 28 Mar 2021 16:25:37 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Psychology Biology Government Society Innovation Evolution University Of California Rice University Rudolf Volker Rudolf Mike Boots Dylan Childs Hannah Tidbury Jessica Crossmore U K s University of Sheffield Volker Rudolf Cannibalism Rudolf Families
    Cannibalistic pantry moths prove a key principle of evolution http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/EndlessInnovation/~3/iPE_gGVCeyY/cannibal-moths-selfishness-study
    • Researchers studied cannibalism among commonly-found moths to test an evolutionary principle.
    • The scientists concluded that moths with more sibling interaction were less selfish.
    • The principle applies to humans and other animals.


    A common moth, found in pantries, could explain a crucial link between society and selfishness, according to a new study. Researchers showed that an increase in sibling interaction resulted in less selfish behavior in Indian meal moth caterpillars. In particular, the scientists observed an effect on cannibalism, a behavior some times observed in the moths.

    While the experiments dealt with insects, the researchers claim its evolutionary principle conclusions can be extrapolated to humans.


    Known also as pantry or weevil moths, the Indian meal moths tend to be a nuisance, laying eggs in cereals, flour, and other foods. What's noteworthy is that they sometimes eat each other, including members of their own brood.

    The researchers were able to effect the rates of cannibalism in these moths by controlling how much individual insects could travel from each other. This had an impact on whether sibling moth larvae interacted with each other. The more interaction, the less selfish behavior like cannibalism was observed within 10 moth generations.

    The study was carried out by the Rice University Biologist Volker Rudolf, Mike Boots of the University of California, as well as Dylan Childs, Hannah Tidbury, and Jessica Crossmore from U.K.'s University of Sheffield.



    Volker explained why cannibalism, which has been found in over 1,000 species, was worth studying:

    "At one end of the continuum are altruistic behaviors, where an individual may be giving up its chance to survive or reproduce to increase reproduction of others," said Rudolf. "Cannibalism is at the other extreme. An individual increases its own survival and reproduction by literally consuming its own kind."

    The study supported a 2010 theoretical prediction by Rudolf and Boots, providing experimental proof of a key idea from evolutionary theory. The scientists proposed that as local interactions would increase, the pressure to avoid selfish behaviors would also increase.


    "Families that were highly cannibalistic just didn't do as well in that system," shared Rudolf. "Families that were less cannibalistic had much less mortality and produced more offspring."

    Applying their conclusions to humans, Rudolf claims that in societies where people live in large family units, there'd be less selfish behavior to find. In more isolated groups, however, where people are separated from their families and live among strangers (because of moving, for example), the reverse would be true.


    Eating your own kind can also be influenced by food options, with Rudolf suggesting that "If food conditions are poor, cannibalism provides additional benefits, which could push for more selfish behavior."

    Another factor effecting this type of phenomena – spotting your relatives. If an animal recognizes kin, "that limits the cost of cannibalism" but also means "you can afford to be a lot more cannibalistic in a mixed population, which can have evolutionary benefits," proposed Rudolf.

    The scientists plan to study further how cannibalism functions in animal groups.

    Check out their paper published in Ecology Letters.

    ]]>
    Sun, 28 Mar 2021 16:25:37 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Psychology Biology Government Society Innovation Evolution University Of California Rudolf Volker Rudolf Mike Boots Dylan Childs Hannah Tidbury Jessica Crossmore U K s University of Sheffield Volker Rudolf Cannibalism Rudolf Families
    How lighthouse keepers show us the way in dark, isolated times https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2021/mar/27/how-lighthouse-keepers-show-us-the-way-in-dark-isolated-times The importance of a beacon and having fortitude are key for lighthouse keepers – clues for us all when there’s little else around

    Imagine being a lighthouse keeper. Before I dropped beneath the surface of this secluded, often secretive, occupation, the idea brought to mind wind-blown seagulls, or a bearded sea dog chewing his pipe. Such is the romantic notion many of us have about lighthouses. The reality is (or was, because the staffed lighthouse is now extinct) quite different.

    Land lights – those charming beacons you’ll find on the coast, the distinctive red stripe of Portland Bill or the thimble-shaped watchpoint at Llanddwyn – are appealing, but for me the sea towers hold the greatest allure. I’m talking about those majestic, improbable stations rising audaciously up out of the ocean – the Bell Rock, the Bishop, the Longships. The famous Eddystone, south of Plymouth, is the fourth built on that reef, in an effort that spanned almost 200 years. Its neighbouring “Smeaton’s Stump”, the remains of a third manifestation, serves as a stark reminder that water is not meant to hold buildings.

    Continue reading...]]>
    Sat, 27 Mar 2021 13:00:18 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Psychology Science Life and style Health & wellbeing Plymouth Eddystone Portland Bill Smeaton Llanddwyn
    Empathy is Not a Sin http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Throckmorton/~3/sFWcNm9DGFs/ I am late to this strange party.

    There is a kerfuffle going around about empathy being a sin. Some theodudes think it is and most people know it isn’t. I am not going to get into it too much, but here are a couple of links to the empathy is sin crowd.

    Reformed pastor and apoligist James White says empathy is “the ability to understand and share the feelings of another” and is sin:

    When you start with man as image-bearing creature of God, you can understand why sympathy is good, but empathy is sinful.

    Do not surrender our mind to the sinful emotional responses of others.

    Minnesota pastor Joe Rigney sat down with Doug Wilson to declare empathy a sin in this odd exchange.

    Rigney: That’s right. And the, and I think that actually is the most relevant difference between them because, so empathy is the sort of thing that you’ve got someone drowning, or they’re in quicksand, and they’re sinking. And what empathy wants to do it jump into the quicksand with them, both feet, and-and it feels like that’s going to be more loving, because they’re going to feel like, I’m glad that you’re here with me in the quicksand. Problem is you’re both now sinking. Wilson: Right. Rigney: Right. Whereas, if you do, I’m going to keep one foot on the shore, and I’m actually gonna grab onto this big branch, and then I’ll step one foot in there with you and try to pull you out. That’s sympathy, and that’s-that’s actually helpful. But to the person who’s in there, it can feel like you’re judging me. Wilson: So sympathy’s clearly hierarchical. Rigney: Right. It implies that one person is the hurting, and one person is the helper. Wilson: Right. Rigney: And, and no, and that’s part of the problem is no one wants to feel like they’re the hurting. We want to equalize everything. And so, and so empathy demands, get in here with me, otherwise you don’t love me. Wilson: But what do you lose— when you get in there with them, and you’re all in, they’re drowning, they’re in the quicksand, they’re in the trouble, and you identify with them completely.

    Rigney went around a little with Karen Prior here.

    What the theodudes seem upset about is that they seem to believe empathy puts the person who understands another’s feelings and experience on the same level as the person who is being understood. They want to be in authority.

    Equality. What a concept.

    Furthermore, they seem to think empathy means accepting everything anyone else does without moral evaluation. Or at least James White seems to think that. White goes out on the porch of his blog and yells at all of the empaths on his lawn, screaming:

    We are not to weep with the bank robber who botches the job and ends up in the slammer. We are, plainly, to exercise control even in our sympathy. We are not to sympathize with sin, nor are we to sympathize with rebellion, or evil.

    But the new cultural (and it has flown into the church as well) orthodoxy is: you shall empathize. You shall enter into the emotions of others AND YOU SHALL NOT MAKE JUDGMENTS ABOUT SAID EMOTIONS. By so doing YOU SHALL VALIDATE ALL HUMAN EXPERIENCES AS SUPREME. The greatest sin of all today is to say, “The emotions that person is experiencing are the result of sinful rebellion against God, and hence do not require my validation, support, or celebration.” HOW DARE YOU! That is the great rule I stepped upon, and must now pay the price.

    I’d like to say I know how you feel, James, but I don’t.

    Empathy is Not Sin

    Empathy isn’t acceptance of things you don’t agree with. Empathy doesn’t require you to give up any position you might otherwise have. For instance, parents can empathize with their wayward children (“when I was your age…”) and still adminster correction and direction. When parents communicate their understanding with care, it helps build relationship even when restrictions need to be imposed.

    Empathy is simply understanding the inner world of other people. It is all about being able to relate to them and understand what they are going through. It quite important in human functioning and when absent is associated with cruelty and antisocial behavior.

    When Joe Rigney and Doug Wilson talk about someone jumping into quicksand with both feet, they are not describing empathy; they instead describe impulsivity. Sympathy or empathy might move a person to prosocial behavior, but strategy to conduct the behavior is another matter. A thoughtful person would perform the rescue safely; an impulsive person might just jump in. Both would be empathic, but only one would live to tell about it.

    Understand this; empathy is good.

     

    Here are some articles on empathy and related topics.

    Empathy-related Responding: Associations with Prosocial Behavior, Aggression, and Intergroup Relations

    Empathy in Narcissistic Personality Disorder: From Clinical and Empirical Perspectives

    Why empathy has a beneficial impact on others in medicine: unifying theories

    Prosocial motivation: Is it ever truly altruistic?

    ]]>
    Thu, 25 Mar 2021 13:39:32 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Psychology Health Minnesota Religion Empathy Infertility White James Wilson James White Doug Wilson Joe Rigney Rigney Karen Prior
    If you're ecstatic after a trip to the shops, it's your brain thanking you for the novelty | Richard A Friedman https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2021/mar/25/ecstatic-shopping-trip-novelty-brain-lockdown-spontaneity-learning-memory The monotony of lockdown life has starved us of spontaneity and serendipity, which enhance learning and memory

    • Richard A Friedman is a professor of clinical psychiatry at Weill Cornell Medical College

    I hit a wall in late February and felt that life had taken on a quality of stultifying sameness. Was it Wednesday or Sunday? I couldn’t really tell: every day of the week felt identical because there was nothing to distinguish them. Work, read, exercise, eat, repeat. Like nearly everyone I know, I have settled into a state of dreary uniformity.

    The pandemic has been a vast uncontrolled experiment – not just in social isolation, which is bad enough, but in the deprivation of novelty. Overnight we were stripped of our ability to roam around our world the way we usually do. Gone were the chance encounters with other people and the experience of new things and places: no travel, no adventures, no restaurants, no theatres, no crowds. We weren’t just quarantined from Covid: we were cut off from the ubiquitous stimulation of the unfamiliar and new.

    Continue reading...]]>
    Thu, 25 Mar 2021 09:15:04 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Psychology Health Science Mental Health Psychiatry Anxiety Friedman Richard A Friedman Coronavirus Weill Cornell Medical
    Pandemic periods: why women's menstrual cycles have gone haywire https://www.theguardian.com/society/2021/mar/25/pandemic-periods-why-womens-menstrual-cycles-have-gone-haywire A majority of menstruating women have experienced changes to their cycle over the last year, surveys suggest. One of the main culprits? Persistent stress

    We will not look back on the past year as a vintage one for the human body. Since March 2020, many of us have experienced physical manifestations of stress that correspond to living through a global pandemic. From low energy and headaches to changes in mood and disrupted sleep, our rhythms are deeply upset. And many women have experienced changes to a fundamental rhythm: the menstrual cycle.

    Rachel Burns has always experienced premenstrual syndrome (PMS), but it has been even more difficult to navigate in the past 12 months. “I always have a few days of feeling quite withdrawn before my period, but this has morphed into me feeling unreachable and anxious for over a week,” says the 36-year-old from Kent. “My partner says the change is significant.” Before Christmas, her PMS made her feel as if she were “going mad, like a panic attack I couldn’t come down from”. The effects of her period drag on now. She feels fluey, achy, “completely depleted, physically and emotionally”. As a result, it can feel like she “only has one ‘good’ week” a month. “It’s like being at sea within yourself,” she says.

    Continue reading...]]>
    Thu, 25 Mar 2021 02:00:20 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Psychology Science Women Life and style Society Kent Menstruation Rachel Burns
    Study: Does the label "straight" worsen perceptions of gay people? http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/EndlessInnovation/~3/wYXZovlIgRQ/gay-prejudice-articles
    • In a recent study published in The Journal of Sex Research, heterosexual people were asked to rate their impressions of fictitious men.
    • Some of the fictitious men were described as "heterosexual," the others as "straight."
    • Across multiple studies, participants reported worse impressions of gay men after being exposed to the word "straight," but only if the participants were highly religious.


    It's no surprise that using negative language to refer to a minority group can produce negative effects among those being targeted. But what about using positive language to refer to a majority group? Could doing so suggest negative ideas about the minority group?

    Noting a "surprising" lack of research on this question, a new study titled "If I Am Straight You Are Askew": Labelling Heterosexuals as Straight Worsen Gay Men's Perception" (published in The Journal of Sex Research) aimed to fill the gap by exploring whether referring to heterosexual people as "straight" produces negative perceptions of gay men.

    Previous research suggests people associate moral perceptions with certain spatial concepts. For example, one study found that people are more likely to prefer straight figures after recalling moral deeds.

    The researchers behind the recent study noted that these findings proved "true not only in the European language but also in Chinese, Arabic, and Russian, thus suggesting this relation to be spread in different cultural contexts."

    "Giving a look at the dictionary, straight is defined as continuing in one direction without curving (adv.), being without bend (adj.), being honest and respectable (adj.) and being heterosexual (adj.)," study author Simona Sacchi , a professor at the University of Milano-Bicocca, told PsyPost.

    "For this reason we decided to investigate the possible impact of this association between straightness (related to morality) and heterosexuality on social perception and prejudice towards sexual minorities."

    To examine how the word "straight" might affect heterosexual participants' perceptions of gay men, Sacchi and her colleagues conducted three studies involving 275 English-speaking and 131 Italian-speaking participants. The researchers collected data on participants' levels of religiosity and prejudice against gay men, as measured by the Modern Homonegativty Scale.


    In the first study, participants were shown a fictitious Facebook profile belonging to a man named James. All participants read the same profile describing James, except for one difference: Half of the participants read that he was "heterosexual," while the other half read that he was "straight."

    Then, both groups were shown a fictitious Facebook profile of a man named Chris, who was described as gay. The researchers asked participants to rate their impressions of Chris. The results showed that participants who had been recently exposed to the word "straight" tended to report worse perceptions of Chris, however this was true only among participants with higher levels of religiosity and prejudice.

    The researchers conducted the same study again, but this time they included a third group of participants who read a profile of James that didn't describe him as "straight" or "heterosexual."

    The second study produced similar results: Highly religious participants reported worse impressions of Chris after being exposed to the label "straight," although in general there wasn't a significant difference between the three groups ("heterosexual," "straight" and control).

    The first two studies involved participants who commonly used the word "straight" to refer to heterosexual people. But what about cultures that don't use such language?


    The researchers decided to conduct a third study in Italy, where people don't use the word "straight" to refer to heterosexual people. In the study, all participants were asked to classify 20 pictures. Ten pictures showed heterosexual couples, while the other ten showed non-romantic partners, such as a pair of police officers.

    The first group of participants was asked to apply the Italian word for "straight" ("retti") to pictures of people in romantic relationships, and to label those who weren't as "other" ("altro"). Meanwhile, the second group was asked to perform the same task, but to label the romantic couples with the Italian word for yellow ("gialli").

    "The word "gialli" was selected because this is a common, neutral adjective, related to a visual feature (in this case, color instead of shape) and unrelated to sexual orientation," the researchers wrote.

    Again, the results showed that being exposed to the word "straight" tended to worsen participants' perceptions of gay men — but only for highly religious participants. Interestingly, all three studies showed that participants low in religiosity actually reported better impressions of gay men after reading the word "straight."


    The researchers said their study is the first to examine the consequences of using positive language to describe majority groups, and that they hope the results will lead to "fruitful" future research to better understand the effects of positive labeling.

    "We should remember that modern prejudice is often subtle, indirect, invisible to the perpetrator, and revealed more by ingroup favoritism than explicit outgroup derogation," Sacchi told PsyPost. "In contemporary society, ingroup-directed favoritism and accentuated positive feelings, as sympathy and admiration, toward ingroup members could be the 'modern' basis for discrimination."


    ]]>
    Wed, 24 Mar 2021 15:55:29 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Psychology Facebook Sex Relationships Religion Italy Innovation Chris James Sacchi University of Milano Bicocca James All Simona Sacchi
    Are your irrational fears holding back your customer and employee experience efforts? https://www.adrianswinscoe.com/2021/03/are-your-irrational-fears-holding-back-your-customer-and-employee-experience-efforts/ Please take a moment and cast your mind back to how many people and businesses used to talk about ideas and practices before becoming commonplace. Can […]

    The post Are your irrational fears holding back your customer and employee experience efforts? first appeared on Adrian Swinscoe.]]>
    Wed, 24 Mar 2021 07:13:54 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Psychology Business Customer Engagement Customer Experience Customer Service Employee Engagement Change Call Centre Employee Experience Customer Journey Customer Relationship Service Experience
    The social biome: how to build nourishing friendships – and banish loneliness https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2021/mar/24/the-social-biome-how-to-build-nourishing-friendships-and-banish-loneliness All your daily interactions with others, big and small, make up your social biome, and the pandemic has severely damaged most of ours. Here’s how to reinvigorate it

    You probably don’t know you have a social biome – but according to Jeffrey Hall, professor of communication studies at the University of Kansas, you do. Perhaps you’ve heard of the gut microbiome – the unique, diverse ecosystem of bacteria and other microbes that inhabit our gastrointestinal system and which, when balanced, keep us in good digestive health. Well, the social biome, says Hall, is the individual ecosystem of relationships and interactions that shapes our emotional, psychological and physical health. And – thanks to lockdown – it is unlikely to be in good shape.

    Hall’s term encompasses the “pattern of your social interactions throughout your days; the who, the what you talk about, and the modalities you use to communicate, from face to face to other means”. The concept has roots, he says, in the idea that social interactions, like food, have “calories” that can make you feel socially nourished. And just as with what you eat, it is not just quantity that matters to health, but variety. Just as you need a mix of food groups on your plate, so you need a mix of modes of communication and types of relationship in your social diet.

    Continue reading...]]>
    Wed, 24 Mar 2021 02:00:32 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Psychology Health Family Media Friendship Social Media Life and style Society Mental Health Digital Media Health & wellbeing Hall University of Kansas Jeffrey Hall
    Anti-masker hilariously digs his own hole after hearing about his own cognitive bias https://boingboing.net/2021/03/23/anti-masker-hilariously-digs-his-own-hole-after-hearing-about-his-own-cognitive-bias.html?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=anti-masker-hilariously-digs-his-own-hole-after-hearing-about-his-own-cognitive-bias

    Nobody should be embarrassed for not being familiar with the Dunning-Kruger effect, the cognitive bias in which the more incompetent or ignorant you are about something, the better or more knowledgeable you think you are at that thing. If you still don't get it, the maskless gentleman above can help you understand.

    ]]>
    Tue, 23 Mar 2021 11:44:49 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Psychology Video News Funny Masks Cognitive Biases Dunning Kruger
    I QUIT! How you get out of a bad job before it’s too late. http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/thechiefhappinessofficer/~3/wn7PQ5GJ9bU/ Some people want you to believe that quitting is weak and for losers. They’re lying and we need to normalize leaving jobs that are not good for us.

    In this video we take a deep look at what happens when you’re unhappy at work, how you can know it’s time to quit and how you can support others who need to get away from a bad job.

    Content:

    ( 00:00 ​ ​) 1: Frogs aren’t idiots
    ( 01:01 ​ ​) 2: Introduction to quitting
    ( 03:45 ​ ) 3: How hating your job hurts you
    ( 06:56 ​ ) 4: Exposing the anti-quitting propaganda
    ( 18:05 ​ ) 5: The excuses people make for not quitting
    ( 27:23 ​ ) 6: Should you quit?
    ( 32:47 ​ ) 7: 21 perfectly valid reasons for quitting
    ( 40:21 ​ ) 8: What if you can’t quit
    ( 46:24 ​ ) 9: How to quit
    ( 47:39 ​ ) 10: Should you always find a new job first before you quit?
    ( 49:42 ​ ) 11: We should celebrate quitters
    ( 59:22 ​ ) 12: I quit!

    References, articles and books from the video

    Boiling frog experiment video

    Boiling frog myth

    Relationship between a bad job and poor health

    A bad jobs affect sleep

    A bad job makes you gain weight

    A bad job hurts mental health

    Unhappy workers are less productive

    Japanese runner breaks leg

    Effective propaganda exploits existing biases

    Ambiguity effect

    The status quo bias

    Loss aversion

    The endowment effect

    Successful Stanford dropouts

    Emotional contagion

    How Herbalife and other MLMs scam people

    The No Asshole Rule – excellent book by Bob Sutton

    Turing pharmaceuticals raised prices

    Hope theory

    Stories from people who quit without first finding a new jobs

    Apprentice car mechanic commits suicide after being bullied

    Steve Ballmer throws a chair

    The most basic freedom is the freedom to quit

    The true cost of employee turnover

    Bosses try to predict who will quit

    Related posts

     

    ]]>
    Tue, 23 Mar 2021 10:00:30 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Psychology Productivity Politics Careers Steve Ballmer Quit Herbalife Happy At Work Best of site Bob Sutton Turing
    "Wim Hof’s technique of using physical discomfort—like ice baths—to improve mind and body is gaining popularity as it seeks scientific acceptance." http://althouse.blogspot.com/2021/03/wim-hofs-technique-of-using-physical.html The Wall Street Journal reports.

    In 2013, researchers at Radboud University Medical Center in the Netherlands found that 12 people trained by Mr. Hof and then injected with E. coli had milder flulike symptoms than an untrained control group. In 2019, tests indicated a significant decrease in inflammation in 13 people suffering spinal arthritis over eight weeks of training in breathing, meditation and cold exposure....

    Mr. Hof’s career was born out of tragedy. He was in the Pyrenees working as a mountain guide when his wife died by suicide in 1995. “That’s the way it actually began—the real trial of my life,” he says. “We were left behind with broken hearts, four kids and no money.”

    Swimming in icy cold water had for years been a pastime. Now, he found it stopped the rumination and pain. Cold water causes you to be in the moment, he says. “Going into the cold brought a lot of space, like stillness in my mind. It gave me moments of time to stop the agony, the why, why, why ten thousand times a day.”

    [Author: noreply@blogger.com (Ann Althouse)]

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    Mon, 22 Mar 2021 14:39:50 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Psychology Health Law Netherlands Wall Street Journal HOF Wim Hof Ann Althouse Radboud University Medical Center Coldness Mr Hof