Bloglikes - Snowboarding https://www.bloglikes.com/c/snowboarding en-US Thu, 26 Nov 2020 12:20:40 +0000 Sat, 06 Apr 2013 00:00:00 +0000 FeedWriter 12 best gifts for skiers and snowboarders 2020 http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/digitaltrends/~3/mcnkQoBftuE/ ]]> Wed, 04 Nov 2020 18:25:50 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Outdoors Trends Skiing Snowboarding Holiday Gifting 2020 Resort review of Le Gets and Chatel in France http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheSkiingDepartment/~3/nIg5pfISnWU/ Portes du Soleil is a vast ski area that spans over France and Switzerland. Having experienced the bigger resorts of the area that are Morzine and Avoriaz, I was eager to experience the smaller French resorts of Les Gets and Chatel.

Les Gets

Nestled in the valley next to Morzine, Les Gets is a beautifully compact village with genuine French charm.  On one side the local slopes are shared with Morzine, and on the other is the isolated slopes of Mont Chery. Both sides can be reached by the free to ride ‘Petit train’ that travels across the short distance of the village.

Before I arrived in Les Gets, the snow conditions were bad. Luckily, I must have pleased the snow gods as it dumped it down almost as soon as I arrived and carried on snowing throughout the night. When I woke up the next morning the sun was out, and the mountains had a new fresh duvet of snow – It was going to be a powder day!

To make the most of the conditions we decided to head over to Mont Chery. A fast chair lift later we had a choice of red and black runs of mainly untracked powder. For a warm-up I hit the red a couple of times that headed straight down to Les Gets. Having said that I hardly stayed on the piste as it was so much fun snowboarding in the powder on the sides.

Dropping down the other side from the top of the chair lift was an untracked black run. Surfing the pow whilst making fresh lines on this run was the most fun I had that day. Despite the amazing snow conditions Mont Chery was mainly deserted! Where else would you have that on a powder day?

The Morzine side of the valley was busier but hardly crowded. The powder was starting to get tracked making the runs a bit choppy. This made some of the red and black runs challenging but gave a different dimension to the experience which I thoroughly enjoyed.

Halfway up on the slopes from the base station is the beginners area which is easily reached via a gondola. This is an ideal location for all the ski schools and for beginners to cut their teeth on the slopes. Learning in the mountains rather than at the bottom gives a much better and real experience and a real feel to what skiing or snowboarding is all about.

Off the slopes Les Gets is a lot quieter than Morzine but does have a couple of decent apres ski bars with live music.

For those achy muscles after a hard day on the slopes it is always good to hit the spa. Luckily for me there was a newly opened spa in the same complex as our apartment. I am not really into Spas but I did enjoy the SPA Sources du Chery. It has everything you could want for a spa but the standout feature was the sensory shower. Just set the shower to one of 5 sensory settings such as ‘tropical rainforest shower’, close your eyes and you are treated to the sensation of the rain, smells and sounds.

Le Gets off piste

Portes du Soleil

On our second day we decided to explore the Portes du Soleil ski area in greater detail. Starting from Les Gets we headed over the valleys of Morzine, Avoriaz, before dropping down into Switzerland for lunch.

We clocked up quite a lot of mileage and had to keep moving to make it over in time. From treelined cruisy blues to technical reds and blacks there was something for everyone. Although snowboarders beware as there are a few flat runs where you need to keep your speed up and make sure you have your board waxed.

Having Lunch in Switzerland was a unique experience, but vegans beware! There is a vast difference between the French and Swiss restaurants when it comes to being vegan friendly. Basically, the French, overall, have now embraced veganism but it is not even on the radar with the Swiss.

After lunch we headed back over into France and down to the resort of Chatel where we were going to stay for the next few days.

En-route I had to check out one of the many snow parks in the area. There are snowparks and boardercross runs across Portes du Soleil for all abilities. From the famous Stash park at Avoriaz, to fun runs for the little ones. The one I hit at Les Crosets had fun intermediate kickers that rolled effortlessly to one another. Followed by wide and curvy benches which were easy and great fun.

Chatel off piste

Chatel

Chatel is a micro village resort on the boarder of France and Switzerland. This lovely, picturesque village that is typically French which is surprising as it on the Swiss border.

During the night we were blessed with another snow dump and by the morning the conditions were perfect. With much anticipation I met up with my guide Jerome who couldn’t wait to show me the best powder.

It didn’t take long to find it! A delightful black run on the Swiss side of the mountain with untracked and treelined powder to the side of it. Effortlessly surfing over a metre of super soft snow was easily some of the most fun hours I have ever had snowboarding!

I spent a couple of hours lapping the run via a drag lift. Most of the lifts on this side of Chatel are drag lifts, but the resort does have a new fast 6-seater ski lift that takes you up 1970m in style and comfort.

It can be argued that overall the lift infrastructure of Chatel needs upgrading and it does feel a throwback to how most of the Portes du Soleil probably was in another era. But to me this is what gives Chatel an authentic and raw charm that is somewhat lacking in most modern ski resorts.

Chatel review in France

Accommodation

In Les Gets we were lucky enough to stay at the newly built and ultra-modern Chalet Coin Perdu. Just a short walk from the main hub and ski lifts of Les Gets, the large designer chalet was immaculate with attention to detail.

From the bar, American pool table, to the wireless entertainment hub which includes speakers throughout and a cinema screen, we had absolutely no reason the leave the chalet in the evenings.

Especially with catering company youchaletchef.com cooking our breakfasts and an evening meals.

Having said that, heading up to the mountain restaurant of La Grande Ourse in the evening is a must. Only accessible by transportation of a piste-basher, enjoy incredible 360 degrees scenery at sunset before sitting down to a feast.

The English family that run the restaurant really go out of the way to make the experience special. The menu is set but vegans and vegetarians are well looked after with delightful cuisine.

Le Gets chalet

In Chatel we stayed at the four star hotel Macchi. This wonderful family run hotel just oozes character and its history is woven into the very tapestry that is Chatel.

This is typified with the Indian décor themed spa and relaxation room. Inspired by adopted Indian members of the family, it is beautifully furnished and instantly takes you to a different time and continent.

The rooms are huge! The bathroom had a large power shower over the bath which is nice and modern. The beds are very large and comfortable – what more do you want for a good nights sleep!

The hotel restaurant is large with a varied menu. Vegan options are not in abundance on the menu for the staff and chefs are very accommodating and will rustle something up on request.

Chatel hotel spa

Final Thoughts of Les Gets and Chatel

Les Gets and Chatel are very different resorts. Not only to each other but also to the rest of Portes du Soleil showcasing how diversely wonderful the ski area is.

Les Gets is the little sister of Morzine. But that is not to say it is inferior as in many ways I prefer it. The village is compact with plenty of Gaelic charm and has everything you need including a couple of lively bars and decent restaurants.

The resort is also the perfect gateway to Portes du Soleil, as well as offering beautifully uncrowded slopes on the other side of the valley. This really is the best of both worlds.

On the other hand, Chatel has a rustic French feel that is unapologetically unmodernised. Beginner snowboarders may struggle with all the drag lifts, but for the experienced skiers and snowboarders this is the land of opportunity. Especially on a powder day!

For more information visit the Portes du Soleil official tourism website.

 

 

The post Resort review of Le Gets and Chatel in France appeared first on Snow.Guide.

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Thu, 20 Aug 2020 06:58:09 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Review France Sport Skiing Switzerland Expert Snowboarding Intermediate Beginner France Ski Holiday Avoriaz Morzine Soleil Jerome Macchi Châtel Portes du Soleil Ski Resort Reviews Portes Les Gets Morzine Les Gets Chatel Holiday Le Gets Holiday Skiing In Chatel Skiing In Le Gets Snowboarding In Chatel Snowboarding In Le Gets Le Gets Chatel Les Mont Chery Morzine Avoriaz Les Crosets Chatel Chatel La Grande Ourse Chatel Les Gets
Resort Review Of Les Gets And Chatel In France http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheSkiingDepartment/~3/QQo3hXoULbQ/ Portes du Soleil is a vast ski area that spans over France and Switzerland. Having experienced the bigger resorts of the area that are Morzine and Avoriaz, I was eager to experience the smaller French resorts of Les Gets and Chatel.

Les Gets

Nestled in the valley next to Morzine, Les Gets is a beautifully compact village with genuine French charm.  On one side the local slopes are shared with Morzine, and on the other is the isolated slopes of Mont Chery. Both sides can be reached by the free to ride ‘Petit train’ that travels across the short distance of the village.

Before I arrived in Les Gets, the snow conditions were bad. Luckily, I must have pleased the snow gods as it dumped it down almost as soon as I arrived and carried on snowing throughout the night. When I woke up the next morning the sun was out, and the mountains had a new fresh duvet of snow – It was going to be a powder day!

To make the most of the conditions we decided to head over to Mont Chery. A fast chair lift later we had a choice of red and black runs of mainly untracked powder. For a warm-up I hit the red a couple of times that headed straight down to Les Gets. Having said that I hardly stayed on the piste as it was so much fun snowboarding in the powder on the sides.

Dropping down the other side from the top of the chair lift was an untracked black run. Surfing the pow whilst making fresh lines on this run was the most fun I had that day. Despite the amazing snow conditions Mont Chery was mainly deserted! Where else would you have that on a powder day?

The Morzine side of the valley was busier but hardly crowded. The powder was starting to get tracked making the runs a bit choppy. This made some of the red and black runs challenging but gave a different dimension to the experience which I thoroughly enjoyed.

Halfway up on the slopes from the base station is the beginners area which is easily reached via a gondola. This is an ideal location for all the ski schools and for beginners to cut their teeth on the slopes. Learning in the mountains rather than at the bottom gives a much better and real experience and a real feel to what skiing or snowboarding is all about.

Off the slopes Les Gets is a lot quieter than Morzine but does have a couple of decent apres ski bars with live music.

For those achy muscles after a hard day on the slopes it is always good to hit the spa. Luckily for me there was a newly opened spa in the same complex as our apartment. I am not really into Spas but I did enjoy the SPA Sources du Chery. It has everything you could want for a spa but the standout feature was the sensory shower. Just set the shower to one of 5 sensory settings such as ‘tropical rainforest shower’, close your eyes and you are treated to the sensation of the rain, smells and sounds.

Le Gets off piste

Portes du Soleil

On our second day we decided to explore the Portes du Soleil ski area in greater detail. Starting from Les Gets we headed over the valleys of Morzine, Avoriaz, before dropping down into Switzerland for lunch.

We clocked up quite a lot of mileage and had to keep moving to make it over in time. From treelined cruisy blues to technical reds and blacks there was something for everyone. Although snowboarders beware as there are a few flat runs where you need to keep your speed up and make sure you have your board waxed.

Having Lunch in Switzerland was a unique experience, but vegans beware! There is a vast difference between the French and Swiss restaurants when it comes to being vegan friendly. Basically, the French, overall, have now embraced veganism but it is not even on the radar with the Swiss.

After lunch we headed back over into France and down to the resort of Chatel where we were going to stay for the next few days.

En-route I had to check out one of the many snow parks in the area. There are snowparks and boardercross runs across Portes du Soleil for all abilities. From the famous Stash park at Avoriaz, to fun runs for the little ones. The one I hit at Les Crosets had fun intermediate kickers that rolled effortlessly to one another. Followed by wide and curvy benches which were easy and great fun.

Chatel off piste

Chatel

Chatel is a micro village resort on the boarder of France and Switzerland. This lovely, picturesque village that is typically French which is surprising as it on the Swiss border.

During the night we were blessed with another snow dump and by the morning the conditions were perfect. With much anticipation I met up with my guide Jerome who couldn’t wait to show me the best powder.

It didn’t take long to find it! A delightful black run on the Swiss side of the mountain with untracked and treelined powder to the side of it. Effortlessly surfing over a metre of super soft snow was easily some of the most fun hours I have ever had snowboarding!

I spent a couple of hours lapping the run via a drag lift. Most of the lifts on this side of Chatel are drag lifts, but the resort does have a new fast 6-seater ski lift that takes you up 1970m in style and comfort.

It can be argued that overall the lift infrastructure of Chatel needs upgrading and it does feel a throwback to how most of the Portes du Soleil probably was in another era. But to me this is what gives Chatel an authentic and raw charm that is somewhat lacking in most modern ski resorts.

Chatel review in France

Accommodation

In Les Gets we were lucky enough to stay at the newly built and ultra-modern Chalet Coin Perdu. Just a short walk from the main hub and ski lifts of Les Gets, the large designer chalet was immaculate with attention to detail.

From the bar, American pool table, to the wireless entertainment hub which includes speakers throughout and a cinema screen, we had absolutely no reason the leave the chalet in the evenings.

Especially with catering company youchaletchef.com cooking our breakfasts and an evening meals.

Having said that, heading up to the mountain restaurant of La Grande Ourse in the evening is a must. Only accessible by transportation of a piste-basher, enjoy incredible 360 degrees scenery at sunset before sitting down to a feast.

The English family that run the restaurant really go out of the way to make the experience special. The menu is set but vegans and vegetarians are well looked after with delightful cuisine.

Le Gets chalet

In Chatel we stayed at the four star hotel Macchi. This wonderful family run hotel just oozes character and its history is woven into the very tapestry that is Chatel.

This is typified with the Indian décor themed spa and relaxation room. Inspired by adopted Indian members of the family, it is beautifully furnished and instantly takes you to a different time and continent.

The rooms are huge! The bathroom had a large power shower over the bath which is nice and modern. The beds are very large and comfortable – what more do you want for a good nights sleep!

The hotel restaurant is large with a varied menu. Vegan options are not in abundance on the menu for the staff and chefs are very accommodating and will rustle something up on request.

Chatel hotel spa

Final Thoughts of Les Gets and Chatel

Les Gets and Chatel are very different resorts. Not only to each other but also to the rest of Portes du Soleil showcasing how diversely wonderful the ski area is.

Les Gets is the little sister of Morzine. But that is not to say it is inferior as in many ways I prefer it. The village is compact with plenty of Gaelic charm and has everything you need including a couple of lively bars and decent restaurants.

The resort is also the perfect gateway to Portes du Soleil, as well as offering beautifully uncrowded slopes on the other side of the valley. This really is the best of both worlds.

On the other hand, Chatel has a rustic French feel that is unapologetically unmodernised. Beginner snowboarders may struggle with all the drag lifts, but for the experienced skiers and snowboarders this is the land of opportunity. Especially on a powder day!

For more information visit the Portes du Soleil official tourism website.

The post Resort Review Of Les Gets And Chatel In France appeared first on Snow.Guide.

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Thu, 20 Aug 2020 06:58:09 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Review France Sport Skiing Switzerland Expert Snowboarding Intermediate Beginner France Ski Holiday Avoriaz Morzine Soleil Jerome Macchi Châtel Portes du Soleil Snowsports Holiday Advice Ski Resort Reviews Portes Les Gets Morzine Les Gets Chatel Holiday Skiing In Chatel Snowboarding In Chatel Chatel Les Mont Chery Morzine Avoriaz Les Crosets Chatel Chatel La Grande Ourse Chatel Les Gets Les Gets Holiday
Alex 'Chumpy' Pullin, Australian Olympian, drowns on Gold Coast https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2020/jul/08/australian-olympian-alex-chumpy-pullin-drowned-gold-coast The two-time world snowboarding champion, 32, has died after he was pulled unconscious from the water at Palm Beach

The Australian Olympian Alex “Chumpy” Pullin has drowned on the Gold Coast.

Police said a 32-year-old spearfisher had died after being pulled from the surf at Palm Beach on the Gold Coast.

Continue reading...]]>
Wed, 08 Jul 2020 01:21:17 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Sport Australia news Australia sport Winter Olympics Snowboarding Alex Palm Beach Gold Coast Police Pullin Gold Coast Continue Alex Chumpy Pullin
Panda RS1 ski goggle review http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheSkiingDepartment/~3/ZrzTgVCSVPE/ I have always had a problem with finding ski goggles that fit. They are either too big (I have a slim face) or it looks like I am wearing kids goggles! I have been wearing Panda Optics Cobalt goggles for the last few years and have been extremely happy with them. I was intrigued to review the Panda RS1 goggles to see what, if any, improvements have been made.

Panda RS1 goggles review

Looks are not everything but the Panda RS1 ski goggles are aesthetically stunning! Especially with the mirrored ocean blue lens which is uber cool.

Of course, it is not all about looking good (well, maybe in some Italian resorts it is!) and I was very pleased with how well they fitted.

They work well with or without a helmet (no judging – but you must be crazy if you don’t wear a helmet!). The goggles are also very comfortable to wear – even at the end of a hard day on the slopes.

The thin and frameless design gives excellent peripheral vision. This is very noticeable when snowboarding or skiing giving a much improved range of vision.

The lenses

The Panda RS1 goggles are supplied with 2 lenses. The polarised mirrored ocean blue lens not only looks cool, but is fantastic for those bluebird days with the sun high in the sky. They are also UV400+ rated so will protect your eyes.

The other lens supplied is for low light. This was perfect for when the sun starts dropping at the end of the day and the slopes are plunged into shadow. Usually I would struggle in these conditions but with the low light lens I could easily pick out the contours of the snow.

The new Panda RS1 goggles are even easier than the Cobalt goggles to change the lens. You simply pull off one lens utilising a little tab for grip, and snap the other lens into place. I easily managed to do this even with ski gloves on.

The lens is held secure by 8 magnetic points. Although easy to replace, the lens is held securely in place even after after a rag doll fall (okay, so I had to catch an edge just to test this out!).

Another feature worth mentioning is that the goggles have Integrated Guma® anti fog technology. It must work as not once did I have a problem with my goggles steaming up!

Panda RS1 goggles – Final thoughts

The Panda RS1 are my new go-to goggles. I love my Panda Cobalt goggles but these are even better!

They look great, fit well, the lenses are so easy to change over, and they are top quality at the fraction of the cost of better known brands.

The Panda RS1 goggles are supplied with a hard protective case, goggle bag and 2 lenses.

The fact that Panda Optics are a British brand is the icing on the cake!

Review Summary Panda RS1 goggles reviewed by Snow.Guide
Gender: Unisex
Good for: Skiing and Snowboarding
Price: £129
Rating: 9.5 out of 10

For a list of all features and more info

 

 

The post Panda RS1 ski goggle review appeared first on Snow.Guide.

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Wed, 01 Apr 2020 18:43:16 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Review Uncategorized Sport Goggles Ski Snowboard Skiing Snowboarding Test Magnetic Snowsports Equipment Guma Panda Optics Panda Optics Cobalt Polarised Lens Best Goggles British Brand
How Skiing Through a Pandemic Can Create a Community Crisis https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/29/sports/skiing/coronavirus-skiers-avalanche-warning.html Sun, 29 Mar 2020 13:36:33 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs News Colorado Canada Skiing Snowboarding Quarantines Coronavirus (2019-nCoV When Are Contracts of Adhesion Binding? http://www.slaw.ca/2020/03/11/when-are-contracts-of-adhesion-binding/ In the Internet age, contracts of adhesion are common. Consumers routinely confirm their acceptance to terms and conditions that they have not read or understood.

In Apps v. Grouse Mountain Resorts Ltd., 2020 BCCA 78, the court addressed when contracts of adhesion are binding. In this case, a snowboarder from Australia was injured in the terrain park. He brought an action for negligence, the failure to warn, and for breaching the Occupiers Liability Act. The BC Court of Appeal found that the trial judge erred in upholding the waiver.

The plaintiff Mr. Apps raised “an issue that has troubled the courts ever since the Industrial Revolution: under what circumstances is such a waiver in a contract of adhesion (where the consumer must take it or leave it) binding on the consumer? This has been of particular concern where the waiver includes words excluding liability for the service provider’s own negligence.”

In the case of Mr. Apps he did not click any buttons or sign any forms. So, what brought the terms of the waiver to his attention?

Above the ticket booth was a sign that contained the terms of the waiver: “… As a condition of use of the ski area and other facilities, the ticket holder assumes all risk of personal injury, death or property loss resulting from any cause whatsoever including but not limited to: the risks, dangers and hazards of skiing…”

The Court of Appeal held that the defendant Grouse Mountain could only contract out of its duty of care under the Occupiers Liability Act if it took reasonable steps to bring the waiver clause to the plaintiff’s attention. The court held that insufficient steps were taken to bring the waiver of liability clause to the plaintiff’s attention. The more onerous the term, the more steps that must be taken to bring attention to the terms.

At paragraph 84, Justice Grauer wrote that “ It will not avail the consumer to say, ‘I did not read the notice’, if the mountain took reasonable steps to draw the own negligence clause to the consumer’s attention. On the findings of the judge, it cannot be held to have done so.”

The trial judge was only permitted to consider what was posted on signs Mr. Apps could have seen at or before the time he purchased his ticket. “By the time Mr. Apps arrived at the Terrain Park, he had paid for his non-refundable ticket, taken the lift up the mountain, and had begun snowboarding. It was far too late to give notice of what was in the waiver. That had to be done at or before the ticket booth.”

After taking the “clear and easy to read” signs at the Terrain Park out of the equation, the court was left with the following findings from the trial judge.

• The sign at the ticket booth was “difficult to read”;

• The own negligence exclusion was “not highlighted or emphasized in any way”, but was buried in small print among many commas and semi-colons;

• “It is unrealistic to believe that a person approaching the ticket booth would stop in front of the window to read the sign.”

Interestingly, Mr. Apps also signed a season pass for Whistler Mountain. “Of course, having signed it, he would be bound by its terms in relation to Whistler Mountain notwithstanding that he did not read it.”

Justice Grauer held that only actual knowledge of the terms through previous dealings is relevant. In this case, previous dealings with Whistler was not relevant. Mr. Apps did not read the Whistler season pass agreement. Constructive knowledge did not apply, and could not impute knowledge to him for the Grouse Mountain.

Despite the thoroughness of the Court of Appeal’s decision, the question remains for contracts of adhesion formed over the Internet – under what circumstances should a waiver of liability be binding? How many people read and understand those terms? For example, how many people are actually consenting to apps selling their data?

(Views are my own and do not represent the views of any organization.)

 

 

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Wed, 11 Mar 2020 08:38:03 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Law Australia Whistler Snowboarding Terrain Park Substantive Law Waiver Whistler Mountain Grauer BC Court of Appeal Ski Hill Contracts Of Adhesion Enforceability Of Contract Of Adhesion Grouse Mountain Resorts Ltd
Free snowboarding on A Day For Jake http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/MatadorNetwork/~3/WoTo_RSHIIg/

Burton, the snowboard and clothing brand founded by the “father of snowboarding,” announced Wednesday that it will host a memorial for Jake Burton on Friday, March 13. As the man who brought snowboarding to the masses surely would have wanted his memorial to happen, it’s going to take place on slopes all over the world. Thirteen ski resorts will welcome riders with free lift tickets and a commemorative wristband on March 13, in an event dubbed “A Day For Jake.”

“Jake Burton Carpenter’s vision was to bring snowboarding to all,” the company said via the event’s website. “His dream, his perseverance and his generosity were his gift to the world. As an industry, and as a community we come together for this day to remember, reflect and ride. Together we open our doors and open our hearts to carry Jake’s spirit forward; to share our love of the mountains and the joy of a perfect turn.”

Riders must register to participate, and will receive a confirmation email from Burton that their ticket can be claimed at their specified resort’s ticket window on the day of the event. Participating ski areas in the US include:

  • Bear and Boreal mountains in California
  • Big Sky in Montana
  • Copper Mountain in Colorado
  • Stratton in Vermont
  • Snoqualmie in Washington
  • Boyne Mountain in Michigan

Resorts in Italy, Japan, Canada, Austria, France, and Switzerland are also participating. More like this: Near Zurich, Switzerland, world-class skiing is just another Saturday in winter

The post Burton to honor its founder with free day of snowboarding worldwide appeared first on Matador Network.

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Thu, 27 Feb 2020 14:30:24 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Travel US Switzerland Snowboarding All Burton Jake Zurich Switzerland Jake Burton Carpenter Jake Burton California Big Sky Montana Copper Mountain Colorado Stratton Vermont Snoqualmie Washington Boyne Mountain Michigan Resorts Italy Japan Canada Austria France
How skiers can reduce their impact http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/MatadorNetwork/~3/JTTSedKW5wc/

For skiers and snowboarders, a good day on the slopes is something to appreciate and look forward to. But visiting ski areas has an environmental impact, and it’s often up to the skier to ensure theirs is as minimal as possible. Follow these tips to keep your footprint small without sacrificing those epic turns.

Research gear before you buy. Ski equipment

Photo: gorillaimages/Shutterstock

Here, we’re referring not only to how the gear performs but to how the company performs on a sustainability level. Buying quality gear means it will last longer, giving you both value for your money and having a significantly lower impact than gear that needs to be replaced every year or two. Sustainably sourced clothing is available for every single piece of ski gear you need for a great day on the slopes. This can include the sourcing of the materials, the facilities and manner in which the gear is produced, and how far the gear has to travel to reach your doorstep. Shop with local brands when possible, and when that isn’t an option, look at the production process on a brand’s website before purchasing it. When in doubt, opt for gear from a company that is forthcoming about its sourcing and production practices, rather than from one that says nothing.

As mentioned above, a quality local producer is often more sustainable because the money is kept in your community and their goods aren’t shipped from across the world. But a number of legacy and other larger ski industry brands have taken massive steps in recent years to reduce their environmental impact and pass that possibility on to customers. Salomon is a ski brand that has been open about its production and sustainability practices, documenting its process of cutting emissions and sourcing sustainable production. On the snowboarding side, Burton is a longtime leader in both boards and outerwear, and Arbor Collective sources renewable wood for its boards as certified by the Forest Stewardship Council. For jackets and other outerwear, look to Patagonia, The North Face, and Picture Organic Clothing.

“The most sustainable product is the one that lasts,” says Jenn Swain, global senior sustainability manager at Burton. “Seek out high quality, durable gear that’s produced using fair labor practices and environmentally preferred materials, such as ethically sourced down insulation and recycled polyester.”

The brand applies this theory in practice, reducing the petroleum input required for its products. “All Burton snowboards are made with bio-based SuperSapTM resin which has a 33 percent lower carbon footprint compared with petroleum-based resins, our board cores contain responsibly sourced wood which promotes biodiversity conservation, and we have eliminated the use of lacquer which can be toxic to human and environmental health,” Swain says.

Carpool or take public transit to the mountain. St. Moritz, Switzerland

Photo: Chalermpon Poungpeth/Shutterstock

Most who have driven I-70 west of Denver or from Salt Lake City up Highway 210 during winter have experienced the frustration of bumper-to-bumper high country traffic. This is the case in many metropolitan ski hubs across the United States, and adding to the frustration is the single occupancy in many of the vehicles. The simple act of carpooling and ridesharing can take many of those cars off the road. Whether you are at home or on vacation, research carpool options to the ski area you plan to visit. Most resorts have advice on their website, and many major cities — including Denver and Salt Lake City — have parking lots for skiers to meet friends to share rides. San Francisco has a club that organizes rides to and from Lake Tahoe.

Depending on your location, public transit may also be a viable way to get to many ski hills. The Colorado Department of Transportation is attempting to cut into its traffic woes with new Bustang and Snowstang services, which shuttle passengers on luxury coaches across the state for as little as $16, including to several ski areas. Towns, counties, and regions whose economies depend on the ski industry often have free public buses available to shuttle skiers between hotels, resorts, and entertainment districts. Summit County, Colorado, home to multiple resorts and ski areas, operates the Summit Stage, which services all resorts along with the towns of Dillon, Frisco, and Silverthorne.

The Utah Transportation Authority offers a ski service bus up Cottonwood Canyon. The Lake Tahoe area has similar service spread between the Tahoe Truckee Area Regional Transit service on the north shore and the BlueGo, trolley service, and local shuttles on the south shore. Karst Stage shuttles passengers from Bozeman to Big Sky, Montana. Those in major cities along the eastern seaboard have it a bit easier. Rome2Rio shows multiple route options from New York City to ski areas in Vermont and New Hampshire via train and bus, with similar options from Boston, Philadelphia, Washington, DC, and Baltimore.

The impact you have by taking public transit over driving is profound. A train ride from Philadelphia to Stowe, Vermont, emits 86 lbs of CO2 per person, whereas a solo drive emits 342 lbs and a flight emits 414 lbs per person. Public transit takes a bit of research but is often easier (and cheaper) than paying for parking. Plus, you don’t have to feel guilty about enjoying the après scene.

Optimize your trips, rather than taking more of them. Snowboarder

Photo: Flystock/Shutterstock

The bulk of a typical skier’s environmental impact comes from their transportation to and from the mountain. Combining ski days together in order to reduce the number of times you take to the road in a given winter is the biggest way you can reduce your ski habit’s environmental impact. This is true whether you’re traveling cross-country or heading two hours up the road — staying overnight and getting an extra day in rather than heading back up the following weekend is far less harmful.

Offsetting flights, drives, and other carbon-emitting actions helps the planet recover from your journey. Offsetting a flight, which involves a financial contribution to an organization working to combat climate change, typically costs about $5 per flight, the amount slightly reduced for a similar one-way drive.

Come prepared to avoid single-use disposables. Skiers dining in mountain hut restaurant in Obergurgl ski area, Tirol, Austria

Photo: Pawel Kazmierczak/Shutterstock

Another important factor in a skier’s environmental impact is the trash they produce during a day on the hill. Perhaps you grab a cup of water from the lodge and toss the cup away after one use, or find yourself filling up a disposable bowl with chili from the cafeteria. Bring an insulated water bottle in your backpack and fill it up instead of grabbing a plastic or paper cup. Dine at a restaurant with reusable plates, glasses, and cutlery, and if you do visit the cafeteria or a restaurant using disposables, carry your own cutlery in your backpack.

In general, draft beer is the most sustainable way to enjoy a toast at the end of the day because you aren’t adding anything to the landfill or recycle pile, provided that beer is poured in an actual glass and not a plastic cup. If the bar is serving in plastic cups, opt for a canned drink instead.

Support resorts that make reducing their impact a priority. aspen gondola

Photo: charles taylor/Shutterstock

As is the case with gear, your dollar is your loudest voice when it comes to ski travel. Supporting resorts that prioritize sustainability is easier as more resorts make sustainability a public, and therefore profitable, initiative. Aspen Snowmass and Jackson Hole Mountain Resort run on solar energy, and Arapahoe Basin has joined Aspen Snowmass in taking its economic voice to Colorado lawmakers. Sugar Bush in Vermont took over six local solar plants that actually cycle energy even beyond its resort back to the surrounding power grid.

These are just a few of the ski areas taking action, but as more visitors demand a cleaner visit, the impact will continue to spread. “Tread lightly on our playground by minimizing waste, following the principle of leave no trace, and sharing space in transportation,” says Swain. “That said, the most important action we can take as individuals is to advocate for the environment that supports our active outdoor lifestyle. Call, write, or visit your elected officials to tell them why you are passionate about protecting our playground and ask what they are doing about it.” More like this: Avalanche risks are growing for inbounds skiers. Here’s how to stay safe.

The post Actionable ways you can reduce your ski trip’s carbon footprint appeared first on Matador Network.

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Thu, 20 Feb 2020 12:00:44 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Travel Colorado New York City San Francisco United States New Hampshire Skiing Patagonia Philadelphia Salt Lake City Ski Resorts Snowboarding Baltimore Forest Stewardship Council Denver Vermont All Bush Burton Colorado Department of Transportation Bozeman Salomon Arapahoe Basin Stowe Vermont Swain Bustang Big Sky Montana Aspen Snowmass Summit County Colorado Pawel Kazmierczak Shutterstock Arbor Collective Jenn Swain Lake Tahoe Depending Dillon Frisco Utah Transportation Authority Cottonwood Canyon The Lake Tahoe Tahoe Truckee Area Boston Philadelphia Washington DC
An Avalanche Almost Killed This Snowboarder. Can He Win Again? https://www.nytimes.com/2020/02/19/sports/brock-crouch-snowboarding-avalanche.html Wed, 19 Feb 2020 15:18:59 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs News Snowboarding Avalanches Crouch Brock Crouch Brock (1999- How to prepare for avalanches http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/MatadorNetwork/~3/gW_4mLTR9as/

In January of this year, a 34-year-old skier was killed inbounds at Lake Tahoe’s Squaw Alpine Resort, skiing a piste off of Alpine Meadows’s Scott Chair. That followed another avalanche that trapped eight skiers at Idaho’s Silver Mountain Ski Resort. Tragically, three of those skiers died.

We already know that even more skiers and snowboarders are hitting up the backcountry — a reported 1.4 million two seasons ago, with continued exponential growth since then — and that they are putting themselves at risk of avalanche-related deaths and injuries. What seems somehow more shocking is when these tragedies happen inside ski area boundaries.

Ski patrols the world over employ professional avalanche training, hazard evaluation, and mitigation techniques to keep slopes safe — and are generally successful. But nature can’t be completely controlled, and accidents do occur. Last year, two skiers died on Taos’ Kachina Peak last year after a slide swept them up on an open shoot.

What this means is that “hitting the good stuff” comes with inherent avalanche risk, even inbounds. The takeaway is that a responsible big-mountain skier is always prepared for the worst, no matter how unlikely that may be. Here’s how to be one of those responsible skiers.

Avalanches are still a threat, even at major ski resorts. Kachina Peak

Photo: Roschetzky Photography/Shutterstock

Despite all efforts to mitigate them, avalanches are a threat anywhere with “avalanche terrain,” including within ski resorts. The odds of being killed by an inbounds avalanche are extremely low. You’re more likely to hit a tree or fatally crash into someone. But there’s still a risk.

“The ability to self-arrest is an important component of skiing in steep and/or exposed terrain,” said Mike Spayd, assistant snow safety director at Aspen Highlands in Colorado. “It is a good idea to ski with a partner and have a meeting place in the event of separation. While more of an issue in deeper maritime snow climates, it is still important to be aware of the dangers of tree wells and the possibility of snow immersion suffocation.”

That said, there’s effectively no avalanche risk on low-angle groomed trails. The continued packing of the snow breaks the “layers” formed by each subsequent storm, making it next to impossible for a top layer to break the layer beneath it and cause a slide. You’re also generally safe when skiing on maintained slopes at less than a 30-degree angle — nearly all green and some blue runs fall into this category — as avalanches are most common on slopes between 30 and 45 degrees.

Tougher blue runs may be steeper than 30 degrees, and most challenging resort runs fall in the category of “avalanche terrain.” Off-piste skiing, such as terrain above treeline or off of a groomed trail, is where you need to be particularly aware as you’re in “lift-accessed backcountry.” In these cases, you should use the same precautions as you would in the backcountry.

Climate change is increasing risk. Large avalanche set by skier in Sillian

Photo: Alessandro Zappalorto/Shutterstock

Climate change is actively playing a role in the increased threat, both inbounds and out. With warming winters, the total snowpack varies from year to year at a higher level than it has in the past. This is known as “interannual variability.” Rising temperatures increase the triggering of avalanches for a number of reasons. First, rapidly rising temperatures after a snowstorm generally make the snowpack less stable. Warmed ground and air temperatures cause the layers of snow to weaken, making already weak layers more likely to collapse.

The greater disparity in predictable weather patterns also impacts the snowpack. Early season snow, followed by an extended period without snow, can create a dangerous layer of very weak snow called “depth hoar” that, as layers build on top of it throughout the season, is increasingly likely to succumb to the pressure and collapse. For example, while skiers in Colorado — the deadliest US state for avalanches — tend to celebrate big October dumps, this can actually set the stage for a heightened avalanche season if it doesn’t snow again until mid-November. Warmer ground and air temperatures also mean that the snowpack is increasingly destabilized across larger areas, leading to bigger and potentially more hazardous avalanches.

A study on the impact of climate change on avalanches, published in the journal Science Daily, found that, “Snow is now also falling earlier in the season, and is being destabilised before spring, at a time when it is thicker, leading to an increase in the number and intensity of avalanches. Since the snow is wet, avalanches are descending slowly but over greater distances than in the past.”

This makes the job of ski patrol even tougher, as spring snowstorms can cause a sudden spike in avalanche risk.

Check avalanche conditions in the region where you are skiing. one freeride skier skiing downhill trough deep fresh powder

Photo: MWiklik/Shutterstock

This all sounds rather dire. While the threat of an inbounds avalanche should be taken seriously, remember that there are professionals in red coats actively working to mitigate the risk at your local ski area. There are two major things you can do to help:

  • Check conditions. If you plan to ski high-altitude or challenging terrain, be aware of the avalanche conditions in the area even if you don’t plan to head out the backcountry gate. Use a site like Avalanche.org to monitor conditions. Should hazardous conditions exist, employ the same tactics as you would in the backcountry. Avoid terrain traps, carry avalanche gear, ski with a partner, and generally maintain an awareness of your surroundings.
  • Obey the signs. When a resort opens terrain for the first time in a given season, it is at higher risk because the snow hasn’t been continually packed down by skiers. This is often why a particular run remains closed longer than others or is closed off mid-season, even though it appears to have plenty of snow; ski patrol isn’t done mitigating the risk just yet. Ducking ropes only worsens the risk, for you and first responders.
Follow backcountry protocol. Skiers and snowboarders

Photo: Olena Rublenko/Shutterstock

Many ski areas with high-altitude extreme terrain actively encourage skiers and riders to wear a beacon at all times. These transceiving devices are used by rescuers and backcountry skiers to locate someone buried in an avalanche and hopefully get them out alive. Backcountry Access, or BCA, has multiple options. On that same note, you should always ski with a partner in challenging terrain, lest an accident should befall you and you’re stuck in a tree well or below a cliff with no one to help you.

“While we operate in a very conservative manner, the risk is never entirely eliminated,” said Spayd. “In the event of an inbounds avalanche Ski Patrol will always perform a beacon search prior to any other search techniques. If the buried subject is wearing a transceiver, a beacon search is hands down the most effective way to locate the individual.”

If you’re chasing powder and find yourself at a resort that has been pounded by snow for three days straight, all terrain above a blue should be considered “lift-accessed backcountry” and approached with caution. Avoid hazards such as convex and concave rolls, commonly known as “rollers,” where terrain suddenly steepens or drops briefly before flattening into a duct, valley, or low-angle slope. Stay in heavily gladed areas whenever possible, as the trees act as anchors that keep snowpack more stable than it is in chutes and couloirs. But avoid single anchors, as they can act as an easy trigger because the snow immediately around them is likely to be at a different temperature than the general snowpack.

Last but not least, know when to call it a day. Even with all considerations taken, the only surefire way to avoid an inbounds avalanche is to stay away from tougher terrain when hazardous conditions exist.

“While it is important to be aware of the hazards it is also important to recognize the risk-vs-reward model,” said Spayd. After all, you don’t need to schuss down the riskiest terrain to have a great day on the mountain. More like this: How to plan for a backcountry ski trip

The post Avalanche risks are growing for inbound skiers. Here’s how to stay safe. appeared first on Matador Network.

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Tue, 18 Feb 2020 16:00:46 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Travel Colorado US Snow Idaho Skiing Snowboarding Lake Tahoe Avalanches All Alpine Meadows Taos Spayd Aspen Highlands Squaw Alpine Resort Silver Mountain Ski Resort Roschetzky Photography Shutterstock Despite Mike Spayd Alessandro Zappalorto Shutterstock Climate Olena Rublenko Shutterstock
36 Hours in Niseko https://www.nytimes.com/2020/02/13/travel/what-to-do-36-hours-in-niseko-japan.html?emc=rss&partner=rss Thu, 13 Feb 2020 05:00:30 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs News Skiing Snowboarding Niseko Travel and Vacations Japanese Food (Cuisine Niseko (Japan Why you should visit Banff and Lake Louise in the Canadian Rockies during the winter http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TravelingCanucks/~3/uogNgNlhnng/

This post is in partnership with Ski Canada and Travel Mindset. 

Why you should visit Banff and Lake Louise in the Canadian Rockies during the winter When you think of winter in Canada, what images come to mind? 

Do you see giant snow-capped peaks and big fluffy snowflakes falling on a frozen mountain lake? Do you see yourself sitting beside a crackling fire inside a cozy ski lodge?

While some people choose to escape winter’s chill and head south, we look forward to the snow. We embrace winter and try to get on the slopes as much as possible. Fortunately, we live in western Canada and have an endless supply of ski resorts to choose from.

One of our recommended places to visit in 2020 is the Canadian Rockies in Alberta. Banff National Park, Canada’s first national park and a UNESCO World Heritage Site, is one of the most beautiful places in the world. If it’s not on your travel wish list, it should be.

While the park is busiest during the summer months, winter in Banff is truly magical. The rocky mountain landscapes are incredible under a blanket of fresh snow.

Shops and restaurants are quieter and locals have more time to engage with visitors, plus accommodations are less expensive, so look for a great deal in the winter months when you visit.

If you like playing outside in the snow, there really is no better place to be.

Banff National Park is home to three ski resorts, known as SkiBig3: Banff Sunshine, Lake Louise Ski Resort and Mt. Norquay.

Visitors can purchase one lift ticket, the SkiBig3 Lift Ticket, and it’s valid at all three ski resorts.

Lake Louise Ski Resort

The mountain landscapes at Lake Louise Ski Resort are some of the most spectacular we’ve witnessed while on a ski mountain. Every turn reveals yet another masterpiece.

With over 4200 skiable acres of terrain and 145+ runs, Lake Louise Ski Resort is one of the largest ski resorts in North America. When it comes to slope length, Lake Louise is the 3rd longest in Canada at 139 km. It was also recognized as the #1 Ski Resort in Canada at the 2019 World Ski Awards.

We love the snow quality in the Canadian Rockies.

It’s very different from the heavy wet snow we get in the Coast Mountains of British Columbia (we live in Vancouver – so the Coast Mountains in southwest BC are our home turf). Because it’s typically colder in the Rockies, the snow tends to be more powdery and light, which is perfect for skiing and snowboarding.

We loved our time snowboarding at Lake Louise. It has such a relaxing and refreshing vibe in the winter. After a full day of snowboarding both sides of the mountain, we kicked off our boots and enjoyed a memorable apres ski session at the Powder Keg Lounge.

Above – on top of the world at Lake Louise Ski Resort in the Canadian Rockies.

In the above photo, if you look at the base of the mountains, directly above my phone, you’ll see a circular patch of white snow. That’s a frozen Lake Louise under about two feet of snow.

Front and Back of Lake Louise Ski Resort

Lake Louise Ski Resort spreads across both the front and backside of the mountain, which creates a variety of snow conditions and terrain.

We spent a full day exploring the mountain and rarely duplicated a run. The longest run on Lake Louise Ski Resort is an impressive 8 kilometers (5 miles). Our legs were burning by the time we reached the lodge!

Download Lake Louise Ski Resort trail maps here.

Learn more about Lake Louise Ski Resort here.

Free Lake Louise Tours Ski Friends

We love that Lake Louise Ski Resort offers its guests a complimentary ski host service, aptly named Ski Friends. The Ski Friends program is such a great service, especially for first time visitors who want to discover as much mountain terrain as their legs can handle.

It’s also a fun option for single skiers who don’t have someone to explore the mountain with.

During our visit to Lake Louise Ski Resort, we spent the morning with John, a retiree from Ontario who spends his winters living in Canmore. He skis Lake Louise at least 3 times a week and enjoys spending a few hours as a Ski Friend.

John said that most people who use the Ski Friend service are not from Banff or Lake Louise, so he gets to play tour guide while enjoying a few turns on the slopes. Not a bad way to spend your retirement!

If you want to dig deep and get to know the resorts, consider a SkiBig3 Guided Adventure. Guides spend the full day with you exploring the full breadth of terrain available. Visitors can also stay with the same guide for 3 days and explore all three resorts consecutively.

Above – our Ski Friend, John, showing us around Lake Louise Ski Resort.

Above – snowboarding down the front side of Lake Louise Ski Resort.

Banff Sunshine Village

Banff Sunshine Village, famous for having Canada’s best snow, is located in the heart of Banff National Park. It’s all the real stuff, too, no snow making here.

It’s about a 15 minute drive from the town of Banff to Sunshine Village.

Sunshine offers more than 3,300 acres of skiable terrain, and it’s said to be the highest ski resort in Canada at 8,954 feet (2,730 meters). It also boasts the longest non-glacial ski season in Canada, beginning in early November and running until late May culminating with a huge Slush Cup celebration the 3rd week of May.

Although we’ve not visited Banff Sunshine in the winter, yet, it ranks high on our list of ski resorts to visit, and it should be on your list, too.

We would love to spend a few nights at Sunshine Mountain Lodge, Banff’s only mountain top hotel, and watch the sunrise from the top of the world.

Banff Sunshine Village is perched on the continental divide and, because the ski resort is accessed via gondola, the resort offers completely uninterrupted views of the Canadian Rockies – no roads, no industry, no town – just pure wilderness views.

Similar to Lake Louise Ski Resort, Banff Sunshine offers complimentary tours with local Snow Hosts.

Fun fact – Banff Sunshine is the first ski resort in Canada to offer a heated chairlift. The TeePee Town LX chair lift has orange-coloured bubble covers that keep skiers warm and protected from the elements. How cool is that?

Photo credits – Banff Sunshine and Mt Norquay photos provided by Ski Canada and Travel Mindset

Mt. Norquay Ski Resort

Located minutes from the town of Banff, Mt. Norquay is a great ski resort for families, which is exactly what we look for these days.

As much as we love big mountain snowboarding, it’s not ideal for our young boys, aged 8 and 6 years old. Mt. Norquay is the smallest of the big three, yet it still offers 60 runs and 190 acres of skiable terrain, so it really is perfect for the whole family.

If you’re short on time, Mt. Norquay is a great option because it’s close to Banff town.

We like that Mt. Norquay offers night skiing. It’s actually the only Banff ski resort that offers night skiing. Our boys love night skiing because there are less people on the lifts and slopes, which gives them more confidence to explore at their own pace. I’m pretty sure they also like night skiing because it means they get to stay up later.

If you plan to visit all three Banff ski resorts, Norquay is a good mountain to start with before heading to Sunshine or Lake Louise. You could also ski the bigger mountains during the day, return to your hotel in Banff, and head back up to Mt Norquay for a few evening runs.

All three ski resorts can be accessed with a SkiBig3 Lift Ticket, including night skiing and tubing at Mt Norquay. It also offers flex days to enjoy other activities and experiences available in Banff and Lake Louise.

The SkiBig3 Lift Ticket

If you plan to spend a few days in the Canadian Rockies and you can’t decide which mountain you should visit, check out the SkiBig3 lift ticket and visit them all! 

The SkiBig3 lift ticket gives you unlimited skiing at Banff Sunshine, Lake Louise and Mt Norquay and free shuttle to the mountains from Banff and Lake Louise hotels.

Another perk is that the SkiBig3 lift ticket will be delivered to your hotel 24 hours before your first day of skiing (provided you order the ticket at least 3 days in advance). We love that you can skip the lines and catch first runs with this feature.

Purchase your SkiBig3 lift tickets here.

Banff and Lake Louise Ski Shuttle

Most ski shuttles in Banff and Lake Louise are free, with multiple pick up locations.

Check the Banff Sunshine, Lake Louise Ski Resort and Mt. Norquay ski shuttle schedules and hotel pickup locations here.

Things to do in Banff and Lake Louise in the winter Dog-sledding to the Great Divide

Take a full day of adventure on a 16-km dog sled tour through the beautiful Kicking Horse Pass at the Continental Divide, the point where Banff National Park in Alberta meets Yoho National Park in British Columbia. Book tours with Kingmik Dog Sled Tours . Read about our dog sledding experience here .

Snowshoeing in Banff National Park  

Another fun winter activity is a guided snowshoe hike with Great Divide Nature Interpretation

Our guide, Joel, navigated us through thick forest and windy trails to a remote frozen lake just in time to watch the sunset over the Valley of the Ten Peaks (the mountain range that surrounds Moraine Lake, one of the most photographed lakes in the world).

Snow tubing at Mt. Norquay

The tubing park at Mt. Norquay is the largest in Alberta, with eight wide lanes to choose from. The tube park also has a small sliding area and kids play area so it’s ideal of young families.

Ice skating on Lake Louise

Marvel at the massive Victoria Glacier and surrounding Rocky Mountains as you glide on the iconic frozen lake. You can rent skates and hockey sticks at the Fairmont Chateau Lake Louise.

While there, check out the incredible ice castles, ice bars, and ice carvings.

Johnston Canyon Icewalk at Night

With only a headlamp and the night stars lighting your way, a guided ice walk tour to the lower ice falls at Johnston Canyon is a truly unique experience in the Canadian Rockies.

Ride the gondola to Sulphur Mountain

The highest point in the town of Banff offers spectacular views of snow-capped peaks. In the winter, you can take the gondola down the mountain for free.

Go for a soak at Banff Upper Hot Springs

When you purchase a 3+ multi-day lift ticket, you receive complimentary passes to Banff Hot Springs (online advance-purchase only ).

Surprise Corner Viewpoint

For amazing views of Fairmont Banff Springs Hotel and Sulphur Mountain, walk from the Banff Pedestrian Bridge along the Bow River to the Surprise Corner Viewpoint.

Get your $45 credit for AirBnB accommodations here.

How to get to Banff and Lake Louise?

The easiest way to get to Banff is to fly to Calgary International Airport (YYC) and drive to Banff. You can pick up and drop off your car rental at the airport, so it’s an easy process.

We recommend that you get an SUV with winter tires because road conditions can be unpredictable in the winter. If available, ask for a vehicle with a roof rack for your skis and/or snowboards. This frees up a lot of space inside your vehicle (unless you plan to rent equipment at the ski resorts).

The drive from Calgary to Banff takes about 1.5 hours (approximately 145 km).

It’s an easy drive on a divided two lane highway. The Trans-Canada Highway is well maintained and equipped to handle heavy snowfall. Canadian’s know how to handle the snow!

Watch out for wildlife.

Even in the winter, you will see wild animals wandering near the highway. Banff National Park is their home. Keep your distance and be careful – these animals are wild.

Bus from Calgary to Banff

You can take the bus from Calgary to Banff, and vice versa.

The most affordable way to get to Banff is the On-It Transit service. It’s only $10 each way. Buses depart from Downtown Calgary.

The Brewster Express offers direct shuttle service from Calgary International Airport to Canmore, Banff, Lake Louise and Kananaskis. One way adult fares start at $71.00. 

The Banff Airporter is another bus option. It offers the most extensive schedule and fares start at $67.00. Learn more here.

Where to stay in the town of Banff?

We spent a couple nights at Hidden Ridge Resort, a quiet and secluded property located on Tunnel Mountain, about a 10 minute drive from downtown Banff.

We stayed in a spacious 2 bedroom, 2 level townhouse with an in-suite Jacuzzi, full kitchen and wood burning fireplace (pictured above). This is an ideal property for families.

The most iconic hotel in Banff is the luxurious Fairmont Banff Springs, known as the Castle in the Rockies. It’s a landmark hotel with exceptional facilities and amenities, including the Willow Stream Spa.

We’ve also stayed at the centrally located Banff Park Lodge and would recommend it as a budget-friendly option for families. If you’d rather stay directly on the ski mountain, consider Sunshine Mountain Lodge, Banff’s only ski-in, ski-out hotel.

The Juniper Hotel is the closest hotel to Mt. Norquay. It’s conveniently located just off the Trans-Canada highway, so it’s easy access to the attractions in Banff National Park.

Where to stay in Lake Louise?

We stayed at Baker Creek Mountain Resort, an intimate mountain lodge located on the Bow Valley Parkway, about 20 minutes south of Lake Louise Ski Resort. 

Of course, the high-end Fairmont Chateau Lake Louise, picture above, is always a good idea. Located on the shores of Lake Louise in Banff National Park, the Chateau is a destination all on its own.

Other hotels near Lake Louise Ski Resort are the Deer Lodge and Mountaineer Lodge.

Regardless of where you stay or which mountains you choose to enjoy, your time in Banff, Lake Louise and Mt. Norquay will be one to remember.

Above – enjoying lunch with a view at the Fairmont Chateau Lake Louise.

Above – outside the lobby cabin at Baker Creek Mountain Resort in Lake Louise.

Read more posts from Alberta: Have you visited any of the Banff ski resorts? 

Share your tips and recommendations in the comments section below.

Why you should visit Banff and Lake Louise in the Canadian Rockies during the winter is a post from: Traveling Canucks

Related posts:

  1. 22 photos from Alberta’s Canadian Rockies we can’t stop looking at
  2. Jasper might just be the most Canadian town in Canada
  3. 30 Photos to get you stoked for the ski season
  4. 10 Family Travel Destinations to Visit in 2020

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US Sports Camps Announces Summer Ski and Snowboard Camps in 2020 https://sports.yahoo.com/us-sports-camps-announces-summer-130000765.html?src=rss US Sports Camps (USSC) and Mt Hood Ski & Snowboard Camps (MHSSC) recently announced a new marketing and logistics arrangement, creating the newest category in the USSC network. SAN RAFAEL, Calif., Jan. 15, 2020 /PRNewswire-PRWeb/ -- US Sports Camps, founded in 1975, recently crossed over the 100,000 camper milestone in 2019 and is looking to new and exciting segments like ski and snowboard camps at Mt Hood to offer to its customers.

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Wed, 15 Jan 2020 08:00:00 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs News US Snowboarding USSC Mt Hood San Rafael Calif Snowboard Camps US Sports Camps USSC US Sports Camps
Easily haul your winter gear with the best ski racks and snowboard carriers http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/digitaltrends/~3/rqRD8M6Vknk/ ]]> Thu, 09 Jan 2020 16:34:59 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Outdoors Trends Skiing Snowboarding Affiliate Buying Guides Ski Racks Racks Snowboard Racks Commerce 2020 Everything you need to know about Sasquatch Mountain Resort http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TravelingCanucks/~3/fI5UdpOhrHk/ Chair lift at Sasquatch Mountain Resort British Columbia Canada Sasquatch Mountain Resort, British Columbia

As part of our quest to visit every ski resort in British Columbia, our goal is to visit at least one new ski resort each winter. This season, we spent 5 nights at Sasquatch Mountain Resort over the holidays.

If the name of this ski resort is not familiar, that’s because it’s new. Well, the name is new. The alpine resort has actually been around since the 1970’s under the name Hemlock Valley Resort. It re-branded to Sasquatch Mountain Resort in 2017, so it’s still a relatively new change. 

Why did we choose Sasquatch Mountain Resort?

Aside from the fact that it’s a new ski resort for us to explore, we decided to visit Sasquatch Mountain Resort for a few reasons.

The first reason was the price of lift tickets. 

Day passes range from $48 to $64 for adults, which is reasonable when compared to nearby Whistler Blackcomb, where lift tickets cost $169 per adult! We planned to ski/snowboard for three days, so that starts to add up when you have a family of four.

The second reason was because we wanted reasonably priced accommodations located directly on the mountain (ideally ski-in, ski out). 

This was our first time spending the Christmas holidays at a ski resort in British Columbia (we spent Christmas in the French Alps long before having kids), so we expected prices to be inflated regardless of the mountain. 

The third reason was accommodation availability.

We booked our accommodations several months in advance because we knew availability would be an issue over the holidays. Nearby Manning Park Resort, which is also reasonably priced, was sold out for the holidays almost a year in advance.

Sasquatch still had options available a few months prior to the holidays. 

The fourth reason is its proximity to Vancouver.

There are family ski resorts in central British Columbia, like Big White Ski Resort and Sun Peaks Resort, but they’re at least 5 hours from Vancouver and you have to drive over the Coquihalla Summit, which can be quite treacherous in the winter.

Sasquatch Mountain Resort is a 2 hour drive from Vancouver (with no traffic). Sasquatch Mountain Resort, Vancouver, British Columbia

Great start to our trip – fresh snow on our first day at Sasquatch. 

Chair lift at Sasquatch Mountain Resort British Columbia Canada

The mountain was surprisingly quiet for a snow day during the holidays.

Snowboarding at Sasquatch Mountain Resort British Columbia Canada

Related – Powder days at Manning Park Resort

Ski terrain and runs at Sasquatch Mountain Resort British Columbia Canada

We lucked out with fresh powder on our first day. This section (above) was the highlight of the day.

Skiing with our boys

This was our first time hitting the slopes this season. It was also the first time Braydon (now 7 years old) began the season without ski lessons. He started to get the hang of it near the end of last season (check out this video), so we were hopeful he would not need lessons this season.

It was the right call. After a few turns on the beginners hill, he was ready to tackle the chair lift. 

By the second day, he wanted to take the big chair lift to the top of the mountain. He was a little nervous but pushed through his fears and did an awesome job.

We’re super proud of him. 

Aside from a brief lesson at the end of last season, Connor had not gone down the hill on skis. This would be his first time, ever. He got new skis and boots for Christmas, so he was eager to give them a try.

Connor (now 5 years old) is the wildcard in our family. We’re not quite sure how he’s going to adapt to new situations. Putting his new skis on for the first time was one of those “I-hope-he-doesn’t-freak-out” moments. It could have gone either way. 

Our goal was for him to make it down the magic carpet section without crying. 

We crossed our fingers and hoped for the best. To our surprise, he loved it! We put him in ski lessons on the second day (more on that below), which really helped his confidence.

He quickly became one of those fearless little boys who points his skis forward and bombs straight down the hill without turning.

It was an awesome moment.

Check snow conditions on the Sasquatch Mountain Resort webcam.

Yellow chair at Sasquatch Mountain Resort British Columbia Canada

Braydon at the top of the yellow chair. This section is perfect for families. 

Yellow chair at Sasquatch Mountain Resort British Columbia Canada

Related – Winter fun at Sea to Sky Gondola in Squamish

Kids Ski School at Sasquatch Mountain Resort

Ski school at Sasquatch Mountain Resort

On our first day, Connor spent the morning practicing in the learning/lesson area. It has a magic carpet instead of a rope tow or chair lift, making it an ideal spot to learn.

We decided it was a good idea to put Connor in ski lessons on our second day.

We both snowboard, so we’re not the best people to be teaching our boys skiing techniques. And, we find our boys learn better when their in a class with peers, as opposed to us trying to teach them (well, that was the path we took with Braydon, and it worked, so we thought we should stick the same plan).

We met his instructor, Cherish, at the base of the magic carpet section and Connor immediately took to her. She had him running up the hill and learning to ski down.

His confidence grew each time he went down. Her words of encouragement really landed on him. Near the end of his 45 minute lesson he even wanted to try some tricks. See the photo below.

Putting Connor in a ski lesson was a good idea. Later that evening he wanted to ski down the magic carpet section by himself. I’m not sure he would have been that confident without the lesson.

More info about Sasquatch Mountain Resort Ski School here.

Kids Ski School at Sasquatch Mountain Resort

Connor was excited to try some tricks during his ski lesson.

Kids Ski School at Sasquatch Mountain Resort

Connor cruising down the hill all by himself. Success!

Night skiing at Sasquatch Mountain Resort, British Columbia, Canada

Night skiing at Sasquatch Mountain Resort

We rarely have the opportunity to go night skiing when we’re staying overnight at a mountain. Sometimes we go night skiing on the Vancouver local mountains, but many of the ski resorts we’ve stayed at recently (Whistler Blackcomb, Manning Park, Mount Baker and Sun Peaks Resort) do not offer night skiing. 

We did not know  that Sasquatch offered night skiing prior to our visit.

In fact, night skiing wasn’t even on our radar. We’re often too tired for night skiing or we’ve already committed to apres ski activities and going back out for a few more runs is not appealing once you’ve been soaking in a hot tub. 

We loved the night skiing at Sasquatch Mountain Resort. It was perfect for Connor’s learning. There was only a few other people skiing from the magic carpet, so Connor had the entire area to himself. This meant he could practice his turns without worrying about running into other people. It also meant he could fly down the hill, which was great for his confidence.

We ended up night skiing three consecutive nights.

Nicole and Connor would ski from the magic carpet and Cameron and Braydon would ski from the yellow chair. It was great! We had most of the mountain to ourselves each night because there aren’t a lot of accommodations and most people left around 4:00 PM. 

Night skiing is not always available. To learn about night skiing at Sasquatch Mountain, check the website here.

Connor enjoyed sitting by the fire after his night skiing session.

Night skiing at Sasquatch Mountain Resort, British Columbia, Canada

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Night skiing at Sasquatch Mountain Resort, British Columbia, Canada

The green chair is also open for night skiing.

Snow Tubing at Sasquatch Mountain Resort

Snow Tubing at Sasquatch Mountain Resort

Braydon needed some down time after a full morning of skiing, so Nicole and Connor checked out the snow tubing park. The park is located behind our accommodations, so it was an easy 10 minute walk.

It was busy when we arrived. We had to wait about 15 minutes until our name was called. We were given 2 hours to play in the tubing park but we only ended up staying about an hour. We managed to go up and down about 8 times during that hour. 

A magic carpet transports guests to the top of the tubing park. It’s a quick ride that takes about 3 minutes. Once at the top, you pick your lane. The park had 6 lanes open that day.

Guests with kids are required to use separate tubes, so I had to hold on to Connor’s tube when we went down. Connor used both hands to grip his tube. I

f you’re a family of four, like us, you’ll need to split up. The most that can go down a run at the same time is three people. Each rider must be in their own tube and riders must sit properly with their bum in the middle of the tube.

More info about snow tubing at Sasquatch Mountain Resort here.

Snow Tubing at Sasquatch Mountain Resort

Big smiles for Connor. He loved the snow tubing at Sasquatch Mountain Resort.

Condo building at Squamish Mountain Resort British Columbia

Where to stay on Sasquatch Mountain Resort?

Sasquatch currently has no hotels but we’re told plans are in the works to build one soon. To stay overnight at Sasquatch, you will need to book a privately owned cabin or apartment.

You can book Sasquatch Mountain accommodations through a third party website like AirBnb (get your $45 credit for AirBnB here) or Hemlock Hollow Accommodations.

Note – you may need to search Hemlock Valley or Hemlock Resort because of the re-branding to Sasquatch Mountain Resort two years ago.

There are a variety of Sasquatch Mountain accommodations available, from large multi-unit cabins to small one bedroom condos. Based on the number of buildings in the village, we’d guess there are over 100 units for rent, give or take. 

We stayed in a two-floor condo with two bedrooms and two bathrooms.

This condo is located in the pyramid building near the day lodge (pictured above and below). The condo has a loft in the upstairs bedroom that sleeps 2 or 3 kids. It also has a living space upstairs with a pull-out couch. We stayed with another family (4 adults and 4 kids) and there was plenty of room for everyone. 

More info about Sasquatch Mountain accommodations here

Related – Dog sledding at Sun Peaks Resort

Inside the Apartments at Squamish Mountain Resort British Columbia

The condo we stayed at was stocked with games, puzzles and videos. It took Nicole a few days but she finally finished this puzzle. Notice the view from the window.

This condo has a window that faces the chair lift and day lodge. It was really nice to ski-in and ski-out each day. 

Inside the Apartments at Squamish Mountain Resort British Columbia

View of the living space from the upper loft.

Apartments at Squamish Mountain Resort British Columbia

Directly in front of the condo is a fun area for sledding and making snowmen.

Thank you to the building manager who gave Frosty a proper carrot nose!

I thought this was interesting. Every day (and night), people leave their skis and snowboards unlocked in front of the condo building. It’s nice to know that people trust their equipment will not get stolen. 

New Year's Eve at Sasquatch Mountain Resort

New Year’s Eve on Sasquatch Mountain Resort

We timed our visit to include New Year’s Eve celebrations. We were looking forward to ringing in the New Year on the mountain with friends, but we weren’t expecting much from the fireworks show. 

The fireworks show began at 9:00 PM. We were so happy the mountain does an early fireworks show, instead of waiting until midnight. This was actually the the first time our boys witnessed New Year’s Eve fireworks! 

We weren’t expecting much because there’s not a lot of people staying overnight on the mountain. We’d estimate about 250-300 people attended the show.

To our surprise, the fireworks show was really good! The show lasted about 20 minutes and it might just rival the NYE fireworks show in Vancouver.

Here’s a short video from the finale

More info about Sasquatch Mountain Resort New Years Eve here.

New Year's Eve at Sasquatch Mountain Resort

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Travel tips for Sasquatch Mountain Resort:
  • The drive up the mountain can be difficult if it’s snowing. It’s a gravel road with a lot of tight switchbacks. You are required to have snow tires and you must carry chains in your vehicle. 
  • Make sure you check the weather report before driving up the mountain. 
  • Check the website for lift ticket prices. There are discount days during the week. It’s cheaper to purchase multi-day passes. More info here.
  • Book accommodations using a third party website like AirBnb (get your $45 credit for AirBnB here), VRBO or Hemlock Hollow Accommodations. You may need to search Hemlock Valley or Hemlock Resort because of the re-branding to Sasquatch Mountain Resort.
  • There’s only one pub/restaurant on the mountain – Molly Hogan’s Pub. The food is decent and it’s reasonably priced. You can view the menu here.
  • Bring food and supplies with you. There aren’t a lot of options on the mountain. The village is basically a cluster of cabins and the main lodge at the base of the ski hill. Don’t expect to find a grocery store or liquor store on at the resort. There is a convenience store at Hemlock Hollow.
  • Most accommodations do not have garbage service. You need to take your household garbage to the local transfer station. It’s located by the fire hall on Laurel Road. You will pass it when you leave the village on Hemlock Valley Road.
Have you visited Sasquatch Mountain Resort?

Share you tips and tricks in the comments below. Our readers thank you!

Everything you need to know about Sasquatch Mountain Resort is a post from: Traveling Canucks

Related posts:

  1. 25 FREE Things to do in Vancouver in 2019
  2. Winter fun at Sea to Sky Gondola in Squamish, British Columbia
  3. Getting our snow fix at Big White Ski Resort
  4. Further proof that British Columbia is ridiculously beautiful

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Tue, 10 Dec 2019 03:00:02 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Travel Facebook Canada Cameron Nye Vancouver Connor Snowboarding British Columbia Sasquatch Popular Columbia Ski Resort Vrbo Travel Stories Trip Ideas French Alps Don Nicole Braydon Big White Ski Resort Whistler Blackcomb Squamish British Columbia Sun Peaks Resort Manning Park Resort Sasquatch Mountain Resort Hemlock Valley Resort Sasquatch Mountain Resort British Columbia Nearby Manning Park Resort Whistler Blackcomb Manning Park Mount Baker Sasquatch Mountain Sasquatch Mountain Resort Braydon Sasquatch Mountain Resort Where Hemlock Valley Molly Hogan Hemlock Hollow Most Laurel Road You Hemlock Valley Road Have Sasquatch Mountain Resort Ski School
23 Awesome Things to Do in Whistler in Winter and Summer http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/theplanetd/HwKP/~3/EMbsdvHKUWA/ There are so many things to do in Whistler that you'll need two seasons to do it all! Whistler, British Columbia is Canada's mountain playground. With great summer and winter activities, it is the perfect year-round vacation destination. The moment you arrive in Whistler, you feel the laid back mountain vibe. Everyone in the village […]

Read the original post 23 Awesome Things to Do in Whistler in Winter and Summer on The Planet D: Adventure Travel Blog.

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Link About It: This Week’s Picks https://coolhunting.com/link-about-it/link-about-it-490/ Sat, 23 Nov 2019 09:03:16 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Psychology Toys Politics Science Design London Kids Laws Climate Change Marijuana Environment Future Artificial Intelligence Therapy Cannabis Furniture Architecture Robots Manhattan Snowboarding Public Art Svalbard Linkaboutit Link About It Snohetta Jake Burton Melanie Klein Cannabis Legalization Environmental Awareness Cannabis Laws Yaara Nusboim Jake Burton Carpenter, Who Ushered in Snowboarding as a Sport, Dies at 65 https://www.nytimes.com/2019/11/22/sports/jake-burton-carpenter-snowboarding-dead.html?emc=rss&partner=rss Fri, 22 Nov 2019 13:49:39 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs News Snowboarding Burton Snowboards Carpenter Jake Burton Carpenter Jake Burton Deaths (Obituaries Founder of Burton Snowboards dies http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/MatadorNetwork/~3/6QSywuVHB7g/

Snowboarding is about exploration. It’s about adventure. And it’s about creating memories. For riders both young and old, their first memories of the sport typically involve trying to glide their way down a sheet of crusty snow without numbing their butt or watching the stars of the sport chuck themselves off cliffs and up the walls of pipes in videos or in a broadcast of the X-Games. Regardless of how one was introduced to the sport of snowboarding, one name has undoubtedly been a part of their experience: Burton.

Jake Burton Carpenter passed away on November 20 due to complications from cancer. He founded Burton Snowboards, now known simply as Burton, in 1977 to improve on the “snurfer” concept invented by Sherman Poppen in the 1960s. He crafted his first boards by hand in Vermont, testing and improving the boards and their accompanying equipment constantly as the sport evolved. When snowboarding hit the mainstream in the 1990s, the name “Burton” was on the bottom of boards around the world and the fronts of the ballcaps, beanies, and baggy clothes worn by those that rode them. His efforts helped change the image of snowboarding as a reckless side sport into a mainstream cultural phenomenon and were explicitly tied to snowboarding’s eventual debut in the 1998 Olympics.

It is with a heavy heart that we share that Burton founder Jake Burton Carpenter passed away peacefully last night surrounded by loved ones as a result of complications from recurring cancer. He was the soul of snowboarding, the one who gave us the sport we love. #RideonJake pic.twitter.com/8dChSsm54Y

— Burton Snowboards (@burtonsnowboard) November 21, 2019

Both Burton Carpenter and his brand have stood as the pinnacle of snowboarding success, introducing millions of people to the sport and helping to innovate snowboarding equipment from the hacks of cut plywood used in the ’60s and ’70s to the modern carbon boards seen on the mountains now. Burton designed the uniforms worn by the US Snowboard Team in the 2018 and 2014 Winter Olympics, and has been a leader in bringing environmentally sustainable production and business practices to the forefront of the ski industry.

In an email sent to Burton staff, CEO John Lacy referred to Burton Carpenter as “our founder, the soul of snowboarding, the one who gave us the sport we love so much.” More like this: Why Banff should be the base for your next backcountry adventure

The post Burton Snowboards’ founder, who championed the sport, passes away at 65 appeared first on Matador Network.

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Fri, 22 Nov 2019 12:30:45 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Travel Snowboard Snowboarding Burton Snowboards Vermont All Burton John Lacy Jake Burton Carpenter Sherman Poppen jack Burton carpenter Burton Jake Burton Carpenter RideonJake Burton Carpenter US Snowboard Team
Farewell to Snowboard Pioneer Jake Burton Carpenter https://coolhunting.com/culture/jake-burton-carpenter-died/ Thu, 21 Nov 2019 14:32:26 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Design Culture Olympics Obituaries Snowboarding Burton Snowboards Snowboards Vermont Snow Sports Linkaboutit Burton Carpenter Jake Burton Carpenter Jake Burton Burton Snowboards Jake Burton Carpenter Sherman Poppen Getting our snow fix at Big White Ski Resort http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TravelingCanucks/~3/3NLNDEqybJU/

This post was originally written in January 2015. Given that the upcoming ski season is upon us, we thought we should re-post this story about our trip to Big White Ski Resort in Kelowna, British Columbia.

Big White Ski Resort, Kelowna

This Vancouver winter has been one of the warmest on record. As I write this, the sun is shining and the temperatures are in the double-digits (Celsius).

Do you remember how warm it was during the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver? This winter has been much warmer. So warm, in fact, that the three Vancouver local mountains have temporarily shut down due to lack of snow and an uncooperative weather forecast.

Great news for many – terrible news if you like to play in the snow.

So, what does one do when Vancouver’s local mountains melt in the middle of February? Well, you head east to British Columbia’s Okanagan Valley, of course.

Big White Ski Resort, located 45 minutes outside of Kelowna, has received over 70 cm’s of snow in the past 2 weeks. By comparison – Cypress Mountain in Vancouver, the venue for many Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympics events, has less than 45 cm snow base. Total.

Seriously. How crazy is that?

Big White Ski Resort, Kelowna

In an effort to salvage the brutal west coast ski season, we decided it was time to re-visit Big White, proudly labeled as Canada’s Favourite Family Resort.

We’ve been to Big White a few times before, but not since our boys joined the team.

The 6-hour drive from Vancouver is not short, especially with little ones, so we decided to make the trip worthwhile and booked 4 nights on the mountain.

Ironically, the moment we committed to spending 4 nights at Big White we had the opportunity to visit both Jasper and Banff within a 3-week period (read more here).

The Mountain Terrain at Big White

Our boys are still too young to take ski lessons (Connor is only 1 years old) so that means we have to take turns on the hill. Nicole went up the first day with a ski host named Rick, a long time resident of Kelowna who splits his time between Big White and Kelowna.

This was Nicole’s first time snowboarding in almost 4 years. She’s been either pregnant or nursing each of the last 3 seasons. Cam went up with Rick the next day.

Here are more photos from our trip to Big White Ski Resort.

Dry champagne powder

Big White Ski Resort is known for having short lift lines and light, dry champagne powder. It offers a wide variety of terrain, from deep powder bowls to wide-open glades and long groomed trails.

The longest run on the mountain, called the Around the World Route, is 7.2 km (4.5 miles) and runs from the top of the T-Bar to Bottom of Gem Lake. It’s a real leg burner!

The Summit sits at 2,319m (7,606 ft) and the Village Centre at 1,755m (5,757 ft).

Happy Valley Adventure Centre

The great thing about Big White is that there are plenty of winter offerings besides skiing. Happy Valley Adventure Centre, an area located below the village gondola (the free gondola is a fun ride for kids), is THE place for kids and family activities.

Happy Valley Adventure Centre has multiple beginner hills and carpet lifts for little ones to learn to ski or snowboard.

And, it’s home to the Mega Snow Coaster Tube Park, Canada’s highest skating rink, a 60-foot ice climbing tower, snowmobiling tours and horse-drawn sleigh rides.

Mega Snow Coaster Tube Park

We visited the Mega Snow Coaster Tube Park to see if Braydon would be interested in snow tubing. We took him snow tubing last year at Sun Peaks Resort and it freaked him out to the point of tears. He wanted nothing to do with it last year, so we were hopeful his attitude would be different this year.

The Mega Snow Coaster Tube Park has 5 specially groomed lanes.

Tubes are provided with the purchase of the lift ticket. At 15 months old, Connor was too small to participate (everyone must have their own tube and he’s too small to go alone), so we took turns going down the hill with Braydon.

He was a little hesitant at first, but he bravely went along with it. We each sat in our own tube as the lift pulled us to the top of the hill, with one of us holding on to Braydon’s tube.

The tubing lanes are actually pretty fast, much faster than we thought they’d be.

When we got to the bottom Braydon turned to me said, “That’s not scary Daddy. That’s fun!”

He ended up having a great time.

At the base of the tube park was a crackling campfire with free hot chocolate – a nice touch.

Climbing the ice tower at Big White

Another adrenaline-filled activity is climbing the 60 foot ice tower located in the Happy Valley Adventure Centre. Because we spent our days snowboarding, we scheduled our climbs for the evening, just before the sun went down.

Fortunately, Mother Nature showed up and delivered a gorgeous sunset filled with pink, purple and blues.

I’d like to say that we sat on the side of that steep ice tower and embraced the magical sunset, but, truth be told, we were too focused on not falling. It’s a lot harder than it looks!

Though, to be fair, it does look pretty hard.

Neither of us made it to the top, but we gave it a good shot. It’s a fun activity if you’re looking for some adventure.

Braydon really wanted to give it a try but the ice picks were too heavy for him. The staff saw the disappointment in his face and quickly jumped to action. They found him a small pair of crampons and a child size hard hat. He was happy to be “a big boy” like the ice climbers. Super cute.

Where to stay at Big White Ski Resort?

What we love about Big White is that it’s a true ski-in/ski-out mountain, regardless of where you stay.

Staying in the village is a great option for families because it’s close to restaurants, pubs, shopping, kid activities, chair lifts and the main lodge.

We stayed at the Chateau Big White (learn more here), conveniently located in the heart of the village and directly beside the top of Plaza Chair lift.

This was the first time I’ve had a chair lift take me directly to my hotel.

Chateau Big White

In the above photo, if you look to your left, beside the hotel (that’s the Chateau Big White), you will see a small fence. That’s where the Plaza Chair disembarks. From there, you walk 20 feet to the hotel entrance.

You can’t get much more convenient than that!

We stayed in suite 409, which was the perfect fit for our family size and needs. It has a full kitchen and dining table, two bathrooms, and two separate bedrooms – one with a queen bed, the other with two bunk beds.

Braydon loves bunk beds, so he was pretty excited about sleeping on the bottom bunk (it only took 4 head bonks before he figured out you can’t stand up on the lower bunk bed).

The suite overlooks the village centre. The above picture was captured from the living room of our hotel suite. This view provided much needed entertainment for the boys when the groomers cleaned the village snow each morning.

What about the food at Big White?

There are plenty of great dining options in the village. We spent our first evening at the Black Diamond Bar & Grill, located on the ground floor of the Chateau Big White.

We also had lunch at the restaurant because our hotel gave us two complimentary drink tickets (we have a strict policy to never say no to free beer). I’d recommend the grilled Caesar salad with a Tree Brewing Beach Blonde Lager – it’s a perfect pairing.

big-white-ski-resort-65

Globe Cafe at Big White Ski Resort

We enjoyed a lovely dinner at Globe Café, located directly across from the Chateau Big White. That’s the great thing about Big White Village – everything is within 100 meters. 

We sampled a variety of delicious tapas, including seared scallops, tuna tartare, potato croquettes and bruschetta – pictured above.

We also enjoyed traditional Irish pub fare at the Blarney Stone Irish Tavern. The steak and Guinness pie is the real deal – go for it!

The kids menu at Blarney Stone was a big hit with our boys because it offers traditional dairy free sausages. Our boys love sausages but finding ones that are dairy free can be a challenge (Connor is allergic to dairy and eggs).

Our time at Big White was filled with winter fun.

From snowboarding to ice climbing to snow tubing to fine dining. We love that Big White embraces family travel and creates a welcoming atmosphere for those with little ones – it’s so refreshing and it makes a world of difference.

If you plan to visit Big White Ski Resort, be sure to check out its calendar of events because there’s always something going on. During our stay, the mountain hosted a Carnival night for the kids that included bouncy castles, games, popcorn and cotton candy, all free of charge. 

More from our trip to Big White Ski Resort: Your turn! What is your favourite ski resort?

Share your favorite ski resort in the comments below and tell us what you love about it.

Getting our snow fix at Big White Ski Resort is a post from: Traveling Canucks

Related posts:

  1. Taking a family ski trip to Sasquatch Mountain Resort? Read this first.
  2. 30 Photos to get you stoked for the ski season
  3. Riding the overnight train from Vancouver to Jasper with VIA Rail
  4. Further proof that British Columbia is ridiculously beautiful

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Tue, 12 Nov 2019 03:00:26 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Travel Featured Canada Adventures Jasper Vancouver Connor Snowboarding Guinness British Columbia Ski Resort Banff Cypress Mountain Happy Valley Cam Nicole Rick Kelowna Caesar Blarney Stone Braydon Big White Chateau Big White Big White Ski Resort Okanagan Valley Sun Peaks Resort White Ski Resort Braydon He Sasquatch Mountain Resort White Ski Resort Kelowna Happy Valley Adventure Centre Mega Snow Coaster Tube Park Canada Mega Snow Coaster Tube Park Black Diamond Bar Grill Globe Café Big White Village Big White Ski Resort Challenge
Skullcandy Vert review: Wireless buds for the mountain http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/digitaltrends/~3/5QoIcBmn_OA/ ]]> Mon, 28 Oct 2019 18:17:31 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Mobile Winter Trends Skiing Home Theater Snowboarding Helmets Wireless Earbuds Skullcandy Vert Whistler, BC by the numbers http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/MatadorNetwork/~3/KkV37yqoZwI/

S kis or snowboards. Snowshoes or snow tubes. For snow fans of any variety, all lift tickets up the slopes of Whistler Blackcomb are golden. This is, you might say, the best winter on the planet.

Whistler sits high in the Coast Mountains north of Vancouver — you may recall that the two teamed up to host the Winter Olympics back in 2010 — and you can get from one to the other in under two hours via the Sea to Sky Highway. If gorgeous views are your thing, budget extra time for photo stops along the way, especially of Howe Sound, North America’s southernmost fjord.

And that’s just the first factoid to keep in mind — here are the rest. You ready to let yourself out?

For boarders and skiers Whistler, BC by the numbers

Photo: Tourism Whistler/Eric Berger

Winter sports fans of all kinds head to Whistler for the plentiful snow and almost-endless ways to play in it. Whistler Blackcomb ski resort opens in late November and doesn’t close till the end of May. Its two lift-accessible peaks receive some 38 feet of snow annually, and the glacier atop Blackcomb is skiable even in the height of summer.

Whistler Blackcomb also lays claim to North America’s most abundant skiable terrain. Whistler Mountain is the big guy at 4,757 acres, supplemented by Blackcomb’s 3,414 acres. But Blackcomb wins the height award with a top chairlift elevation of 7,494 feet, while Whistler’s is “just” 7,160 feet. Your ears will pop going both up and down the 5,280 feet — yes, that’s exactly 1 mile — of vertical. A total of 36 lifts whiz as many as 70,000 passengers every hour to access the two mountains’ 200+ marked ski and snowboard trails.

Whistler, BC by the numbers

Photo: Tourism Whistler/Justa Jeskova

There’s no need to pick just one mountain, either — a single lift ticket grants access to both Whistler and Blackcomb. And instead of skiing down to the Village to switch mountains, you can ride the PEAK 2 PEAK Gondola between them. The PEAK 2 PEAK breaks two world records: the longest continuous lift system in the world and the highest lift of its kind, at 1,430 feet above Fitzsimmons Creek. While the 11-minute journey is long enough for a catnap, sharp-eyed passengers might spot lynx in winter and bears during spring ski season. It’s even easier through the two glass-bottomed cabins.

You’re equally welcome at Whistler Blackcomb whether you’re a boarder or a skier. Blackcomb was the first major resort in BC to welcome snowboarders, who were banned on most ski hills around the world during the 1980s. In addition to the regular terrain, each mountain has 4 designated terrain parks, plus Blackcomb has a cross track and a halfpipe.

Instead-of-ski and après-ski Whistler, BC by the numbers

Photo: Tourism Whistler/Justa Jeskova

For those who want to embrace the snow without planks of any kind strapped to their feet, Whistler has plenty of instead-of-ski activities (in addition to the après drinks, food, and festivities). Here’s a list to keep you busy:

  • Speed across a network of ziplines by day or under the stars.
  • Bungee jump from a 160-foot-high bridge.
  • Take the Tube Lift up to slide down 7 tubing lanes.
  • Have a team of sled dogs pull you at speeds up to 20mph.
  • Venture out in snowshoes to explore trails in 4 snowshoeing areas.
  • Take on the world’s fastest ice track and live your Olympic dreams — you can ride with friends in a four-passenger bobsleigh or go it alone, headfirst, aboard a skeleton sled.
  • Check out all the activities where Kids Play Free. Whistler Blackcomb won the 2019 Readers’ Choice Award for Best International Ski Resort for Families.
Whistler, BC by the numbers

Photo: Tourism Whistler/Coast Mountain Photography

If shivering in snow isn’t your thing, know that even in the coldest months temperatures in Whistler Village average between 18 and 28 degrees Fahrenheit. Thanks to the proximity to the Pacific Ocean, daytime temps up on the slopes average 22 degrees Fahrenheit — just right for shredding, carving, and schussing.

There’s joy in watching other people ski, too — especially while staying warm in your own hotel suite or an all-season outdoor pool or hot tub. It gets even warmer at Scandinave Spa Whistler — they’ve got 2 outdoor hot pools, 2 saunas, 2 eucalyptus steam baths, and their signature hot-cold-relax experience (where you can melt into a hot pool and then cool off beneath a Nordic waterfall).

Whistler, BC by the numbers

Photo: Tourism Whistler/Justa Jeskova

Or just keep an eye on the snow from the shops in pedestrian-friendly Whistler Village or one of the many restaurants, 18 of them directly on the mountains. Most anywhere you go will be within walking distance of your hotel, and you won’t be missing out on any of the action that is après in Whistler. It’s an experience in itself, a chance to celebrate your day in the mountains, to refuel, refresh, and reconnect with family and friends over a bite and a craft beer (or fancy fine dining!).

Whistler, BC by the numbers

Photo: Tourism Whistler/Kevin Arnold

After you’ve caught some air (even if it was just checking out the scenery from the PEAK 2 PEAK Gondola), you have plenty of options of where to catch some Zs. Choose from classic hotels — many with multiple bedrooms and full kitchens — chalets, B&Bs, hostels, and campsites. Within a third of a mile of the ski lifts lie 20,000 pillows on which to rest your head, with or without your toque (that, by the way, is Canadian for winter hat).

Whatever your number, you’ll be in 7th Heaven at Whistler Blackcomb (hint: Blackcomb’s 7th Heaven Express takes you right there).

The post Whistler, BC by the numbers appeared first on Matador Network.

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Powder sharing agreement: plans to create Italy’s biggest ski area https://www.theguardian.com/travel/2019/oct/20/skiing-champoluc-plans-italy-biggest-ski-area-zermatt The small Alps resort of Champoluc, with its famed off-piste, is set to be linked with mighty, pricey Zermatt. So go now, while it’s relatively untouched

Is there such a thing as too much snow? The week I arrived in Champoluc, in Italy’s Valle d’Aosta, the whole village seemed to be buried. Trees resembled sticks of candyfloss, huge mounds hid cars that would take days to dig out, and the air itself was laced with a diaphanous glittery frost.

Each morning a fresh set of hastily printed warning posters was plastered over the walls of the Chalet Hotel Champoluc, which can be booked through Inghams, one of few operators that offer trips to this resort: “High avalanche risk today,” read one. “Avoid the area around the church.”

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Sun, 20 Oct 2019 06:00:55 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Travel Family Holidays Ski Resorts Snowboarding Europe Holidays Skiing Holidays Alps Holidays Winter Sports Holidays Italy Holidays
Testing the iPhone 11 Pro with Snowboarder Mark McMorris https://coolhunting.com/tech/testing-the-iphone-11-pro-with-snowboarder-mark-mcmorris/ Mon, 14 Oct 2019 16:41:35 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Apple Videos Outdoors Photography Design Instagram Sports Tech Cameras Innovation New Zealand Phones Snowboarding Content Creators Mark McMorris Max Apple Iphone 11 Pro Three Camera System New stylish and sustainable ski kit – in pictures https://www.theguardian.com/travel/gallery/2019/oct/13/new-stylish-and-sustainable-skiing-kit-skiwear-in-pictures A new wave of skiwear uses recycled materials and sustainable manufacturing to produce snazzy but practical gear, from mittens to customised skis

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Sun, 13 Oct 2019 05:00:13 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Travel Snowboarding Green travel Shopping trips Skiing Holidays Winter Sports Holidays
20 of the best Alps ski resorts by train https://www.theguardian.com/travel/2019/oct/12/20-best-alps-ski-resorts-by-train-rail-france-switzerland-austria-italy Think skiing in the Alps has to mean taking a flight? Think again: our rail and ski expert picks resorts to suit all abilities – all accessible by train from London

SWITZERLAND

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Sat, 12 Oct 2019 02:00:21 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Travel Rail Travel Ski Resorts Snowboarding Europe Holidays France Holidays Skiing Holidays Alps Holidays Switzerland Holidays Italy Holidays Austria Holidays
Pistes in our time: What’s new for the 2019-20 ski season https://www.theguardian.com/travel/2019/oct/11/new-skiing-2019-20-budget-ski-season-hotels-resorts-green-initiatives From cool hotels to fun, budget skiing trips for young people and some welcome green initiatives, there’s plenty happening on the slopes this winter

The past few years have seen a boom in tourism to Georgia: its cities for their fashion and food; and the Caucasus for hiking and mountain life. Things aren’t slowing down for winter, with several operators offering pricey but enticing new ski adventures to intrepid intermediate-plus downhillers. Mountain Heaven has a nine-night guided group tour departing 6 March, taking in Gudauri (the biggest resort with 80km of slopes), Bakuriani and the country’s newest resort, Mestia, as well as time in Tbilisi (€2,100pp including ski guiding, half-board, lift passes, a show in the capital and wine tasting, excluding flights). Silk Road Adventures has a seven-day break based in Gudauri, with a day of wine-tasting (four departures between January and March, £2,480pp including full-board, car with driver, guide, transfers, lift pass and ski equipment, excluding flights).

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Fri, 11 Oct 2019 01:31:43 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Travel Georgia Ski Resorts Top 10s Snowboarding Tbilisi Skiing Holidays Winter Sports Holidays Mestia Gudauri Bakuriani
30 Photos to get you stoked for the ski season http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TravelingCanucks/~3/Vjkg5GlxFFI/ Snowboarding, Skiing, Whistler, British Columbia

This post has been sponsored by ATG Runway Lighting Solutions.

Photos to get you stoked for the ski season!

Ski season is officially upon us! With snow on the brain, we thought we’d dig into the photo archives and share some of our favorite photos from previous snowboarding trips.

This winter we plan to visit a new ski resort as part of my quest to visit every ski resort in British Columbia. I’ve made little progress on this list over the past few years, so it’s time to start planning my next move. Do you have any recommendations?

Tignes Le Lac, Tignes, France

Cypress Mountain, British Columbia, Canada

Cypress Mountain, British Columbia, Canada


Read next – Powder Days at Manning Park Ski Resort

 

Fresh lines on Cypress Mountain, host mountain of the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver.

 Sun Peaks Resort in Kamloops, British Columbia

Mount Baker Ski Resort, Washington, USA

 Mount Baker in Washington State, United States

Snowboarding, Cypress Mountain, Vancouver, British Columbia

Related – 5 Awesome BC Ski Resorts You’ve Never Heard Of

Powder day on Manning Park in central British Columbia.

Lake Louise Ski Resort, Banff National Park, Alberta, Canada

Big White Ski Resort, Kelowna, British Columbia, Canada

 Big White Ski Resort in Kelowna, British Columbia, Canada

Mount Seymour in Vancouver, British Columbia

Mount Seymour in Vancouver, British Columbia

Related – Snowboarding at Lake Louise Ski Resort 

Cypress Mountain in Vancouver, British Columbia

Big White Ski Resort, Kelowna, British Columbia, Canada

Lake Louise Ski Resort in Banff National Park, Alberta

Tignes Ski Resort in the French Alps

Sun Peaks Village, Kamloops, British Columbia

Lake Louise Ski Resort in Banff National Park, Alberta

Cypress Mountain, Vancouver, British Columbia

Tignes Ski Resort in France, home of the 1992 Winter Olympics

Spectacular views of the Coast Mountains from the Peak of Whistler Mountain

Big White Ski Resort in Kelowna, British Columbia

Mount Baker in Washington State, United States

Whistler-Blackcomb ski resort in Whistler, British Columbia

Cypress Mountain, Vancouver, British Columbia

Fresh lines at Manning Park, British Columbia

Snow-covered village in Tignes, France

Silver Star Mountain Resort, Vernon, British Columbia, Canada

Night snowboarding at Cypress Mountain in Vancouver, British Clumbia

Related – Jasper might be the most Canadian town in Canada

Jasper National Park, Alberta, Canada

Whistler Mountain, Whistler, British Columbia

More posts from past snowboarding trips: What is your favorite ski resort?

Share your favourites in the comments section below.

 

30 Photos to get you stoked for the ski season is a post from: Traveling Canucks

Related posts:

  1. Hiking to the Hidden Whistler Train Wreck
  2. 25 FREE Things to do in Vancouver in 2019
  3. Taking a family ski trip to Sasquatch Mountain Resort? Read this first.
  4. 22 photos from Alberta’s Canadian Rockies we can’t stop looking at

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Thu, 10 Oct 2019 15:00:46 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Travel France Canada Pictures Jasper Vancouver Whistler Snowboarding British Columbia Alberta Rockies Banff National Park Travel Stories Beautiful Bc Series Canadian Rockies Cypress Mountain Trip Ideas Vancouver British Columbia Big White Ski Resort Lake Louise Ski Resort Mount Seymour Whistler Mountain Tignes Ski Resort Washington State United States Kelowna British Columbia Canada Mount Seymour Banff National Park Alberta Tignes Ski Resort Whistler Mountain Big White Ski Resort Kelowna British Columbia Mount Baker Canada Jasper National Park Manning Park Sasquatch Mountain Resort Lake Louise Ski Resort Cypress Mountain Manning Park British Columbia Snow Alps Powder Days Manning Park Ski Resort Taking ATG Runway Lighting Solutions Photos Manning Park Ski Resort Fresh Vancouver Sun Peaks Resort Kamloops British Columbia Mount Baker Washington State United States Whistler Blackcomb