Bloglikes - Snowboarding https://www.bloglikes.com/c/snowboarding en-US Thu, 05 Aug 2021 01:28:45 +0000 Sat, 06 Apr 2013 00:00:00 +0000 FeedWriter In his own words – Part 2 – Terje Haakonsen continues his personal growth journey https://blower.media/in-his-own-words-part-2-terje-haakonsen-continues-his-personal-growth-journey/
Terje Haakonsen. All photos courtesy Adam Moran

Life moves quick, even more so on the Internet. But when personal growth is the object, sometimes that same amount of time can creep by… That said, we’ve finally received and compiled Terje’s promised responses to this post from April in regards to supporting the LGBT community. Read on. – BG

ICYMI: Dear Terje – a response from the LGBTQ+ community
Terje in Pemberton, BC. Photo: Adam Moran

Jay C asks: What are you doing differently now other than your use of language and recognising that in the past it may have been harmful (albeit not on purpose). I think it’s great to apologise and recognise where we may have taken a misstep, but other than this, how do you think you can help the LGBT+ community going forward?

Hi Jay. That’s a good question. To be honest, staying mindful of my language and taking care not to to use words or terminology that can be perceived as offensive by individuals and groups alike is the main challenge, and I have to admit, it’s not always easy. So many variables to keep track of. I have always tried to be authentic and frank in my communication. A straight talker. And that automatically means not always hitting the right notes. I know that at times (often) this has made me seem blunt, insensitive or arrogant. So doing better with my communication, being more aware of how others might be perceiving what I say, is the ongoing challenge. Without compromising my own values of being authentic and speaking plainly. But to answer your question about how I can help the LGBTQ+ community. The simple answer is, if anybody asks for help or support, I will give it. The longer version is that my whole career has been spent speaking out against the Olympics, and a huge part of that is because they stomp on human rights. I am a lifelong human rights advocate, and as part of that I consider myself an ally of the LGBTQ+ community, always have. I know my past jokes and misuse of the term ‘gay’ didn’t seem like I was/am, but that’s where appearances and intention are often not the same thing. As someone who considered themselves an open ally, I thought I could say those things without being seen as an enemy. I was 100% mistaken on that score. So, as an ally who has been called an enemy, moving forwards I aim to ‘help’ by expressing my support and respect for the LGBT community whenever the opportunity presents. Terje. Photo: Adam Moran
“Drop Terje” says: Burton and everyone just needs to be done with this guy already. This apology is trash. A lot of blame shifting, gaslighting, and thinking that proximity to gayness absolves him of any wrongdoing. Glad you had fun at an LGBTQIA+ wedding, Terje, but you’re still a homophobic asshole who is utterly clueless. Get dropped, learn more, do better.

Some pretty straight talk here. Your response covers most of the negative comments I got for my apology – blame shifting, gaslighting and ‘thinking that proximity to gayness’ absolves’ me from wrongdoing. And that I am a homophobe. So I’ll try to answer those four here.

Blame shifting. I guess this is about how I said english was my second language. It’s true that using “gay” as a term for “not cool & lame” was something I learned as a teenager, from my U.S. peers. But I don’t say that to absolve myself from blame. It’s more about giving some context, like how and why, as a definitely-not-homophobic person, I would use the word like this in the first place. It was wrong to misuse the term like this, and an apology was needed.

Gaslighting. I had to look this one up. Apparently, it means manipulating other people into doubting their sanity. Hmmm, I don’t see how that could apply to my apology. The only thing I can think of: because I made comments or jokes that some considered homophobic, then I must be a homophobe – yet I say I am not a homophobe. And my answer to that is… I am not a homophobe, so there was no homophobic intention. In hindsight, I see they could have been interpreted as homophobic, so I’m not doubting anyone’s sanity. If I didn’t know me, maybe I’d have read those things and wondered if I was a homophobe too.

Proximity. I never claimed that my proximity to gayness absolves me from anything. I was wrong. I fully accepted my wrongdoing, and my apology was sincere.

Homophobe. If I have gay friends, if I started a family with a bisexual partner, if I openly supported LGBT rights and athletes around the Sochi Olympics (every Olympics) – am I likely to be a homophobe? Sorry if that is just repeating what I wrote in the apology, but it’s true.

Terje Haakonsen, Asakidake Japan, Hokkaido. Photo: Adam Moran ICYMI: Dear Terje – a response from the LGBTQ+ community]]>
Thu, 08 Jul 2021 11:52:40 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Human Rights Interviews Sport Olympics Snowboarding Sochi Terje Haakonsen Burton Pemberton Terje LGBTQ rights Adam Moran Hot Shit Jay That Adam Moran Life Adam Moran Jay C Adam Moran Drop Terje Terje Haakonsen Asakidake
Killington opens for Downhill MTB – Successful attempts are made! https://blower.media/killington-opens-for-downhill-mtb-successful-attempts-are-made/
Your willing and slightly able tour guide, Brooke Geery.

My wisest uncle once told me, the quickest way to get good at riding a bike (or anything, really) is to start at the top. My interpretation of this is: skip the pads, spandex and full-face helmet (they are simply devices that enable you to fall), and be sure to arrive at Killington for your first attempt at downhill mountain biking (DH MTB, yo!) on opening weekend. Ya know, when there’s only one lift open and every super serious downhiller in a 500-mile radius is there too!

For the record: the last time I attempted DH MTB at the Beast, it didn’t have a catchy acronym and the K1 gondola was a double chair. 25 years ago, and I left bleeding and in need of several stitches.

But last fall, when deciding between a basic winter-only pass and Beast 365 pass, I said ‘fuck it, let’s give downhill MTB another shot.’

My trusty steed and the ever important medicinal CL Smooth.

Surely the equipment has improved, and if the summer terrain is anything like the winter stuff at Killington, that’s improved, too. Add in my co-workers’ encouraging words and my recent pandemic-inspired fitness journey, and my physical confidence was at a relative high.

In addition to all this bluster, I was outfitted with base-model Schwinn mountain bike from Dicks’ in Rutland, a no-face-mask helmet from Giro that matched my outfit, and a really dope Carhartt rain coat I got at Rutland’s-best-store, Tractor Supply. My Airblaster wizard hood completed the outfit, because… did I mention it was freaking cold, Bob?

Turns out I wasn’t the only one with this idea…

With temps in the low 40s and the impending doom of rain chilling things down to the bone, Sunday, May 30 (day 2 of the summer of 2021) was as good a day as any to pop my modern downhill cherry.

To say I felt under dressed, well, that’s something I’d prefer not to admit to in writing. Plus, I looked damn good. But the best DH MTB riders with the sickest, most appropriate gear were all there too, making me question my footwear decision of muck boots.

Luckily, I live mostly inside my own head, so ignored all the signs that this shit might actually be dangerous and rolled right through the singles line. At the front, I randomly loaded the lift with my cousins from the recently-concluded snowboard season, one of whom had done some electrical work at my house this past winter. Small world!? Check.

Kitted.

As I nervously cracked a medicinal CL smooth, they assured me I’d be fine. This instilled at least as much confidence as two mountain friends’ opinions ever could. They also suggested they’d be having their own medicinal safety meeting at the top, which I quickly invited myself to, before the smart part of my brain reminded me the more keen senses I had for this experiment, the better!

At the top of the snowshed lift I finally realized something. That bunny slope trail I can rip down in about 4 seconds on my snowboard? It looks a lot longer and scarier without snow and with every single rock showing…

…but, I was committed.

One of many rules to live by at a resort if you wanna hang with the locals is that you never take the lift down unless walking is your only other option (gross, walking.) And since I did have a bike, I was doing it, dude!

From the top, it looks pretty at least.

I procrastinated the inevitable by snapping some pics of the lush greenery and dark clouds from Vermont’s (hopefully) final cold spell of the season. Eventually, I had finished my Coors light — it was now or never.

My cousins on the lift, my friends on the park crew and the signs at Killington, suggested I take it easy my first run. So as any logical person might do, I opted for ‘Easy Street.’

With a name like that, how could I go wrong?

Must be cool to have friends!

Turns out, DH MTB is all go — no right or wrong! Something about how gravity works, I think. Thankfully, the fresh new brakes on my bike worked well, and I would know — I tested them aggressively. I also tested the brakes and skills of everyone who ripped past me as I tried hard   to convince myself to let go, just a little.

The actual experts zipped past shouting “on your left,” as if my brain could possibly tell the difference between directionals while I white-knuckled around the berms. One guy shouted out a supportive, “you’re doing great” as I squealed an apology for being little more than a slow-moving obstacle.

But through whatever miracle, I bounced, skidded and bobbled my way down the first section of Easy Street, coming out unscathed on a nice flat service road. There, two youths waited for their crew with shit-eating grins in their faces.

I excitedly exclaimed, “you guys do this for fun!? This is terrifying!”

The laughed, disagreed and and pointed me in the direction of ‘Roller.’

“The easiest way down,” they said.

The downill MTB version of a perfectly groomed cat track… #drool

The good news is, my the second half of the trail, I actually did feel slightly better. Roller was as advertised — rolling enough that I didn’t need to hold my brakes the whole time!

Dare I say, I was starting to feel like… not a beginner? I mean my kit still screamed Jerry, but the loosening-tension in my back said, ‘you might make it to the bottom without dying!’

Not a bad view from here.

In fact, by the third and final section of Snowshed, I was actually starting to be the one the yelling. I passed a group of women who had stopped to enjoy the view.

“What did they do with all the snow!?” I shouted without a pause, making myself cackle and eliciting a classic East Coast sarcastic “sorry” from one of them.

The people I’d just spent the spring with? It turns out, they just switched from snowboarding/skiing to downhill for the summer.

RRRRRRipping.

When I finally emerged (unscathed) at the bottom and could see the lift, lodge and parking lot, it was executive decision time. As a freshly-intermediate downhill mountain biker, I made the was a quick one to go back to the car and switch to skateboarding. My back and legs hurt, and I was ready to not suck at something again. Plus, the rain drops were threatening and if I wanted to get in some loops on the Darkside mini, well, time was a-wastin’!

Alas, my attempt was foiled – and the rain started to fall shortly after anway! But hey, that one-run counts for a lot of back-to-back axle stalls, so I’ll take it!

View this post on Instagram

A post shared by Rick Kuehl (@vtsundayshredder)

p.s. This is what it looks like when you get good 

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Tue, 01 Jun 2021 07:18:04 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Dicks Sport Features Bob Snowboarding Vermont Rutland Killington Mtb Jerry Coors New Skills Brooke Geery Hot Shit Beast365 Downhill Mtb Learning Is Fun DH MTB Rick Kuehl
LilHomie x BIG SNOW: Harley’s first trip to Big Snow American Dream New Jersey https://blower.media/lilhomie-x-big-snow-harleys-first-trip-to-big-snow-american-dream/
When Mommy showed me the videos of Big Snow in my birthstate of New Jersey, I knew I had to be there. How is there snow inside? In the summer? And they got a chairlift inside too? It’s like a whole mountain, but inside! Luckily, my mommy and daddy said we could go Memorial Day weekend, so we did.

Parking lot swagger! I walked inside and it was really real! The mall had a whole mountain inside! Even though I was looking at it with my own eyes, I still couldn’t really believe I was about to snowboard. And why are all these people wearing normal clothes? Don’t they want to go snowboarding too? Phew, that was enough thinking, I just want to shred! As soon as I got inside the mountain, my social media fans were all up in my biz! It was so cool to see them and hang out. All this time I thought I was only a big deal in Killington and inside the Instagram, but it turns out, I’m cool in Jersey, too! People kept showing me boards with my stickers on them, and I was like, “that’s me!” Headed into the spot! I couldn’t believe that some of my Darkside homies showed up too! The first run was a little weird, but everyone — workers and fellow shredders — were so nice and stayed outta my way. By the second run, I had it down, and by the third run I was shredding!  On the 20th run, I was tired, so we decided to go home! It wasn’t too crowded, at least not for me, because everyone let me rip! The vibes were good, and all the people we’re so nice to the homie. That’s me! This place is crazy! Thanks Big Snow and thanks to everyone who supports and sponsors me: Dominator Wax, Shred Dog, Darkside and Blower! I can’t wait to go back tomorrow! Get your own @lilhomie802 stickers here: ONE > MANY]]>
Sun, 30 May 2021 14:40:14 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Videos Sport Features New Jersey Mommy Snowboarding Jersey Harley Don Killington Boss Baby Hot Shit Big Snow Big Snow American Dream Harley Ruffle
Jess Kimura “Learning to Drown” documentary premieres June 10 https://blower.media/jess-kimura-learning-to-drown-documentary-premieres-june-10/
When you lose someone you can’t live with, you can choose to quit, or you can choose to keep going. Jess Kimura chose the latter, and maybe even opted for a little improvement in the process. Filmmaker Ben Knight and producer Travis Rummel made a movie about it, and the flick will premiere at the Tribeca Film Festival on June 10, 2021.

You can’t go in person, because it’s sold out, but you can learn more get a virtual screening pass here: https://tribecafilm.com/films/learning-to-drown-2021

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Thu, 27 May 2021 08:18:48 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Videos Sport Features Snowboarding Tribeca Film Festival Ben Knight Jess Kimura Learning To Drown Snowboard Documentary Travis Rummel
GLOSS Podcast: The artistry of snowboarding with Pika Burtner https://blower.media/gloss-podcast-the-artistry-of-snowboarding-with-pika-burtner/
All photos courtesy of Pika. by Halie McGee

This interview is an abridged version of Crude Conversations EP 90 The artistry of snowboarding with Pika Burtner . It’s part of an ongoing series between Crude and Blower Media called GLOSS, or the Gorgeous Ladies of Snowboarding and Skiing. In this episode, I talk with Christina Burtner, better known as Pika, a long-time artist, photographer and graphic designer in the snowboard industry. Listen to the podcast here :

Christina Burtner, better known as Pika, grew up watching and studying snowboard videos with the technical eye of an auteur. At 14, she started renting snowboard videos from Fairhaven Bike and Ski in Bellingham, Washington. She would always rewind the videos and return them on time. Fairhaven eventually offered her a job, which is where she worked until she went to college. At 18, she got a photography job at the University of Washington. It came with all the traditional benefits, including a steady paycheck, a 401k and healthcare. Because of that job, Pika—alongside her husband Jesse Burtner and Sean Genovese—was able to help create and fund Think Thank, a snowboard video production company. Think Thank would go on to create a category of snowboarding that focused on riding urban environments rather than backcountry ones. Pika describes Think Thank as an ongoing piece of art.

In 2014, Pika and Jesse had their son Ollie. At that moment, Pika says that she went from working on Think Thank to being a mother. It was a transition that caught her by surprise. So, in response, she began pursuing things she’s always been interested in. She says that as you get older, you feel like there’s less room for error, but that it’s also important to not be afraid to fail.

Cody Liska: Where are you right now?

Pika Burtner: Oh my god. I’m in Shelton, Washington, which is like an old logging town, kind of by the Hood Canal. Close to the Olympic National Forest. It’s very secluded. I mean, it’s like being in Anchorage, [Alaska] in 2012, when everyone was dressing like it was still 1995. It’s like that—like Ed Hardy, Anarchy sunglasses, JNCO jeans, chain wallets. It’s like going into a time machine. You know what I’m talking about?

CL: Yeah, I know exactly what you’re talking about. Have you seen any Doc Martens? 

PB: Oh, so many. I think those are back in though, like in the mainstream. At least with moms that are trying to recapture their youth.

CL: So, you’re out there and you’re teaching?

PB: No, I’m here to just paint. I got this artist residency that I applied for and you get to stay in this cool cottage in the middle of the forest. And, I mean, it’s beautiful. It looks out over the water and they provide a space for women artists to write or draw or paint or make music. It’s really cool. Actually, it’s really rare; kind of special. So, I’m just making art for a week in Shelton, Washington while Jesse slaves with single parenthood by himself [laughs].

CL: It sounds amazing. I feel like you’re outside [right now]. I can hear the birds.

PB: I’m outside. It’s like 75 degrees. It’s amazing. And this is the one place that had a little bit of internet. It’s close to the router or something. I don’t know. Because the cottage is sort of like an offshoot from this main house that the internet comes from. It’s really funny. These people, like, make custom guns. It’s a really interesting juxtaposition of this custom, gun-making, mom and pop place and then right across the little country gravel driveway is this little spiritual, female oasis for creativity.

CL:  So, in our conversations leading up to this interview, I asked if you had anything specific you’d like to talk about and you mentioned how you were really into watching snowboard videos before you met your husband, Jesse. Why did you want to talk about that?

PB: You know, sometimes I just think it’s kind of a funny, special thing. Jesse and I were young kids and we had so much in common. So imagine this: it was less than a month after my 18th birthday, Jesse was 19 and we’re in Bellingham—and I’d been working at this bike and snowboard shop and I was so Bellingham, you know? I had khaki cargo pants and a fleece vest and Timberland hiking boots. He’s a skater guy and I just looked like a crunchy, granola Bellingham girl. And I had never gone to a kegger party before. And I had an older brother who was very protective of me in high school, so I could kind of go to them once in a while, but [my brother would] never let me drink. And I just got into a fight with my buddy and just wanted to mope around, but they dragged me to this party, and I was like, “Oh my God, I’m at my first real kegger.”

So, I get a red cup and drink out of a keg and I got a little drunk, actually. Jesse never drank, he still hardly drinks. So, of course, I was like the dumb, drunk girl. But then we started talking about stuff. ”What kind of music do you like,” you know? We were talking already about, “Oh, what movies do you like?” And I was like, “I just saw this movie Bottle Rocket by this guy named Wes Anderson.” Back then there were not too many people who knew about Wes Anderson. And I really liked this guy named Hal Hartley, and then Jesse was talking about Jim Jarmusch and David Lynch and Stanley Kubrick. And I was talking about how I just watched The Rope and how there’s like only two cuts in the whole movie—you can’t even see them because they’re edited so seamlessly. And then we started to talk about snowboarding and I was telling him how I got a job [at a snowboard shop] because I watched so many snowboard videos. He was like, “Oh my God, I make snowboard videos.” It was funny how much we had in common from the very beginning. We pretty much hung out every single day after that. We just liked to talk about stuff and go on adventures. It was fun. 

CL: Do you feel like it’s been difficult, or maybe it hasn’t been difficult, to have a career in snowboarding viewed as independent of Jesse’s career and snowboarding?

PB: Oh, for sure. I mean, I guess that is one reason why I do like to say I was into snowboard movies before I met Jesse. I was who I was before I met Jesse. And I think in most relationships you want to have independence from your spouse, right? You want to get there on your own merits. And if you know us, you know we’re pretty different. We have different skills. He’s much more big picture thinking and he’s a visionary, really. And I really get stuck in the weeds. Like, I have blinders. I get into the technicalities of things. I’m a designer, I like to push pixels. So we’re kind of a team, really. So, I like to think that I bring my own dynamite to the…

CL: Explosion?

PB: To the explosion, yeah. We like to make things and he does it his way and I do it my way and we just work well together. But, you know, we can’t even talk about this without mentioning Geno—Sean Genovese. It was really like Jesse and Sean and I that started Thank Thank in a lot of ways.

by Halie McGee

CL: I read that the Think Thank logo was the first logo that you ever designed.

PB: I did and I don’t want to take all the credit because, you know, Woody [Engle]—Gus [Engle’s] brother—he kind of did the first version of it. He drew the Think Thank [font], but it had an upside down “i” and stuff. But then I kind of reworked it and then made the brain thought bubble part of it. Yeah, that was the first logo I really ever made. I’m pretty proud of that, actually. None of us knew what we were doing. We were all just making it up.

CL: And what’s going on with Think Thank now?

PB: Well, Scott [Stevens] and Jesse worked really hard on Suzy Greenberg. And that was kind of a triumph. I did the cover of that movie—it was like a Green Day inspired cover. It took three years to film and that was… I don’t know how people do that honestly. It kind of destroyed us.

CL:  In what way?

PB: Well, we had a newborn baby and Jesse had a full-time job. Because, you know, he’s the Marketing Director for Mervin now. And then Scott was hurt and he was trying to recover, but also trying to film and then getting hurt. Like destroyed in that kind of way. So, I think everyone’s kind of recovering from it still. But I think Think Thank will always be there. I mean, remember Ted [Borland] did Falling Leaf? He took over Think Think for a while and used it as a platform for his baby. And then he became the filmer for Snowboarder and did all the Snowboarder movies. So, [Think Thank] is like this bastion for people who want to use it if they have a message to convey.

CL: Has that transition been hard, to let go of or even relinquish some control over the direction of something you’ve put so much time and energy into?

PB: In fact, I think that’s the beauty of Think Thank, you know? Sean Lucey took it over basically completely for like the last three movies. And it was so welcomed. You know, that’s what you have to do with something as organic and vibrant and alive as snowboarding. You know, where you want new, fun, crazy stuff happening? You know? You can’t just be like the old 40-year-old person trying to be a kid. We’re not kids anymore, Cody [laughs].

CL: I believe you [laughs].

PB: Well, you might be. How old are you?

CL: 33

PB: You’re gonna be perpetually, like, youthful. I think of you still as a 9-year-old. 

CL: Well, I wish that I had my head of hair still from when I was 9 years old. That would be beautiful.

PB: Oh, did you lose your hair?

CL: It’s on its way out, yea [laughs].

PB: Well, women… we just scoff because men are just worried about losing their hair. Boy, if you only knew what women have to go through. Just, like, so many body changes. It’s scary.

CL: I feel like I want to say something to that, but I just don’t know what it is. I should have a response at the ready [laughs].

PB: [Laughs] One thing that was remarkable to me was, I had a hell of a time finding maternity snow pants. So for all the women who are trying to fight for equal pay and rights and stuff, let’s just say we also need to fight for letting women still be able to snowboard—when they’re safely able to snowboard—while they’re pregnant. Maybe that’s why they don’t want to encourage pregnant women to snowboard. I never thought of it that way [laughs]. But Airblaster hooked me up with some high-waisted, elastic pants and they were great. They’re dude pants, but they were awesome. So, thanks Max Tokunaga for letting me keep snowboarding while pregnant.

CL:  How many women would you say are involved in the snowboard industry on the creative or production level?

PB: Oh, well, guess what? Big, huge, ginormous shout out to the Lib Tech Art Director—who’s been my, like, handler over these many, many years. Her name is Annette Veihelmann. She’s been their director for like 20 years. Did you know that? The Art Director for Lib Tech is like a total badass lady. And she’s awesome and she’s very talented and she just quietly does the art direction for the freakin’ sickest art snowboard brand on the planet. And of course, Barrett Christy. She’s like a total legend, badass, awesome, amazing and capable. Also a very humble, modest person. 

CL: In a best case scenario, what happens to women in snowboarding when they’re supported in the same way as their male counterparts?

PB: It just makes complete sense to me. The sport grows and gets more interesting and new ideas come in and more people are included. And if you’re thinking about a business, your market grows. I mean, I think of [companies] like Burton. Maria Thomsen is a pro rider for them with a kid. I mean, they had a whole marketing campaign about, you know, appealing to older women that still maybe want to keep snowboarding or going through their midlife crisis—they want to try something new and want to do something that makes them feel young again. I don’t know. I mean, I do know because that’s what I’m going through. But yeah, it just makes sense to me. There are so many things happening in our culture right now that are opening up people’s minds. Like, you have talented people that are passionate about something and they have a message they want to convey and are going to be a spokesperson for your brand. Why wouldn’t you want to pay them for doing a good job? 

Honestly, I feel like men are very threatened. Especially white men. There’s kind of an old boys club that runs a lot of the upper positions and, my God, the ceiling is crashing down on a lot of dudes that have just always been in that place at the top for so long, you know? So, it’s really going to take those men to be like ambassadors for that change to happen. It has to happen from that direction, and then share the space with women in those top level jobs making the decisions. That’s really the only way. 

CL: I feel like exclusivity is never the answer.

PB: Right? There you go.

CL: What would you tell girls or women listening to this, who might be interested in getting into the snowboard industry?

PB: I would say, if you love it, do it regardless. But if you have something interesting, like a message or something you stand for or a style that you just really want to share or you want to use it as a platform to express yourself, then I think you can’t really go wrong. 

CL: Well, Pika, that does it for my questions. Do you have anything else you’d like to add?

PB: You know, Jesse was always kind of in charge of who rode for the Think Thank videos and it was very organic. He really wanted the people who had a message, that were interesting and were trying to push the envelope in some way. And Jess Kimura and Desiree Melancon—holy shit I can’t think of two more incredible women who are just such pioneers and completely fearless. I mean, they do have fears but they could overcome their fears and then just go for broke. And I never even thought of them as women in the videos. They were just a part of the crew in every way. I mean, how special is that? You know, it was pretty much the best ever. 

Over the years, my life has been touched by women in ways that are kind of indefinable but special. I feel lucky. Yeah, very grateful. A lot of very awesome women. Of course, nowadays there are so many awesome women snowboarders—Nirvana [Ortanez] and Naima [Antolin], Jill Perkins. The list goes on and on and on. I’ve always been a fan of Dangy [Danyale Patterson]. She’s wild and crazy. I’m of course not mentioning like a million other people, but you know who they are.

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Wed, 26 May 2021 18:12:37 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Interviews Sport Features Alaska Wes Anderson Stanley Kubrick Jim Jarmusch Snowboarding David Lynch Hal Hartley Scott Sean Anchorage Bellingham Jesse Cody Geno Fairhaven Ollie Doc Martens Bellingham Washington Pika Lib Tech Desiree Melancon Jess Kimura Sean Genovese Mervin Jesse Burtner JNCO Think Thank Shelton Washington Cody Liska Airblaster University of Washington It Danyale Patterson Hot Shit Mervin Manufacturing Blower Media Jill Perkins Pika Burtner Halie McGee Christina Burtner Fairhaven Bike Jesse Why Woody -LSB- Engle Gus -LSB- Engle Scott -LSB- Stevens Suzy Greenberg Ted -LSB- Borland Sean Lucey Max Tokunaga Annette Veihelmann Burton Maria Thomsen Naima -LSB- Antolin
Slush Video Magazine—Season 1, Episode 2 https://blower.media/slush-video-magazine-season-1-episode-2/
Slush’s second episode features the inimitable Russell Winfield, following him to the inaugural World Quarterpipe Championships Presented by Dakine at Squaw Valley, and down to Mammoth for a session with one of the all-time greats, Keir Dillon, and Virgil Abloh of Louis Vuitton and Off-White fame.

Filmed and edited by Justin Meyer

Additional filming and editing by Ted Borland

Art direction by Kyle Sauter

SIMS segment by Brock Nielsen

Montage filming by Brendan Barry, Egan Wint, Mikey Tuck, Brendon Sullivan, Kyler Duncan, Dan Tyler, Garrett McKenzie

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Tue, 25 May 2021 08:08:38 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Videos Sport Features Snowboarding Louis Vuitton Squaw Valley Dakine Virgil Abloh Justin Meyer Russell Winfield Keir Dillon World Quarterpipe Championships Kyle Sauter Brock Nielsen Montage
Brooke Geery 20/21 – The Killington Trilogy https://blower.media/brooke-geery-20-21-the-killington-trilogy/
(Above) Part 1: Winter

Killington (also known as The Beast of the East, K-mart and Boston’s best bar) comes by its nicknames honestly. It’s a beast. Ride it for a whole season and you’ll come out a better, more confident snowboarder, and dare I say, Vermont strong? Well, that last one might take a few seasons to really accomplish. I got my first Killington pass in 1986, and now, in these wild P.ost C.ovid times, I’m happy to present my official three-part edit for your viewing pleasure. Why three parts? They don’t brag about the longest season in the world for nothing.

Part 2: Second and third winter, plus first spring!

Part 3: Real spring & first summer + Surpise LDOH!

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Tue, 25 May 2021 07:29:16 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Videos Boston Sport Features Snowboarding Vermont Killington Darkside Brooke Geery Season Edit Hot Shit Killington Trilogy
Jamie Lynn Microdose Part 3 / EP1 https://blower.media/jamie-lynn-microdose-part-3-ep1/
Jamie Lynn seems to have mastered the art of life. Over the last thirty years he has chosen to express himself primarily through snowboarding, paint and music but it’s hard to imagine him not succeeding at anything he puts his mind to. Here is where his Microdose story begins.

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Mon, 24 May 2021 14:13:46 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Videos Sport Snowboarding Jamie Lynn Snowboard History Absinthe Films Jamie Lynn Microdose
Superstars of Killington – Unofficial official LDOH for the Beast https://blower.media/superstars-of-killington-unofficial-official-ldoh-for-the-beast/
It turned out Sunday, May 16, 2021 was indeed the last day for top-to-bottom, lift accessed runs at Killington Resort for the 20/21 season.

Don’t worry, Pete Ripley, Scott “from basically Vermont” Sanderson, Nick, Jimmy, myself and so many more took full advantage for ya.

The day went 3 runs, drink, 3 runs, drink, and 2 more runs for me… then it was parking lot party to Umbrella Bar for a quick set by Chris Pallutto. Finally, we headed to The Darkside for a little apres skate, where it turns out mogul skiers really do make the best skateboarders after all!

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Sat, 22 May 2021 10:37:51 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Videos Sport Snowboarding Vermont Killington Killington Resort Party Boarding Umbrella Bar Last day on hill Hot Shit Ldoh Pete Ripley Scott Sanderson Nick Jimmy Chris Pallutto
Dumbass Death Race // Wildcard https://blower.media/dumbass-death-race-wildcard/
In the penultimate episode, nine of Whistler’s sketchiest degenerates crawled out of the woodwork to duke it out for one last chance to make it to the finals showdown and compete against the other victors for a chance to become the first ever Dumbass Death Race Champion.

ICYMI – Dumbass Death Race 1-4

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Tue, 18 May 2021 22:00:27 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Videos Sport Whistler Contests Snowboarding Dumbass Death Race
Peter have you seen this? https://blower.media/peter-have-you-seen-this/
The latest from the Dustbox.

Music
“The Night Of The Hunter (Part 2)”
Miklos Rozsa

“I Will Have That Power”
Hard Creation

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Tue, 18 May 2021 21:58:21 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Videos Europe Sport Snowboarding Miklos Rozsa Peter Dustbox
Foraging tips and etiquette 101 https://blower.media/vermontspringforaging101/
It’s Art!

If you haven’t heard, foraging is a productive and entertaning hobby to keep you busy while the lifts are closed. It can also be a side-gig while you’re hiking, splitboarding, skating, etc (any activity that brings you outside.) Eventually I will assemble the ultimate guide to survival foraging for snowboarders, but since it’s prime ‘shroomin’ season in Vermont (and other moist, wooded places such as ski resorts, too) here are some tips to get you going. For even more info, be sure to check out the former installment on the Mountain Times. 

Black staining Polypores are a “survival mushroom” — you could eat them, but you probably dont want to.

1. Know what you’re looking for — The most important reason to do your research before hitting the trails is so you don’t accidentally poison yourself. Never, I repeat, never eat anything you can’t 100% positively identify.

“Yes, there are only a few deadly mushrooms but there are many that will make you wish you were dead. I know of a couple people who have been left with organ damage that they will have to deal with for the rest of their life,” expert forager Roger “The Birdman” Boutard explained. “One of the best ways for people to be sure they have the correct knowledge is to join a mycology group. There’s usually a mycology society with somebody who has a degree in it.”

A giant artist conk somewhere in East Wallingford.

2. Respect the terrain — Mud season is the worst season to trek around in the woods, but also one of the best to find desirable edible mushrooms and plants. As much as possible, stay on the marked trails in the spring, as not to disturb the burgeoning plant life that is fighting for survival in the forest. Also, know that the largest mushrooms have been there for many years, and while it’s always tempting (at least for me personally) to snag a huge bracket fungi for display purposes, I try to leave anything that’s clearly still living and working on decomposing its host alone for others to enjoy, too.

Perfect Turkey tail. Pure white on the bottom tells you you’ve found the right one!

3. Leave things as you found them — This doesn’t mean don’t take anything, but rather don’t leave anything behind. Beer cans, paper masks, cigarette butts, granola bar wrappers, etc. The woods are no place to store them, so if you choose to bring a picnic or stay covid-safe as you hike, make sure you pack everything out with you, too. If you see someone else’s trash don’t be afraid to pick it up. That good deed might be just what it takes to find your next mushroom score.

Hoof fungi are everywhere you look – as long as you’re looking at Black Birch.

4. Check for ticks — Vermont has more ticks than New Jersey has traffic, so check yourself carefully when you get home. In the Green Mountains, contracting Lyme disease should truly be a bigger concern than “that other virus,” but it’s very preventable if caught early.

Dryad’s Saddle aka Berkely’s Polypore aka Pheasants back. Edibile, but not very delicious.

5.  Take only what you need and can use — Once you learn to spot mushrooms, ramps, fiddleheads and more, you will see them everywhere. For the novice forager it can be tempting to fill a bag to the brim with everything you see, but please don’t!

Not only is it good policy to leave some for others, but over picking things can decimate the population for years to come. That said, certain mushrooms, such as Oysters, grow fast and often, so you can feel better about taking most of them. However, be sure to leave some to “spore out” and create the next bumper crop when conditions are right. As for Morels, be sure to use a knife as not to remove the underground mitochondria (doing so also makes them easier to clean—It’s best to brush off the mushrooms in the forest otherwise you bring the dirt into the basket or bag. If possible mushrooms should not be washed.) And also on the recommendation of Boutard,  “Don’t go with one of those little pretty baskets; hide the bag in your pocket or the Morels will run and hide!”

Fiddleheads!]]>
Thu, 13 May 2021 07:21:54 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Sport Features New Jersey Snowboarding Mushrooms Vermont Foraging Roger Green Mountains BERKELY Hot Shit Perfect Turkey Artist Conk Birch Polypore Fiddleheads Mountain Times Black Boutard East Wallingford Black Birch
A quick guide to Mushroom Foraging tips; Plus etiquette 101! https://blower.media/vermontspringforaging101/
It’s Art!

If you haven’t heard, foraging is a productive and entertaning hobby to keep you busy while the lifts are closed. It can also be a side-gig while you’re hiking, splitboarding, skating, etc (any activity that brings you outside.) Eventually I will assemble the ultimate guide to survival foraging for snowboarders, but since it’s prime ‘shroomin’ season in Vermont (and other moist, wooded places such as ski resorts, too) here are some tips to get you going. For even more info, be sure to check out the former installment on the Mountain Times. 

Black staining Polypores are a “survival mushroom” — you could eat them, but you probably dont want to.

1. Know what you’re looking for — The most important reason to do your research before hitting the trails is so you don’t accidentally poison yourself. Never, I repeat, never eat anything you can’t 100% positively identify.

“Yes, there are only a few deadly mushrooms but there are many that will make you wish you were dead. I know of a couple people who have been left with organ damage that they will have to deal with for the rest of their life,” expert forager Roger “The Birdman” Boutard explained. “One of the best ways for people to be sure they have the correct knowledge is to join a mycology group. There’s usually a mycology society with somebody who has a degree in it.”

A giant artist conk somewhere in East Wallingford.

2. Respect the terrain — Mud season is the worst season to trek around in the woods, but also one of the best to find desirable edible mushrooms and plants. As much as possible, stay on the marked trails in the spring, as not to disturb the burgeoning plant life that is fighting for survival in the forest. Also, know that the largest mushrooms have been there for many years, and while it’s always tempting (at least for me personally) to snag a huge bracket fungi for display purposes, I try to leave anything that’s clearly still living and working on decomposing its host alone for others to enjoy, too.

Perfect Turkey tail. Pure white on the bottom tells you you’ve found the right one!

3. Leave things as you found them — This doesn’t mean don’t take anything, but rather don’t leave anything behind. Beer cans, paper masks, cigarette butts, granola bar wrappers, etc. The woods are no place to store them, so if you choose to bring a picnic or stay covid-safe as you hike, make sure you pack everything out with you, too. If you see someone else’s trash don’t be afraid to pick it up. That good deed might be just what it takes to find your next mushroom score.

Hoof fungi are everywhere you look – as long as you’re looking at Black Birch.

4. Check for ticks — Vermont has more ticks than New Jersey has traffic, so check yourself carefully when you get home. In the Green Mountains, contracting Lyme disease should truly be a bigger concern than “that other virus,” but it’s very preventable if caught early.

Dryad’s Saddle aka Berkely’s Polypore aka Pheasants back. Edibile, but not very delicious.

5.  Take only what you need and can use — Once you learn to spot mushrooms, ramps, fiddleheads and more, you will see them everywhere. For the novice forager it can be tempting to fill a bag to the brim with everything you see, but please don’t!

Not only is it good policy to leave some for others, but over picking things can decimate the population for years to come. That said, certain mushrooms, such as Oysters, grow fast and often, so you can feel better about taking most of them. However, be sure to leave some to “spore out” and create the next bumper crop when conditions are right. As for Morels, be sure to use a knife as not to remove the underground mitochondria (doing so also makes them easier to clean—It’s best to brush off the mushrooms in the forest otherwise you bring the dirt into the basket or bag. If possible mushrooms should not be washed.) And also on the recommendation of Boutard,  “Don’t go with one of those little pretty baskets; hide the bag in your pocket or the Morels will run and hide!”

Fiddleheads!]]>
Thu, 13 May 2021 07:21:54 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Sport Features New Jersey Snowboarding Mushrooms Vermont Foraging Roger Green Mountains BERKELY Hot Shit Perfect Turkey Artist Conk Birch Polypore Fiddleheads Mountain Times Black Boutard East Wallingford Black Birch
Harrison Gordon | The Bomb Hole Episode 56 https://blower.media/harrison-gordon-the-bomb-hole-episode-56/
Harrison discusses mammy swag, sniffing salts, the board sports trifecta, the current state of pro snowboarding, aliens, multiple sclerosis, how to be a good house guest, marriage and more! Harrison’s easy going attitude and positive outlook make’s him one of the most fun people you could ever have in your life, let alone snowboard with. His long term relationships with brands like Salomon and Monster show they feel the same way. Blake Paul recently dubbed him the official vibe ambassador of snowboarding while Salomon named him the team spirit guide. Join us on this week’s episode of The Bomb Hole as we sit down with Harrison and get a chance to see the world through his eyes and catch some of that stress free vibe he puts out!

Support the bombhole: https://www.patreon.com/thebombhole @thebombhole

Follow Harry: @harrison_gordon

Chapters- | Intro 00:01:17 | The Trifecta | Sniffing Salts | Mammy Swag | Harry’s Life As A Movie 00:15:45 | Formidable Years | Spelling B | Aliens | Rooming With Louif 00:34:36 | Ten Barrel Pub Beer Break Out Moment 00:36:47 | Big Discussion About All Things Snowboard Tricks | Style 00:58:43 | Song Selections In Video Parts | Being A Good House Guest | Snowboarding’s Vibe Ambassador 01:09:34 | Getting Married | Peace Arch | Relationship Advice For Long Distance | Multiple Sclerosis | Hot Takes 01:28:37 | Name That Video Part 01:34:40 | State Of Pro Snowboarding 01:38:40 | Wild Mike’s Ultimate Pizza 01:40:07 | Harrison’s Set Up | Filming With Salomon | Harry Gore tex |

Thank Yous/Show Notes- Heathcliff The OG Red CatThe TrifectaInfo On Smelling Salts

| Matt Hammer Video Part |

| Nixon Jib Fest |

Bill And Ted’s Excellent Adventure Full Movie |

| 1080 Snowboarding Panda |

Government Released UFO DocumentsMute Renamed WeddleHow To ChillPeace Arch ParkDealing With MS |

| https://www.snowboarder.com/videos/team-thunder-beauville-full-length-video/ Thanks For Watching!

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Thu, 13 May 2021 06:46:50 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Uncategorized Sport Snowboarding Nixon Harrison Salomon Bill And Ted Blake Paul Harrison Gordon Harry Gore
“It’s Tits!” 2021: It’s All Heart (video and gallery) https://blower.media/its-tits-2021/

It’s Tits! Photos and words by Charlotte Harris

After a hard-fucking-year of loss, loneliness, and isolation, “It’s Tits!” was the healing everyone needed. All humans invited brought with them each day their snowboards, shovels, and stoke—every grab, spin, and new trick did not go without earning yews and yips.

No one shows up better than women when it comes to supporting other women. I can’t think of a single thing that slaps harder than the love women have for their peers. Affinity spaces have been proven to push progression, foster mentorship, and create inclusive spaces for learning—”It’s Tits!” is a shining example of this. In a sport where women are consistently paid less, represented less, and frequently left uninvited, they’re telling the world to put up or fuck off and creating their own community of support. Friends reunited after 15 months of separation, and not a single person left “It’s Tits!” as a stranger. But all anyone needs to do is look to Instagram comments to know that this circle of advocating for one another transcends quarantine, and this time spent on snow together at last was a celebration of resilience.

Isabella Gomez Madison Blackley and Ellie Weiler. Nirvana Ortanez Mary Walsh immortalizes Jill Perkins. Mary Rand Jill Perkins Jaime Somers Vincent and Jaimee Deister Maggie Leon Laura Rogoski It’s Tits! Marissa Krawczak Erika Vikander Crowded. 10/10 Would ride. Back for more. HEADS: Jess Kimura, Krush Kulesza and Barrett Christy-Cummins Isabella Gomez round 2 Taylor Elliott Fancy Rutherford Isabella Gomez Laura Rogoski Kailey Bogart Caitlyn Vossen Jackie Flanagan Sponsor props. Abby Lewis Family skills Dreamin’ Naima Antolin Kaleah Opal and Jaimee Deister Ty Walker Caitlyn Vossen Rel Friedman, Jaime Somers Vincent and Isabella Gerry HUGS!]]>
Tue, 11 May 2021 20:31:19 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Videos Events Sport Snowboarding Mt Hood Timberline Snowboy Productions Charlotte Harris Abby Lewis Hot Shit It's Tits Mt Hood 2021 Isabella Gomez Madison Blackley Ellie Weiler Nirvana Ortanez Mary Walsh Jaimee Deister Maggie Leon Laura Rogoski Marissa Krawczak Erika Vikander Jess Kimura Krush Kulesza Barrett Christy Cummins Isabella Gomez Naima Antolin Kaleah Opal
Dumbass Death Race 1-4 https://blower.media/dumbass-death-race-1-4/
Above, notorious speedsmen Dan Barker and Harrison Gray face off in the final qualifying race of the Dumbass Death Race, an event we can truly get behind, courtesy of the brains(?) at Dumbass Magazine.

This Whistler instant-classic series is brought to you by Whis local Chase Harley. As you’d expect, it’s pretty much perfect, much like the environment it’s bred in.

According to our number one Canadian source @kody69:

“[Chase] does the Dumbass Magazine and films/edits those race videos himself. He’s a really good writer and covers interesting things, but it’s usually a joke in the grand scheme, which is sick. Anyway, what you see is pretty much exactly what’s going on with those deathrace videos.. Not too much behind the scene action. Chase gets his buddies to race down a part of the mountain, first one to crack the beer at the finish line wins. Chase also got local comedic legend Kyle K to announce them and that’s really the icing on the cake.”

If you want a copy of the mag, “ Look out for one appearing on a weed crusted coffee table at a boarder flop house near you.”

Below: the rest of the race ICYMI.

Scot Brown vs Layne Treeter

Dumbass Death Race is presented by nobody. Nobody got paid. Enjoy.

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Sun, 09 May 2021 13:35:15 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Videos Sport Features Scott Brown Chase Whistler Snowboarding Dumbasses Layne Treeter Dan Barker Hot Shit Brin Alexander Kyle K Nick Elliot Dumbass Death Race Dumbass Mag Evan Stum Harrison Gray Keegan Filmer Dumbass Magazine This Whistler Chase Harley Dumbass Magazine Scot Brown
Holy Bowly – Timberline – 2021 – The Official Video https://blower.media/holy-bowly-timberline-2021-the-official-video/
After missing a year due to COVID-19, the Holy Bowly returned for its 8th incarnation at Timberline Lodge on the sunny slopes of Mt Hood. Here is a small taste of what went down over five days. Thanks to Timberline, Lib Tech and Quiksilver for making it possible.

Filmed and edited by Derek Weimer. Additional filming by Ryan Finder, Paul Osborne, Kyle Murray, Derek Zornado, Ted Borland and Dylan Trewin.

Riders in order of appearance: Jed Sky, Garrett Warnick, Phil Hansen, Denver Orr, Xander Cornaby, Jack Wiley, Devin Tubbs, Blake Paul, Julian Gluck, Dusty Miller, Jake Rose, Andrew Brewer, Mitch Richmond, Pat Fava, Bode Merrill, Dave Marx, Casey Pflipsen, Eli Lamm, Jill Perkins, Katie Kennedy, Marissa Krawczak, Christine Savage, Nora Beck, Desiree Melancon, Laura Rogoski, Egan Wint, Sam Bakken, Justus Hines, Jacob Krugmire, Jagger Heckman, Miles Fallon and Brandon Davis.

This edit dedicated to the memory of Jaeger Bailey and Chris Larson. We miss you.

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Sat, 08 May 2021 11:48:14 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Videos Sport Snowboarding Quiksilver Dusty Miller Mitch Richmond Timberline Andrew Brewer Chris Larson Desiree Melancon Laura Rogoski Brandon Davis Nora Beck Phil Hansen Jed Sky Timberline Lodge Marissa Krawczak Miles Fallon Katie Kennedy Derek Weimer Hot Shit Blake Paul Jaeger Bailey Christine Savage Denver Orr Justus Hines Bode Merrill Jake Rose Jill Perkins Casey Pflipsen Dave Marx Devin Tubbs Egan Wint Eli Lamm Garrett Warnick Jack Wiley Jacob Krugmire Jagger Heckman Julian Gluck Pat Fava Sam Bakken Xander Cornaby Timberline Lib Tech Dylan Trewin Riders
Precious Memories: Fear of a Snowboarding Planet https://blower.media/precious-memories-fear-of-a-snowboarding-planet/
From the desk of Brendan Barry:

Before FOASP came to fruition there was just this edit that we made, which was going to be called “Powder Is Reality” and released online.
I think this was filmed over a course of 3 days of great snow at @winterparkresort in December 2013.
Jackson had sent the edit to Air Blaster and I recall Jesse Grandkoski telling me through the grapevine that he was hyped on it and to just save the footage and make a full video.  I was so stoked and instantly decided he was right.
We kept filming from this point on and this edit would be the foundation of what would develop in “FOASP.”  This section landed in the middle of the video and literally had no re editing from the first time we made it.  It goes to show what you can create if you hold onto your footage and let it marinate.
Enjoy peeps!

Featuring: @schmuckbucket ❤ @ruckermandrews @fisheswithsocks @hazardnumberone

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Sat, 08 May 2021 11:45:53 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Videos Colorado Sport Jackson Snowboarding Winter Park Tucker Andrews Ben Lynch Brendan Barry Classic Videos Jesse Grandkoski
Snowcats – All-lady snowboard Video https://blower.media/snowcats-all-lady-snowboard-video/
Everyone knows, women are taking over. As men fight their way to the middle with hyper-progression, the women have been slowly but surely getting not just good, but good enough to create movie magic. Add a Monster budget and put it in Jamie Anderson’s backyard, and you have the ultimate recipe for success. Here’s the official scoop:

Get comfy and put this one on the big screen. Monster Energy’s first all-female snowboarding video, ‘Snowcats,’ showcases some of the most creative freestyle snowboarders on the planet in a free-flowing expression session. On a special course at Sierra-at-Tahoe Resort in Twin Bridges, Cali, Jamie Anderson, Chloe Kim, Kokomo Murase, Annika Morgan, Zoi Sadowski-Synnott, and Jill Perkins throw down technical tricks and transfers. – the perfect recipe for a memorable snowboard video. This crew has had an epic 2020/21 season with Chloe Kim leaving her freshman year at Princeton and dominating every single Superpipe event she entered to Jill Perkins earning ‘Rider of the Year’ honors at the 2021 Slush Magazine Snowboard Awards.

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Wed, 05 May 2021 16:11:16 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Videos Sport Snowboarding Princeton Sierra Chloe Kim Jamie Anderson Hot Shit Jill Perkins Tahoe Resort
OG East Coast Style-master Jeremy Baye Remembers… https://blower.media/og-east-coast-style-master-jeremy-baye-remembers/

…a lot more about his life than you do.

Settle in as the one and only Jeremy Baye catches up with the original Gary Land (of East Street Archives fame) to tell some of the stories you may have missed (or forgotten) over the years. And of course, they are delivered in a style that no one else has mastered. If you’re wondering why some people didn’t like snowboarding back-in-the-day, J Baye will explain that too.

After you watch make sure to check out @1945speedandcustom to see what J Baye is up to now.

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Tue, 04 May 2021 06:26:36 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Videos Interviews Sport Snowboarding Legends Baye Jeremy Baye East Street Archives Memories Frozen In Time J Baye
Mario rides the Peace Park https://blower.media/mario-rides-the-peace-park/
Adriel Santos is a Ski lift technician and cross fit champ who added one more notch to his belt this winter: real life snowboarding video game character. Take a lap through Killington’s Peace Park with the Mexican plumber-turned-super-brother at Killington Resort!

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Mon, 03 May 2021 07:03:09 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Videos Video Games Sport Mario Snowboarding Peace Park Killington Super Mario Brothers Mexican Plumber Snowboarding Video Games Adriel Santos
Steve Gruber campaigns for snowboarding in Zillertal https://blower.media/steve-gruber-campaigns-for-snowboarding-in-zillertal/
The Zillertal Valley is both traditional and full of action, offering snowboarders any type of terrain they could ever hope for. From deep powder days, to slushy park laps, the valley even offers year round laps at the Hintertux Glacier. Around every turn and over every knoll, there is something unique about snowboarding in this valley – and there’s not many that can navigate those turns and knolls like Steve Gruber. One of the most familiar faces to welcome into the Zillertal valley, Steve Gruber has been associated with this piece of paradise for decades. With a long history in next-level snowboarding and an obsession of finding the perfect turn, Steve is snowboarding’s unofficial ambassador to Zillertal.

Film: MonEpic

Edit: Seamus Foster

Edit: Seamus Foster

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Sat, 01 May 2021 07:18:16 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Videos Sport Snowboarding Steve Steve Gruber Zillertal Zillertal Valley
Earn your dog a beer sponsor in 3 easy steps https://blower.media/earn-your-dog-a-beer-sponsor-in-3-easy-steps/

Here at Blower, we love beer. The taste, the feel, the fact that it cuts down on how many glasses of water we need to drink to feel healthy. And we also love dogs! So, when 10 Barrel Brewing asked us nicely to share its beer-related sponsorship opportunity involving dogs, beer and beer for dogs, we wasted no time in saying, hell yes this is something the readers of Blower won’t be able to live with out. And as a bonus, its also your chance to get some of Good Sit Pup Ale and some human beer for free. Read on to learn more about you and your talented pup’s chance at a real deal beer sponsor: Five dogs (note: one spot is already filled) will be selected for the team and receive a year’s supply of Good Sit Ale (guardians/coaches get their own supply too). The puppies (or old dogs with new tricks) will represent 10 Barrel for the 2021-2022 season with custom gear, a $100 gift card to Ruffwear, plenty of “coach’s fuel” for their owner and $1,000 cash to cover competition entries, video projects, and more.

Good Sit Pup “Ale” will also be available for purchase at all of 10 Barrel’s pub locations. 100% of the net Good Sit proceeds will be going to the following shelters.

View this post on Instagram

A post shared by Nord Boss (@nordbossrockdog)

Good Sit Pup “Ale” will also be available for purchase at all of 10 Barrel’s pub locations. 100% of the net Good Sit proceeds will be going to the following shelters.

HOW TO AUDITION:
  1. Post a video of your pup doing their best trick or favorite sport on Instagram, Twitter, or Facebook.
  2. Tag @10barrelbrewing and use #GoodSitSquad and #10Barrel in your post.
  3. Make sure your profile is public so they can see it!

10 Barrel will be accepting entries until May 14th, 2021. Then, its team of human athletes will judge the top finalists and pick the remaining four pets to join the squad. For more information, visit: 10barrel.com/goodsit.

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Thu, 29 Apr 2021 06:42:42 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Sport Portland Contests Snowboarding Instagram Twitter Barrel Brewing 10 Barrel Brewing Hot Shit Beer For Dogs Dog Sponsorship Good Sit Ale Pub Beer Meridian Canine Rescue
Remembering Ben Lynch https://blower.media/remembering-ben-lynch/

The world lost a great one on April 26, 2021 when Ben Lynch made the tragically permanent decision to end his own life. He was 31 years old. Those in the snowboard industry that knew him have been reacting on Instagram, so here are a few of the most poingant posts we’ve seen. If have something you’d like to add, please email us at submissions@blower.media. RIP Ben.

View this post on Instagram

A post shared by Blower Media (@blowermedia)

View this post on Instagram

A post shared by Stanley J. Leveille (@mysonstan)

View this post on Instagram

A post shared by Brandon Cocard (@bcocard)

View this post on Instagram

A post shared by Robert Harold Sell III (@robbiesell)

View this post on Instagram

A post shared by Taylor Carlton (@shad_to_the_bone)

https://www.instagram.com/tv/COO1DLgAipk/?igshid=ncm5mulq1uzz

https://www.instagram.com/tv/COMBMKmpL6R/?igshid=1quybxawr98ec

View this post on Instagram

A post shared by Eric Wallis (@actionlabor)

 

View this post on Instagram

A post shared by Taylor M Boyd (@taylormboyd)

 

 

We encourage anyone reading this to put this number in your phone to use yourself or share with anyone struggling with depression or any mental health concerns: (800) 273-8255. It’s the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline ‘1-800-273-TALK (8255)’ and they are available and prepared to help 24/7, 365 days a year.

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Tue, 27 Apr 2021 07:31:35 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Instagram Suicide Sport Features Snowboarding National Suicide Prevention Lifeline Suicide Prevention Brandon Cocard Ben Lynch Hot Shit Robert Harold Sell III Blower Media @blowermedia View Stanley J Leveille Taylor Carlton Eric Wallis Taylor M Boyd
Huntin’ Pow at Hunter Mountain https://blower.media/huntin-pow-at-hunter-mountain/

East Coast spring is a wild ride, especially so in 2021. From 63 degrees (warm af in Celcius) to 15 inches (deep af in CMs.) Dan S. tells the story and makes us reconsider some of our previously held beliefs on riding in New York.

Seriously though, it was an awesome season and this final storm was truly the icing on the cake!

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Mon, 26 Apr 2021 07:07:38 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Videos New York Sport Snowboarding East Coast Hunter Hunter Mountain Blower Pow Suprise Storm
Natural Selection 2021 REPLAY: Tordrillo Mountains Showcase https://blower.media/natural-selection-2021-replay-tordrillo-mountains-showcase/

The third and final stop of the next-level Natural Selection Tour competition series, the world’s top snowboarders head to the Tordrillo Mountains in Alaska, where one man and one woman will be crowned 2021 Natural Selection Tour Champions.

Playing host to some of the most breathtaking terrain on planet earth, the Tordrillos are straight off the page of a science fiction novel. Alaska truly is the Last Frontier, and the riders have to find their own lines and navigate their way down massive Alaskan faces in prime conditions in a best of three-run semifinal and a head-to-head final. Seven of the world’s best big mountain freestylers earned their way to AK to battle it out for the top spot and the grand prize.

Who won? If ya don’t already know, watch the video and find out. #noSpoilersHere.

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Mon, 19 Apr 2021 07:43:33 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Videos Sport Alaska Contests Snowboarding Natural Selection Ben Ferguson Mark McMorris Hana Beaman Tordrillo Mountains Chris Rasman 2021 Finals Mikkel Bang Robin Van Gyn Zoi Sadowski-Synnott Seven of the world
GLOSS podcast: Brooke Geery on the past, present and future of snowboard media https://blower.media/gloss-podcast-brooke-geery-on-the-past-present-and-future-of-snowboard-media/
This interview is an abridged version of Crude Conversations EP 087 Brooke Geery on the past, present and future of snowboard media. Listen to the podcast here.

This is the first episode of GLOSS — an ongoing series between Crude and Blower Media, where Cody Liska will be talking with influential women in snowboarding. 

Photo by Keith Rutherford

In 1997, Brooke Geery started an online snowboard publication called YoBeat. It began on an AOL chatroom with 2 megabytes of free space and grew into an internationally recognized website. She says that it was a satirical site that gave a voice to people who snowboarded rather than a mouthpiece for the industry. Brooke and the content YoBeat hosted were children of the Internet, conveying unfiltered opinions and candid ideas. Many of which garnered love and hate in the comment sections that often drew just as much attention as the articles. And this all started back when there were only a few online snowboard publications. 

Brooke says that YoBeat needed to die so that she could run a more mature snowboard publication. She was 15 years old when she started the site, and that voice persisted throughout the lifespan of the publication. Now, with her new online publication, Blower Media, a more mature Brooke is re-entering the conversation surrounding the culture of snowboarding during a time when so many legacy publications have died out. There are only a few people left in the industry with the same knowledge and first-hand experience as Brooke. So, her perspective on the past, present and future of snowboard media is one to listen to.

Smell the flowers Happiness is a state of mind. Self portrait.

Cody Liska: When I was writing for YoBeat years ago, I remember thinking there was this kind of underlying sadness, or maybe even like a little bitterness towards something. But now that you’re working on your new snowboard publication, you seem genuinely happier.

Brooke Geery: Yeah. I mean, I don’t like to place blame on other people, but I had, actually, now two men in my life who really took it out of me. When I was doing YoBeat, my partner was very difficult to deal with, he just insisted on doing everything the hardest way possible. And anytime that I would be up and excited and happy and things were be working out, he would find a way to just tear it away from me. My more recent partner affected me in different ways. And actually, I think helped me in a lot of ways to motivate me to do Blower because he was just a cheerleader for that element of my life. Unfortunately, there’s a lot more to life than just running a website and snowboarding. So it didn’t work out between us. But my ex ex really was a downer and it affected me. It made me not myself. So, now to be kind of on the cusp of total freedom… I’m just excited. 

CL:  Do you feel like you’re a person who is kind of an empath, somebody who is greatly affected by the emotions of other people, or even, like, the vibe of other people?

BG: Well, yeah. Kind of a funny story: Ben Fee, who was a snowboard filmmaker back in the day. He worked for Nikita and was Hunter S Thompson’s assistant. I mean, he’s just lived this incredible, incredible life. So, we went to Plymouth State (now university, then college) together and I was always talking about the vibes. And so he started calling me the “vibrator,” which is hilarious in hindsight, but at the time I thought it was pretty lame.

But absolutely. I’ve never referred to it as an empath. In fact, I think I have a kind of icy exterior sometimes. Not so much lately, but when I was younger… I think it’s a front that I put up because it does matter so much to me, and I do want everyone to be happy and I do want everyone to succeed. Even the people who don’t like me and have been vocal about not liking me. You know, there’s the part of me that always just wants to be like, “Well, why don’t we just have a conversation and see if we can find common ground?” And I cover that up and kind of deal with that by just being mad. But yeah, absolutely, deep down it affects me just like anybody else. Maybe more.

Brooke and Killington’s grooviest groomer, Brian Hughes. When Brooke was 15, Brian was on the park crew at Killington.

CL: So, you’ve been working in some capacity within the snowboard industry since the early ‘90s, right?

BG: Mid-to-late ‘90s, 97.

CL: What did snowboard media look like back then?

BG:  Well, there were magazines and people read them. On the East Coast, we actually had two magazines. There was East Infection and Eastern Edge, and Eastern Edge was kind of like the straight-laced magazine. Neil Korn ran it and he was just more of an “adult.” And then East Infection was Mark Sullivan and Pat Bridges. It was raw and raucous and much more representative of the actual snowboard scene at that time—I think I still have copies of both and they’re amazing. And, I don’t know, we were just lucky to have all that. 

CL:  What’s interesting, is the two East Coast magazines that you brought up and how one was a little bit more straight-laced and the other one was more representative of the culture. It seems to me like one of those won-out for a while.

BG:  Sure. I mean, you know what happened, actually, was that Mark Sullivan and Pat Bridges just got jobs at Snowboarder. So, in a lot of ways, I think that they did win because Neil Korn never got a job anywhere (in the industry.) And so Bridges and Sullivan were able to translate East Infection into this amazing career in snowboarding.

CL: Why do you think magazines like TransWorld SNOWboarding and Snowboarder went out of business?

BG:  Because they were bought by giant corporations that didn’t care (about snowboarding.) Also, because they didn’t adapt quickly enough to the changing market. And I think media is a tough business. But it’s also a business that’s infinitely adaptable and you just have to be always thinking on your feet. When you’re part of this giant conglomerate that sets the trends and the standards and tells you what you have to do—it’s hard to do that. So that’s part of the problem.

And also, nobody cared. Snowboarder definitely did a great job and had some great articles, but it was irrelevant to 99 percent of the people who snowboard because 99 percent of the people who snowboard don’t know that there are professional snowboarders. They don’t care that there’s a scene. And the other thing is that they were always targeted at 17-year-olds, which was fine when that was the only option, but 17-year-olds are not picking up magazines anymore. They continue to try and talk to that same age range and same audience and it’s like, “Yo, they’re not listening.”

So, when it comes down to the bottom line, if there’s no audience, there’s no need for it. But as far as the snowboard industry went, it’s a huge loss because snowboard media is what’s going to keep the scene and the connection alive in a lot of ways. 

Don’t speak, don’t breathe, just live. Hanging with a wooden Bear in Ludlow.

CL: Other than watching snowboard clips, I don’t really keep up on the snowboard industry. So I don’t know if this question has been answered before, but within the snowboard industry you have these people who have been kind of these purveyors and curators of the sport. People like Pat Bridges, who was the editor of Snowboarder Magazine for such a long time. What do you think happens to these people after traditional snowboard publications aren’t around anymore?

BG:  So, let me correct you. First, Pat Bridges was the editor of Snowboarder Magazine long, long ago. But in more recent history, he was the Creative Director. He had a much more over-the-top job, kind of pulling the strings, holding the marionette handles, if you will. Stan was actually the editor of Snowboarder at the end. And Bridges and Stan and a bunch of other people are doing Slush Mag now. They were able to rebrand an established Instagram , and kick off Slush Mag with that. So they have like 100k followers. And they’re just doing their thing.

I told Stan that I’m very excited to launch a media brand alongside him, and to help each other out. Because there’s room for (at least) three major publications in snowboarding. Historically, that’s what brands have accepted. And yes, the internet changed everything, but I think from a culture and industry perspective, that there can be three outlets and that will create enough room for all the brands to be represented, all the writers to be represented and for enough stories to be told for snowboarding to have that robust excitement again. 

So, to answer your question, people like Bridges aren’t gonna lay down and die. Bridges will always be a part of snowboarding. He is super creative and super funny, and has as much knowledge and way more connections than I do. So, if he wants to start a snowboard media site, it’s going to happen. So, you know, I don’t think you have to worry about smart, creative people. They’re always gonna find a way.

CL: Brooke, you’re so positive [laughs].

BG: I know. Right? [laughs] Who am I?

CL: Okay, so let’s move on to YoBeat.

BG: Okay. So, that was a thing I did for a really long time. It was my heart and soul. And like I said, when we re-started I had a very negative partner who made me feel like I couldn’t do it alone, who helped a lot, brought a lot of skills and a very cool office and a lot of things to the table. And I was so convinced that I couldn’t do it without him that I let him destroy it. And it sucks. It sucks a lot. And it took me three years to get over it, but, you know, I think in a lot of ways YoBeat needed to die for me to be able to do what I really wanted to do.

Because there was always going to be that underlying feeling, that “this is the blog that I started when I was 15.” It was always going to be snowboarding from 15-year-old Brooke’s perspective. And now that it’s gone—and it’s been gone long enough that I can move on—and I can be myself, I can create the media I want to create, I don’t have to answer to shady commenters or my shitty exes or whatever. It’s almost liberating. I can take the good stuff from YoBeat and I can apply it to Blower, but I can also just forget about anything I didn’t like about YoBeat.

CL: You don’t have to hold on to any of that baggage.

BG:  Exactly. There’s no expectations. You know, and I always said, when I write the book about YoBeat, it’s gonna be called Unrealistic Expectations: The YoBeat Story because every single person involved had unrealistic expectations, myself included. The advertisers had unrealistic expectations, my partner had unrealistic expectations, my employees had unrealistic expectations. It was just not reality. And it worked for years, somehow. But it just never had that solid footing that you needed to be a bigger success than just kind of a novelty brand.

View this post on Instagram

A post shared by Brooke Geery (@brookegeery)

CL:  Were there ever any articles that you regret writing or publishing on YoBeat?

BG:  Sure. I shouldn’t have published that Burton letter. That was shitty. I mean, it got a ton of traffic and it got a lot of people calling me excited, but the timing was horrible. It was just inappropriate to put it up because it made life harder for a lot of people.

Other than that, no, everything was fine. People get bent out of shape over nothing, a lot of times. 

CL: And that Burton letter kind of detailed some of the toxicity in their workplace, if I remember correctly? 

BG: Yeah. And from that perspective, I thought it was a positive thing because that was the situation I was hearing about from a lot of people. And for a lot of people that worked there and dealt with that, they were like, “Oh, thank God, maybe something will change.” But what I didn’t know was that Jake was in the hospital paralyzed. I didn’t know any of that. So it was just too much. And that goes back to looking at people on a human level.

And you can look at Jake and Donna and say, “Oh, well, they were public figures and they’re kind of larger than life. And they should just know that this is just the price you pay for being successful.”

But as an “adult” now, I don’t want to be that person anymore. I still want to deliver the news, I still want to be realistic, I still want truth, but I don’t need to take people down to do it anymore. And so that’s going to be, I think, the biggest change that people notice going forward. 

CL:  Yeah. Which gets back to what you were saying about laying YoBeat to rest and how you feel like it’s this natural progression where you don’t have to be that 15-year-old Brooke anymore, you can move on to being 40-year-old Brooke with Blower.

View this post on Instagram

A post shared by Brooke Geery (@brookegeery)

BG:  Exactly. That’s the plan. You know, we’ll see what happens.

CL: So, what ultimately happened to YoBeat?

BG:  Basically, there was a lawsuit. I paid 50 grand to lawyers to fight over nothing. The legal battle lasted as long as it did because I had already sold ad contracts before I got sued. And so I had like five contracts that ran through March that I said, “I have to fulfill these, I have to because I made this commitment to like these five brands.” I had signed a piece of paper that said, “I’m going to do all this stuff for your brand through March.”

I got sued in probably December or January—I think it was January, that he filed like a $600,000 lawsuit against me alleging me of conversion and actual financial crimes that I couldn’t just ignore.

I even said to my lawyer, “Can we just ignore this, this is bullshit,” and he was like, “No, because if we ignore it then you’ll basically be found guilty and then you’ll have financial crimes on your record forever.”

So, that sucked. I did the best I could to stick with it, but by the end of it I just said, “You know what, you can have it, you can have every single thing on Facebook, the website, you can have the URL, you can have the name, the apparel brand, you can have the Instagram, the Twitter, you can have it all. I don’t want it, take it.

And he said to me, “Well, I don’t want the website, I wouldn’t do that to you. I just want the Instagram and the name.”

And I was like, “Fine, whatever, take the stupid Instagram.” And I tried. I tried. And I just eventually said, “You know what, I don’t even care.”

I eventually just deleted [the YoBeat website] and I did it in haste. As I often do. So a lot of it got completely deleted forever. I don’t have a backup. It doesn’t exist. But I do have a lot of stuff, especially from the later days of YoBeat, thanks to hard drives and Gmail and everything. So I’m trying to bring back the stuff that I liked and I thought was cool. 

But yeah, the Instagram and the name got sold to Korea. And that is why there is now a Korean outerwear brand called YoBeat. But I didn’t get any of the money for that. I was not involved. I don’t know anything about it. My only contact with them has been to send a Facebook message saying to take the thing I wrote off their website. But, you know, as long as my ex isn’t involved, I have no ill will towards them. They’re just trying to do their thing, and in some ways it’s kind of cool to see YoBeat written on an outerwear line in Korea, I guess.

CL:  So, now where do you see Blower fitting into that list of relevant top three snowboard publications?

BG:  I look at what else is out there and, to me, Snowboarder is irrelevant at this point. Maybe that’s ignorant. You know, I think they have that legacy title and whatever, but from an industry perspective—from the people who are involved and have been involved for a long time— Snowboarder doesn’t exist without Bridges.

So, I look at the landscape and I see Blower , Slush and Torment . And the way I figure it is, Slush can be the new Snowboarder , Torment can be the new YoBeat and Blower will be TransWorld. Number one, baby [laughs].

But, you know, we’ll see what happens.

Hippie shit.

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