Bloglikes - Small Business https://www.bloglikes.com/c/small-business en-US Thu, 15 Apr 2021 17:28:43 +0000 Sat, 06 Apr 2013 00:00:00 +0000 FeedWriter 7 quirky job perks small business owners are using to attract top talent, from custom $1,200 suits to a gifted Peloton http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/typepad/alleyinsider/silicon_alley_insider/~3/i0qrEQU9cb0/small-business-competing-to-hire-top-talent-2021-4 Million Dollar Baby Co. CEO Teddy Fong and a colleague.

Million Dollar Baby Co.

  • The increased desire to continue working from home post-pandemic can be a major benefit for small businesses.
  • To poach top talent, small business owners are offering remote working perks and wellness incentives.
  • One CEO offers his employees a $150 monthly WFH stipend, while another gives a $700 annual subsidy for a domestic vacation.
  • See more stories on Insider's business page.

From fully remote work to seemingly endless video conference calls, COVID-19 has no doubt changed the way we work over the last year.

And while its long-lasting effects remain to be seen, the increased desire to continue working from home post-pandemic has inspired many workers to consider more flexible workplaces - a trend that has businesses scrambling to compete for talent.

Teddy Fong. Teddy Fong.

Teddy Fong

"You have the Silicon Valley companies who are paying for dry cleaning and massages," said Million Dollar Baby Co. CEO Teddy Fong. "But if not done properly, those perks can be like a Trojan horse to get people to stay longer and just do more work."

Instead, Fong opts for smaller, more thoughtful changes that can make big differences in the lives of his employees.

Here are seven unique benefit ideas from small business owners who have successfully recruited talent this year.

1. Give perks that align with your brand's mission

A lot of companies provide their employees with two weeks of paid vacation, but how many of them actually pay their employees to take a vacation?

Million Dollar Baby Co. - known for their suite of baby furniture brands including DaVinci and Babyletto - is bringing new meaning to the phase "paid vacation."

With nearly 150 employees between their office and warehouse, the family operation, run by its founder's children, CEO Teddy Fong and VP of Sales Tracy Fong, offers employees a $700 annual subsidy toward any domestic trip.

The one caveat: After returning from a vacation, employees must present their learnings to the larger team (on Zoom of course).

"One team member recently spoke for 20 minutes about how the dolphins are trained in Mo'orea," said Fong. "It was hilarious, and overly detailed. But moments like these bring our team so much closer together."

2. Invest in employees and your business simultaneously

Two words: Custom suits.

Scott Kimberly runs a five-person law firm in Murfreesboro, Tennessee, but takes his employees on an annual pilgrimage to Manhattan to visit a custom tailor, where each team member is gifted with a custom suit.

Scott Kimberly. Scott Kimberly.

Scott Kimberly

"It's a win-win for me," said Kimberly. "My employees both feel valued and exude confidence."

Kimberly knows that while big firms may naturally attract more talent, those firms aren't ponying up $1,200 for suits in the first year of employment.

"I'd like to think it makes my [team] feel like a million bucks and keeps them loyal to this brand instead of [considering] the big firms," Kimberly said.

3. Give timely incentives

Headsets.com has 31 full-time employees, and while most of them work remotely, the company is committed to getting all of its employees their COVID-19 vaccinations.

So much so, that Headsets.com founder and CEO Mike Faith is offering a $500 stipend to employees who get vaccinated before June 2021.

Mike Faith Mike Faith.

Mike Faith

"We're suggesting resources for sign up but leaving it to the individual team member to decide how and if they get it," Faith said, adding that the choice to vaccinate is totally optional.

Giving your employees a cash incentive - while also ensuring a safer workspace is a total win-win.

4. Make your benefits the talk of the town

Rachel Brenke is an attorney and business strategist who employs five full-time employees between her two companies, Eden Law and The Brenke Group LLC.

A cancer survivor, mother of five, and author of seven books, Brenke is no stranger to the importance of a balanced personal life - and her employee perks align to that value.

Rachel Brenke Rachel Brenke.

Rachel Brenke

In addition to unlimited PTO, quarterly bonuses, and a retirement contribution plan, Brenke recently gifted her operations manager a Peloton for surpassing the company's revenue goals in both Q4 2020 and 2020.

"As a mother of five and an athlete who loves to be out training, I know how important it is for a wholly virtual and flexible business," Brenke said, adding that the Peloton gift supported her Operator Manager's desire to pursue her own fitness journey.

Meanwhile, Scott Kimberly knows that the custom suits he buys for his staff get worn outside of work, too.

"I have no doubt that [my employees] proudly share where their suit came from," he said: "From a boss that gives a damn about his employees and wants them to feel valued."

"Make your workplace a place that your employees will brag about to their friends," Kimberly said.

It'll not only make your business look good, but it might also help you recruit more talent.

5. Make sure your benefits are on-brand

Go Text Blast, Inc. offered a remote work option to their six full-time employees long before the pandemic, but last year, they upped the ante, also giving their employees a $100 to $150 monthly work-from-home stipend.

Matthew Payne Matthew Payne.

Matthew Payne

"We're a tech startup, so ensuring my developers' [technology] is always up to speed was very important," said Go Text Blast, Inc. CEO and chairman Matthew Payne, who also encourages employees to use the stipend on office supplies and internet services.

Cycling technology company Hammerhead also walks the talk - or, cycles the cycle.

Bianca Nedjar, the head of people at Hammerhead, told Business Insider the company offers its 40 employees a $900 annual athletic endeavor stipend (think: a marathon or wilderness survival hike), along with an additional $200 per year toward cycling equipment purchases and maintenance.

Bianca Nedjar Bianca Nedjar.

Bianca Nedjar

Whether its technology, fitness or something else that's integrated into your company's DNA - make sure your company benefits reflect the job at hand.

6. Think of the long haul

"68% of millennials consider fertility benefits when choosing an employer," said Parham Zar, the founder and managing director of The Egg Donor & Surrogacy Institute in Beverly Hills, California.

And EDSI is taking note, covering 50% of the total cost of IVF and medication for their employees.

With the average IVF cycle costing $12,000 or more - and medication starting at $1,500 or more per cycle, the cost savings to their team are astronomical.

And while 2020 births were down compared to 2019, Miami-based law firm Mark Migdal & Hayden is also confident that family planning is top of mind for their employees.

The firm offers four months of 100% paid parental leave for any employee welcoming a child through birth, surrogacy, or adoption, also allowing employees to schedule the four months of leave at any time throughout a one-year period.

"Studies have shown that [parental leave] is not only advantageous for employees and businesses, but also for combating postpartum depression and boosting emotional development in children through parental bonding," said MM&H founding partner Etan Mark.

Etan Mark. Etan Mark.

Etan Mark.

Caring for your employees - especially when they're not in the office - is paramount for long-term retention.

7. Ask the people what they want

It's easy to make assumptions about what a potential employee might want from a benefits standpoint, but how many companies stop to ask?

Every six months, Million Dollar Baby Co. distributes an 80-question survey to their 150 employees to gauge their satisfaction levels at the company. In the age of COVID, those questions range from "Do you have a best friend at the company?" to "Do you feel you have enough face time with your team?"

"We don't want to assume that an employee likes something just because we're doing it," said Fong. "We want to establish benefits that are actually beneficial to our employees."

"And when you establish trust, I think you can get a lot of honest feedback."

Read the original article on Business Insider

[Author: insider@insider.com (Natalie Zfat)]

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Mon, 12 Apr 2021 14:10:15 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Small Business Trends Strategy Remote Work Employees Faith Manhattan Miami Silicon Valley Talent Hiring Nordic Beverly Hills California PTO Kimberly Hammerhead Fong Big Business Rachel Brenke Murfreesboro Tennessee Peloton Matthew Payne Job Perks Natalie Zfat Blast Inc WFH EDSI Mike Faith Contributor 2019 Original Contributor Million Dollar Baby Co Teddy Fong Babyletto Tracy Fong Mo orea Scott Kimberly Scott Kimberly Scott Kimberly Kimberly My Eden Law Brenke Group LLC Brenke Rachel Brenke Rachel Brenke Go Text Blast Inc Matthew Payne Matthew Payne Bianca Nedjar Bianca Nedjar Bianca Nedjar Parham Zar The Egg Donor Surrogacy Institute Mark Migdal Hayden Etan Mark Etan Mark Etan Mark Caring
Best Prime Day Printer Deals 2021: What to expect http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/digitaltrends/~3/pVxvnYXTpWY/ ]]> Mon, 12 Apr 2021 05:10:40 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Deals Small Business Trends Hp Computing Canon Epson Printer Deals Amazon Prime Day Printer Deals Amazon 2021 Commerce 2021 Prime Day 2021 4 ways small businesses made changes during the pandemic to help boost their bottom line http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/typepad/alleyinsider/silicon_alley_insider/~3/9ywV044b1vw/small-business-boost-bottom-line-changes-during-covid-2021-4 Small business owners are "persistent, innovative, and creative" when it comes to keeping their businesses afloat during the pandemic.

Donald Iain Smith/Getty

  • Many small businesses were forced to make adjustments during the pandemic.
  • These changes, such as increasing online presence and working remotely, have yielded strong benefits.
  • Owners were challenged to think outside the box and adapt quickly to keep their businesses afloat.
  • See more stories on Insider's business page.

Now that a year has passed since COVID-19 first made itself known across the US, many small business owners are taking a step back to process how the virus has impacted their business models. It's no secret that it was a challenge to transform everyday practices into ones that met government mandates and kept people safe - but now, looking back, some entrepreneurs are recognizing that the changes they've implemented have helped their bottom line. Here's how.

Small businesses have upped their digital presence

One of the toughest barriers small businesses have faced over the past year has involved brick-and-mortar operations: Specifically, businesses have had to close to the public, reduce occupancy or implement changes like frequent sanitization in order to comply with state and municipal guidelines. In response to these challenges, many businesses rapidly shifted operations to the virtual realm. Companies that were previously on the fence about refreshing their landing pages or starting social media accounts finally bit the bullet; storefronts began debating their ecommerce options; and service-based businesses found "contactless" ways to help their customers. And consumers shifted, too; now that just about anything can be done online, consumers are far more comfortable doing everything from telehealth visits to finding their next home on the web. Digital presence has always been a must-have even prior to the pandemic, but today, it's a bigger opportunity than ever.

More teams than ever are working from home

Boutique firms, small creative agencies, rapidly-growing technology companies - you name it. If they don't have to meet customers in person, they've likely found a way to let their teams work from home. Not only does this provide a slew of informal benefits for employees (like improved work-life balance, enhanced disability accommodations, and time and money saved on commuting), but it also provides major cost-cutting opportunities for the business itself. Businesses that know they'll be working remotely for an extended period of time can avoid signing leases for pricey office space, and trendy startups can pause their snack subscriptions (for now). It's a win-win.

A lull is a clean slate in disguise

Some entrepreneurs who have found themselves in a slow period during the pandemic have used deceleration as an opportunity to reassess and refresh. Though it's always disappointing to see business decline, it can also be a blessing; companies that were previously in nonstop scale mode might benefit from a period of reflection on what really works and what doesn't. While not a small business, GoDaddy notoriously took 2020 as an opportunity to reinvigorate its logo and renew its commitment to corporate responsibility. Other businesses are turning a break in brick-and-mortar operations into a chance to revamp their spaces and provide exciting updates to customers once circumstances dictate it's safe to do so.

Many small business owners are stepping outside of their comfort zones

They say diamonds are formed under pressure, and the old adage rings true for business owners who are serious about helping their ventures thrive under unusual conditions. As contactless sales and services rose in popularity throughout 2020, many businesses found themselves capable of expanding into new markets and offering more customizable shipping options. Heightened social awareness has provided a catalyst for businesses to promote racial justice and gender equity, offset carbon emissions caused by shipping and delivery services and develop transparency in their daily practices. And because people tend to shop with both their needs and values in mind, this added level of consciousness has the ability to bring in waves of new customers and clients.

The obstacles presented by COVID-19 haven't been easy to overcome - nor are they gone from our economy and from the world at large. But if time has proven anything, it's that small business owners are persistent, innovative, and creative. Pandemic or no pandemic, that hasn't changed.

Read the original article on Business Insider

[Author: insider@insider.com (Thomas Smale)]

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Sun, 11 Apr 2021 09:20:00 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Business Small Business US Entrepreneur Trends Strategy Godaddy Growth Nordic Thomas Smale Contributor Donald Iain Smith Getty COVID-19 COVID Contributor 2019 Pandemic Economy
The best videoconferencing apps for 2021 http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/digitaltrends/~3/b8uTm9dePpk/ ]]> Fri, 09 Apr 2021 08:53:46 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Apple Ios Android Mobile Small Business Trends Videoconference WFH Coronavirus #632 The Real Reason Why Startups Fail Now http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/BarryMoltzBlog/~3/omrINGsNWx8/ Listen to “#632 The Real Reason Why Startups Fail Now” on Spreaker.
     

On this episode of The Small Business Radio Show…

SEGMENT 1 with Tom Eisenmann, starting at 0:00: One of the eternal questions in entrepreneurship is why do so many startups fail? Professor at Harvard Business School, Tom Eisenmann, is here to reveal the key patterns that explain why startups fail.

SEGMENT 2 with Tim Koegel, starting at 17:30: Presenting online is very different than presenting in person. What can we do to optimize these tools and make virtual meetings more effective? Presentation expert Tim Koegel is here to give us some very practical tips.

SEGMENT 3 with Victoria Jones, starting at 36:15: One of the biggest issues facing any company that conducts business online is how to handle data privacy. Here to guide small businesses on the topic is Victoria Jones who shares key findings from Zoho’s data privacy survey.

Sponsored by AT&T Business

More on each segment below.

 

Segment 1: Tom Eisenmann is the Howard H. Stevenson Professor of Business Administration at Harvard Business School (HBS) and the faculty co-chair of the Arthur Rock Center for Entrepreneurship. Tom has authored more than one hundred HBS case studies and his writing has appeared in The Wall Street Journal, Harvard Business Review, and Forbes. He is the author of the new book Why Startups Fail.

1:30 – At the most basic level, why do startups fail?

3:45 – What are the key patterns to why startups fail?

6:00 – The wrong team, investors, or partners can sink a venture quickly.

8:30 – How can success with early adopters be misleading and give founders unwarranted confidence to expand?

9:30 – Despite the pressure to “get big fast,” hypergrowth can spell disaster for even the most promising ventures.

11:00 – Silicon Valley exhorts entrepreneurs to dream big. But the bigger the vision, the more things that can go wrong.

12:30 – It is possible for failed entrepreneurs to heal and bounce back. What is the process of healing?

Tim Koegel on The Small Business Radio Show

Segment 2: Tim Koegel is the founder of The Presentation Academy in Annapolis, MD. He is the author of the New York Times and Wall Street Journal best-selling book, The Exceptional Presenter. Tim’s second book, The Exceptional Presenter Goes Virtual was named a Top 5 Business Book by the Wall Street Journal and Washington Post. In January 2021 he published an Executive Summary of The Exceptional Presenter Goes Virtual. A sample of Tim’s corporate clients includes:  Nationwide Insurance, Under Armour, T. Rowe Price, M&T Bank, Acxiom, Jones Lang LaSalle and Deloitte. He has worked with US Presidents and members of the United States Congress. He speaks at top MBA and EMBA programs: Yale, NYU, Harvard, Michigan, MIT, Notre Dame, North Carolina, Duke and Stanford to name a few.

17:30 – How has the shift to online affected presentations?

20:00 – How is presenting online different than presenting in person?

22:30 – How to make your virtual presentations better. Operating the software takes a completely different set of skills than leading the meeting. 23?

24:30 – You don’t get a retake when you’re in a business meeting. Practice!

26:30 – How to create an in-person atmosphere that looks familiar.

28:45 – How do you engage people during a virtual presentation?

32:00 – What will happen to virtual meetings once the live in-person meetings come back?

Victoria Jones on The Small Business Radio Show

Segment 3: Victoria Jones is an Evangelist on Zoho‘s customer advocacy team. She is a frequent speaker and trainer on digital collaboration, AI, and privacy. Victoria focuses on creating Zoho centered educational content to support and empower customers.

36:15 – Zoho conducted a data privacy survey among 1,220 business leaders. What issues did you find?

38:30 – Do consumers care about data privacy?

40:45 – Tech companies have spent years getting rich by abusing their customer’s data.

42:00 – 62% of businesses aren’t telling customers about third party tracking. Why is this? 43. 44-44:45

46:15 – What types of data are companies collecting?

47:45 – Companies should go above and beyond regulations and laws when it comes to data privacy.


Sponsored by AT&T Business

More episodes of The Small Business Radio Show

The post #632 The Real Reason Why Startups Fail Now appeared first on Barry Moltz.

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Thu, 08 Apr 2021 16:03:05 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Startups Small Business Congress Washington Entrepreneurship Stanford Failure US Sales United States New York Times Silicon Valley Victoria Wall Street Journal Data Privacy Presentations Virtual Radio Show Tim Annapolis HBS Harvard Business School Zoho Harvard Business School HBS Victoria Jones Small Business Radio Show Tom Eisenmann Wall Street Journal Harvard Business Review Deloitte He Tim Koegel Arthur Rock Center for Entrepreneurship Tom Presentation Academy
10 Best CRMs for Small Businesses https://www.crowdspring.com/blog/best-crm-small-business/

Whether your business is small or large, there's a CRM platform that will fit your needs. Here are the most recommended CRMs for small businesses and startups.]]>
Tue, 06 Apr 2021 15:23:28 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Small Business Sales
#631 How to Create a Growth Strategy Focused on Humanity Instead of Money http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/BarryMoltzBlog/~3/rIURNEM8k5c/ Listen to “#631 How to Create a Growth Strategy Focused on Humanity Instead of Money” on Spreaker.
     

On this episode of The Small Business Radio Show…

SEGMENT 1 with Ben Pring, starting at 0:00: We have a social media uncivil war going on in the U.S. and in the world. Fostering extreme viewpoints, addiction, anonymity, and a lack of data privacy… what can be done to tame the monster that social media has become?

SEGMENT 2 with Praval Singh, starting at 18:30: Can a company really design a growth strategy and run a business focused on humanity instead of just in monetary terms? Zoho’s Praval Singh says yes and he’s here to show us how.

SEGMENT 3 with Howard Tiersky, starting at 35:45: Digital transformation is happening faster than ever, and many once-loved brands are becoming increasingly irrelevant and ultimately disappearing.  How can your brand remain relevant in the shifting world of a digital transformation?

Sponsored by AT&T Business

More on each segment below.

 

Ben Pring on The Small Business Radio Show

Segment 1: Ben Pring co-founded and leads the Center for the Future of Work at Cognizant, an American multinational technology company that provides consulting, information technology and outsourcing services. Ben sits on the advisory board of the Labor and Work Life program at Harvard Law School. In 2018, Ben was a Bilderberg Meeting participant. Ben was named as one of 30 management thinkers to watch in 2020 by Thinkers 50. His work has been featured in the Wall Street Journal, the Financial Times, the London Times,  Forbes, and Fortune.

1:30 – There is a social media uncivil war going on in the U.S. and the world. Why is this happening?

4:45 – How do we tame the monster that is social media?

8:00 – Why we need guardrails on social media and why everyone should be involved in charting the rules of the road.

10:30 – We have to break the addictive habit of technology.

12:15 – What hope do we have that we can break the gridlock and something like a Federal Technology Association would be formed within the federal government?

Praval Singh on The Small Business Radio Show growth strategy

Segment 2: Praval Singh joined Zoho in 2012 and is currently the VP of Marketing & Customer Experience. He and his team work on building the Zoho brand. Over the last 12 years—between his agency work and his time with Zoho—he has built marketing teams, launched products, developed go-to-market strategies, led training workshops, and fostered critical partnerships.

18:30 – How does Zohonomics function as a growth strategy around humanity rather than money?

21:15 – Has this growth strategy been a part of Zoho since the very beginning or was it developed along the way?

24:30 – Running a business is all about the people. How does the concept of remote rural offices demonstrate this?

29:00 – As small business owners are thinking about bringing employees back into the office, what should they consider?

32:30 – Where can small business owners learn more about the values of the Zohonomics growth strategy and how to apply these concepts to their businesses?

Howard Tiersky on The Small Business Radio Show

Segment 3: Howard Tiersky is the author of the Wall Street Journal bestseller Winning Digital Customers: The Antidote to Irrelevance. He has been named by IDG as one of the “Top 10 Digital Transformation Influencers to Follow Today.” As an entrepreneur, he has launched two successful companies that help large brands transform to thrive in the digital age.

35:45 – Companies that have been successful for years face a world that is being changed rapidly by digital and are struggling to keep up.

38:45 – What prevents companies from keeping up with digital transformation?

40:15 – What can businesses do to be successful in the post-pandemic era?

42:15 – What can brands do today to make sure they remain relevant in today’s fast-paced, digitally-driven, post-pandemic era?

46:00 – What COVID-era experiences will continue post-pandemic?

48:00 – What company has done an excellent job keeping up with digital transformation?

Sponsored by AT&T Business

More episodes of The Small Business Radio Show

The post #631 How to Create a Growth Strategy Focused on Humanity Instead of Money appeared first on Barry Moltz.

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Thu, 01 Apr 2021 13:30:02 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs London Digital Transformation Small Business Labor Sales Social Media Radio Show Harvard Law School Ben Wall Street Journal the Financial Times IDG Zoho Growth Strategy Ben Pring Howard Tiersky Small Business Radio Show Digital Transformation Influencers AT T Business More Praval Singh Federal Technology Association
This is How You Can Grow Your Small Business Faster https://www.crowdspring.com/blog/grow-small-business-tips/

Your business must start thinking of customers as long-term investments instead of one-off sales. This is the secret to growing your business faster.]]>
Mon, 29 Mar 2021 17:29:10 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Small Business Sales Small business marketing Growing A Business Startup Marketing
Almost Half of Small Business Owners Will Require a COVID Vaccine Before Returning to the Office http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/BarryMoltzBlog/~3/_TlBfhtEfZM/ I surveyed small business owners a few weeks ago to see how many of them would require a COVID Vaccine before coming back to the office (exceptions for religious beliefs or medical conditions). I also wondered if they would keep unvaccinated employees working from home. Here are the results:

47% Yes

40% No

13% Unsure

As you might expect, respondents had a very strong opinion to this question besides inquiring of the legality of this. Small business owners commented that:

Absolutely! No shot, no work. I’m not getting sued for having a vector in my shop, giving it to elderly customers.

We will not be taking the vaccine ourselves and would never require anyone to get a vaccine. That is a very personal choice.

Humans should be free to make there wound decisions!.

If asked, we will be letting our clients know who is vaccinated and who is not.

What will you be doing inside your company?

The post Almost Half of Small Business Owners Will Require a COVID Vaccine Before Returning to the Office appeared first on Barry Moltz.

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Mon, 29 Mar 2021 11:17:24 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Small Business Sales Covid Vaccine
Brexit: UK cheese firm boss in despair over minister's export advice https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2021/mar/27/brexit-uk-cheese-firm-boss-in-despair-over-ministers-export-advice Co-founder of Cheshire Cheese Company told by environment minister to look at US and Canada markets rather than EU

The boss of a Cheshire cheese firm has told of his despair over Brexit after an unexpected meeting with the environment minister resulted in advice to look at the US and Canada markets.

Simon Spurrell, the co-founder of the Cheshire Cheese Company, was phoned “out of the blue” for an online meeting with Victoria Prentis after he embarked on a personal crusade involving nearly 100 media interviews in the UK and the EU about his post-Brexit plight.

Continue reading...]]>
Sat, 27 Mar 2021 04:43:41 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Food Europe Business Politics UK Small Business Cheese US Eu European Union UK News World news Canada Foreign Policy Brexit Cheshire Victoria Prentis Simon Spurrell Cheshire Cheese Company
#630 How to Build a Business That Isn’t All About You http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/BarryMoltzBlog/~3/ISGoldq64So/ Listen to “#630 How to Build a Business That Isn’t All About You” on Spreaker.
     

On this episode of The Small Business Radio Show…

SEGMENT 1 with Thomas Michael Hogg, starting at 0:00: One of the things that Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel used to say is “never let a crisis go to waste.” Well, this year definitely has been a crisis and for small business an almost extinction event. So how can you take advantage of this crisis?

SEGMENT 2 with Harma Hartouni, starting at 16:00: We have heard many stories of resilience and success on this show, but strap in, you have never heard one like this. Harma shares his experience as a gay Middle Eastern man, surviving a horrific car accident, coming to America, and pursing a career in real estate despite the disapproval from his family and his culture.

SEGMENT 3 with Rita Goodroe, starting at 34:45: Everyone loves a good story, and so do your customers! Here’s how to use storytelling to build your brand.

Sponsored by AT&T Business

More on each segment below.

 

Thomas Michael Hogg on The Small Business Radio Show

Segment 1: Thomas Michael Hogg, author of Profitable Growth Strategy, is a consultant and mentor with more than 20 years of market and work experience in Germany, Mexico, Switzerland and the USA. He has been an advisor to global companies such as PepsiCo (Germany), adidas (Germany), Campbell’s Soup, Johnson Controls, Bulkmatic, among other multinational companies.

1:30 – How to position yourself best when there is a crisis.

4:30 – How can you plan your business strategy for a crisis? What does it mean to “think like a German”?

7:30 – Own your niche: How the German “niche” management approach has led Germany to become a leader in international trade.

9:30 – Advice for people who have had to reimagine their business to ensure their future.

11:15 – The importance of focusing on your existing employees and clients.

Harma Hartouni on The Small Business Radio Show

Segment 2: Harma Hartouni is a self-made entrepreneur and developer, owns a real estate company employing hundreds of residential and commercial real estate agents in Southern California, and runs the #1 ranked real estate business in his region. His memoir, Getting Back Up: A Story of Resilience, Self-Acceptance & Success, tells the story of his life growing up in Iran, where he suffered from bullying and abuse as a teen and young adult. Then, he almost died during a horrific car accident and had to re-learn how to walk. He came to America as an outcast gay Middle Eastern man and built the life of his dreams. Today he is one half of a power couple and a father of three kids.

16:00 – Take us back to your childhood. What were your early years like growing up as a minority in Iran?

19:00 – Why did you decide to come to America?

20:30 – Harma’s experience coming out as a gay Middle Eastern man.

23:00 – How did you get started in real estate even though it was frowned upon in your culture?  What gave you the skills to be successful?

26:15 – Why you should not be the sole focus of your business: The importance of helping the people around you grow and thrive, and how it inspires dedication and ownership. Your business isn’t all about you

29:30 – The question you must ask yourself before choosing a business partner.

30:45 – Why every business leader needs a glass of “shut the F* up water” on their desk.

Rita Goodroe on The Small Business Radio Show

Segment 3: Rita Goodroe is a business strategist, international speaker and sales coach helping entrepreneurs leverage the power of curiosity to create meaningful relationships and build profitable businesses. Rita uses storytelling to break tough topics down into practical, easily implementable actions.

34:45 – What are the great stories that will come out of the COVID-19 pandemic?

37:15 – What do you say to small business owners who say their business doesn’t have a good story?

41:00 – What’s a brand that uses storytelling well?

43:00 – What makes storytelling so powerful?

45:00 – How can you empower your customers to use storytelling to promote your business?

48:30 – You have to be authentic, transparent, and congruent with your storytelling.

Sponsored by AT&T Business

More episodes of The Small Business Radio Show

The post #630 How to Build a Business That Isn’t All About You appeared first on Barry Moltz.

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Fri, 26 Mar 2021 11:17:13 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Usa Small Business Germany Sales America Success Iran Chicago Resilience Crisis Storytelling Radio Show Southern California Rahm Emanuel Rita AT T Business More Thomas Michael Hogg Harma Hartouni Harma Rita Goodroe Germany Mexico Switzerland
The return of neighborhood retail and other surprising real estate trends http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Techcrunch/~3/ZGP0StYZy54/ The pandemic made remote work and on-demand delivery normal far faster than anyone expected. Today, as the world beings to emerge from the pandemic, location doesn’t matter like it did a year ago.

As shocking as it sounds, we could be entering a much better era for small, local businesses.

Modern society produced superstar cities filled with skyscraper office and residential buildings. Now, the populations that once thrived in these urban centers are deciding how to repurpose them for a post-pandemic world.

I caught up with ten top investors who focus on real estate property technology to get a sense of how they’re betting on the future.

They are optimistic overall, because the typically glacial real estate industry now sees proptech as essential to its future. However, they are the most unsure about the office sector, at least as we knew the concept before the pandemic.

They expect remote work to be part of the future in a significant way and foresee ongoing high housing demand in the suburbs and smaller cities. They are especially positive about fintech and SaaS products focused on areas like single-family home sales and rentals. Many are continuing to invest in big cities, but around alternative housing (co-living, accessory dwelling units) and climate-related concepts.

Most surprisingly, some investors are actually excited about physical retail. I examined the latest evidence and found myself agreeing. As shocking as it sounds, we could be entering a much better era for small, local businesses. Details farther down.

(And before we dig in below, please note that Extra Crunch subscribers can separately read the people cited below responding fully in their own words, with lots of great information I wasn’t able to explore. One other thing, we did suggest they mention their own investments to illustrate what they believe about the sector. )

When the office is more of a luxury

The pandemic combined with existing trends has made office renters “more akin to a consumer of a luxury product,” explains Clelia Warburg Peters, a venture partner at Bain Capital Ventures and long-time proptech investor and real estate operator.

Landlords who have “largely been in a position of power since the 1950s” now have to put the customer first, she says. The “best landlords will recognize that they are going to be under pressure to shift from simply providing a physical space, to helping provide tenants with a multichannel work experience.”

This includes tangible additional services like software and hardware for managing employees as they travel between various office locations. But the market today also dictates a new attitude. “These assets will need to be provided in the context of a much more human relationship, focusing on serving the needs of tenants,” she says. “As lease terms inevitably shorten, tenants will need to be courted and supported in a much more active way than they have been in the past.”

The changes in office space may be more favorable to the supply side in suburban areas.

“Companies are going to have to offer employees space in an urban headquarters,” Zach Aarons of Metaprop tells me (his firm just published a very positive report on the sector). But many will also want to offer ”some sort of office alternative in the suburbs so the worker can leave home sometimes but not have to take a one-hour train ride to get to the office when needed.”

“If we were still purchasing hard real estate assets like many of us on the MetaProp team used to do in previous careers,” he added, “we would be looking aggressively to purchase suburban office inventory.”

Most people thought that remote work was here for good and would impact the nature of office space in the future.

Adam Demuyakor, co-founder and managing director of Wilshire Lane Partners, is generally bullish on big cities, but he notes that startups themselves are already untethering from specific places. This is a key leading indicator, in TechCrunch’s opinion.

“Something that has been interesting to watch over the past year is how startups themselves have begun to evolve due to newfound geographic flexibility from the pandemic,” he observes. “Previously, startups (especially real-estate-related startups) felt pressure to be ‘headquartered’ near where their customers, prospective capital sources and pools of talent were located. However, we’ve seen this change over the past few months.”

In fact, a recent report by my former colleague Kim-Mai Cutler, now a partner at Initialized Capital, highlights these trends in a regular survey of its portfolio companies. When the pandemic began, the Bay Area was still the number one place that founders said they’d start a company. Today, remote-first is in first place. Meanwhile, the portfolio companies are either going toward remote-first or a hub-and-spoke model of a smaller headquarters and more far-flung offices. Those who maintain some sort of office say they will require significantly less than five days a week. Nearly two-thirds of respondents said they would also not adjust salaries based on location!

That’s a small sample but as Demuyakor says, “Startups (a) are frequently the most adept at utilizing the types of technology necessary for effective remote work and (b) simultaneously have to compete ferociously for talent. As such, I think we may be able to infer what the ‘future of work’ may look like as we observe what startups choose to do as the pandemic passes.”

Some landlords (with big loans) and large cities (with big budgets) are making a push to repopulate their offices quickly, and some large companies are loading up on office space or reaffirming their commitments to current locations.

Maybe efforts like these, plus the natural desire to network live, will bring back the industry clusters and pull everyone back to the old geographies? Maybe something close to 100% of what we saw before? What does that look like?

In such a scenario, some pandemic-era changes will persist, says Christopher Yip, a partner and managing director at RET Ventures. “A populace that has become sensitized to public health considerations may well gravitate toward solo forms of transportation (cars and bicycles) instead of mass transit, and parking-related and bike-sharing tech tools may likely thrive. From a real estate management perspective, technology that makes high-density living more comfortable and healthier will also increase, as consumers will become increasingly attracted to touchless technology and tools that facilitate self-leasing.”

Here’s the other scenario that he lays out “if a large number of jobs remain fully remote.”

“In theory, retail and office properties could structurally continue to suffer, and there has been some talk from government officials in certain regions about converting office properties into affordable housing,” he details. “If market-rate vacancies in cities remain high, there will be increasing demand for short-term rental platforms like Airbnb and Kasa, which enable landlords to gain revenue from hotel-type stays even in a market where residential demand is not strong.”

Vik Chawla, a partner at Fifth Wall, sketches out a middle-of-the-road scenario. “We believe that major cities will continue to attract knowledge workers and top talent post-pandemic,” he says, “though we expect remote work to become an increasingly critical component to the work economy, meaning that there will be increased flexibility in terms of time spent in the office versus elsewhere.”

This would still mean some sort of long-term price decline. “At a city level, this means that rents should taper relative to pre-pandemic levels due to lesser demand,” he believes. “That said, the real estate ecosystems in cities that have experienced growth throughout the pandemic will enter a period of innovation, and with it, see an increase in housing density, ADUs and modular building techniques.”

Andrew Ackerman, managing director of UrbanTech for DreamIt Ventures, also sees a gentle deflation of commercial office prices over time, followed by some complex space-management questions.

“[T]he return to work will likely result in more flexible work arrangements rather than the demise of the office which, as leases renew over the next 5-10 years, will lead to a gradual meaningful-but-not-catastrophic reduction in the demand for office space. The question is, what then happens to the excess office space?”

“Office to residential conversion is tricky,” he elaborates. “Layout is a major constraint. Many modern offices have deep, windowless interior space that is hard to repurpose. But even with narrow layouts, the structural elements are often in the wrong place. Drilling thousands of holes in structural concrete so you can move plumbing and gas to the right places is a heavy lift.”

This might just lead to new types of still-valuable uses? “One of the areas that I’m still investigating is whether co-living or microunits might be a more attractive conversion option. Turning an office break room and interior bullpens into a shared kitchen, dining area, and recreation or work flexspace may be a better way to repurpose deep interior space without a very costly retrofit. And if you don’t have to reroute too much plumbing, it may even be possible to convert (and convert back!) individual floors as market demand for office and residential space fluctuates over time.”

All respondents saw proptech being a core part of the next era of big cities (of course), however bullish or bearish they may be about the office itself.

A new equilibrium for residential

Housing availability has become even more limited in most places during the pandemic, with many more people looking to buy and fewer people wanting to sell. This is even though the previously hottest cities have seen major rental price drops.

Demuyakor of Wilshire Lane is staying focused on the housing problem, and solutions to it like co-living. “Despite the pandemic, it is still difficult for millennials and Gen Z to afford to live in the most expensive cities (New York, San Francisco, Los Angeles, etc.) at current wage levels,” he says. “As such, we believe that we will continue to see demand for products and solutions that can continue to help alleviate costs and burdens of living in major cities. For example, we think that at its core, co-living is an economic decision. Solutions that continue to help people live where they want to live more easily (ADUs are another example of this) will continue to thrive.”

Casey Berman, managing director and general partner of Camber Creek, thinks that “cities will continue to attract people to live, work and play because they offer density and opportunities for experiences that people crave even more now. To the extent all of this is true, there will be renewed demand for urban spaces and properties to take advantage of that demand.”

He says that the firm has been investing in products to make dense living safer and more convenient and “we expect those solutions will become increasingly popular. Flex allows tenants to pay rent online in easier-to-manage installments and in the process makes it more likely that landlords will receive payment on time. Latch’s access control devices are in one out of 10 new multifamily buildings. A lot of people purchased a pet over the past year. PetScreening makes it easy to manage pet records and confirm when a pet is a service or support animal.”

Robin Godenrath and Julian Roeoes, partners at Picus Capital, generally share this viewpoint and describe how new living arrangements in cities could allow for more radical changes to how people live.

“Flexible living solutions will allow remote workers to spend time across different cities with a fully managed, affordable and safe rental option for short-to-long-term urban living,” he says, “while commercial conversion to residential will play a key role in driving down per square foot prices enabling long-term returning residents to afford less densified space. Although co-living densifies multifamily buildings, we believe it will remain an interesting sector as the continued shift to remote work will make living communities increasingly important considering the reduced social interaction on the job.”

But modern proptech is also making the suburbs and beyond more appealing in the long run, according to many. Great new technologies for living can exist anywhere you are.

Proptech has also helped fuel the new suburban boom. “There is an ongoing trend of reverse urban migration causing an uptick in the demand for suburban-style living,” he says. “Proptech companies have played a significant role in enabling this shift, specifically via digitizing the home buying, selling and renting transaction processes (e.g., iBuyers, alternative financing models and tech-enabled brokerages). Additionally, proptech companies have played a key role in reducing physical interactions through remote appraisals, 3D/VR viewings and digital communications thus enabling homebuyers and sellers to efficiently and safely transact throughout the pandemic.”

Ultimately, the same technologies that could make cities more affordable will also help out in the suburbs. “We strongly believe that the acceleration of the digitalization of the home transaction process coupled with the significant increase in demand for suburban-style housing and evolving buyer profiles (e.g., tech-savvy millennials) opens up a multitude of opportunities for proptech to significantly impact suburban living across construction, access and lifestyle. This includes companies focusing on built-to-rent developments, modular homebuilding, affordable housing, community building and digital amenities.

Many investors who we talked to highlighted the single-family rental market trend. Here’s Christopher Yip again from RET.

“One of the unheralded trends of the past decade has been the rise of the single-family rental (SFR) market,” he says “with a significant number of major investors moving into this asset class. The SFR space is poised to benefit from the migration from cities, and the tech that supports SFR will likely have positive ripple effects across the industry.”

“SFR portfolios are particularly challenging to operate efficiently and at scale; compared with a multifamily property, they have more distinct unit layouts and are more spread out geographically,” he explains. “Technology has the ability to streamline operations and maintenance for SFR operators, with smart home tools like SmartRent facilitating self-touring and management of these distributed portfolios. We’re bullish on this space and are keeping a close eye on proptech tools that serve this market.”

Andrew Ackerman of DreamIt agrees. “Single-family has been neglected, slowly growing more interesting both from an asset and proptech perspective for some time. For example, we invested in startups like NestEgg and Abode who service this ecosystem … prior to the pandemic. COVID has been good to these startups and brought more attention to the opportunities in single-family in general.”

Stonly Baptiste and Shaun Abrahamson, co-founders of Urban.us, already see a world of options unfolding across geographies, with choices like co-living and short-term rentals letting people find new lifestyles. “Portfolio companies like Starcity are really thriving as co-living doesn’t just solve for cost, but also for a key overlooked issue — access to community. We also see room for more nomadic lifestyles. A lot of the discussion about Miami is about people moving there, but it seems like a more interesting question for a lot of places is maybe whether or not people will spend a few months of the year there. So for remote workers this might mean places near specific activities like mountain biking, surfing, snowboarding etc. Starcity makes it easy to move between city locations and Kibbo takes this far beyond the city by building communities around van life.”

Here’s how all these changes are adding up for the suburban market, as mapped out by Clelia Warburg Peters of BCV.

“The residential transaction disruption is now settling in three core categories: iBuyers (who buy homes directly from sellers and ultimately hope to own the sell-side marketplace), neobrokers (who generally employ their agents and use secondary services such as title mortgage and insurance to increase their revenue) and elite agent tools (platforms or tools focused on the top agents).”

This combination of innovations are changing residential real estate as we know it. “[C]onsumers are increasingly open to alternative financing tools, including home-equity-based financing models (where you sell a stake in your home, or you buy into full ownership in a home over time). The growth and proliferation of these new models are consolidating the whole residential market so that brokerage sales commissions and commission from the sale of mortgage, title and home insurance are now functionally one large and intertwined disruptable market.”

The surprising revival of neighborhood retail

Humans seem to love the concept of a traditional Main Street full of bustling, walkable local businesses. But the hits have kept coming to the people trying to successfully operate independent retail storefronts.

E-commerce began cutting into traditionally thin margins with the rise of Amazon and the 90s wave of “e-tailers.” More recently, art galleries, high-end restaurants and boutiques became a harbinger of gentrification in many cities. Many commercial retail landlords in these locations aggressively priced rents as more residents moved in who could afford higher prices, ultimately contributing to gluts of empty storefronts in prime locations.

The pandemic seemed to be the final blow, with even the most loyal shoppers turning to order online while local businesses stayed closed.

And yet, a range of investors are strangely optimistic. Even though the pandemic upended social and economic activity for more than a year, most agreed that IRL retail experiences are an essential aspect of modern life.

“Humans are fundamentally social animals and I think we will all be hungry for in-person experiences once it is safe to return to them. Additionally, I think the shift away from working five days a week in the office is going to create a greater desire for ‘third spaces’ — not home, not a formal office environment,” said Peters.

“I do think we will continue to see more ‘Apple store’-type retail experiences, where the focus is less on selling inventory and more on creating an environment for customers to physically interact with goods and experience the brand ethos beyond a website. Because I anticipate that retail rents are going to be meaningfully lower at the end of the pandemic, I actually think we will see even more experimentation than we did pre-COVID. It will be a very interesting period for retail.”

Many others held views in this direction, whether they are investing specifically in retail-related tech or more generally in third-space ideas.

“It’s true that retail has been in flux for more than a decade; the list of common e-commerce purchases has expanded from books and clothing to prepared meals and groceries. It’s also true that the pandemic has accelerated e-commerce’s growth, to the detriment of brick-and-mortar retail,” says RET’s Yip. “But people are still human and crave in-person experiences. Even if cities never bounce back fully, major metropolises will still have enough foot traffic to support a fair amount of retail, and innovative models like pop-up shops can be brought in to help address vacancies. It should also be noted that the public markets still have some confidence in the retail space. While the major REITs struggled in early to mid-2020, many have recovered substantially, and several have actually surpassed their pre-pandemic figures. It has been a bad decade for retail — and a very bad year — but it is just too soon to close the book on the sector.”

Godenrath and Roeoes of Picus say movie theaters are just one example of a retail sector poised for success when public life resumes at scale post-pandemic.

“Cinemas, many of which are key shopping center anchor tenants, were already reinventing the traditional theater experience by offering a more holistic experiential solution (e.g., reserved seating, 4DX visuals, in-theater restaurants, cafes and bars) and the pandemic has led to an expansion of these offerings (i.e., private theater rentals and events). We have the opinion that this trend will continue to expand across the entire retail real estate industry from restaurants (immersive culinary experiences) to traditional retail (integrated online and offline shopping experiences) and believe that proptech will play a defining role in helping retail real estate owners identify potential tenants and market properties as well as in helping retailers drive in-store customer engagement and gain key insights into the customer journey.”

The internet is also a friend these days, surprisingly! “We also see a lot of potential for hybrid models combining online and offline experiences without friction,” they say. “Taking the fitness sectors as an example we can imagine a new normal where in-studio courses are broadcasted to allow a broader participant group and apps tracking fitness and health progress throughout in-studio visits and at-home workouts.”

I have a few additional reasons to believe in the future of retail that I didn’t hear from any of the investors I interviewed.

You can also see how retail intersects with many other solutions investors are betting on, particularly to improve the appeal of cities and solve for macro problems like climate change.

“Cities have some massively underutilized assets, perhaps the biggest being public spaces that are allocated to cars,” Baptiste and Abrahamson say. “So one change we think will become permanent is reallocating parking spaces away from private vehicles to micromobility (bike/scooter/board lanes, parking, etc.). We’re seeing a lot of demand for portfolio companies like Coord (manages curb space starting with commercial vehicles and smart zones), Qucit (manages bike and scooter share operations in many large cities) and Oonee (secure bike/scooter/board parking).”

That’s just the start of the virtuous cycle they foresee.

“As [car removal] happens, the use cases like logistics can shift to electric micro-EVs. Similarly, parklets or seating areas increase social spaces. The EU is setting the pace for banning cars, but overall reduced access to streets for cars is going to be a big change. And likely will make cities attractive — yes, you give up private living space, but you’re going to get a lot more common/social space. This is also likely to drive more co-living so you can decrease the cost basis for being in a city, but get a lot more from shared spaces, which have no real comparison in lower density communities.”

Demuyakor of Wilshire Lane is betting in the same direction.

“One of the key tenets of our overall strategy has always been a focus on space utilization and identifying the best ways technology can monetize underutilized spaces. This can be seen clearly with many of our newest investments: Stuf and Neighbor (monetization of basements, parking garages and other vacant spaces), MealCo (monetization of vacant kitchens), WorkChew (monetization of restaurant seating areas, hotel lobbies and conference rooms), and Saltbox (monetization of empty warehouses). We believe that landlords can certainly use these types of strategies to help mitigate increased levels of vacancies that we’re seeing across the real estate industry today in the medium term.”

If this thesis pans out, retail may become more about shared spaces. “With WorkChew in particular, which just announced funding this week, we’re seeing a ton of demand for their product both on the demand side and the supply side. Hotels and restaurants are excited to partner with them to monetize their less-utilized spaces and infrastructure,” said Demuyakor. “And of course, employers and companies love [it] as an easy amenity that can be offered to their hybrid workforces that increasingly want to spend more time out of the HQ office.”

I have a few additional reasons to believe in the future of retail that I didn’t hear explicitly from the investors I interviewed.

  • First, millions of new businesses have been created during the pandemic, to the surprise of even economists and policymakers. A large portion appear to have a very local angle, whether food delivery (cupcakes) or services (on-site haircuts) or internet-first products with strong local followings (much of Etsy). These entrepreneurs went internet-first and now, as commercial rents plummet, they have sufficient revenue to support a physical presence.
  • Second, most local business that have sustained themselves during the COVID-19 era figured out how to succeed on the internet. To see which ones in your vicinity are weathering the storm, just open one of your preferred on-demand delivery and services apps and place an order.
  • Third, as noted by respondents and available data, landlords are already starting to drop prices, creating a renter’s market for the first time in decades.
  • Fourth, there are whole new types of financing opening up to more traditional businesses that could enable any company with a successful online side hustle, hobby (or perhaps larger project) to get funding for expansion. (This reason is perhaps the most speculative, but we are trying to figure out the future here at TechCrunch.) For example, Shopify has just invested in Pipe.com, a new “platform for trading recurring revenue.” Although the companies are not saying much now about the relationship, it’s possible to imagine a bunch of successful small(ish) businesses on Shopify suddenly getting a new kind of capital infusion right as the math is suddenly much better for a storefront location.

If you roll all of this up with other broader shifts in how we think about cities, like making them more climate-friendly through allowing density and bike lanes, you can start to see a world emerging that sounds a lot more like the fantasies of a New Urbanist than the world before the pandemic.

At the same time, these concepts are being deployed across smaller cities, suburbs and towns: All will compete to offer the highest quality of living — unless the old network effects of industry clusters return miraculously.

And let’s say the industry clusters don’t cluster like they used to. It’s possible that many landlords, lenders and city budgets will have to retrench soon, creating a drag on the economies of otherwise-attractive cities.

Even in this case, you can imagine a rebirth for places like New York and San Francisco focused around housing, retail and amenities. Maybe one day, we’ll look back at recent decades as the bad old days before we collectively bottomed out during the pandemic and had to decide on the right answers for the long-term.

And with that, I invite readers to go check out the full sets of responses from the investors I interviewed. Each person offered a lot more than I was able to fit into this already-too-long article and is worth reading in detail. Extra Crunch subscription required, so you can support our ongoing coverage of these changes.

I’ll be covering the future of proptech and cities more soon. Have other thoughts about all of this? Email me at eldon@techcrunch.com.

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Wed, 24 Mar 2021 15:47:45 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Amazon TC Real Estate New York Small Business San Francisco Tech Eu Retail Miami Airbnb Smart Cities Shopify Bain Capital Ventures Commercial Real Estate Initialized Capital Smbs Bay Area Peters Abrahamson Picus Baptiste MetaProp Shaun Abrahamson Camber Creek Zach Aarons New Urbanist Andrew Ackerman Kasa PROPtech Casey Berman New York San Francisco Los Angeles Stonly Baptiste Picus Capital Kim Mai Cutler Vik Chawla Adam Demuyakor Coord Demuyakor RET Ventures Christopher Yip Clelia Warburg Peters COVID-19 Kibbo Robin Godenrath Wilshire Lane Partners EC Market Map EC Investor Surveys UrbanTech for DreamIt Ventures Wilshire Lane Julian Roeoes
Digital tools create a safety net for European businesses http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/KPG75rHWkl8/ Alongside the public health crisis, the economic impact of the pandemic is being felt heavily around the world. As entrepreneurs, business leaders and Governments work to protect jobs and accelerate a return to prosperity in the long term, it's clear that digital tools and skills are going to be more important than ever. That’s why Google is investing in new tools and training to ensure all businesses can build resilience and recover quickly. These are helping companies such as handmade accessories retailer MoonDot in Poland who used digital tools to improve online sales by 70%, and La Maison Des Soeurs Macarons in France who gained 200 new customers after its team took online training courses in digital skills. 

A new report released today by the Connected Commerce Council, funded by Google, shows how a “digital safety net” can serve as a support system for small businesses. The survey of more than 5,000 small businesses across Europe found that businesses that used digital tools to rapidly change how they find customers, sell products and operate reported 80 percent better sales during COVID-19 than those who didn’t, and hired three times as many people. And without such tools, many would have gone out of business.


Digital drives jobs and sales for small businesses

Whilst almost all (80 percent) of European small businesses increased their use of digital tools during the pandemic, the report identified three different types of small businesses based on their adoption of digital tools, and how this impacts their business:

  • Digitally Advanced small businesses (42 percent of small businesses in Europe) use more than 10 digital tools and prioritize their importance, leading to better business outcomes such as higher revenue and jobs 

  • Digitally Evolving small businesses (40 percent) viewed tools as supporting or essential for their business, but were deploying an average of six 

  • Digitally Uncertain small businesses (18 percent) use less digital tools and don’t prioritize their importance, leading to worse business outcomes

Digital drives jobs and sales for small businesses There is clear untapped potential for European businesses to benefit from digital tools 

From consulting with small businesses, the researchers identified a “stack” of digital tools —  e-commerce, data analytics and talent management, cloud services and collaboration tools — that created significant revenue advantages for small businesses if they were being used prior to the pandemic. This ultimately showed that not only is digital driving revenue and jobs for these businesses, but also that Europe is missing out on significant untapped growth from businesses who are not yet convinced about the usefulness of digital tools. 

The pandemic had a dramatic, and uneven, impact on small businesses

The impact on small businesses was, and continues to be, extreme, with 90 percent saying they were negatively impacted and 44 percent having to adjust their business models. And certain industries and groups faced greater challenges than others, particularly female, older and solo-operator business owners. 

Impact of digital tools on different business owners What’s next 

It’s clear from this research that there is an opportunity to drive jobs and revenue for European small businesses. However, the research shows that governments and companies need to narrow the gap between the digitally advanced and uncertain, particularly for underrepresented groups. As new digital habits like online shopping and remote working are here to stay even after the pandemic, the research also highlights the risk of some small businesses falling further behind their competitors if they don’t increase their use of digital tools. The barriers those businesses face include being unsure of the return on investment and also a lack of skills and knowledge about digital tools. 

This is why new skills are such an important part of economic recovery efforts across Europe. It’s also why we are committed to investing in research like this to inform and build on the tools and training we already provide. Google is joining policy makers, public agencies, training partners and others to develop products and partnerships to help tackle these barriers, like ourZukunftHandel program, in partnership with HDE, the German Retail Association, to help German retail businesses or Ma Vitrine En Ligne, in partnership with the French Federation of Trade Associations, to connect artisans and traders with digital experts for remote support courses, and providing personalized product recommendations for small business owners on our Google for Small Business hub

By removing these barriers, we can achieve an accelerated, sustainable recovery which works for everyone. 

Read the full report and methodology from the Connected Commerce Council.


Key stats at a glance:
  • Key stats at a glance:

    • The impact: 

      • 80% of small businesses increased their use of digital tools during the pandemic

      • 44% had to to adjust their business models

      • Small businesses with a sophisticated use of digital tools fared nearly twice as better financially (80% better sales; 60% better revenue) during COVID-19, and hired over three times as many people

    • The challenge: 

      • 90% of small businesses were negatively impacted by the pandemic 

      • Digitally advanced small businesses are about 2.5X more likely to be led by someone under 45 years old versus a leader over 45. 

      • Female small business leaders face more than 10% greater revenue challenges than men if they don’t use digital tools, but conversely these tools help women more when deployed successfully

    • The future

      • 62% of small businesses believe they will fully recover to pre-pandemic levels during the next year

      • 50% of small businesses plan to increase their use of digital tools

[Author: Matt Brittin]

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Wed, 24 Mar 2021 01:00:00 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Google Europe Small Business France Digital Poland Matt Brittin Google in Europe Grow With Google Retail Association COVID Connected Commerce Council La Maison Des Soeurs Macarons Ma Vitrine En Ligne French Federation of Trade Associations Connected Commerce Council Key
Pretend City Children’s Museum reopens Saturday with new exhibits, pandemic lessons learned https://www.dailynews.com/2021/03/22/pretend-city-childrens-museum-reopens-saturday-with-new-exhibits-pandemic-lessons-learned/ Spring break a year ago was a chaotic time of firsts: stay-at-home lockdowns, travel restrictions, bye-bye fun.

Spring break this year promises to bring back a little bit of fun as entertainment venues reopen.

One of them is Pretend City Children’s Museum in Irvine. A destination for parents looking to entertain and educate young children, the nonprofit first opened in 2009. Like most museums, it was closed for much of the pandemic, reopening briefly in summer and fall when restrictions loosened.

The closures gave Leslie Perovich, the museum’s chief operating officer, and the Pretend City team time to “make lemons into lemonade” while adding exhibits and retrofitting the 28,000-square-foot facility to meet COVID-19 protocols. A lot of things, including the bathrooms, have been updated with safety in mind.

“Because parents and restrooms are a big deal,” Perovich said Thursday with a laugh.

The nonprofit opened in 2009 and features a collection of scaled-down, hands-on experiences that teach children how things work. Think bank, doctor’s office, Trader Joe’s, a police station, fire station, a local marina and even the historic Orange Plaza. The museum previously was funded primarily through ticket sales, but that all changed in the pandemic. Perovich says philanthropy, grants and the Paycheck Protection Program have kept it afloat in tough times.

  • The new mechanics exhibit at Pretend City in Irvine on Thursday, March 18, 2021. Pretend City was able to obtain the new exhibit after World of Speed museum in Oregon announced it was shuttering the auto museum, Leslie Perovich, the chief operating officer of Pretend City saw an opportunity and was able to obtain the mechanics exhibit that will have kids learning about oil changes, tires and more.(Photo by Leonard Ortiz, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • The new mechanics exhibit at Pretend City in Irvine on Thursday, March 18, 2021 allows children to work on a car engine. Pretend City was able to obtain the new exhibit after World of Speed museum in Oregon announced it was shuttering the auto museum, Leslie Perovich, the chief operating officer of Pretend City saw an opportunity and was able to obtain the mechanics exhibit that will have kids learning about oil changes, tires and more.(Photo by Leonard Ortiz, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Sound The gallery will resume in seconds
  • The new mechanics exhibit at Pretend City in Irvine on Thursday, March 18, 2021 features tool boxes and tools work on cars. Pretend City was able to obtain the new exhibit after World of Speed museum in Oregon announced it was shuttering the auto museum, Leslie Perovich, the chief operating officer of Pretend City saw an opportunity and was able to obtain the mechanics exhibit that will have kids learning about oil changes, tires and more.(Photo by Leonard Ortiz, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • The new Mind + Body Studio exhibit at Pretend City in Irvine on Thursday, March 18, 2021.(Photo by Leonard Ortiz, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • The new mechanics exhibit at Pretend City in Irvine on Thursday, March 18, 2021 is inside the existing Gas Station. Pretend City was able to obtain the new exhibit after World of Speed museum in Oregon announced it was shuttering the auto museum, Leslie Perovich, the chief operating officer of Pretend City saw an opportunity and was able to obtain the mechanics exhibit that will have kids learning about oil changes, tires and more.(Photo by Leonard Ortiz, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • The new mechanics exhibit at Pretend City in Irvine on Thursday, March 18, 2021 features tool boxes and tools work on cars. Pretend City was able to obtain the new exhibit after World of Speed museum in Oregon announced it was shuttering the auto museum, Leslie Perovich, the chief operating officer of Pretend City saw an opportunity and was able to obtain the mechanics exhibit that will have kids learning about oil changes, tires and more.(Photo by Leonard Ortiz, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Brain Builder Andrea Lu leads a parade celebrating the Purim holiday at Pretend City Children’s Museum in Irvine, CA on Monday, March 9, 2020. Kids did story time, crafts and had a parade to mark the Jewish holiday. (Photo by Paul Bersebach, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Brain Builder Hunter Tardiff reads the book “The Better-Than-Best Purim” during a celebration of the Purim holiday at Pretend City Children’s Museum in Irvine, CA on Monday, March 9, 2020. Kids did story time, crafts and had a parade to mark the Jewish holiday. (Photo by Paul Bersebach, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Tru Nguyen, 2, is more interested in playing with the pretend jelly than making crafts during a celebration of the Purim holiday at Pretend City Children’s Museum in Irvine, CA on Monday, March 9, 2020. Tru was making a hamentashen, a jelly-filled cookie. Kids did story time, crafts and had a parade to mark the Jewish holiday. (Photo by Paul Bersebach, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Kristen Lee and Angelina Wu, from left, have a laugh during storytime with the book “The Better-Than-Best Purim” during a celebration of the Purim holiday at Pretend City Children’s Museum in Irvine, CA on Monday, March 9, 2020. Kids did story time, crafts and had a parade to mark the Jewish holiday. (Photo by Paul Bersebach, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Angel Chen leads interactive storytelling in English and Chinese during an Asian Cultural Festival at Irvine’s Pretend City on Saturday, February 8, 2020. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • Amelia Havck, 4, of Redondo Beach, Aria Tockstein, 6, of Long Beach and Quinn Perez, 6, of Mission Viejo, from left, decorate paper fans during an Asian Cultural Festival at Pretend City in Irvine on Saturday, February 8, 2020. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • Cousins Amelia Havck, left, 4, of Redondo Beach and Aria Tockstein, 6, of Long Beach decorate paper fans during an Asian Cultural Festival at Pretend City in Irvine on Saturday, February 8, 2020. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • Volunteer Una Santos, left, teaches cousins Amelia Havck, 4, of Redondo Beach, Katie Tockstein, 8, of Long Beach and Audrey Uhlenkamp, 8, of Long Beach, from left, how to use chopsticks during an Asian Cultural Festival at Pretend City in Irvine on Saturday, February 8, 2020. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • Andrea Lu, left, dressed as a Japanese Princess, helps Quinn Perez, 6, of Mission Viejo learn how to use chopsticks during Pretend City’s Asian Cultural Festival on Saturday, February 8, 2020. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

Show Caption of

Expand

Staffing, once at 42, sunk to 13 during lockdowns and now stands at 24 with onboarding still ongoing, she said.

The creative economy, or that which supports creative jobs, arts and entertainment, took a tremendous hit in 2020 as the pandemic shut down businesses. A study by the Otis College of Art and Design estimates $140 billion of the industry’s economic output was lost in California. More than 500,000 jobs were affected with $40 billion in income lost.

Southern California claims the largest share of the creative economy with 49% of California’s creative wage and salary employment and 52% of its contract employment, according to the study.

Pretend City’s third reopening in a year on Saturday, March 27 comes with two new exhibits, one with a pandemic twist that explores children’s wellness and state of mind, and the other a windfall from another museum’s demise.

We spoke with Perovich about changes at Pretend City and some of the lessons learned in the past year.

Q: With so many parents looking for family activities, how are you preparing for the pent-up demand?

A: The good news for us is we opened twice before, in June and October. We’ve done this before; we’ve got it down.

When we were getting ready to open, we realized we had an exhibit that never got funded, and it sat in the middle of the exhibition floor. We used it for storage. We realized we had an opportunity: What could we do that would resonate with families right now?

We knew that emotional well-being was going to be so important for kids, so we got rid of the storage and converted it to the Mind & Body studio. It has two sections: a way to talk to kids about their feelings and a yoga section.

Q: What’s changing at the museum with COVID-19 in mind?

A: During the shutdown, we’ve been retrofitting exhibits, and we changed a lot of how we do business. Now, we have timed admission sessions, and we close midday for deep cleaning.

Perovich said every exhibit has hand sanitation stations and new “prop buckets” for items that children put in their mouths or generally slobber. The buckets and their contents are cleaned during the midday closure. Staff members also rotate exhibits and sanitize surfaces as they exit. Another cleaning happens at the end of the day.

Q: Tell us how the museum pivoted during the closures.

A: Before the pandemic, we had a guide to play in the museum, so we switched that to a play-at-home guide. The guides help parents gauge their child’s emotional and gross motor skill development. We also did Town Halls, Facebook live videos on gross motor skills, and parenting webinars, helping our members learn how to parent under quarantine.

Q: Pretend City’s newest exhibition arrived courtesy of another museum closure. Tell us about it.

A: I read an article when the pandemic first hit that World of Speed was closing (in Oregon) and I thought to myself, ‘what can I get for our museum?’

They had what was a child’s area with an exhibit in it, and even though they said everything would go to nonprofits in Oregon, I told them, ‘I have this perfect home in Irvine.’ So, we worked together over a couple months, and ‘lo and behold, they awarded it to us; we were thrilled to get it.

We went up in November, packed it in a U-Haul and drove it down.”

The $65,000 exhibit was a gift, Perovich said. The only cost was moving it.

The slick exhibit called ‘Service Station’ comes with all the parts needed to overhaul a car. It even has sound, Perovich said. So kids can expect the ‘glug, glug, glug’ when they change the oil or the revving of an engine or a compressor whirring as tires are changed. Windshield wipers even swish.

Q: What will forever stay that the pandemic taught you?

A: How important a committed and dedicated staff and board are to the mission of our organization.

Five things about Leslie
  • Favorite crave food? Dessert
  • Any new pandemic habits? I’m becoming a Master Gardner through the UC system
  • What have the children of Pretend City taught you? Children still need free-range, pretend play to help them build their minds and bodies.
  • Favorite tip or piece of advice for new parents? Make time to play with your child because it’s how they learn.  It’s the catalyst of healthy development.
  • If you could pick one exhibit as a favorite one that fits your personality, which one is it? I usually say the ‘streets’ because they connect everything together.
If you go

Opening day: March 27

Address: 29 Hubble, Irvine

Safety measures: Cloth masks are a required part of all staff uniforms. Adult guests and children over the age of 2 also must wear masks that cover the nose and mouth.

Limited crowds: As the museum is reopening at 25% capacity, timed reservation are required. Guests can buy timed entry tickets online at Pretendcity.org.

Free ticket: Parents who fill out an “age and stages questionnaire” for children ages newborn through 5½ can get a free child’s ticket. Go to pretendcity.org/forms/asq/ to complete the form.

]]>
Mon, 22 Mar 2021 12:30:02 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Business Small Business Children California Oregon Sport Soccer Long Beach Nonprofits Southern California Irvine CA Irvine Gardner Leslie Redondo Beach Mission Viejo Otis College of Art Mind Body Redondo Kristen Lee Service Station Top Stories OCR Leonard Ortiz Orange County Register Leonard Ortiz Orange County Register SCNG JEFF ANTENORE Paul Bersebach Orange County Register Paul Bersebach Orange County Register SCNG Coronavirus Economy Paycheck Protection Program Coronavirus Anniversary Pretend City Children 's Museum Leslie Perovich Pretend City Perovich Orange Plaza The museum World of Speed museum Gas Station Pretend City Andrea Lu Hunter Tardiff Angelina Wu Amelia Havck Redondo Beach Aria Tockstein Quinn Perez Aria Tockstein Contributing Photographer Volunteer Una Santos Katie Tockstein Audrey Uhlenkamp Town Halls Facebook Pretendcity
Pretend City reopens Saturday with new exhibits, pandemic lessons learned https://www.dailynews.com/2021/03/22/pretend-city-childrens-museum-reopens-saturday-with-new-exhibits-pandemic-lessons-learned/ Spring break a year ago was a chaotic time of firsts: stay-at-home lockdowns, travel restrictions, bye-bye fun.

Spring break this year promises to bring back a little bit of fun as entertainment venues reopen.

One of them is Pretend City Children’s Museum in Irvine. A destination for parents looking to entertain and educate young children, the nonprofit first opened in 2009. Like most museums, it was closed for much of the pandemic, reopening briefly in summer and fall when restrictions loosened.

The closures gave Leslie Perovich, the museum’s chief operating officer, and the Pretend City team time to “make lemons into lemonade” while adding exhibits and retrofitting the 28,000-square-foot facility to meet COVID-19 protocols. A lot of things, including the bathrooms, have been updated with safety in mind.

“Because parents and restrooms are a big deal,” Perovich said Thursday with a laugh.

The nonprofit opened in 2009 and features a collection of scaled-down, hands-on experiences that teach children how things work. Think bank, doctor’s office, Trader Joe’s, a police station, fire station, a local marina and even the historic Orange Plaza. The museum previously was funded primarily through ticket sales, but that all changed in the pandemic. Perovich says philanthropy, grants and the Paycheck Protection Program have kept it afloat in tough times.

  • The new mechanics exhibit at Pretend City in Irvine on Thursday, March 18, 2021. Pretend City was able to obtain the new exhibit after World of Speed museum in Oregon announced it was shuttering the auto museum, Leslie Perovich, the chief operating officer of Pretend City saw an opportunity and was able to obtain the mechanics exhibit that will have kids learning about oil changes, tires and more.(Photo by Leonard Ortiz, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • The new mechanics exhibit at Pretend City in Irvine on Thursday, March 18, 2021 allows children to work on a car engine. Pretend City was able to obtain the new exhibit after World of Speed museum in Oregon announced it was shuttering the auto museum, Leslie Perovich, the chief operating officer of Pretend City saw an opportunity and was able to obtain the mechanics exhibit that will have kids learning about oil changes, tires and more.(Photo by Leonard Ortiz, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Sound The gallery will resume in seconds
  • The new mechanics exhibit at Pretend City in Irvine on Thursday, March 18, 2021 features tool boxes and tools work on cars. Pretend City was able to obtain the new exhibit after World of Speed museum in Oregon announced it was shuttering the auto museum, Leslie Perovich, the chief operating officer of Pretend City saw an opportunity and was able to obtain the mechanics exhibit that will have kids learning about oil changes, tires and more.(Photo by Leonard Ortiz, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • The new Mind + Body Studio exhibit at Pretend City in Irvine on Thursday, March 18, 2021.(Photo by Leonard Ortiz, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • The new mechanics exhibit at Pretend City in Irvine on Thursday, March 18, 2021 is inside the existing Gas Station. Pretend City was able to obtain the new exhibit after World of Speed museum in Oregon announced it was shuttering the auto museum, Leslie Perovich, the chief operating officer of Pretend City saw an opportunity and was able to obtain the mechanics exhibit that will have kids learning about oil changes, tires and more.(Photo by Leonard Ortiz, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • The new mechanics exhibit at Pretend City in Irvine on Thursday, March 18, 2021 features tool boxes and tools work on cars. Pretend City was able to obtain the new exhibit after World of Speed museum in Oregon announced it was shuttering the auto museum, Leslie Perovich, the chief operating officer of Pretend City saw an opportunity and was able to obtain the mechanics exhibit that will have kids learning about oil changes, tires and more.(Photo by Leonard Ortiz, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Brain Builder Andrea Lu leads a parade celebrating the Purim holiday at Pretend City Children’s Museum in Irvine, CA on Monday, March 9, 2020. Kids did story time, crafts and had a parade to mark the Jewish holiday. (Photo by Paul Bersebach, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Brain Builder Hunter Tardiff reads the book “The Better-Than-Best Purim” during a celebration of the Purim holiday at Pretend City Children’s Museum in Irvine, CA on Monday, March 9, 2020. Kids did story time, crafts and had a parade to mark the Jewish holiday. (Photo by Paul Bersebach, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Tru Nguyen, 2, is more interested in playing with the pretend jelly than making crafts during a celebration of the Purim holiday at Pretend City Children’s Museum in Irvine, CA on Monday, March 9, 2020. Tru was making a hamentashen, a jelly-filled cookie. Kids did story time, crafts and had a parade to mark the Jewish holiday. (Photo by Paul Bersebach, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Kristen Lee and Angelina Wu, from left, have a laugh during storytime with the book “The Better-Than-Best Purim” during a celebration of the Purim holiday at Pretend City Children’s Museum in Irvine, CA on Monday, March 9, 2020. Kids did story time, crafts and had a parade to mark the Jewish holiday. (Photo by Paul Bersebach, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Angel Chen leads interactive storytelling in English and Chinese during an Asian Cultural Festival at Irvine’s Pretend City on Saturday, February 8, 2020. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • Amelia Havck, 4, of Redondo Beach, Aria Tockstein, 6, of Long Beach and Quinn Perez, 6, of Mission Viejo, from left, decorate paper fans during an Asian Cultural Festival at Pretend City in Irvine on Saturday, February 8, 2020. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • Cousins Amelia Havck, left, 4, of Redondo Beach and Aria Tockstein, 6, of Long Beach decorate paper fans during an Asian Cultural Festival at Pretend City in Irvine on Saturday, February 8, 2020. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • Volunteer Una Santos, left, teaches cousins Amelia Havck, 4, of Redondo Beach, Katie Tockstein, 8, of Long Beach and Audrey Uhlenkamp, 8, of Long Beach, from left, how to use chopsticks during an Asian Cultural Festival at Pretend City in Irvine on Saturday, February 8, 2020. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • Andrea Lu, left, dressed as a Japanese Princess, helps Quinn Perez, 6, of Mission Viejo learn how to use chopsticks during Pretend City’s Asian Cultural Festival on Saturday, February 8, 2020. (Photo By Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

Show Caption of

Expand

Staffing, once at 42, sunk to 13 during lockdowns and now stands at 24 with onboarding still ongoing, she said.

The creative economy, or that which supports creative jobs, arts and entertainment, took a tremendous hit in 2020 as the pandemic shut down businesses. A study by the Otis College of Art and Design estimates $140 billion of the industry’s economic output was lost in California. More than 500,000 jobs were affected with $40 billion in income lost.

Southern California claims the largest share of the creative economy with 49% of California’s creative wage and salary employment and 52% of its contract employment, according to the study.

Pretend City’s third reopening in a year on Saturday, March 27 comes with two new exhibits, one with a pandemic twist that explores children’s wellness and state of mind, and the other a windfall from another museum’s demise.

We spoke with Perovich about changes at Pretend City and some of the lessons learned in the past year.

Q: With so many parents looking for family activities, how are you preparing for the pent-up demand?

A: The good news for us is we opened twice before, in June and October. We’ve done this before; we’ve got it down.

When we were getting ready to open, we realized we had an exhibit that never got funded, and it sat in the middle of the exhibition floor. We used it for storage. We realized we had an opportunity: What could we do that would resonate with families right now?

We knew that emotional well-being was going to be so important for kids, so we got rid of the storage and converted it to the Mind & Body studio. It has two sections: a way to talk to kids about their feelings and a yoga section.

Q: What’s changing at the museum with COVID-19 in mind?

A: During the shutdown, we’ve been retrofitting exhibits, and we changed a lot of how we do business. Now, we have timed admission sessions, and we close midday for deep cleaning.

Perovich said every exhibit has hand sanitation stations and new “prop buckets” for items that children put in their mouths or generally slobber. The buckets and their contents are cleaned during the midday closure. Staff members also rotate exhibits and sanitize surfaces as they exit. Another cleaning happens at the end of the day.

Q: Tell us how the museum pivoted during the closures.

A: Before the pandemic, we had a guide to play in the museum, so we switched that to a play-at-home guide. The guides help parents gauge their child’s emotional and gross motor skill development. We also did Town Halls, Facebook live videos on gross motor skills, and parenting webinars, helping our members learn how to parent under quarantine.

Q: Pretend City’s newest exhibition arrived courtesy of another museum closure. Tell us about it.

A: I read an article when the pandemic first hit that World of Speed was closing (in Oregon) and I thought to myself, ‘what can I get for our museum?’

They had what was a child’s area with an exhibit in it, and even though they said everything would go to nonprofits in Oregon, I told them, ‘I have this perfect home in Irvine.’ So, we worked together over a couple months, and ‘lo and behold, they awarded it to us; we were thrilled to get it.

We went up in November, packed it in a U-Haul and drove it down.”

The $65,000 exhibit was a gift, Perovich said. The only cost was moving it.

The slick exhibit called ‘Service Station’ comes with all the parts needed to overhaul a car. It even has sound, Perovich said. So kids can expect the ‘glug, glug, glug’ when they change the oil or the revving of an engine or a compressor whirring as tires are changed. Windshield wipers even swish.

Q: What will forever stay that the pandemic taught you?

A: How important a committed and dedicated staff and board are to the mission of our organization.

Five things about Leslie
  • Favorite crave food? Dessert
  • Any new pandemic habits? I’m becoming a Master Gardner through the UC system
  • What have the children of Pretend City taught you? Children still need free-range, pretend play to help them build their minds and bodies.
  • Favorite tip or piece of advice for new parents? Make time to play with your child because it’s how they learn.  It’s the catalyst of healthy development.
  • If you could pick one exhibit as a favorite one that fits your personality, which one is it? I usually say the ‘streets’ because they connect everything together.
If you go

Opening day: March 27

Address: 29 Hubble, Irvine

Safety measures: Cloth masks are a required part of all staff uniforms. Adult guests and children over the age of 2 also must wear masks that cover the nose and mouth.

Limited crowds: As the museum is reopening at 25% capacity, timed reservation are required. Guests can buy timed entry tickets online at Pretendcity.org.

Free ticket: Parents who fill out an “age and stages questionnaire” for children ages newborn through 5½ can get a free child’s ticket. Go to pretendcity.org/forms/asq/ to complete the form.

]]>
Mon, 22 Mar 2021 12:30:02 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Business Small Business Children California Oregon Sport Soccer Long Beach Nonprofits Southern California Irvine CA Irvine Gardner Leslie Redondo Beach Mission Viejo Otis College of Art Mind Body Redondo Kristen Lee Service Station Top Stories OCR Leonard Ortiz Orange County Register Leonard Ortiz Orange County Register SCNG JEFF ANTENORE Paul Bersebach Orange County Register Paul Bersebach Orange County Register SCNG Coronavirus Economy Paycheck Protection Program Coronavirus Anniversary Pretend City Children 's Museum Leslie Perovich Pretend City Perovich Orange Plaza The museum World of Speed museum Gas Station Pretend City Andrea Lu Hunter Tardiff Angelina Wu Amelia Havck Redondo Beach Aria Tockstein Quinn Perez Aria Tockstein Contributing Photographer Volunteer Una Santos Katie Tockstein Audrey Uhlenkamp Town Halls Facebook Pretendcity
Meet the new breed of work from home chefs https://www.theguardian.com/food/2021/mar/21/meet-the-new-breed-of-work-from-home-chefs-lockdown-takeaway-meal-kits- Lockdown has seen an explosion in domestic food businesses, including takeaways and meal kits. Will it continue?

The Covid-19 era has seen an explosion in food businesses based in people’s homes. According to the Food Standards Agency, 44% of new ventures registered since March 2020 are run from domestic kitchens, as new platforms emerge (All About the Cooks, NoshyCircle, GruBie) to connect home cooks with hungry diners. Increasingly, anyone can compete with local restaurants to sell hot takeaways or ready-meals.

“I want it to be as easy to sign-up to All About the Cooks as it is to let out a room on Airbnb,” says founder Claire Ladkin of the currently Bristol-only site. “There’s enormous talent in communities and little opportunity to share it. It’s difficult to get into food. You have to work evenings, start at the bottom in a restaurant or risk setting up as a business.” All About the Cooks wants to democratise getting started, nationally, in return for its 12.5% commission: “Enabling people who might find it difficult to make money if they have language barriers or caring responsibilities. The social impact is a massive driver.”

Continue reading...]]>
Sun, 21 Mar 2021 09:00:01 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Food Business Small Business Food & drink industry Working From Home Chefs Bristol Food Standards Agency Cooks Claire Ladkin
#629 Are You Feeding Your Inner Critic or Inner Coach? http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/BarryMoltzBlog/~3/SMMWwQYpQ4E/ Listen to “#629 Are You Feeding Your Inner Critic or Inner Coach?” on Spreaker.

     

On this episode of The Small Business Radio Show…

SEGMENT 1 with Naz Beheshti, starting at 0:00: Managing our wellbeing has been a difficult challenge for every small business owner during the pandemic. Naz Beheshti is here with a simple 3-step solution: Pause, Breathe and Choose. She also shows us how to feed our inner coach, rather than our inner critic.

SEGMENT 2 with Tova Sherman, starting at 19:45: Many of us talk about inclusiveness and accessibility for our employees, but a lot of us have no idea where to start to hire and manage people with disabilities.  Tova Sherman is here to help.

SEGMENT 3 with Arthur F. Coombs III, starting at 35:00: Change is hard. Your biology fights against it. How do you actually make the changes to get the life and business you want?

Sponsored by AT&T Business

More on each segment below.

 

Segment 1: Naz Beheshti is the author of Pause. Breathe. Choose: Become the CEO of Your Well-Being. She is an executive wellness coach, speaker, Forbes contributor, and CEO and founder of Prananaz, a corporate wellness company improving leadership effectiveness, employee engagement and well-being, company culture, and business outcomes. Clients include Nike, JPMorgan Chase, and Stanford University.

1:30 – You say that Steve Jobs inspired you to write Pause. Breathe. Choose. How so?

4:00 – What do you say to small business owners who say they don’t have time to focus on their wellbeing because they have to work?

8:30 – Does everyone have an inner coach and inner critic? What impact does each have on us? How do you feed one over the other?

11:15 – Advice for those who are having a hard time connecting with a sense of passion and purpose in their lives.

13:15 – What do you think the impact of the pandemic will be on business leaders going forward and what’s the most important theme of 2021?

15:00 – The power of Pause. Breathe. Choose. in our lives.

Tova Sherman on The Small Business Radio Show

Segment 2: Tova Sherman is a TEDx Speaker and thought leader with more than 25 years of experience in diversity and inclusion and the award-winning CEO of reachAbility, an organization which provides supportive and accessible programs dedicated to workplace inclusion for anyone facing barriers. She is the winner of Queen Elizabeth II’s Diamond Jubilee Medal and the Canada Law Leadership Award.

19:45 – Why are many small business owners clueless about how to hire and manage persons with disabilities?

22:30 – Win, Win, Win: The benefits of inclusion throughout an organization—for the employer, the consumer, and the diverse workforce of the future.

24:30 – Why attitudinal barriers are the biggest obstacles to an inclusive workplace culture. How can you best educate your team?

29:15 – Actionable steps for educating your existing team to build the foundation for a truly inclusive workplace.

Art Coombs on The Small Business Radio Show

Segment 3: Arthur F. Coombs III is a best-selling author, dynamic speaker, and leadership guru III who brings decades of global expertise to readers, audiences, and corporations through his visionary and innovative practices. His new book is called “Hard Easy: A Get-Real Guide for Getting the Life You Want”.

35:00 – What holds people back from going out and getting the life they want?

37:00 – The “hard-easy” approach that you have to take to be successful in life.

40:00 – Why do we tend to focus on our weaknesses instead of our strengths? What should we do instead?

44:45 – What is the first step to making changes and living an empowered life?

47:00 – When creating an empowered life, begin with the end in mind.

48:30 – What do you say to people who say creating the life they want is too hard?

Sponsored by AT&T Business

More episodes of The Small Business Radio Show

The post #629 Are You Feeding Your Inner Critic or Inner Coach? appeared first on Barry Moltz.

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Wed, 17 Mar 2021 22:27:16 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Motivation Small Business Steve Jobs Sales Diversity Change Canada Disabilities Stanford University Inner Critic Elizabeth Ii Radio Show Forbes Wellbeing Inclusion Small Business Radio Show Naz Beheshti AT T Business More Empowered Life Tova Sherman Arthur F Coombs III Prananaz Nike JPMorgan Chase
A Shopify seller says she lost about $55,000 after her account was hacked. Now Insider wants to know if there are more people like her. http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/typepad/alleyinsider/silicon_alley_insider/~3/IwBatNiBpLI/shopify-seller-lost-55000-dollars-after-account-was-hacked-2021-3

REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

  • Shopify seller Andi Rosenberg is missing about $55,000 in sales after her account was hacked.
  • A customer service representative at the company recommended she seek outside legal counsel to resolve the problem.
  • Shopify, which went public in 2015, helps small businesses join the e-commerce boom.
  • See more stories on Insider's business page.

Small business-owner Andi Rosenberg lost tens of thousands of dollars last year when her Shopify account was hacked.

Starting on November 23, 2020, payments from her Shopify sales began being deposited in an unknown bank account without Rosenberg's knowledge. On her Shopify account, Rosenberg could see the daily sales being paid out. But, her bank account, which she only checks once a month, wasn't getting any of the payouts.

On December 29, a Shopify support specialist emailed her about "detected suspicious login activity," and she needed to confirm her bank account and identity. That's when Rosenberg checked her own bank account and saw she was missing thousands of dollars from her Shopify sales.

She was sick to her stomach, and has been since.

She confirmed her identity and her bank account with Shopify over the course of several days via emails, which were viewed by Insider. The company eventually gave her the payouts from December 30 to January 14, which had been frozen by Shopify until she could confirm her identity and account. The payouts added up to $22,816, based on payment confirmations provided to Insider.

But she was still missing $55,656 in payouts made to the hacker's bank account for the pay period from November 23 to December 29. She said when the Shopify account was apparently first hacked in November, she never received a notification that her bank information was changed.

"I'm a small business; you could put me out of business," she said she told customer service on the phone. "It's just sickening."

Rosenberg, owner of clothing and jewelry line Hipchik, has sold her products through department stores for years. In 2018, she opened a Shopify account and loved it.

As store sales dwindled, Shopify helped her get through the pandemic, and she had her best year yet online, selling nearly $1 million of merchandise.

Since the missing payments, she says she's spoken to Shopify's customer service and the legal team and even reached out to company executives on LinkedIn. In an email seen by Insider, a customer service representative said the legal team could not give Rosenberg advice. The representative added that, "At this point I recommend that you proceed with private legal counsel in order to work towards recovering missing funds, and moving in a productive direction with this investigation."

She has been in talks with outside lawyers to see if they can help get her payments back, but she's worried about the legal fees on top of the losses she already incurred.

Insider asked if Shopify knows how frequently sellers' accounts are hacked, what security measures are in place, and how sellers can get their money back if it's stolen. "At Shopify, we take the privacy and security of our merchants very seriously," a spokesperson said. "We go to great lengths to help merchants manage their accounts more securely by providing guidelines and recommendations. We recommend that all merchants enable two-factor authentication to provide a more secure login process and to help prevent unauthorized access to a merchant's admin."

The company did not comment on Rosenberg's case, or answer questions as to why it took several weeks to notice suspicious logins on her account and why the company has not reimbursed her for her lost payments.

Shopify, based in Ottowa, Canada, is an e-commerce company that's known for helping small business owners attract customers online. Fakespot analyzed Shopify, which went public in 2015, and found that about a fifth of sellers deserved a "caution" or "warning" sign for activities like selling fraudulent products or not delivering items. Shopify told Insider that it has closed thousands of stores, and it regularly implements new measures to address fraud or other violations.

Shopify sellers have also faced fraud from buyers, who order personalized products and then ask for refunds. In 2018, Shopify rolled out a prevention system to protect sellers from these fraudulent buyers, TechCrunch reported.

If you're a seller and believe you have lost money on Shopify because of a stolen or hacked account, reach out to the reporter of this article, Natasha Dailey at ndailey@businessinsider.com.

Read the original article on Business Insider

[Author: ndailey@businessinsider.com (Natasha Dailey)]

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Wed, 17 Mar 2021 13:08:17 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs News Small Business Trends E-commerce Hacking Retail Shopify Rosenberg Ottowa Canada Fakespot Natasha Dailey Lucas Jackson Shopify Andi Rosenberg Hipchik
Does Your Small Business Need a Trademark or Copyright? http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/noobpreneur/~3/m4IYMb9Kb-0/ One of the most important things a small business owner can do is protect its intellectual property. Registering a trademark or copyright allows businesses to protect their IP and receive… Read more »

The post Does Your Small Business Need a Trademark or Copyright? appeared first on Noobpreneur.com.

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Wed, 17 Mar 2021 05:14:01 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Business Legal Small Business Copyright Intellectual Property Trademark Business Advice
The best headsets for Zoom http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/digitaltrends/~3/eke8S28TWH0/ ]]> Tue, 16 Mar 2021 18:54:13 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Android Small Business Trends Computing Sony Logitech Wired Bose Buying Guides Brand Fonts: Why Some Website Typeface Combinations Look So Stunning http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/BigBrandSystem/~3/qztEbFi2e5k/ Your “brand voice?” It start with your brand fonts!

And the #1 place to start using your brand fonts is on your website.

There are two companies offering you the ability to customize the typefaces on your website, and they’re easy — and often free — to use.

In this post, you’re going to get the resources you need to use beautiful brand fonts on your website — plus five tips that will show you how to combine website typefaces like a pro.

Google Fonts is free and offers a robust collection of open-source typefaces suitable to standing in as your brand fonts.

Adobe Fonts (formerly Typekit) is a commercial solution that’s reasonably priced, and offers a wide range of beautiful brand fonts.

Adobe Fonts includes collections from major type foundries and typeface designers.

On this blog, I switched from the web standard Georgia to Gentium Book Basic, which is a Google font that’s classic and easy-to-read.

Fresh fonts served daily

Both services work in a similar fashion: typefaces are “served” up onto users’ machines, much the way websites are served on the internet.

Users don’t need to have the typeface installed in order to see it used on a web page.

So many font decisions!

In the early days of the internet, you wouldn’t expect to see your exact brand fonts on your website — it’s usually wasn’t available.

Now? Web typography is as powerful as print typography in terms of choice and the ability to customize the look of your website.

Does all this choice seem overwhelming?

The easiest way to pinpoint what fonts to consider is to first pinpoint your brand personality. Fortunately, I have a quick quiz that will help:

Related: How to Define Your Brand Personality: Start with this Quick Quiz

There are two main brand personality categories. Do you know yours now?

If so, then you should know which brand fonts will work for your website.

Now let’s go over the best way to combine and use brand fonts — I’m about to share a few closely guarded design secrets!

Are you working on your branding? Register for my FREE visual marketing workshop How many fonts should a brand have?

In order to maintain visual consistency, pick two fonts — just two.

It’s easier for your visitor to notice, absorb and remember two brand fonts than it is three, or four or more.

Spend some time picking out two versatile brand font styles and you’ll have what you need to establish a memorable visual brand.

Related: What Font Should You Use to Brand Your Business?

The easiest way to do this is to pick one font for your text, and a different font for your headlines and subheads.

Your text font should be highly readable. This is where the bulk of your information will be conveyed, so you need to be sure it’s clear and easy on the eyes.

Your headline font will be used in smaller doses, so it can be slightly more challenging to read, or more decorative.

Mix and match brand font styles

A great way to decide which styles combine well is to study their letter forms.

Look at two things: size and shape.

One will affect readability, and the other will help you combine different typefaces. Pick your text typeface first (it’s more important), then look for a headline style that will work with it.

Large x-height=readability

When looking for a text typeface, notice the space between the baseline the letters stand on, and the tops of lower case letters or the “bowls” on letters like b and h.

This is called the x-height.

brand marketing includes choosing a readable typeface

It’s easier to read text fonts when they have a large x-height rather than a small one.

Related: Are You Falling for Font Falsehoods? What Matters for Picking the Best Font Size

Typefaces with compact x-heights tend to close up visually at a distance, making them hard to decipher.

Both Google Fonts and Adobe Fonts offer you the ability to view text blocks set in the style you’re considering. Be sure to check readability at small sizes.

How to choose two brand fonts that look great together like a pro graphic designer

You’ve picked out a text typeface with a nice, large x-height. Now you want to combine it with a headline style, but where should you start?

First, try looking at the letter forms in the text typeface you chose. Look closely at the letters a, g and e.

For the best blend, look for typefaces that draw the letters a, g and e similarly. In the examples below, the serif typeface on the first line combines best with the second sans serif example. The serif typeface on the second line combines best with the first sans serif example.

brand marketing includes choosing good typeface combinations

Related: How to Choose and Combine Fonts

Another brand font tip the pros use

Another direction you can take things is to make your headline text dramatically different from your body text. Don’t try to match letter forms: make them obviously different.

In the example below, notice how the headline typeface is dramatically different, yet this combination works, too.

brand marketing includes choosing typefaces that combine well Warning! Don’t make your brand fonts wishy-washy

The worst thing you can do is to almost match your letter forms.

In the realm of graphic design, something that almost matches looks like a mistake.

Be decisive: either make your letter forms match closely, or make them dramatically different.

See the example below for an almost-match that doesn’t quite work.

brand marketing includes avoiding typefaces without definite contrast Get daring with your website typeface choices

Rock your typography like a pro!

Use the tips above to get started. Visit Google Fonts or Adobe Fonts and follow their instructions for bringing custom brand fonts to life on your website.

Have you see my free visual marketing workshop yet?

If you’re working on creating a beautiful visual brand, my free workshop will show you how to combine brand fonts, brand colors, and images to creating stunning, memorable visual marketing.

Best of all, it’s FREE — and you can watch it the moment you sign up!

Editor’s note: This post was originally published on August 26, 2010 and has been updated with the latest links and information — enjoy!

The post Brand Fonts: Why Some Website Typeface Combinations Look So Stunning appeared first on BIG Brand System.

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Sun, 14 Mar 2021 14:30:00 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Google Design Small Business Typography Marketing Georgia Typefaces Fonts Consistency Branding Don Google Fonts Visual Brand Adobe Fonts Visit Google Fonts
How to Start a Consulting Business in 2021: The Definitive Guide https://www.crowdspring.com/blog/how-to-start-a-consulting-business/

This definitive step-by-step guide includes actionable and proven strategies and insights to help you start and grow a successful consulting business.]]>
Sat, 13 Mar 2021 12:49:54 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Startups Small Business Sales Starting A Business
How to Start a Photography Business in 2021: The Definitive Guide https://www.crowdspring.com/blog/how-to-start-a-photography-business/

Learn how to start a photography business with this definitive guide, which includes actionable and proven strategies and insights.]]>
Thu, 11 Mar 2021 13:25:01 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Startups Small Business Sales
Irish retailers can build an online presence with Pointy http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/CuwlfspX9Kc/ As a Dublin native who started a company to help small retailers get online, I’ve seen local retailers adapt to many situations. It’s safe to say that the pandemic has brought challenges unlike any other, and we’ve seen it directly affect many of our favorite local shops.

Due to lockdown restrictions, it’s become critical for brick-and-mortar retailers to be visible online. I also know firsthand how helpful it is to be able to search online and see what a store has in stock prior to heading out of the house. 

But sharing in-store inventory online can be challenging for smaller businesses, as they may not have the resources to build and maintain an e-commerce platform. Pointy from Google meets that need by creating an online presence for these retailers to help them showcase their product offering and potentially reach new customers. 

Starting today for a limited time, Pointy from Google will offer free Pointy devices to qualifying small and medium retailers in Ireland, enabling them to display their in-store products online. Irish retailers who connect with Pointy within the next six months will also get €100 ad credit to trial Pointy’s Product Ads feature.  

Pointy works by creating a connection between physical stores and Google so that their products can appear in local Google search results, which can help attract shoppers in the surrounding area to the store. Retailers don’t have to do any extra work: As they scan items to be sold, the products are added to their Business Profile on Google Search and Maps so that potential customers can easily see them.

Scan your products, display products on Google, help shoppers find you

Shoppers are actively supporting local retailers: 66% of people who shop local say they are doing so in a conscious effort to support local businesses. Displaying products on their stores’ Business Profiles will help Irish retailers tap into that sentiment as consumers can see that the products they are searching for online can be bought locally.

Quote from John Feely, Feely's Total Health Pharmacy, Galway: "Pointy has put us in reach of an audience online that would often pass us by."

COVID-19 continues to challenge retailers, and the economic impact on small and medium businesses has been severe. Google is committed to helping these businesses recover. With a 100% increase in  searches for “available near me” since last year, this new tool will help Irish retailers reach more customers and drive footfall to local stores and shops. 

Pointy can be used via a device that is plugged into a business’s point-of-sale (POS) system, or through the Pointy app, depending on the system. Pointy will be offering free devices to qualifying Irish businesses up until September 30, 2021. To find out more and sign up, retailers should visit: pointy.com/ireland.

[Author: Mark Cummins]

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Wed, 10 Mar 2021 02:00:00 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Google Small Business Ireland Dublin Google Ads Google in Europe Mark Cummins Pointy
QuickBooks vs NetSuite: Which accounting software is king? http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/digitaltrends/~3/Nxq7dqJA-Sk/ ]]> Tue, 09 Mar 2021 15:01:09 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Deals Sponsored Small Business Trends Deal Netsuite QuickBooks Accounting Software Cloud-based Accounting Software #628 Jeff Immelt, Former CEO of GE, Interrogates Himself http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/BarryMoltzBlog/~3/D-QVu9iWQXA/ Listen to “#628 Jeff Immelt, Former CEO of GE, Interrogates Himself” on Spreaker.
     

On this episode of The Small Business Radio Show…

SEGMENT 1 with Jeff Immelt, starting at 0:00: Many former CEOs write books after they retire. But no one has written a book like former GE CEO Jeff Immelt. He cites both his accomplishments and shortcomings in what has been called the most honest book that’s ever been written by a former CEO of a large organization. He’s here to share stories from the book that will help small business owners.

SEGMENT 2 with Ramon Ray, starting at 18:00: The new “it” social media platform is called Clubhouse. What is it and how can small business owners use it to talk to prospects and grow their business?

SEGMENT 3 with Martin Diamond, starting at 35:15: One of the biggest problems of our time is the hate and conflict that is happening on all social media platforms every day. Martin Diamond came up with a solution with his positive social media app Kindli.

Sponsored by AT&T Business

More on each segment below.

 

Segment 1: Jeff Immelt is the former CEO of GE. He is the author of the new book, “Hot Seat: What I Learned Leading a Great American Company.”

1:15 – Your second day on the job was Sept 11. How did this affect your tenure at GE?

2:30 – Why did you write a book about your time at GE?

4:00 – How do you make decisions in the midst of so much uncertainty?

6:15 – Transforming a big legacy company requires persistence.

7:15 – What impact did Jack Welch, the man you succeeded, have on your tenure as CEO?

8:30 – Leaders show up. How do you get comfortable with not knowing all the answers?

10:00 – Leaders persevere in crisis. How can leaders persevere through the COVID-19 crisis?

12:30 – Leaders are optimistic. What was your favorite part of leading GE?

14:00 – What is your outlook for business this year?

Segment 2: Ramon Ray is an entrepreneur who started four companies and sold two of them (last one just this year). He’s published four books, the latest – “Celebrity CEO – How Entrepreneurs Can Thrive by Building Community and a Strong Personal Brand.”

20:00 – What is Clubhouse? How does it work?

24:00 – What’s the benefit of being on Clubhouse?

25:30 – How can you make connections with prospects on Clubhouse?

27:15 – What’s the difference between Clubs and Rooms? Are the subjects of the Clubhouse rooms constant?

29:15 – What are the best practices for making the most out of Clubhouse?

32:00 – How would you rate Clubhouse among other social media platforms?

33:30 – How do you get an invite to join Clubhouse?

Martin Diamond on The Small Business radio Show

Segment 3: Martin Diamond is a digital media guru and father of three. He has been working in the web, mobile and digital space for 20 years. Concerned about social media’s toxic culture and the inevitable exposure to hate and conflict for his family, Martin was inspired to create Kindli after watching a Youtube video of a dad building a roller coaster in his backyard as an elaborate gift to his children. Martin is the sole founder and CEO of VURIA, LLC, a leading digital media firm based in Scottsdale, AZ since 2001.

35:15 – Why did you decide to tackle social media’s toxic culture?

37:45 – What are the three main problems with social media?

38:45 – What steps does Kindli take to address the main problems of social media?

41:45 – Why did Facebook and Twitter’s online culture get out of hand?

45:00 – What does Kindli do that no other social media platform does?

48:00 – Facebook and Twitter are starting to take proactive measures to fight toxic culture online. Will this help?

49:45 – How has Kindli been doing since its launch?

Sponsored by AT&T Business

More episodes of The Small Business Radio Show

The post #628 Jeff Immelt, Former CEO of GE, Interrogates Himself appeared first on Barry Moltz.

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Mon, 08 Mar 2021 23:55:16 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Facebook Leadership Ge Small Business Sales Social Media Crisis Radio Show Uncertainty Martin Jeff Immelt Jack Welch Scottsdale AZ Ramon Ray Building Community Small Business Radio Show Jeff Immelt He Martin Diamond Kindli VURIA LLC AT T Business More
Digital Marketing Tips for Small Businesses http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/hoteladvisor/~3/WIoFvOlahuU/ Digital marketing allows you to extend your market reach and connect with an enormous audience....

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Mon, 08 Mar 2021 15:25:51 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Small Business Seo Digital Marketing Sponsored Post Digital Marketing Tips
Eight women kicking butt and taking (domain) names http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/Dkx7pMp4pRA/ Who do you think of when you hear the words sister, daughter, mother? How about when the words are leader, founder, CEO? As a mom of three, I want my kids to grow up in a world where the second set of words is as likely as the first to bring a woman to mind. Which is why we’re elevating the voices of women and making sure their stories are heard in today’s #MyDomain series. On this International Women’s Day, Google Registry is sharing eight new videos — all featuring female leaders who are taking care of business on their .app and .dev domains. 

Alice Truswell Alice Truswell is co-founder of Snoop.app, a money-saving app. “Fear being forgettable more than fearing not fitting in,” she says, “because the earlier you get comfortable with your voice, the earlier you can start refining results.” A video interview with Alice Truswell 10:25 Annie Hwang Annie Hwang is co-founder of Jemi.app, a company that helps creators and public figures interact with their audiences and make money. “Don't let imposter syndrome ever stop you,” she advises. “We've grown up in a society where we are constantly told that we should be a follower. Don't be a follower anymore; be a leader!” A video interview with Annie Hwang 10:25 Elena Czubiak Elena Czubiak is the developer and designer behind saturdaydesign.dev and co-founder of imaginarie.app. She quit her day job in 2018 to start her own business and hasn’t looked back since. Elena says, "Remember that although it might feel like starting over, you'll quickly see that your unique experiences will help you solve problems and make connections that nobody else could." A video interview with Elena Czubiak 10:25 Ifrah Khan Ifrah Khan is co-founder of Clubba.app, a platform that provides virtual creative extracurricular clubs (led by college students) for kids ages 6 to 12.  Ifrah encourages entrepreneurial women to find and connect with other women who are also working on their own ventures. “Really talk to them and get to know their journey,” she says. “If they fundraised, how did they fundraise? Fundraising is so hard when you start your own business in general, but as a woman it’s even harder.” A video interview with Ifrah Khan 10:25 Rita Kozlov

Rita Kozlov is a product manager who leads the Cloudflare Workers product, which uses the workers.dev domain. Rita’s advice for women who want to become a product manager is, “Don’t be afraid to ask lots of questions. In product management that’s definitely 100% a strength and never a weakness.”

A video interview with Rita Kozlov 10:25 Romina Arrigoni Samsó  Romina Arrigoni Samsó is founder and CEO of ADDSKIN.app, a social marketplace for skincare, where community recommendations help customers choose the best products. Romina says, “La gracia de la tecnología es que como dice el dicho, el avión se construye en el aire. Lo importante es lanzarse,” which translates to, “The grace of technology is that, as the saying goes, the plane is built in the air. The important thing is to launch.” Romina Arrigoni Samsó 10:25 Soraya Jaber

Soraya Jaber is co-founder and CEO of Minsar.app, a no-code AR-VR creative and publishing platform. “We don't care about your age, your gender, your race, or sexual orientation — there is no space where you are not allowed,” Soraya says.“Don't hinder yourself, jump into entrepreneurship. I can assure you that's a hell of a great adventure!”

A video interview with Soraya Jaber 10:25 Stefania Olafsdóttir Stefania Olafsdóttir is the co-founder and CEO of Avo.app, a next-generation analytics governance company. Her advice? “It’s way more important to be brave than to be perfect.” A video interview with Stefania Olafsdóttir 10:25

To see a special video featuring all these amazing women, check out goo.gle/mydomain. If you have a unique story to share about a .app, .dev, or .page domain and would like to be considered for our series, please fill out this short application form. Here’s to helping tell the stories of women everywhere so that we may inspire generations to come.

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21 websites and apps to make your 2021 better

Twenty-one websites and apps on .new, .app, .page, and .dev domains to check out in the new year.

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These Black tech creators are changing the domain

In honor of Black History Month, the Google Registry team is featuring six Black creators on their #MyDomain video series.

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[Author: Christina Yeh]

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Mon, 08 Mar 2021 12:00:00 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Small Business Entrepreneurs Developers Soraya Don Elena Rita Romina Diversity and Inclusion Ifrah Google Registry Christina Yeh Alice Truswell Alice Truswell Annie Hwang Annie Hwang Elena Czubiak Elena Czubiak Ifrah Khan Ifrah Khan Clubba Rita Kozlov Rita Kozlov Romina Arrigoni Samsó Romina Arrigoni Samsó Soraya Jaber Soraya Jaber Stefania Olafsdóttir Stefania Olafsdóttir
How Google is helping Latina business owners like me http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/dIJVSMSY64k/ Making the leap to start a small business is daunting, to say the least. But I had a crazy dream and the drive to see it through, so in 2013 I left my law career and created Reina Rebelde, a makeup brand focused on Latinas. Latinas are a of cosmetics consumers, but corporate brands were selling to us in a way that lacked authenticity. I felt like they were taking us for granted. With Reina Rebelde, I wanted to create products and a brand that celebrates Latinas and our diverse heritage. 


I had to learn so much to get this company started, but one of the most important steps I took was to make sure I was making the most of digital tools. My website is critical to sharing our mission and showcasing our products. I use insights from Google Analytics to help me understand changing shopping habits and demands so I can best optimize my website to meet the needs of my customers. As the business has grown, Google Workspace tools like Gmail, Google Meet and Google Drive have been instrumental in ensuring my team is always connected and engaged with customers, especially now that we’re all working from home. 


The pandemic has shown us that it’s crucial to be able to quickly pivot and be flexible. I know that many businesses in my community are struggling right now: 32% of Latino-owned businesses have been forced to close due to COVID-19. So I wanted to share some resources, available in both Spanish and English, to help businesses learn how to best use digital tools and stand out online. 


  • Google for Small Business is now available in Spanish. This tool gives small business owners a personalized plan with recommendations for the right Google products to help your business meet its goals.  

  • Grow with Google has a library of free, on-demand workshops in Spanish, for business owners in a variety of industries and of all skill levels. 

  • Grow with Google has Digital Coaches based in 20 cities who regularly host workshops in English and Spanish specifically designed to help Latino and Black business owners thrive online. Coaches like Mary Rábago in Phoenix, Arizona, teach Latino entrepreneurs how to build a searchable website, use Google tools to stay productive and use tools, like YouTube or Google Maps, to connect with customers. 

  • If you're a local business that identifies as women-led, you can add the attribute to your Business Profile on Google. By doing so, your business can potentially appear for users on Google Maps and Search who search for queries like “women-led shops” or “women-led restaurants.”

Google para Empresas Pequeñas

g.co/empresaspequenas

Owning my own business has been such a challenging and rewarding experience. This International Women’s Day, I’m celebrating all of my fellow women business owners who are working hard to make their dreams a reality and their communities a better place.

[Author: Regina Merson]

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Mon, 08 Mar 2021 07:00:00 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Google Small Business Google Analytics Google Maps PHOENIX Arizona Regina Merson Reina Rebelde Grow With Google Digital Coaches Mary Rábago
Tips to Ensuring the Security of Your Small Business https://gadgetadvisor.com/gadgets/tips-to-ensuring-the-security-of-your-small-business Ensuring the safety of your small business is not only restricted to securing online data; you also have…

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Mon, 08 Mar 2021 05:42:07 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Security Gadgets Small Business Security Cameras