Bloglikes - Social Media https://www.bloglikes.com/c/social-media en-US Thu, 15 Apr 2021 16:49:47 +0000 Sat, 06 Apr 2013 00:00:00 +0000 FeedWriter Facebook to test new business discovery features in U.S. News Feed http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Techcrunch/~3/nnY12AU8bhs/ Facebook announced this morning it will begin testing a new experience for discovering businesses in its News Feed in the U.S. When live, users to tap on topics they’re interested in underneath posts and ads in their News Feed in order to explore related content from businesses. The change comes at a time when Facebook has been arguing how Apple’s App Tracking Transparency update will impact its — a claim many have dismissed as misleading, but nevertheless led some about the impacts to their ad targeting capabilities, as a result. This new test is an example of how easily Facebook can tweak its News Feed to build out more data on its users, if needed.

The company suggests users may see the change under posts and ads from businesses selling beauty products, fitness or clothing, among other things.

The idea here is that Facebook would direct users to related businesses through a News Feed feature, when they take a specific action to discover related content. This, in turn, could help Facebook create a new set of data on its users, in terms of which users clicked to see more, and what sort of businesses they engaged with, among other things. Over time, it could turn this feature into an ad unit, if desired, where businesses could pay for higher placement.

“People already discover businesses while scrolling through News Feed, and this will make it easier to discover and consider new businesses they might not have found on their own,” the company noted in a brief announcement.

Facebook didn’t detail its further plans with the test, but said as it learned from how users interacted with the feature, it will expand the experience to more people and businesses.

Image Credits: Facebook

Along with news of the test, Facebook said it will roll out more tools for business owners this month, including the ability to create, publish and schedule Stories to both Facebook and Instagram; make changes and edits to Scheduled Posts; and soon, create and manage Facebook Photos and Albums from Facebook’s Business Suite. It will also soon add the ability to create and save Facebook and Instagram posts as drafts from the Business Suite mobile app.

Related to the businesses updates, Facebook updated features across ad products focused on connecting businesses with customer leads, including Lead Ads, Call Ads, and Click to Messenger Lead Generations.

Facebook earlier this year announced a new Facebook Page experience that gave businesses the ability to engage on the social network with their business profile for things like posting, commenting and liking, and access to their own, dedicated News Feed. And it had removed the Like button in favor of focusing on Followers.

It is not a coincidence that Facebook is touting its tools for small businesses at a time when there’s concern — much of it loudly shouted by Facebook itself — that its platform could be less useful to small business owners in the near future, when ad targeting capabilities becomes less precise as users vote ‘no’ when Facebook’s iOS app asks if it can track them.

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Thu, 15 Apr 2021 10:41:43 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Advertising Tech Mobile Social Facebook News Feed Social Media Social Network Social Software Software Targeted Advertising United States
Horseshoe Theory, Now on the Blockchain https://gizmodo.com/horseshoe-theory-now-on-the-blockchain-1846686192

Republicans whining about how social media moderators are violating their inalienable right to lucrative follower counts have found an ally in Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas.

Read more...

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Thu, 15 Apr 2021 09:45:00 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Mark Zuckerberg He Clarence Thomas Mike Lindell Social Media Tiktok Twitter Donald Trump Facebook Computing Ryan Mac David Cameron Ali Alexander Matt Novak Snapchat Mark Zuckerberg Software Nick Clegg Pinterest My Pillow Google Bytedance Trumpism Twitch Jim Watkins Real Time Web Operating Systems Steve Bannon Universal Windows Platform Apps Brian Kemp Sebastian Gorka
Pearpop raises from The Chainsmokers, Alexis Ohanian, Amy Schumer, Kevin Hart, Mark Cuban, Marshmello, and Snoop Dogg http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Techcrunch/~3/-aceD91ILug/ Pearpop, the marketplace for social collaborations between the teeming hordes of musicians, craftspeople, chefs, clowns, diarists, dancers, artists, actors, acrobats, aspiring celebrities and actual celebrities, has raised $16 million in funding that includes what seems like half of Hollywood, along with Alexis Ohanian’s Seven Seven Six venture firm and Bessemer Venture Partners.

The funding was actually split between a $6 million seed funding round co-led by Ashton Kutcher and Guy Oseary’s Sound Ventures and Slow Ventures, with participation from Atelier Ventures and Chapter One Ventures and a $10 million additional investment led by Ohanian’s Seven Seven Six with participation from Bessemer.

TechCrunch first covered pearpop last year and there’s no denying that the startup is on to something. It basically takes Cameo’s celebrity marketplace for private shout-outs and makes it public. Allowing social media personalities to boost their followers by paying more popular personalities to shout out, duet, or comment on their posts.

“I’ve invested in pearpop because it’s been on my mind for a while that the creator economy has resulted in a lot of not equitable outcomes for creators. Where i talked about the missing middle class of the creator economy,” said Li Jin, the founder of Atelier Ventures and author of a critical piece on creator economics, “The creator economy needs a middle class“. 

“When I saw pearpop I felt like there was a really big potential for pearpop to be the one of the creators of the creative middle class. They’ve introduced this mechanism by which larger creators can help smaller creators and everyone has something of value to offer something to everyone else in the ecosystem.”

Jin discovered pearpop through the TechCrunch piece, she said. “ You wrote that article and then i reached out to the team,” said Jin.

PearPop lets TikTok celebrities monetize by sharing shout-outs and screen time with fans

The idea was so appealing, it brought in a slew of musicians, athletes, actors and entertainers, including: Abel Makkonen (The Weeknd), Amy Schumer, The Chainsmokers, Diddy, Gary Vaynerchuk, Griffin Johnson, Josh Richards, Kevin Durant (Thirty 5 Ventures), Kevin Hart (HartBeat Ventures), Mark Cuban, Marshmello, Moe Shalizi, Michael Gruen (Animal Capital), MrBeast (Night Media Ventures), Rich Miner (Android co-founder) and Snoop Dogg.

“Pearpop has the potential to benefit all social media platforms by delivering new users and engagement, while simultaneously leveling the playing field of opportunity for creators,” said Alexis Ohanian, Founder, Seven Seven Six, in a statement. “The company has created a revolutionary new marketplace model that is set to completely reimagine how we think of social media monetization. As both a social media founder and an investor, I’m excited for what’s to come with pearpop.”

Already Heidi Klum, Loren Gray, Snoop Dogg, and Tony Hawk have gotten paid to appear in social media posts from aspiring auteurs on the social media platform TikTok.

Using the platform is relatively simple. A social media user (for now, that means just TikTok) sends a post that exists on their social feed and requests that another social media user interacts with it in some way — either commenting, posting a video in response, or adding a sound. If the request seems okay, or “on brand”, then the person who accepts the request performs the prescribed action.

Pearpop takes a 25% cut of all transactions with the social media user who’s performing the task getting the other 75%.

The company wouldn’t comment on revenue numbers, except to say that it’s on track to bring in seven figures this year.

Users on the platform set their prices and determine which kinds of services they’re willing to provide to boost the social media posts of their contractors.

Prices range anywhere from $5 to $10,000 depending on the size of a user’s following and the type of request that’s being made. Right now, the most requested personality on the marketplace is the TikTok star, Anna Banana.

These kinds of transactions do have impacts. The company said that personalities on the platform were able to increase their follower count with the service. For instance, Leah Svoboda went from 20K to 141K followers, after a pearpop duet with Anna Shumate.

If this all makes you feel like you’ve tripped and fallen through a Black Mirror into a dystopian hellscape where everything and every interaction is a commodity to be mined for money, well… that’s life.

“What I appreciate most about pearpop is the control it gives me as a creator,” said Anna Shumate, TikTok influencer @annabananaxdddd. “The platform allows me to post what I want and when I want. My followers still love my content because it’s authentic and true to me, which is what sets pearpop apart from all of the other opportunities on social media.”

Talent agencies, too, see the draw. Early adopters include Talent X, Get Engaged, and Next Step Talent and The Fuel Injector, which has added its entire roster of talent to pearpop, which includes Kody Antle, Brooke Monk and Harry Raftus, the company said.

“The initial concept came out of an obvious gap within the space: no marketplace existed for creators of all sizes to monetize through simple, authentic collaborations that are mutually beneficial,” said Cole Mason, co-founder & CEO, pearpop.  “It soon became clear that this was a product that people had been waiting for, as thousands of people rely on our platform today to gain full control of their social capital for the first time starting with TikTok.”

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Thu, 15 Apr 2021 09:44:20 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs TC Alexis Ohanian Amy Schumer Android Anna Shumate Ashton Kutcher Atelier Ventures Author Bessemer Venture Partners Bytedance Cole Mason Founder Gary Vaynerchuk Instagram Kevin Durant Kevin Hart Li Jin Mark Cuban PearPop Slow Ventures Snoop Dogg Social Media Social Media Monetization Social Media Platforms Software TechCrunch Tiktok Tony Hawk Video Hosting
Facebook Continues ‘More Together’ Campaign With Two Spots Focused on Dance and Basketball http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Adfreak/~3/xcCltdztkmY/ ]]> Thu, 15 Apr 2021 09:39:05 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Platforms Social Media Technology Instagram apologises for promoting weight-loss content to users with eating disorders https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2021/apr/15/instagram-apologises-for-promoting-weight-loss-content-to-users-with-eating-disorders Social media platform says it was a ‘mistake’ and that harmful terms have been removed in an update

Instagram has apologised for a “mistake” that meant it promoted weight-loss content to users with eating disorders.

A new feature on the social network provides users with suggested search terms based on their interests, with default prompts including terms such as “yard work”, “home decor” or “sunsets”. But some people with eating disorders found the app was prompting them to search for terms like “appetite suppressant” instead, raising the risk of a relapse or worse.

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Thu, 15 Apr 2021 09:34:42 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Instagram Eating disorders Mental health UK news Health Social media Digital media Anorexia
Facebook planned to remove fake accounts in India – until it realized a BJP politician was involved https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2021/apr/15/facebook-india-bjp-fake-accounts Whistleblower points to double standard in Facebook’s enforcement of rules against powerful

Facebook allowed a network of fake accounts to artificially inflate the popularity of an MP from India’s ruling Bharatiya Janata party (BJP), for months after being alerted to the problem.

The company was preparing to remove the fake accounts but paused when it found evidence that the politician was probably directly involved in the network, internal documents seen by the Guardian show.

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Thu, 15 Apr 2021 06:00:33 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Social media Facebook India US news Social networking Technology
‘I blamed myself’: how stigma stops Arab women reporting online abuse https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2021/apr/15/online-abuse-sexual-harassment-arab-women-middle-east-north-africa- Women in the Middle East and north Africa say social codes leave them unable to talk about social media abuse as pandemic pushes sexual harassment off the streets

The first pornographic picture sent shivers of shock through Amal as she stared in horror at the phone screen. Until now, she had responded politely to the older man who had been messaging her on Facebook, hoping to deter his questions about her life with curt, one-word replies.

More lurid pictures followed, some from pornographic magazines, others of the man himself in sexual poses. “I started to blame myself and feel that I invited this because I had replied to him,” says the 21-year-old, who is a university student in Amman, Jordan.

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Thu, 15 Apr 2021 02:15:28 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Global development Women Cyberbullying Jordan Lebanon Egypt Internet Social media Middle East and North Africa Bullying Digital media Africa Life and style Media Society Technology World news
Elegant Ways to Create Calls-to-Action in Clubhouse and on Podcasts https://www.davidmeermanscott.com/blog/create-calls-to-action-in-clubhouse Elegant Ways to Create Calls-to-Action in Clubhouse and on Podcasts

Audio social media is booming. New podcasts are started every day and established show hosts tell me their listener numbers are rising. At the same time, the Clubhouse app is one of the fastest growing social networks ever. Perhaps it’s the pandemic and people with time to explore? Whatever the reason, audio is hot right now. However, many marketers struggle with how to effectively move people from audio to a place where they can learn more.

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Wed, 14 Apr 2021 21:37:26 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Social Media Mobile applications Fanocracy
TikTok funds first episodic public health series ‘VIRAL’ from NowThis http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Techcrunch/~3/xqtlbgn8SFs/ TikTok is taking another step towards directly funding publishers’ content with today’s announcement that it’s financially backing the production of media publisher NowThis’ new series, “VIRAL,” which will feature interviews with public health experts and a live Q&A session focused on answering questions about the pandemic. The partnership represents TikTok’s first-ever funding of an episodic series from a publisher, though TikTok has previously funded creator content.

Through TikTok’s Instructive Accelerator Program, which was formerly known as the Creative Learning Fund, other TikTok publishers have received grants and hands-on support from TikTok so they could produce quality instructive content for TikTok’s #LearnOnTikTok initiative. The program today is structured as four, eight-week cycles during which time publishers post videos four times per week.

NowThis had also participated in the Creative Learning Fund last year and was selected for the latest cycle of the Instructive Accelerator Program. But its “VIRAL” series is separate from these efforts.

NowThis says it brought the concept for the show to TikTok earlier this year outside of the accelerator program, and TikTok greenlit it. TikTok then co-produced the series and provided some funding. Neither NowThis nor TikTok would comment on the extent of the financial backing involved, however.

The “VIRAL” series itself is hosted by infectious disease clinical researcher Laurel Bristow, who spent the last year working on COVID treatments and research. Every Thursday, Bristow will break down COVID facts in easy-to-understand language, NowThis says, including things like vaccine efficacy, transmission timelines, and treatment. The show will also bust COVID myths, provide information about ongoing public health risks, and feature interviews with a cross-section of experts.

Each episode of the will be 45 minutes in length and will also include an interactive segment where the TikTok viewing audience will be able to engage in a real-time Q&A session about the show’s content. In total, five episodes are being produced, and will air starting on Thursday April 15 at 6 PM ET and will run through Thursday May 13 on the @NowThis main TikTok page.

@nowthisTune in to our new TikTok live show VIRAL on Thursdays at 6pm ET with host @kinggutterbaby

♬ original sound – nowthis

NowThis has become one of the most-followed news media accounts on TikTok, with 4.6 million followers across its news and politics channels, since launching a little over a year ago. Because of its focus on video, it’s been a good fit for the TikTok’s platform.

The approach TikTok is taking with “VIRAL’s” production, it’s worth noting, stands in contrast to how other social media platforms are handling the pandemic and COVID-19 information. While most, including TikTok, have pledged to fact check COVID-19 information, remove misinformation and conspiracies, point users to official sources for health information, and provide other resources, TikTok is directly funding public health content featuring scientists and researchers, and then promoting it on its network.

The company explained to TechCrunch its thinking on the matter.

“As the pandemic continues to evolve, we think it’s important to provide our community an outlet to dispel misinformation and communicate with public health experts in real-time,” said Robbie Levin, Manager of Media Partnerships at TikTok. “NowThis has consistently been a great partner that produces engaging and informative content, so we felt this series would be an impactful and important avenue for our users to receive credible information on our platform,” Levin noted.

While the pandemic has driven the topic of choice here, paying creators for content is not new. And TikTok isn’t the only one to do so. Instagram and Snapchat are both funding creator content for their TikTok clones, Reels and Spotlight, respectively. And new social platforms like Clubhouse are funding creators’ shows, as well.

TikTok says it’s not currently talking to other publishers to produce more series like “VIRAL,” but it isn’t ruling out the idea of expanding its creator funding and producing efforts. In addition to its accelerator program, which is continuing, TikTok says if “VIRAL” proves successful and the community responds positively, it will pursue similar opportunities in the future.

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Wed, 14 Apr 2021 15:42:35 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Apps Media Mobile Interactive NowThis News Public Health Real-time Social Social Media Tiktok Video Viral
Mike Lindell's "free speech" social media platform will ban free speech https://boingboing.net/2021/04/14/mike-lindells-free-speech-social-media-platform-will-ban-free-speech.html?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=mike-lindells-free-speech-social-media-platform-will-ban-free-speech

Big Lie spreader Mike "MyPillow" Lindell is launching Frank, his new "free speech" social network, on April 19. In his video message at frankspeech.com, Lindell hilariously reveals that speech on Frank isn't really free. "You don't get to use the four swear words: the c-word, the n-word, the f-word, or God's name in vain," he says. — Read the rest

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Wed, 14 Apr 2021 11:47:20 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Post Big Lie Believers Censorship and Information Control Mike Lindell MyPillow Social Media
Instagram, Facebook users could soon hide ‘like’ counts https://www.dailynews.com/2021/04/14/users-could-soon-hide-like-counts-on-instagram-facebook/ By Barbara Ortutay | The Associated Press

The tiny red hearts that appear under Instagram photos of kids, kittens and sandwiches can be a source of stress for many users, an insidious way of measuring self-worth and popularity.

Now Facebook says it’s going to test out — again — an option for users to hide those “like” counts to see if it can reduce the pressure of being on social media. Instagram, which Facebook owns, will soon allow a small group of random users to decide whether or not they want to see the number of likes their posts and those of others receive.

The social media giant says it’s also exploring the feature for Facebook. Comments will still be available for people who chose to hide likes — they just won’t see whether it was 2, 20 or 20,000 people who liked their posts.

Instagram began hiding likes in 2019. While many users welcomed the feature, others, including some influencers, worried it might take away from the social media experience. At the time, the platform didn’t give users a choice to hide or unhide the like counts.

“Some people found this beneficial but some still wanted to see like counts so they could track what’s popular,” the company said in a statement. In March of this year, a bug caused like counts to disappear for some Instagram uses for a couple of hours, prompting questions about whether the company would soon relaunch the feature.

The company stressed that this is still a small test and that it expects “more to share” before long. Related Articles

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Wed, 14 Apr 2021 11:36:47 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Business Uncategorized Social-media Technology
Instagram reveals mixed results from its experiment hiding 'likes,' and will now test letting users decide whether to keep them http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/typepad/alleyinsider/silicon_alley_insider/~3/k1DwBNoaxjA/instagram-users-likes-show-hide-option-2021-4 Instagram.

Thomas Trutschel/Photothek via Getty Images

  • Instagram is testing the option to allow users to either see or hide "likes."
  • Users can decide if they want to remove all likes, hide likes on their own posts, or make no change.
  • Instagram began testing the removal of likes in 2019 and accidentally rolled this feature out again in March.
  • See more stories on Insider's business page.

Instagram is now testing the option to allow users to decide if they want to see or hide "likes."

Some users prefer not seeing the like count due to decreased social media pressure, while others want to see what's been a hit on the app, according to feedback from Instagram's previous tests. Now, the social media platform is using these differences in viewpoints to test the option for users to decide whether they want to see or remove the like tally. If the user opts for the latter, they'll be able to either hide all like counts across the platform, or hide likes on their own posts.

The social media giant first began exploring the removal of likes in 2019 via a test on users across seven countries, including Canada, Australia, and Japan. According to a spokesperson at Facebook, Instagram's parent company, this was done to see whether the hiding of likes could "lessen some pressure when posting" to the app.

Read more: Instagram is testing removing public 'like' counts and influencers say it would be good for the industry. Here's why.

Instagram saw "positive feedback" during this testing stage, although the concept also received some backlash from celebrities and influencers.

"We're testing this because we want Instagram to be a place where people feel comfortable expressing themselves," a Facebook spokesperson told Insider in 2019. "This includes helping people to focus on the photos and videos they share, not how many likes they get."

In March, Instagram again removed the like count for some users. But this time, it was an accident caused by a bug.

The removal of likes and reactions is also being tested on Facebook, according to the spokesperson. Like Instagram, Facebook began testing this in 2019.

Read the original article on Business Insider

[Author: bchang@businessinsider.com (Brittany Chang)]

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Wed, 14 Apr 2021 11:02:15 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Tech Insider News Instagram Likes Social Media Facebook Like count Influencers
Instagram’s new test lets you choose if you want to hide ‘Likes,’ Facebook test to follow http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Techcrunch/~3/qKcJzQICn98/ Instagram today will begin a new test around hiding Like counts on users’ posts, following its experiments in this area which first began in 2019. This time, however, Instagram is not enabling or disabling the feature for more users. Instead, it will begin to explore a new option where users get to decide what works best for them — either choosing to see the Like counts on others’ posts, or not. Users will also be able to turn off Like counts on their own posts, if they choose. Facebook additionally confirmed it will begin to test a similar experience on its own social network.

Instagram says tests involving Like counts were deprioritized after Covid-19 hit, as the company focused on other efforts needed to support its community. (Except for that brief period this March where Instagram accidentally hid Likes for more users due to a bug.)

The company says it’s now revisiting the feedback it collected from users during the tests and found a wide range of opinions. Originally, the idea with hiding Like counts was about reducing the anxiety and embarrassment that surrounds posting content on the social network. That is, people would stress over whether their post would receive enough Likes to be deemed “popular.” This problem was particularly difficult for Instagram’s younger users, who care much more about what their peers think — so much so that they would take down posts that didn’t receive “enough” Likes.

In addition, the removal of Likes helped reduce the sort of herd mentality that drives people to like things that are already popular, as opposed to judging the content for themselves.

But during tests, not everyone agreed the removal of Likes was a change for the better. Some people said they still wanted to see Like counts so they could track what was trending and popular. The argument for keeping Likes was more prevalent among the influencer community, where creators used the metric in order to communicate their value to partners, like brands and advertisers. Here, lower engagement rates on posts could directly translate to lower earnings for these creators.

Both arguments for and against Likes have merit, which is why Instagram’s latest test will put the choice back into users’ own hands.

This new test will be enabled for a small percentage of users globally on Instagram, the company says.

If you’ve been opted in, you’ll find a new option to hide the Likes from within the app’s Settings. This will prevent you from seeing Likes on other people’s posts as you scroll through your Instagram Feed. As a creator, you’ll be able to hide Likes on a per-post basis via the three-dot “…” menu at the top. Even if Likes are disabled publicly, creators are still able to view Like counts and other engagements through analytics, just as they did before.

The tests on Facebook, which has also been testing Like count removals for some time, have not yet begun. Facebook tells TechCrunch those will roll out in the weeks ahead.

Making Like counts an choice may initially seem like it could help to address everyone’s needs. But in reality, if the wider influencer community chooses to continue to use Likes as a currency that translates to popularity and job opportunities, then other users will continue to do the same.

Ultimately, communities themselves have to decide what sort of tone they want to set, preferably from the outset — before you’ve attracted millions of users who will be angry when you later try to change course.

There’s also a question as to whether social media users are really hungry for an “Like-free” safer space. For years we’ve seen startups focused on building an “anti-Instagram” of sorts, where they drop one or more Instagram features, like algorithmic feeds, Likes and other engagement mechanisms, such as Minutiae, Vero, Dayflash, Oggl, and now, newcomers like troubled Dispo, or under-the-radar Herd. But Instagram has yet to fail because of an anti-Instagram rival. If anything is a threat, it’s a new type of social network entirely, like TikTok –where it should be noted getting Likes and engagements is still very important for creator success.

Instagram didn’t say how long the new tests would last or if and when the features would roll out more broadly.

“We’re testing this on Instagram to start, but we’re also exploring a similar experience for Facebook. We will learn from this new small test and have more to share soon,” a Facebook company spokesperson said.

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Wed, 14 Apr 2021 11:00:02 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Apps Social Facebook Influencers Instagram Like Button Likes Social Apps Social Media Social Network Social Software
Ex-Navy SEAL and ultramarathoner David Goggins is the toughest man on the planet. His latest challenge: convincing the world to suffer on purpose. http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/typepad/alleyinsider/silicon_alley_insider/~3/_kCDsWl6Vns/david-goggins-navy-seal-business-toughness-books-speaking-2021-4

david goggins turning joys of suffering into business model 2x1

Brandon Rogers/US Navy; @davidgoggins/Twitter; Marianne Ayala/Insider

Everywhere Devin Featherstone goes, David Goggins follows. It starts in the morning when Featherstone opens his eyes and catches Goggins' thousand-yard stare from the book jacket of "Can't Hurt Me," Goggins' memoir, on his nightstand.

Throughout the day, Featherstone, 36, a firefighter and an avid runner in Calgary, Alberta, ingests YouTube videos and podcast clips of the former Navy SEAL and ultramarathoner, who reminds him to "Stay hard!" And as night falls, and Featherstone crawls back into bed beside his wife, there Goggins remains on the nightstand - inert, gazing blankly into the darkness.

Featherstone acknowledges the reality plainly: "David Goggins is in my head daily."

The sway that Goggins, who is 46, has over his followers - his ability to occupy their thoughts and persuade them to push past their limits - is hard to overstate. Last month, he oversaw the Goggins Challenge, a two-day test of physical fitness that ran March 5-7. Across 90 countries, tens of thousands of weekend warriors ran four miles every four hours, for 48 hours straight. If you weren't a runner, you exercised. If you weren't a gym rat, you just got sweaty. It was free to enter, and if you wanted a T-shirt, you paid $35.

Devin Featherstone did it in full firefighter gear because why not.

While Goggins ended up donating more than $200,000 in profits from the T-shirt sales to charity, for individual people there is still no good reason to do challenges like these. But Goggins regularly inspires such action. Drawing on stories of his difficult past, mixed with expletive-ridden calls to reject creature comforts, he's found a way to become equal parts drill sergeant, life coach, and superhero for his community of nearly 4 million highly engaged Instagram followers.

"It's just really empowering," said Jenny Petersen, a 48-year-old nurse and runner from Lincoln, Nebraska, speaking of Goggins' list of accomplishments. Petersen - a runner and triathlete - was among those who completed the Goggins Challenge. "People are starting to embrace that it's OK if you suffer, and that you're tougher than you think."

After more than a year of both mental and physical anguish wrought by COVID-19, Goggins' calls to embrace discomfort may seem ill-timed. But for the newly converted and die-hards alike, he's offering people more than motivation: an opportunity to reclaim control of their suffering, and practice it on their own terms.

Goggins' fan base is growing fast, and there are promising signs his ability to monetize that interest - through a bestselling memoir, corporate speaking engagements, merchandise, and avenues yet-to-be explored - could carve out a lucrative "business of toughness" over the coming years.

"I discovered a whole nother part of your fucking brain that a lot of people don't even know about," Goggins told Joe Rogan in a 2018 podcast episode. "It's my job now to take these weak people, in the category that I was in, and say, 'Uh-uh. Stop reading the bullshit. Stop listening to the bullshit.' And if my story of success can impact somebody, it is my job, it is my duty, to share the story." (Goggins declined to be interviewed for this article.)

Achievements born from adversity

It was November 1, 2005, and a 6-foot-2, 245-pound linebacker of a Navy SEAL was on the starting line of a 24-hour footrace in Southern California. Goggins had signed up for the San Diego 1-Day, an event he entered as a qualifying race for a separate ultramarathon in which he hoped to raise money for charity.

He was no fleet-footed runner. In the lead-up to the race, Goggins' cardiovascular training included just 20 minutes spent on the elliptical every Sunday. The task ahead of him: Complete 100 laps of the one-mile track before the 24 hours were up.

The race nearly broke Goggins, who describes the hellacious experience in his book and on podcasts as the most painful day of his life. He broke all the small bones in his feet. His kidneys shut down. By the time he got home, having run 101 miles in under 19 hours, he was smeared with blood, urine, and feces, and was unable to walk under his own weight. His wife at the time begged him to go to the hospital.

"She kept talking, shouting, crying, trying to reach me through the haze," Goggins wrote in his 2018 memoir, "Can't Hurt Me: Master Your Mind and Defy the Odds." "And I heard most of what she said, but I knew if we went to the hospital they'd give me pain killers and I didn't want to mask this pain. I'd just accomplished the most amazing feat in my entire life."

brent gleeson & david goggins Navy SEAL training in 2001. Brent Gleeson, second from left. David Goggins, second from right.

Brent Gleeson

david goggins Goggins during Navy SEAL training.

Brent Gleeson

David Goggins & Brent Gleeson Goggins and Gleeson at the SEAL training graduation in 2001.

Brent Gleeson

As Goggins described it, that race obliterated any sense of physical limits he'd once had.

Two months after the San Diego 1-Day, he ran the Hurt 100, a 100-mile trail race with 24,500 feet of climbing through hills in Hawaii. In 2006, he completed seven more races of 30 miles or more. In 2007, he completed 14 more, including a third-place finish at the Badwater 135, a race longer than five normal marathons that cuts through the sneaker-melting heat of Death Valley. He's completed two dozen more ultras in the 14 years since.

Goggins has also competed in the Ironman World Championship, finishing the 140.6-mile triathlon in 11 hours and 24 minutes. And in 2013, he broke the Guinness World Record for most pullups completed in 24 hours with 4,030. He broke the record with seven hours to spare.

For people such as Petersen and Featherstone, Goggins' core appeal is his mental toughness, which Goggins said he channels into "going the distance," not winning the race. He speaks often of the "40% rule," which says that when people typically give up, they're really only 40% depleted.

"The reason it's so powerful," Goggins wrote in "Can't Hurt Me," "is that if you follow it, you will unlock your mind to new levels of performance and excellence in sports and in life, and your rewards will run far deeper than mere material success."

The San Diego 1-Day marked Goggins' first step on the road to becoming an endurance athlete, but overcoming adversity stretches back to his childhood. Growing up Black in the small, predominantly white town of Brazil, Indiana, he faced virulent racism and struggled with a learning disability, speech impediment, and low self-esteem.

"I damn sure wasn't going to get into college based on academics," Goggins wrote in "Can't Hurt Me." "All I knew was that I had to get the fuck out of Brazil, Indiana." He saw the military as his best chance and took the requisite entrance exam three times. On his third try, he met the minimum standard for the Air Force.

To date, Goggins is the only person to complete training as a Navy SEAL, Army Ranger, and Air Force Tactical Air Controller. And "when that glory faded," about 20 years ago, Goggins set his sights on ultramarathon running, said Brent Gleeson, a former Navy SEAL who graduated from SEAL training with Goggins in 2001.

"He's always striving, as he would say, to recertify himself as a savage," said Gleeson, who is now an entrepreneur and the author of several books, including "Embrace the Suck: The Navy SEAL Way to an Extraordinary Life." "It's that continual journey, and I think that inadvertently started to spark something in other people."

Even in middle age, Goggins seems to have no plans of slowing down. In October, at 45 years old, he ran 238 miles in 62 hours, 21 minutes, and 29 seconds as part of the Moab 240 in Utah. It was good enough for a second-place finish.

US Navy Goggins ran the Badwater 135 in 2007, in a string of 14 ultramarathon races that year.

Brandon Rogers/US Navy

Not just transformation - multiplication

But now the 46-year-old veteran is increasingly turning his attention toward brand-building. In 2016, Goggins, along with his team, founded Goggins LLC as a way to start investing in himself, as he told Rogan on his first of two podcast appearances.

"I try to be as real as I can," Goggins said, "because we're all fucking suffering in this world. We're all hurting. And I try to take away all titles you wanna give me to let you know that I did not come from that shit. That's why I have to be so authentic and so real about my own insecurities and my own faults, and being a fucked-up person."

Influencers strive to be as authentic as possible; it can make or break a nascent brand. Fortunately for Goggins, who may never even use the word "influencer," staying true to himself and his story has been the greatest source of his success - and sometimes his stress.

"My biggest fear in life is, people can read right through a motherfucker that's not real," he told Rogan. "I do it all the time. A lot of people have these great quotes, and they mass-produce. I can't mass-produce something, man."

Instead, he's started giving talks. He's spoken at companies such as Cisco and Microsoft and at pro sports teams such as the Seattle Seahawks and the New York Giants. (Because of COVID-19, he has not given a talk since March 2020, a spokesperson confirmed.) Clips from these talks carry titles such as "Stop Talking Yourself Out of Being Great" and "Get Comfortable With Being Uncomfortable."

There is ample room for Goggins to grow in these spaces: Together, the self-improvement and motivational-speaking markets are worth about $15 billion. And they are expected to grow between 4% and 6% over the next few years, according to research from Marketdata Enterprises.

In 2018, he and his co-author, Adam Skolnick, self-published his memoir, "Can't Hurt Me." He said in a 2019 Facebook Live event that, despite being offered an advance of $300,000, he turned it down "at the last minute" and decided instead to invest $800,000 of his own money in self-publishing. (Goggins' press representative did not respond to Insider's request to confirm these figures.)

"It was the best decision, business-wise, I ever made in my entire life," Goggins said in the event, "because I had the mental toughness and also the ability to know what was right for me and my brand."

The book ended up selling 900,000 copies across print and digital within the first four months, Deadline's Patrick Hipes reported. It stayed on The New York Times' bestseller list for 14 weeks and has sold more than 3 million copies to date. According to Bookscan data, roughly 300,000 of those copies are from the two bound editions.

"That's spectacular for any book," said Giles Anderson, the owner and founder of Anderson Literary Agency.

Still, even as a businessman, Goggins is adamant that money isn't what gets him up in the morning. "I'm not driven by the business," he told Rogan. "I'm a minimalist motherfucker. Gimme a backpack, a fucking ground to sleep on, a pullup bar, some fucking running shoes, and a Subway sandwich, and I'm fucking straight."

To be sure, Goggins isn't the only tough-as-nails influencer. Plenty have come before him, Tony Robbins perhaps looming the largest, literally, over the past two decades. Nor is Goggins the only veteran turned life coach to break onto the scene in recent years.

Jocko Willink is a retired naval officer, a podcaster, and the author of several books, including "Extreme Ownership: How Navy SEALs Lead and Win." Willink is well known on Instagram, where he has nearly 2 million followers, for posting gritty, black-and-white close-ups of his digital watch displaying ungodly wake-up times. A recent photo showed the time as 4:25:41. The caption: "WARPATH."

Many of Goggins' followers also find strength in Jocko, as he's better known. But where Jocko has posted more than 4,700 times, Goggins has just 335 posts to his name, and each one is a viral sensation in its own right. His videos regularly pull in more than a million views.

To retired SEAL Gleeson, who previously founded and ran a digital-media agency for 11 years, the growth and engagement Goggins has achieved are nothing short of anomalous. "I've never seen an explosion of rapid growth from a social-media-brand standpoint," Gleeson said. "Never seen it before."

david goggins moab 240 Goggins ran the Moab 240 in October, finishing second.

David Goggins/Instagram

david goggins moab 240 Goggins' finishing time at the Moab 240 was 62 hours, 21 minutes.

David Goggins/Instagram

Goggins isn't for everyone … yet

Part of Goggins' appeal has been the mythic quality that's followed him ever since stories began to surface on YouTube about six years ago. In 2015, the entrepreneur Jesse Itzler published "Living With a SEAL: 31 Days Training With the Toughest Man on the Planet." Itzler never used the SEAL's name in the book, but word soon got out that the "toughest man" was in fact David Goggins. More videos emerged; rumors swirled. Have you heard of David Goggins? The man himself began appearing on podcasts, news shows, and social media.

All that organic growth has created a reputation that some find intriguing. For instance, a month after the official Goggins Challenge weekend in March, a handful of New York City-based runners embarked on the challenge to raise money for charity the weekend of April 9. For others, who may be landing on Goggins' Instagram page for the first time, the catalog of running videos, in which our hero yells at the camera for a minute straight, may seem intimidating. But for every Goggins nonbeliever, there is often a friend close by who's ready to dispel the myths and spread the gospel.

Joelle Tomlinson, a morning-news host in Calgary, and a friend of Featherstone, regularly runs ultramarathons. When she came across Goggins, in 2020, by way of a running partner, she first thought, "Wow, this guy is absolutely wild" - in a good way, she said. "I've never heard of anyone like this. I think he has completely made this recreational suffering more achievable." She said she was eager to pick up a copy of his book.

But then there are people such as Jacy Cunningham, a 32-year-old professional trainer in Maryland, who admire Goggins for his intensity but find less value in glorifying it as a way of life. "Our society promotes pure extreme," said Cunningham, who runs his own business on a holistic form of fitness called the Jacy Method. "We're fanatic about crazy shit. We're big on pushing ourselves to crazy limits."

Devin Featherstone said an increasingly comfortable world is to blame. "People are driving more toward that in-your-face attitude of how Goggins tells you straight up: If you're lazy, you're lazy. You're not candy-coating it, and I think more and more people need that."

Still, even a superfan such as Featherstone said he's motivated most by his family and his values, and that he taps the fearless warrior in his head only when times get tough. As a dad to a 5-year-old son, he knows the misery of a 4 a.m. wake-up. But after studying "Can't Hurt Me" and listening to clip after clip, Featherstone said cleaning a mess or settling a dispute doesn't seem so bad.

"There are things that I would bitch and complain about that were really small," he said. Now, not so much, and people have even asked where his inner peace comes from. "I'm, like, 'Honestly? I read David Goggins' book.'"

Read the original article on Business Insider

[Author: insider@insider.com (Chris Weller)]

]]>
Wed, 14 Apr 2021 10:03:40 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Strategy Influencer David Goggins Navy SEAL Leadership Motivation Social Media Marianne Ayala BI Graphics Enhanced
Ex-Navy SEAL and ultramarathoner David Goggins is the toughest man on the planet. His latest challenge: persuading the world to suffer on purpose. http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/typepad/alleyinsider/silicon_alley_insider/~3/_kCDsWl6Vns/david-goggins-navy-seal-business-toughness-books-speaking-2021-4

david goggins turning joys of suffering into business model 2x1

Brandon Rogers/US Navy; @davidgoggins/Twitter; Marianne Ayala/Insider

Everywhere Devin Featherstone goes, David Goggins follows. It starts in the morning when Featherstone opens his eyes and catches Goggins' thousand-yard stare from the book jacket of "Can't Hurt Me," Goggins' memoir, on his nightstand.

Throughout the day, Featherstone, 36, a firefighter and an avid runner in Calgary, Alberta, ingests YouTube videos and podcast clips of the former Navy SEAL and ultramarathoner, who reminds him to "Stay hard!" And as night falls, and Featherstone crawls back into bed beside his wife, there Goggins remains on the nightstand - inert, gazing blankly into the darkness.

Featherstone acknowledges the reality plainly: "David Goggins is in my head daily."

The sway that Goggins, who is 46, has over his followers - his ability to occupy their thoughts and persuade them to push past their limits - is hard to overstate. Last month, he oversaw the Goggins Challenge, a two-day test of physical fitness that ran March 5-7. Across 90 countries, tens of thousands of weekend warriors ran four miles every four hours, for 48 hours straight. If you weren't a runner, you exercised. If you weren't a gym rat, you just got sweaty. It was free to enter, and if you wanted a T-shirt, you paid $35.

Devin Featherstone did it in full firefighter gear because why not.

While Goggins ended up donating more than $200,000 in profits from the T-shirt sales to charity, for individual people there is still no good reason to do challenges like these. But Goggins regularly inspires such action. Drawing on stories of his difficult past, mixed with expletive-ridden calls to reject creature comforts, he's found a way to become equal parts drill sergeant, life coach, and superhero for his community of nearly 4 million highly engaged Instagram followers.

"It's just really empowering," said Jenny Petersen, a 48-year-old nurse and runner from Lincoln, Nebraska, speaking of Goggins' list of accomplishments. Petersen - a runner and triathlete - was among those who completed the Goggins Challenge. "People are starting to embrace that it's OK if you suffer, and that you're tougher than you think."

After more than a year of both mental and physical anguish wrought by COVID-19, Goggins' calls to embrace discomfort may seem ill-timed. But for the newly converted and die-hards alike, he's offering people more than motivation: an opportunity to reclaim control of their suffering, and practice it on their own terms.

Goggins' fan base is growing fast, and there are promising signs his ability to monetize that interest - through a bestselling memoir, corporate speaking engagements, merchandise, and avenues yet-to-be explored - could carve out a lucrative "business of toughness" over the coming years.

"I discovered a whole nother part of your fucking brain that a lot of people don't even know about," Goggins told Joe Rogan in a 2018 podcast episode. "It's my job now to take these weak people, in the category that I was in, and say, 'Uh-uh. Stop reading the bullshit. Stop listening to the bullshit.' And if my story of success can impact somebody, it is my job, it is my duty, to share the story." (Goggins declined to be interviewed for this article.)

Achievements born from adversity

It was November 1, 2005, and a 6-foot-2, 245-pound linebacker of a Navy SEAL was on the starting line of a 24-hour footrace in Southern California. Goggins had signed up for the San Diego 1-Day, an event he entered as a qualifying race for a separate ultramarathon in which he hoped to raise money for charity.

He was no fleet-footed runner. In the lead-up to the race, Goggins' cardiovascular training included just 20 minutes spent on the elliptical every Sunday. The task ahead of him: Complete 100 laps of the one-mile track before the 24 hours were up.

The race nearly broke Goggins, who describes the hellacious experience in his book and on podcasts as the most painful day of his life. He broke all the small bones in his feet. His kidneys shut down. By the time he got home, having run 101 miles in under 19 hours, he was smeared with blood, urine, and feces, and was unable to walk under his own weight. His wife at the time begged him to go to the hospital.

"She kept talking, shouting, crying, trying to reach me through the haze," Goggins wrote in his 2018 memoir, "Can't Hurt Me: Master Your Mind and Defy the Odds." "And I heard most of what she said, but I knew if we went to the hospital they'd give me pain killers and I didn't want to mask this pain. I'd just accomplished the most amazing feat in my entire life."

brent gleeson & david goggins Navy SEAL training in 2001. Brent Gleeson, second from left. David Goggins, second from right.

Brent Gleeson

david goggins Goggins during Navy SEAL training.

Brent Gleeson

David Goggins & Brent Gleeson Goggins and Gleeson at the SEAL training graduation in 2001.

Brent Gleeson

As Goggins described it, that race obliterated any sense of physical limits he'd once had.

Two months after the San Diego 1-Day, he ran the Hurt 100, a 100-mile trail race with 24,500 feet of climbing through hills in Hawaii. In 2006, he completed seven more races of 30 miles or more. In 2007, he completed 14 more, including a third-place finish at the Badwater 135, a race longer than five normal marathons that cuts through the sneaker-melting heat of Death Valley. He's completed two dozen more ultras in the 14 years since.

Goggins has also competed in the Ironman World Championship, finishing the 140.6-mile triathlon in 11 hours and 24 minutes. And in 2013, he broke the Guinness World Record for most pullups completed in 24 hours with 4,030. He broke the record with seven hours to spare.

For people such as Petersen and Featherstone, Goggins' core appeal is his mental toughness, which Goggins said he channels into "going the distance," not winning the race. He speaks often of the "40% rule," which says that when people typically give up, they're really only 40% depleted.

"The reason it's so powerful," Goggins wrote in "Can't Hurt Me," "is that if you follow it, you will unlock your mind to new levels of performance and excellence in sports and in life, and your rewards will run far deeper than mere material success."

The San Diego 1-Day marked Goggins' first step on the road to becoming an endurance athlete, but overcoming adversity stretches back to his childhood. Growing up Black in the small, predominantly white town of Brazil, Indiana, he faced virulent racism and struggled with a learning disability, speech impediment, and low self-esteem.

"I damn sure wasn't going to get into college based on academics," Goggins wrote in "Can't Hurt Me." "All I knew was that I had to get the fuck out of Brazil, Indiana." He saw the military as his best chance and took the requisite entrance exam three times. On his third try, he met the minimum standard for the Air Force.

To date, Goggins is the only person to complete training as a Navy SEAL, Army Ranger, and Air Force Tactical Air Controller. And "when that glory faded," about 20 years ago, Goggins set his sights on ultramarathon running, said Brent Gleeson, a former Navy SEAL who graduated from SEAL training with Goggins in 2001.

"He's always striving, as he would say, to recertify himself as a savage," said Gleeson, who is now an entrepreneur and the author of several books, including "Embrace the Suck: The Navy SEAL Way to an Extraordinary Life." "It's that continual journey, and I think that inadvertently started to spark something in other people."

Even in middle age, Goggins seems to have no plans of slowing down. In October, at 45 years old, he ran 238 miles in 62 hours, 21 minutes, and 29 seconds as part of the Moab 240 in Utah. It was good enough for a second-place finish.

US Navy Goggins ran the Badwater 135 in 2007, in a string of 14 ultramarathon races that year.

Brandon Rogers/US Navy

Not just transformation - multiplication

But now the 46-year-old veteran is increasingly turning his attention toward brand-building. In 2016, Goggins, along with his team, founded Goggins LLC as a way to start investing in himself, as he told Rogan on his first of two podcast appearances.

"I try to be as real as I can," Goggins said, "because we're all fucking suffering in this world. We're all hurting. And I try to take away all titles you wanna give me to let you know that I did not come from that shit. That's why I have to be so authentic and so real about my own insecurities and my own faults, and being a fucked-up person."

Influencers strive to be as authentic as possible; it can make or break a nascent brand. Fortunately for Goggins, who may never even use the word "influencer," staying true to himself and his story has been the greatest source of his success - and sometimes his stress.

"My biggest fear in life is, people can read right through a motherfucker that's not real," he told Rogan. "I do it all the time. A lot of people have these great quotes, and they mass-produce. I can't mass-produce something, man."

Instead, he's started giving talks. He's spoken at companies such as Cisco and Microsoft and at pro sports teams such as the Seattle Seahawks and the New York Giants. (Because of COVID-19, he has not given a talk since March 2020, a spokesperson confirmed.) Clips from these talks carry titles such as "Stop Talking Yourself Out of Being Great" and "Get Comfortable With Being Uncomfortable."

There is ample room for Goggins to grow in these spaces: Together, the self-improvement and motivational-speaking markets are worth about $15 billion. And they are expected to grow between 4% and 6% over the next few years, according to research from Marketdata Enterprises.

In 2018, he and his co-author, Adam Skolnick, self-published his memoir, "Can't Hurt Me." He said in a 2019 Facebook Live event that, despite being offered an advance of $300,000, he turned it down "at the last minute" and decided instead to invest $800,000 of his own money in self-publishing. (Goggins' press representative did not respond to Insider's request to confirm these figures.)

"It was the best decision, business-wise, I ever made in my entire life," Goggins said in the event, "because I had the mental toughness and also the ability to know what was right for me and my brand."

The book ended up selling 900,000 copies across print and digital within the first four months, Deadline's Patrick Hipes reported. It stayed on The New York Times' bestseller list for 14 weeks and has sold more than 3 million copies to date. According to Bookscan data, roughly 300,000 of those copies are from the two bound editions.

"That's spectacular for any book," said Giles Anderson, the owner and founder of Anderson Literary Agency.

Still, even as a businessman, Goggins is adamant that money isn't what gets him up in the morning. "I'm not driven by the business," he told Rogan. "I'm a minimalist motherfucker. Gimme a backpack, a fucking ground to sleep on, a pullup bar, some fucking running shoes, and a Subway sandwich, and I'm fucking straight."

To be sure, Goggins isn't the only tough-as-nails influencer. Plenty have come before him, Tony Robbins perhaps looming the largest, literally, over the past two decades. Nor is Goggins the only veteran turned life coach to break onto the scene in recent years.

Jocko Willink is a retired naval officer, a podcaster, and the author of several books, including "Extreme Ownership: How Navy SEALs Lead and Win." Willink is well known on Instagram, where he has nearly 2 million followers, for posting gritty, black-and-white close-ups of his digital watch displaying ungodly wake-up times. A recent photo showed the time as 4:25:41. The caption: "WARPATH."

Many of Goggins' followers also find strength in Jocko, as he's better known. But where Jocko has posted more than 4,700 times, Goggins has just 335 posts to his name, and each one is a viral sensation in its own right. His videos regularly pull in more than a million views.

To retired SEAL Gleeson, who previously founded and ran a digital-media agency for 11 years, the growth and engagement Goggins has achieved are nothing short of anomalous. "I've never seen an explosion of rapid growth from a social-media-brand standpoint," Gleeson said. "Never seen it before."

david goggins moab 240 Goggins ran the Moab 240 in October, finishing second.

David Goggins/Instagram

david goggins moab 240 Goggins' finishing time at the Moab 240 was 62 hours, 21 minutes.

David Goggins/Instagram

Goggins isn't for everyone … yet

Part of Goggins' appeal has been the mythic quality that's followed him ever since stories began to surface on YouTube about six years ago. In 2015, the entrepreneur Jesse Itzler published "Living With a SEAL: 31 Days Training With the Toughest Man on the Planet." Itzler never used the SEAL's name in the book, but word soon got out that the "toughest man" was in fact David Goggins. More videos emerged; rumors swirled. Have you heard of David Goggins? The man himself began appearing on podcasts, news shows, and social media.

All that organic growth has created a reputation that some find intriguing. For instance, a month after the official Goggins Challenge weekend in March, a handful of New York City-based runners embarked on the challenge to raise money for charity the weekend of April 9. For others, who may be landing on Goggins' Instagram page for the first time, the catalog of running videos, in which our hero yells at the camera for a minute straight, may seem intimidating. But for every Goggins nonbeliever, there is often a friend close by who's ready to dispel the myths and spread the gospel.

Joelle Tomlinson, a morning-news host in Calgary, and a friend of Featherstone, regularly runs ultramarathons. When she came across Goggins, in 2020, by way of a running partner, she first thought, "Wow, this guy is absolutely wild" - in a good way, she said. "I've never heard of anyone like this. I think he has completely made this recreational suffering more achievable." She said she was eager to pick up a copy of his book.

But then there are people such as Jacy Cunningham, a 32-year-old professional trainer in Maryland, who admire Goggins for his intensity but find less value in glorifying it as a way of life. "Our society promotes pure extreme," said Cunningham, who runs his own business on a holistic form of fitness called the Jacy Method. "We're fanatic about crazy shit. We're big on pushing ourselves to crazy limits."

Devin Featherstone said an increasingly comfortable world is to blame. "People are driving more toward that in-your-face attitude of how Goggins tells you straight up: If you're lazy, you're lazy. You're not candy-coating it, and I think more and more people need that."

Still, even a superfan such as Featherstone said he's motivated most by his family and his values, and that he taps the fearless warrior in his head only when times get tough. As a dad to a 5-year-old son, he knows the misery of a 4 a.m. wake-up. But after studying "Can't Hurt Me" and listening to clip after clip, Featherstone said cleaning a mess or settling a dispute doesn't seem so bad.

"There are things that I would bitch and complain about that were really small," he said. Now, not so much, and people have even asked where his inner peace comes from. "I'm, like, 'Honestly? I read David Goggins' book.'"

Read the original article on Business Insider

[Author: insider@insider.com (Chris Weller)]

]]>
Wed, 14 Apr 2021 10:03:40 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Strategy Influencer David Goggins Navy SEAL Leadership Motivation Social Media Marianne Ayala BI Graphics Enhanced
Ex-Navy SEAL and ultramarathoner David Goggins is the toughest man on the planet. He wants you to love suffering as much as he does. http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/typepad/alleyinsider/silicon_alley_insider/~3/_kCDsWl6Vns/david-goggins-navy-seal-business-toughness-books-speaking-2021-4

david goggins turning joys of suffering into business model 2x1

Brandon Rogers/US Navy; @davidgoggins/Twitter; Marianne Ayala/Insider

Everywhere Devin Featherstone goes, David Goggins follows. It starts in the morning when Featherstone opens his eyes and catches Goggins' thousand-yard stare from the book jacket of "Can't Hurt Me," Goggins' memoir, on his nightstand.

Throughout the day, Featherstone, 36, a firefighter and an avid runner in Calgary, Alberta, ingests YouTube videos and podcast clips of the former Navy SEAL and ultramarathoner, who reminds him to "Stay hard!" And as night falls, and Featherstone crawls back into bed beside his wife, there Goggins remains on the nightstand - inert, gazing blankly into the darkness.

Featherstone acknowledges the reality plainly: "David Goggins is in my head daily."

The sway that Goggins, who is 46, has over his followers - his ability to occupy their thoughts and persuade them to push past their limits - is hard to overstate. Last month, he oversaw the Goggins Challenge, a two-day test of physical fitness that ran March 5-7. Across 90 countries, tens of thousands of weekend warriors ran four miles every four hours, for 48 hours straight. If you weren't a runner, you exercised. If you weren't a gym rat, you just got sweaty. It was free to enter, and if you wanted a T-shirt, you paid $35.

Devin Featherstone did it in full firefighter gear because why not.

While Goggins ended up donating more than $200,000 in profits from the T-shirt sales to charity, for individual people there is still no good reason to do challenges like these. But Goggins regularly inspires such action. Drawing on stories of his difficult past, mixed with expletive-ridden calls to reject creature comforts, he's found a way to become equal parts drill sergeant, life coach, and superhero for his community of nearly 4 million highly engaged Instagram followers.

"It's just really empowering," said Jenny Petersen, a 48-year-old nurse and runner from Lincoln, Nebraska, speaking of Goggins' list of accomplishments. Petersen - a runner and triathlete - was among those who completed the Goggins Challenge. "People are starting to embrace that it's OK if you suffer, and that you're tougher than you think."

After more than a year of both mental and physical anguish wrought by COVID-19, Goggins' calls to embrace discomfort may seem ill-timed. But for the newly converted and die-hards alike, he's offering people more than motivation: an opportunity to reclaim control of their suffering, and practice it on their own terms.

Goggins' fan base is growing fast, and there are promising signs his ability to monetize that interest - through a bestselling memoir, corporate speaking engagements, merchandise, and avenues yet-to-be explored - could carve out a lucrative "business of toughness" over the coming years.

"I discovered a whole nother part of your fucking brain that a lot of people don't even know about," Goggins told Joe Rogan in a 2018 podcast episode. "It's my job now to take these weak people, in the category that I was in, and say, 'Uh-uh. Stop reading the bullshit. Stop listening to the bullshit.' And if my story of success can impact somebody, it is my job, it is my duty, to share the story." (Goggins declined to be interviewed for this article.)

Achievements born from adversity

It was November 1, 2005, and a 6-foot-2, 245-pound linebacker of a Navy SEAL was on the starting line of a 24-hour footrace in Southern California. Goggins had signed up for the San Diego 1-Day, an event he entered as a qualifying race for a separate ultramarathon in which he hoped to raise money for charity.

He was no fleet-footed runner. In the lead-up to the race, Goggins' cardiovascular training included just 20 minutes spent on the elliptical every Sunday. The task ahead of him: Complete 100 laps of the one-mile track before the 24 hours were up.

The race nearly broke Goggins, who describes the hellacious experience in his book and on podcasts as the most painful day of his life. He broke all the small bones in his feet. His kidneys shut down. By the time he got home, having run 101 miles in under 19 hours, he was smeared with blood, urine, and feces, and was unable to walk under his own weight. His wife at the time begged him to go to the hospital.

"She kept talking, shouting, crying, trying to reach me through the haze," Goggins wrote in his 2018 memoir, "Can't Hurt Me: Master Your Mind and Defy the Odds." "And I heard most of what she said, but I knew if we went to the hospital they'd give me pain killers and I didn't want to mask this pain. I'd just accomplished the most amazing feat in my entire life."

brent gleeson & david goggins Navy SEAL training in 2001. Brent Gleeson, second from left. David Goggins, second from right.

Brent Gleeson

david goggins Goggins during Navy SEAL training.

Brent Gleeson

David Goggins & Brent Gleeson Goggins and Gleeson at the SEAL training graduation in 2001.

Brent Gleeson

As Goggins described it, that race obliterated any sense of physical limits he'd once had.

Two months after the San Diego 1-Day, he ran the Hurt 100, a 100-mile trail race with 24,500 feet of climbing through hills in Hawaii. In 2006, he completed seven more races of 30 miles or more. In 2007, he completed 14 more, including a third-place finish at the Badwater 135, a race longer than five normal marathons that cuts through the sneaker-melting heat of Death Valley. He's completed two dozen more ultras in the 14 years since.

Goggins has also competed in the Ironman World Championship, finishing the 140.6-mile triathlon in 11 hours and 24 minutes. And in 2013, he broke the Guinness World Record for most pullups completed in 24 hours with 4,030. He broke the record with seven hours to spare.

For people such as Petersen and Featherstone, Goggins' core appeal is his mental toughness, which Goggins said he channels into "going the distance," not winning the race. He speaks often of the "40% rule," which says that when people typically give up, they're really only 40% depleted.

"The reason it's so powerful," Goggins wrote in "Can't Hurt Me," "is that if you follow it, you will unlock your mind to new levels of performance and excellence in sports and in life, and your rewards will run far deeper than mere material success."

The San Diego 1-Day marked Goggins' first step on the road to becoming an endurance athlete, but overcoming adversity stretches back to his childhood. Growing up Black in the small, predominantly white town of Brazil, Indiana, he faced virulent racism and struggled with a learning disability, speech impediment, and low self-esteem.

"I damn sure wasn't going to get into college based on academics," Goggins wrote in "Can't Hurt Me." "All I knew was that I had to get the fuck out of Brazil, Indiana." He saw the military as his best chance and took the requisite entrance exam three times. On his third try, he met the minimum standard for the Air Force.

To date, Goggins is the only person to complete training as a Navy SEAL, Army Ranger, and Air Force Tactical Air Controller. And "when that glory faded," about 20 years ago, Goggins set his sights on ultramarathon running, said Brent Gleeson, a former Navy SEAL who graduated from SEAL training with Goggins in 2001.

"He's always striving, as he would say, to recertify himself as a savage," said Gleeson, who is now an entrepreneur and the author of several books, including "Embrace the Suck: The Navy SEAL Way to an Extraordinary Life." "It's that continual journey, and I think that inadvertently started to spark something in other people."

Even in middle age, Goggins seems to have no plans of slowing down. In October, at 45 years old, he ran 238 miles in 62 hours, 21 minutes, and 29 seconds as part of the Moab 240 in Utah. It was good enough for a second-place finish.

US Navy Goggins ran the Badwater 135 in 2007, in a string of 14 ultramarathon races that year.

Brandon Rogers/US Navy

Not just transformation - multiplication

But now the 46-year-old veteran is increasingly turning his attention toward brand-building. In 2016, Goggins, along with his team, founded Goggins LLC as a way to start investing in himself, as he told Rogan on his first of two podcast appearances.

"I try to be as real as I can," Goggins said, "because we're all fucking suffering in this world. We're all hurting. And I try to take away all titles you wanna give me to let you know that I did not come from that shit. That's why I have to be so authentic and so real about my own insecurities and my own faults, and being a fucked-up person."

Influencers strive to be as authentic as possible; it can make or break a nascent brand. Fortunately for Goggins, who may never even use the word "influencer," staying true to himself and his story has been the greatest source of his success - and sometimes his stress.

"My biggest fear in life is, people can read right through a motherfucker that's not real," he told Rogan. "I do it all the time. A lot of people have these great quotes, and they mass-produce. I can't mass-produce something, man."

Instead, he's started giving talks. He's spoken at companies such as Cisco and Microsoft and at pro sports teams such as the Seattle Seahawks and the New York Giants. (Because of COVID-19, he has not given a talk since March 2020, a spokesperson confirmed.) Clips from these talks carry titles such as "Stop Talking Yourself Out of Being Great" and "Get Comfortable With Being Uncomfortable."

There is ample room for Goggins to grow in these spaces: Together, the self-improvement and motivational-speaking markets are worth about $15 billion. And they are expected to grow between 4% and 6% over the next few years, according to research from Marketdata Enterprises.

In 2018, he and his co-author, Adam Skolnick, self-published his memoir, "Can't Hurt Me." He said in a 2019 Facebook Live event that, despite being offered an advance of $300,000, he turned it down "at the last minute" and decided instead to invest $800,000 of his own money in self-publishing. (Goggins' press representative did not respond to Insider's request to confirm these figures.)

"It was the best decision, business-wise, I ever made in my entire life," Goggins said in the event, "because I had the mental toughness and also the ability to know what was right for me and my brand."

The book ended up selling 900,000 copies across print and digital within the first four months, Deadline's Patrick Hipes reported. It stayed on The New York Times' bestseller list for 14 weeks and has sold more than 3 million copies to date. According to Bookscan data, roughly 300,000 of those copies are from the two bound editions.

"That's spectacular for any book," said Giles Anderson, the owner and founder of Anderson Literary Agency.

Still, even as a businessman, Goggins is adamant that money isn't what gets him up in the morning. "I'm not driven by the business," he told Rogan. "I'm a minimalist motherfucker. Gimme a backpack, a fucking ground to sleep on, a pullup bar, some fucking running shoes, and a Subway sandwich, and I'm fucking straight."

To be sure, Goggins isn't the only tough-as-nails influencer. Plenty have come before him, Tony Robbins perhaps looming the largest, literally, over the past two decades. Nor is Goggins the only veteran turned life coach to break onto the scene in recent years.

Jocko Willink is a retired naval officer, a podcaster, and the author of several books, including "Extreme Ownership: How Navy SEALs Lead and Win." Willink is well known on Instagram, where he has nearly 2 million followers, for posting gritty, black-and-white close-ups of his digital watch displaying ungodly wake-up times. A recent photo showed the time as 4:25:41. The caption: "WARPATH."

Many of Goggins' followers also find strength in Jocko, as he's better known. But where Jocko has posted more than 4,700 times, Goggins has just 335 posts to his name, and each one is a viral sensation in its own right. His videos regularly pull in more than a million views.

To retired SEAL Gleeson, who previously founded and ran a digital-media agency for 11 years, the growth and engagement Goggins has achieved are nothing short of anomalous. "I've never seen an explosion of rapid growth from a social-media-brand standpoint," Gleeson said. "Never seen it before."

david goggins moab 240 Goggins ran the Moab 240 in October, finishing second.

David Goggins/Instagram

david goggins moab 240 Goggins' finishing time at the Moab 240 was 62 hours, 21 minutes.

David Goggins/Instagram

Goggins isn't for everyone … yet

Part of Goggins' appeal has been the mythic quality that's followed him ever since stories began to surface on YouTube about six years ago. In 2015, the entrepreneur Jesse Itzler published "Living With a SEAL: 31 Days Training With the Toughest Man on the Planet." Itzler never used the SEAL's name in the book, but word soon got out that the "toughest man" was in fact David Goggins. More videos emerged; rumors swirled. Have you heard of David Goggins? The man himself began appearing on podcasts, news shows, and social media.

All that organic growth has created a reputation that some find intriguing. For instance, a month after the official Goggins Challenge weekend in March, a handful of New York City-based runners embarked on the challenge to raise money for charity the weekend of April 9. For others, who may be landing on Goggins' Instagram page for the first time, the catalog of running videos, in which our hero yells at the camera for a minute straight, may seem intimidating. But for every Goggins nonbeliever, there is often a friend close by who's ready to dispel the myths and spread the gospel.

Joelle Tomlinson, a morning-news host in Calgary, and a friend of Featherstone, regularly runs ultramarathons. When she came across Goggins, in 2020, by way of a running partner, she first thought, "Wow, this guy is absolutely wild" - in a good way, she said. "I've never heard of anyone like this. I think he has completely made this recreational suffering more achievable." She said she was eager to pick up a copy of his book.

But then there are people such as Jacy Cunningham, a 32-year-old professional trainer in Maryland, who admire Goggins for his intensity but find less value in glorifying it as a way of life. "Our society promotes pure extreme," said Cunningham, who runs his own business on a holistic form of fitness called the Jacy Method. "We're fanatic about crazy shit. We're big on pushing ourselves to crazy limits."

Devin Featherstone said an increasingly comfortable world is to blame. "People are driving more toward that in-your-face attitude of how Goggins tells you straight up: If you're lazy, you're lazy. You're not candy-coating it, and I think more and more people need that."

Still, even a superfan such as Featherstone said he's motivated most by his family and his values, and that he taps the fearless warrior in his head only when times get tough. As a dad to a 5-year-old son, he knows the misery of a 4 a.m. wake-up. But after studying "Can't Hurt Me" and listening to clip after clip, Featherstone said cleaning a mess or settling a dispute doesn't seem so bad.

"There are things that I would bitch and complain about that were really small," he said. Now, not so much, and people have even asked where his inner peace comes from. "I'm, like, 'Honestly? I read David Goggins' book.'"

Read the original article on Business Insider

[Author: insider@insider.com (Chris Weller)]

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Wed, 14 Apr 2021 07:30:00 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Strategy Influencer David Goggins Navy SEAL Leadership Motivation Social Media Marianne Ayala BI Graphics Enhanced
Mike Lindell has launched VIP access to his social-media site Frank, which he says will bar swearing, porn, and death threats http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/typepad/alleyinsider/silicon_alley_insider/~3/9P69iNtuEaU/mike-lindell-access-social-media-frank-block-swearing-porn-blasphemy-2021-4 MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell.

Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

  • Mike Lindell's platform Frank is set to go live on Monday but VIPs can get access from Thursday.
  • Lindell said he'd spent millions of dollars on the site's security, including its own servers.
  • He described the site as a cross between YouTube and Twitter - but some content will be off-limits.
  • See more stories on Insider's business page.

You can now sign up for VIP access to Frank, the social-media site being launched by MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell but if you choose to join, you'll still have to be careful about what you post.

Although the site supports free speech, people won't be able to post swear words, porn, or death threats, Lindell said.

Lindell, a staunch supporter of former President Donald Trump, first announced plans to launch his own social-media site in early March, after being banned from Twitter.

Read more: The MyPillow guy says God helped him beat a crack addiction to build a multimillion-dollar empire. Now his religious devotion to Trump threatens to bring it all crashing down.

In a video posted this week to Frank's static webpage, which first went live in late March, Lindell said he had worked on the site for four years and it would be a "platform like no other."

Frank uses the tagline "the voice of free speech," and Lindell has previously said he would use the site to share evidence of his voter-fraud theory, which has been thoroughly debunked.

In the new video, which Newsweek first reported on, Lindell said: "You're not going to have to worry about what you're saying."

He did, however, note that there will be some content moderation on the site. "You don't get to use the four swear words: the c-word, the n-word, the f-word, or God's name in vain," he said. "Free speech is not pornography, free speech isn't 'I'm gonna kill you.'"

Details of this would be available in the site's mission statement when it goes live, he said.

Lindell added that he had spent millions of dollars on the site's security over the last four weeks because he expected the site to be the victim of cyberattacks.

"We're going to be attacked, but I have my own servers and everything," he said. "We're not going to be worried about Amazon taking it down, or YouTube, or Google, or Apple."

Social-media site Parler was booted offline by its previous web host Amazon Web Services. It was also shunned by other tech giants, including Apple and Google, after Trump supporters used it to call for more violence during the January Capitol riots because of its lax stance on moderating content.

Lindell said Frank would be "kind of like a YouTube-Twitter combination."

"You're going to have your own like YouTube channel, only that's your Twitter handle," he said.

A previous description of the site, which has since been removed, said that users would be able to "post videos, livestream television, distribute news and information, and find community and fellowship with likeminded Americans."

Lindell told "The Eric Metaxas Radio Show" in March that the site is "reverse-engineered," and that when influencers join, "they will now have a platform where all the people down here follow them instantly."

"They don't have to earn their followers," he added.

Frank's webpage includes a box where visitors can submit their cellphone number to receive a text code for early VIP access to sign up. Lindell said in the video that people who do would be able to get access to the site at midnight on Thursday.

He said the site is set to launch more widely at 9 a.m. on Monday for a two-day "Frankathon," during which he'll broadcast live on the site.

Read the original article on Business Insider

[Author: gdean@insider.com (Grace Dean)]

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Wed, 14 Apr 2021 07:26:06 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Tech Insider Retail Mike Lindell Frank Frank Speech MyPillow Social Media Donald Trump
GOP donors and lawmakers reportedly discussed how to tackle big tech during an RNC event at Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago resort http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/typepad/alleyinsider/silicon_alley_insider/~3/OWJ1jUwMtA8/gop-republican-donors-lawmakers-big-tech-social-media-trump-rnc-2021-4 The event took place at Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida.

Getty

  • Key GOP players discussed the future of big tech and social media at the RNC donors' summit, CNBC reported.
  • Wisconsin Sen. Ron Johnson told the publication he spoke to attendees about bias in social media.
  • Republicans and social media sites are at loggerheads over blockings and content moderation.
  • See more stories on Insider's business page.

Key Republican figures spent some of the weekend mulling plans for the future of big tech at former president Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida, according to a report by CNBC.

The gathering last weekend saw Republican donors, lawmakers, and strategists discuss their plans for tackling big tech, social media, and corporate America last weekend, the publication reported.

Attendees discussed a "strategy on social media and big tech," Matt Schlapp, chairman of the American Conservative Union and attendee at the retreat, told the publication.

CNBC reported that Wisconsin Senator Ron Johnson said he had taken part in conversations about "concern over bias and growing power of media and social media."

The two groups have been at loggerheads over what Republicans see as the restriction of free speech and the social media platforms see as the removal of hate speech and misinformation from their sites.

After the January 6 attack on the US Capitol, social media giants rushed to crack down on Trump and his supporters, with Facebook and Twitter both suspending Trump's accounts.

Twitter also purged 70,000 accounts associated with QAnon, blocked the accounts of Trump allies including Michael Flynn and Sidney Powell, and suspended the accounts of both Mike Lindell and his company MyPillow after he used them to spread voter-fraud conspiracy theories.

Many Trump supporters flocked to right-wing network Parler instead, but it was temporarily booted offlinee after its web host Amazon Web Services cut ties.

But Republicans are fighting back against the social media crackdown. Both Trump and Lindell are planning on launching their own platforms, and major Republican donor Roy Bailey told CNBC that he is interested in investing in a site where conservatives wouldn't have to "worry about censorship."

The discussions happened during the Republican National Committee's donor summit, which was held largely at a Four Seasons hotel in Palm Beach, Florida.

The invite-only event lets Republican candidates mingle the party's donors as they discuss the GOP's strategy and direction.

The group headed to Mar-a-Lago on Saturday night for a speech from Trump, where he reportedly insulted Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell and asked people to call the COVID-19 vaccine "Trumpcine."

Schlapp told the publication that some attendees at the Mar-a-Lago event said they were "being cancelled" by insurance companies and banks and thought they weren't being denied services because banks thought their businesses were too conservative.

He told CNBC that most of the conversations at Mar-a-Lago were "informal" and that the plans were still developing.

At other points during the RNC retreat, Florida Senator Marco Rubio criticized big tech companies over how they treat their staff and seemed to encourage GOP leaders to attract more support from union workers in the 2022 midterm elections, people briefed on the matter told CNBC.

In mid-March, Rubio became the first GOP senator to publicly endorse efforts by Amazon workers to form a union.

He wrote for USA Today that the tech giant had "waged a war against working-class values."

Support for the unionization effort, which ultimately was defeated, came largely from Democrat lawmakers including Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren.

Read the original article on Business Insider

[Author: gdean@insider.com (Grace Dean)]

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Wed, 14 Apr 2021 07:03:46 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Politics Donald Trump GOP Republican Party RNC Republican National Committee RNC Convention Big Tech Social Media
3 reasons Instagram isn’t working for you (and what to do) http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheFutureOfRealEstateMarketing/~3/AMpWFIJuk0k/ Wed, 14 Apr 2021 04:28:01 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Agent Back To Basics Lead Generation Marketing Select Service Teams Instagram Social Media Social Media Strategy Stefanie Lugo Theme-month-202104 Facebook tests video speed dating events with ‘Sparked’ http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Techcrunch/~3/-u8gtH2zbRQ/ Facebook confirmed it’s testing a video speed-dating app called Sparked, after the app’s website was spotted by The Verge. Unlike dating app giants such as Tinder, Sparked users don’t swipe on people they like or direct message others. Instead, they cycle through a series of short video dates during an event to make connections with others. The product itself is being developed by Facebook’s internal R&D group, the NPE Team, but had not been officially announced.

“Sparked is an early experiment by New Product Experimentation,” a spokesperson for Facebook’s NPE Team confirmed to TechCrunch. “We’re exploring how video-first speed dating can help people find love online.”

They also characterized the app as undergoing a “small, external beta test” designed to generate insights about how video dating could work, in order to improve people’s experiences with Facebook products. The app is not currently live on app stores, only the web.

Sparked is, however, preparing to test the experience at a Chicago Date Night event on Wednesday, The Verge’s report noted.

Image Credits: Facebook

 

During the sign-up process, Sparked tells users to “be kind,” “keep this a safe space,” and “show up.” A walkthrough of how the app also works explains that participants will meet face to face during a series of 4-minute video dates, which they can then follow up with a 10-minute date if all goes well. They can additionally choose to exchange contact info, like phone numbers, emails, or Instagram handles.

Facebook, of course, already offers a dating app product, Facebook Dating.

That experience, which takes place inside Facebook itself, first launched in 2018 outside the U.S., and then arrived in the U.S. the following year. In the early days of the pandemic, Facebook announced it would roll out a sort of virtual dating experience that leveraged Messenger for video chats — a move came at a time when many other dating apps in the market also turned to video to serve users under lockdowns. These video experiences could potentially compete with Sparked, unless the new product’s goal is to become another option inside Facebook Dating itself.

Image Credits: Facebook

Despite the potential reach, Facebook’s success in the dating market is not guaranteed, some analysts have warned. People don’t think of Facebook as a place to go meet partners, and the dating product today is still separated from the main Facebook app for privacy purposes. That means it can’t fully leverage Facebook’s network effects to gain traction, as users in this case may not want their friends and family to know about their dating plans.

Facebook’s competition in dating is fierce, too. Even the pandemic didn’t slow down the dating app giants, like Match Group or newly IPO’d Bumble. Tinder’s direct revenues increased 18% year-over-year to $1.4 billion in 2020, Match Group reported, for instance. Direct revenues from the company’s non-Tinder brands collectively increased 16%. And Bumble topped its revenue estimates in its first quarter as a public company, pulling in $165.6 million in the fourth quarter.

Image Credits: Facebook

Facebook, on the other hand, has remained fairly quiet about its dating efforts. Though the company cited over 1.5 billion matches in the 20 countries it’s live, a “match” doesn’t indicate a successful pairing — in fact, that sort of result may not be measured. But it’s early days for the product, which only rolled out to European markets this past fall.

The NPE Team’s experiment in speed dating could ultimately help to inform Facebook of what sort of new experiences a dating app user may want to use, and how.

The company didn’t say if or when Sparked would roll out more broadly.

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Tue, 13 Apr 2021 13:45:04 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Social Facebook Apps Instagram Tinder Ipo Social Media Tech Chicago Dating United States Dating Apps Match Group Facebook Facebook Facebook During NPE Team
You Can Finally Flag Bad Takes Directly to Facebook's Oversight Board https://gizmodo.com/you-can-finally-flag-bad-takes-directly-to-facebooks-ov-1846672941

If you have problems with any hate speech, harassment, or generally bad takes that appear on your Facebook feed, good news! On Tuesday, the (supposedly) independent Oversight Board announced that users can appeal directly to it directly regarding questionable content that’s been left up on Facebook and Instagram.

Read more...

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Tue, 13 Apr 2021 12:40:00 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Facebook Science Instagram Social Media Software Computing Operating Systems Oversight Board Facebook s Oversight Board Technology Internet
Why Bounce Curl Founder’s Success is Rooted in Science and Social Media http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Adfreak/~3/5mklV2lw_CQ/ ]]> Tue, 13 Apr 2021 12:09:07 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Advertising Social Media Merian Women Trailblazers Merian Odesho Instagram for Kids Doesn’t Have to Be a Problem http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Adfreak/~3/mbG25cpaA68/ ]]> Tue, 13 Apr 2021 12:00:53 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Facebook Advertising Social Media Voice Level up your gaming knowledge, pt. 1: reaching the social gamer http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/wearesocial/~3/FE2OM0Y4pqA/level-up-your-gaming-knowledge-pt-1-reaching-the-social-gamer In the first in a new three-part series which draws on its new Gaming dataset, Market Intelligence Manager for GlobalWebIndex Chris Beer, dives into the social side of gaming, and the potential for marketers in video game worlds.

Gaming has entered more and more marketers’ radars over the last 12 months, but misconceptions and stereotypes about the field are still plentiful. There’s a lingering image of the young, male, and usually antisocial gamer. Think of the Big Bang Theory guys doing “ Halo night”, or the kids in South Park playing World of Warcraft .

As has been covered on this blog before, gaming has moved on from that stereotype, if it was ever accurate in the first place. And with persistent multiplayer worlds easier to drop into than ever, gaming has become a kind of social media; a network of people all focused on doing something they enjoy and sharing their interests with others.

And just as with social media, it offers brands the chance to make meaningful activations with an engaged audience – assuming they get their execution right. 

Just looking at players of specific devices or even franchises doesn’t quite give the whole picture. Someone might play Minecraft on their own in survival mode, without ever touching the multiplayer. So it’s important to really delve into who your audience is and craft meaningful gamer segments, as you would for any other demographic, drawing particularly on their motivations to play.

Gaming is a “third place”
It’s eye-opening to see just how central the social aspect is to gamers in 2021. More gamers play to socialise with friends (26%) than to escape from reality (22%), or to immerse themselves in storylines (18%). 

Here’s another way of taking that insight – players are more likely to see gaming as an enabler of their social networks, and not a retreat from them. Fundamentally, it’s something that brings people together more than it splits them apart.

This has been cemented in recent years by the creation of bespoke “hangout spaces” in online video games, where there is less emphasis on gameplay mechanics and more on relaxed social interaction. This includes Fortnite’s Party Royale mode, Roblox ’s Party Place, and GTA Online ’s casino and resort. 

Coupled with other social-friendly franchises like Minecraft and Animal Crossing , these are sometimes referred to as “metaverses”, more akin to fully-fledged virtual worlds than games per se. We can also understand them according to the sociological concept of the “third place”, spaces where people socialise outside of their home and their workplace. 

Without wanting to get too technical, the implications for brands are fairly simple – these new universes create opportunities for impactful campaigns. 

Social gamers are committed and skew young
So who exactly plays games to socialise? 

You might expect social gamers to be more “casual”’, with all that that entails, but they do skew more male, and they’re more likely to have a “hardcore” interest in gaming, saying they’re extremely or very interested in it. 

Playing to socialise is particularly pronounced among the youngest gamers, the 16-24s. It’s sometimes missed just how much persistent multiplayer worlds have shaped their experience of gaming; younger players don’t really know the medium without it. 

Older generations might still remember gaming as more of a single-player experience, and online servers were a more niche part of playing, but it’s now as easy to jump into a gaming world online as it is to log into Instagram.

In fact, 16-24s are unique in playing games to socialise more than for the challenge. It’s the clearest sign of a generational shift in how they view the medium, and one that should overturn many long-held conceptions about it.  

Community and competition go hand-in-hand
Our Gaming dataset uses a recontact methodology, which allows us to profile different types of gamers against data points from our Core dataset, which gives further detail about how they think and behave when they’re not gaming.  

Broadly speaking, two themes emerge when analysing social gamers which, at first glance, may seem contradictory. They want to feel part of a community, but also to stand out. They’re team players, but also individualistic. 

The best example of this is in their most favoured brand actions. Their largest over-indexes are for brands who improve their image/reputation, run customer communities and personalise products. A real mix of self- and group-directed actions. 

Likewise, for their personal values, they over-index for saying both standing out in a crowd and contributing to their community are important to them. 

Putting these qualities into a gaming context, though, helps shed some light. These social gamers want to feel part of the communities around the franchises they play, but also to stand out from other gamers within them. 

Gamers will have avatars, characters, teams, vehicles, and just about anything that can be customised and curated to represent them. Being a Fortnite player, for example, is a part of someone’s digital identity, but that is in turn reinforced by how they turn out in the game. 

This is why cosmetics and skins in games like Fortnite can be so successful, as they’re effectively another layer of aesthetic competition between players underneath the traditional battle royale. Nike’s work is a good example, as it brought the exclusive, limited-run culture of footwear “drops” into the game. It was delivered in a way that added value to the players (new gaming modes) but understood the competitive dynamics particular to gaming. 

Even outside of competitive contexts, the principle of standing out while being part of a community still applies. Animal Crossing players can feel bonded through their shared experience of playing the game, but the islands they look after are very much their own. 

This is a crucial point that brands looking to get involved need to grasp. It’s not just a case of understanding the culture around specific franchises and gaming worlds, but also tapping into these virtual projections of a player’s identity. 

See you in the lobby
Gaming is a kind of social media, but it’s not a one-size-fits-all. You wouldn’t expect to copy/paste campaigns across any other social network, so brands have to do their due diligence on the community “feel” that is particular to each gaming world.

More to the point, gaming is a social media where competition and socialising are finely intertwined. Respecting that community has to be done in tandem with boosting the profile of individual gamers. 

—–

In our next gaming deep-dive, the GlobalWebIndex team will be taking a closer look at the characteristics of individual platforms and how marketers can cut through on them. 

The post Level up your gaming knowledge, pt. 1: reaching the social gamer appeared first on We Are Social UK - Global Socially-Led Creative Agency.

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Tue, 13 Apr 2021 11:25:06 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Gaming South Park Social Media Seo Nike Thought Leadership GlobalWebIndex Animal Crossing Fortnite GlobalWebIndex Chris Beer Roblox 's Party Place
Avon Makes TikTok Debut as Part of ‘Digital Transformation’ http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Adfreak/~3/Lcbn4QQmqVA/ ]]> Tue, 13 Apr 2021 10:48:07 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs London Advertising Social Media Avon AdFreak CPG & Grocery Facebook, Instagram users can now ask ‘oversight’ panel to review decisions not to remove content http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Techcrunch/~3/twkbZn_Jzqw/ Facebook’s self-styled ‘Oversight Board’ (FOB) has announced an operational change that looks intended to respond to criticism of the limits of the self-regulatory content-moderation decision review body: It says it’s started accepting requests from users to review decisions to leave content up on Facebook and Instagram.

The move expands the FOB’s remit beyond reviewing (and mostly reversing) content takedowns — an arbitrary limit that critics said aligns it with the economic incentives of its parent entity, given that Facebook’s business benefits from increased engagement with content (and outrageous content drives clicks and makes eyeballs stick).

“So far, users have been able to appeal content to the Board which they think should be restored to Facebook or Instagram. Now, users can also appeal content to the Board which they think should be removed from Facebook or Instagram,” the FOB writes, adding that it will “use its independent judgment to decide what to leave up and what to take down”.

“Our decisions will be binding on Facebook,” it adds.

The ability to request an appeal on content Facebook wouldn’t take down has been added across all markets, per Facebook. But the tech giant said it will take some “weeks” for all users to get access as it said it’s rolling out the feature “ in waves to ensure stability of the product experience”.

While the FOB can now get individual pieces of content taken down from Facebook/Instagram — i.e. if the Board believes it’s justified in reversing an earlier decision by the company not to remove content — it cannot make Facebook adopt any associated suggestions vis-a-vis its content moderation policies generally.

That’s because Facebook has never said it will be bound by the FOB’s policy recommendations; only by the final decision made per review.

That in turn limits the FOB’s ability to influence the shape of the tech giant’s approach to speech policing. And indeed the whole effort remains inextricably bound to Facebook which devised and structured the FOB — writing the Board’s charter and bylaws, and hand picking the first cohort of members. The company thus continues to exert inescapable pull on the strings linking its self-regulatory vehicle to its lucrative people-profiling and ad-targeting empire.

The FOB getting the ability to review content ‘keep ups’ (if we can call them that) is also essentially irrelevant when you consider the ocean of content Facebook has ensured the Board won’t have any say in moderating — because its limited resources/man-power mean it can only ever consider a fantastically tiny subset of cases referred to it for review.

For an oversight body to provide a meaningful limit on Facebook’s power it would need to have considerably more meaty (i.e. legal) powers; be able to freely range across all aspects of Facebook’s business (not just review user generated content); and be truly independent of the adtech mothership — as well as having meaningful powers of enforcement and sanction.

So, in other words, it needs to be a public body, functioning in the public interest.

Facebook’s controversial Oversight Board starts reviewing content moderation cases

Instead, while Facebook applies its army of in house lawyers to fight actual democratic regulatory oversight and compliance, it has splashed out to fashion this bespoke bureaucracy that can align with its speech interests — handpicking a handful of external experts to pay to perform a content review cameo in its crisis PR drama.

Unsurprisingly, then, the FOB has mostly moved the needle in a speech-maximizing direction so far — while expressing some frustration at the limited deck of cards Facebook has dealt it.

Most notably, the Board still has a decision pending on whether to reverse Facebook’s indefinitely ban on former US president Donald Trump. If it reverses that decision Facebook users won’t have any recourse to appeal the restoration of Trump’s account.

The only available route would, presumably, be for users to report future Trump content to Facebook for violating its policies — and if Facebook refuses to take that stuff down, users could try to request a FOB review. But, again, there’s no guarantee the FOB will accept any such review requests. (Indeed, if the board chooses to reinstate Trump that may make it harder for it to accept requests to review Trump content, at least in the short term (in the interests of keeping a diverse case file, so… )

Facebook’s ‘oversight’ body overturns four takedowns and issues a slew of policy suggestions

How to ask for a review after content isn’t removed

To request the FOB review a piece of content that’s been left up a user of Facebook/Instagram first has to report the content to Facebook/Instagram.

If the company decides to keep the content up Facebook says the reporting person will receive an Oversight Board Reference ID (a ten-character string that begins with ‘FB’) in their Support Inbox — which they can use to appeal its ‘no takedown’ decision to the Oversight Board.

There are several hoops to jump through to make an appeal: Following on-screen instructions Facebook says the user will be taken to the Oversight Board website where they need to log in with the account to which the reference ID was issued.

They will then be asked to provide responses to a number of questions about their reasons for reporting the content (to “help the board understand why you think Facebook made the wrong decision”).

Once an appeal has been submitted, the Oversight Board will decide whether or not to review it. The board only selects a certain number of “eligible appeals” to review; and Facebook has not disclosed the proportion of requests the Board accepts for review vs submissions it receives — per case or on aggregate. So how much chance of submission success any user has for any given piece of content is an unknown (and probably unknowable) quantity.

Users who have submitted an appeal against content that was left up can check the status of their appeal via the FOB’s website — again by logging in and using the reference ID.

A further limitation is time, as Facebook notes there’s a time limit on appealing decisions to the FOB

“Bear in mind that there is a time limit on appealing decisions to the Oversight Board. Once the window to appeal a decision has expired, you will no longer be able to submit it,” it writes in its Help Center, without specifying how long users have to get their appeal in (we asked Facebook to confirm this and it’s 15 days). 

Facebook’s Oversight Board will review the decision to suspend Trump

Facebook Oversight Board says other social networks ‘welcome to join’ if project succeeds

]]> Tue, 13 Apr 2021 10:41:50 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Social Facebook Instagram US Social Media Tech Policy User Generated Content Donald Trump Trump Board Facebook Instagram Freedom Of Expression Oversight Board Content Moderation FOB Content Takedowns Facebook Oversight Board Facebook s Oversight Board Oversight Board FOB Instagram the FOB Oversight Board Reference Oversight Board Once Trump Facebook Oversight Board Every app is going to copy Clubhouse, and we just have to deal with it http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/digitaltrends/~3/UcxZWvRM1xo/ ]]> Tue, 13 Apr 2021 09:00:51 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Mobile Trends Social Media Snapchat Clubhouse Get help identifying that mystery plant you bought at the hardware store https://boingboing.net/2021/04/13/get-help-identifying-that-mystery-plant-you-bought-at-the-hardware-store.html?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=get-help-identifying-that-mystery-plant-you-bought-at-the-hardware-store

During the pandemic I needed to fill my life with something productive and, hopefully, enriching. I chose plants. Succulents, mostly. Crassulas, echeverias, gasterias, haworthias, strings of pearls and dolphins and coins. Most of the time, I'd get a handy label on the plastic pot describing the plant's name and needs. — Read the rest

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Tue, 13 Apr 2021 08:13:40 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Post News Social Media Reddit Houseplants Succulents Plant Care
Facebook knew of Honduran president’s manipulation campaign – and let it continue for 11 months https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2021/apr/13/facebook-honduras-juan-orlando-hernandez-fake-engagement Juan Orlando Hernández falsely inflated his posts’ popularity for nearly a year after the company was informed about it

Facebook allowed the president of Honduras to artificially inflate the appearance of popularity on his posts for nearly a year after the company was first alerted to the activity.

The astroturfing – the digital equivalent of a bussed-in crowd – was just one facet of a broader online disinformation effort that the administration has used to attack critics and undermine social movements, Honduran activists and scholars say.

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Tue, 13 Apr 2021 07:00:09 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Facebook Technology Social Networking Americas Social Media World news Honduras Juan Orlando Hernández
‘Facebook isn’t interested in countries like ours’: Azerbaijan troll network returns months after ban https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2021/apr/13/facebook-azerbaijan-ilham-aliyev State-backed harassment campaign targets journalists and dissidents in authoritarian country

Facebook has allowed a state-backed harassment campaign targeting independent news outlets and opposition politicians in Azerbaijan to return to its platform, less than six months after it banned the troll network.

A Guardian investigation has revealed how Facebook allowed an arm of Azerbaijan’s ruling party, the YAP, to carry out the harassment campaign for 14 months after an employee, Sophie Zhang, first alerted managers and executives to its existence in August 2019.

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Tue, 13 Apr 2021 04:00:27 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Facebook Technology Social Networking Social Media World news US news Azerbaijan Yap Sophie Zhang