Posts filtered by tags: 05.09.19[x]


 

This Ancient Art Form Is Practiced Every Morning In Front Of Houses All Over South India

“A physical form of prayer and symbol of protection, a daily exercise, and a moment of intense concentration and meditation, drawing kolam is an important household ritual that has a lot more to it than may first meet the eye. Two very different women living in Chennai explain their shared passion for kolam, and their involvement in the local kolam competition.” (video) – Yahoo! (BBC)
Tags: Art, Visual, Chennai, South India, 05.09.19


Elevating the Arts Through Non-Arts Spaces

Aileen Alon: “While most of my career has been in the arts, I’ve never been employed by an arts organization. … In fact, I’ve probably been able to do more for the arts and culture sector in my community by being an advocate for the arts in non-arts organizations.” – Americans for the Arts
Tags: Uncategorized, 05.09.19, Sj1


Acknowledging Impact, Regardless of Intent

Bri Ng Schwartz: “An intent to make space for artists with diverse backgrounds can get lost in translation when the impact is harmful. … All of my recent experiences [as an Asian-American theatre artist with majority white companies] speak to artists with power and privilege wanting to do the right thing without having the vocabulary to get there. Each one is an example of people intellectualizing the issue without speaking to those who are affected by it.” – HowlRound
Tags: Uncategorized, 05.09.19, Sj


A Performance Festival by and for Disabled Artists

“In mid-April, Performance Space New York hosted I wanna be with you everywhere (IWBWYE), a three-day festival “of, by, and for” disabled artists and writers. … The organizers adhere to the Disability Justice framework — which originated in 2005 with performance project Sins Invalid — that centers disabled people experiencing intersecting and multiple forms of oppression.” – Hyperallergic
Tags: Uncategorized, 05.09.19, Sj


There’s A Reason For That: Understanding The Age Of Enlightenment

“It has been said, indeed, that the eighteenth century was less the Age of Reason than the Age of Feelings—because so many Enlightenment thinkers took pride in recognizing the importance of the sentiments, as their intellectual predecessors often had not. (In Hume’s famous line: “Reason is and ought only to be the slave of the Passions.”) The aim of building a rational society meant contending with the ways in which human beings are not creatures of sweet reason. And that meant, in turn, having...
Tags: Art, Ideas, Hume, 05.09.19


Diary Of A Player In The First US Orchestra Ever To Visit Mao’s China

As the Philadelphia Orchestra prepares to depart for its 12th tour to China, here are excerpts from a journal kept by the piccolo player on the orchestra’s first tour there, back in 1973. – The Philadelphia Inquirer
Tags: Art, Music, China, Mao, Philadelphia Orchestra, 05.09.19


This Detroit Artist Turned The Street He Grew Up On Into A Great Big Art Installation — Why Is He Now Taking It Apart?

“At various points in the last three decades, [Tyree Guyton’s] Heidelberg Project, as it has come to be known, has been dismissed by neighbors as the junk of a crazy hoarder and hailed by critics as one of the great American artworks of the last 50 years. … After years of fighting off destruction from vandals, from elected officials, from arsonists and police, Guyton must now effectively destroy his work in order to save it.” – The New York Times Magazine
Tags: Art, Visual, SJ, Heidelberg Project, Tyree Guyton, Guyton, 05.09.19


Howard Stern Explains How He Turned Into Terri Gross

Three years ago, the Times ran a feature about how the erstwhile King of All Media had moved on from the crazy, raunchy stuff that made him rich and famous and become an intelligent, sensitive, and generally admirable interviewer. Here, in an extended Q&A, he tells David Marchese just how it happened. (includes straight talk about Donald Trump, a longtime friend and frequent guest of yore) – The New York Times Magazine
Tags: Art, People, Howard Stern, Times, Donald Trump, David Marchese, 05.09.19


Howard Stern Explains How He Turned Into Terry Gross

Three years ago, the Times ran a feature about how the erstwhile King of All Media had moved on from the crazy, raunchy stuff that made him rich and famous and become an intelligent, sensitive, and generally admirable interviewer. Here, in an extended Q&A, he tells David Marchese just how it happened. (includes straight talk about Donald Trump, a longtime friend and frequent guest of yore) – The New York Times Magazine
Tags: Art, People, Howard Stern, Times, Donald Trump, Terry Gross, David Marchese, 05.09.19


Shakespeare’s Globe Postpones Its Project Prospero Expansion

The major capital project, which was to begin in October of this year, includes new production and rehearsal facilities and a library/archive; when it was announced in 2016, it was expected to cost £30 million. But projected construction costs have risen significantly since then, and Globe administrators decided to delay work for two years. – The Stage
Tags: Art, Theatre, Shakespeare, 05.09.19


Wales Proposes Making Arts Core To Public Education

The Welsh government is proposing a new curriculum in which schools would be required to provide a “broad and balanced curriculum” in which the arts would become one of six core “areas of learning and experience”.These are the expressive arts; health and well-being; humanities; languages, literacy and communication; mathematics and numeracy; and science and technology. – The Stage
Tags: Art, Wales, Issues, 05.09.19


The Cost Of Being A Ballerina

As 43-year-old ballerina Crystal Brothers prepares to retire from Ballet Memphis, here’s what she has been doing each day to keep her body going in the brutal sport, er, art, of dance: She sleeps in therapy boots all night to reduce leg cramping, and then … “I ice my feet, I take at least three baths a day, I have heating pads attached to my body with elastic bands and thera-bands, and I’m, you know, shoving a heating pad down my pants for my lower back.” – WKNO (Tennessee)
Tags: Art, Dance, 05.09.19, Crystal Brothers, Ballet Memphis


Bringing Brooklyn Back To BAM

Shamel Pitts, who grew up in Bed-Stuy and danced in The Ailey School and at Juilliard before leaving to dance with an Israeli group he saw at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, has moved back home – and is dancing his own creation in BAM, based on (but altered from) the Israeli dance called Gaga. – The Undefeated
Tags: Art, Dance, Brooklyn, Brooklyn Academy of Music, Juilliard, 05.09.19, Shamel Pitts, Ailey School


Dirty Little Secret: Who Owns Land In Great Britain

What’s astonishing about his research is how little has changed in the last 1,000 years. Guy Shrubsole’s figures reveal that the aristocracy and landed gentry – many the descendants of those Norman barons – still own at least 30% of England and probably far more, as 17% is not registered by the Land Registry and is probably inherited land that has never been bought or sold. Half of England is owned by less than 1% of the population. The homeowners’ share adds up to just 5%: “A few thousand duke...
Tags: Art, Ideas, 05.09.19


How To Save The Humanities In Colleges? Rethink The Whole Idea

Academics and their allies need to advocate for a fundamental shift in the social contract around the nature of higher education, moving it away from short-term job training to long-term career development and genuine pursuit of one’s interests. In other words, the only way to save the discipline of history is by making college free. – Pacific Standard
Tags: Art, Ideas, 05.09.19


Could Shakespeare Have Been A Woman?

Had anyone ever proposed that the creator of those extraordinary women might be a woman? Each of the male possibilities requires an elaborate theory to explain his use of another’s name. None of the candidates has succeeded in dethroning the man from Stratford. Yet a simple reason would explain a playwright’s need for a pseudonym in Elizabethan England: being female. – The Atlantic
Tags: Art, Words, 05.09.19


Adventures In Pricing: Art Gallery Of Ontario Rethinks Who Pays What To Come Inside

Those under age 25 will get in free. AGO director Stephen Jost says he initially pitched this idea to this staff two years ago, and wanted the age limit to be 18, but “honestly it was our staff that pushed it up. We looked at the revenue we get from 18- to 25-year-olds, and it’s not that much. But I do know is most humans make their cultural taste choices between 16 and 25, so if you start coming in for free, we can create that habit and relationship.” – Toronto Star
Tags: Art, Visual, 05.09.19


What’s It Like To Play The Clintons On Broadway? Let Laurie Metcalf And John Lithgow Tell You

Lithgow: “Look, I read the script and I wanted to be in it, but my immediate anxiety was, ‘What were these two people going to think?’ Because I admire them, I know them, I care about them.” – The Washington Post
Tags: Art, Theatre, Broadway, John Lithgow, Laurie Metcalf, Lithgow, 05.09.19


As Ethical Controversies Arise Around Their Donors And Collections, Can Museums Correct Themselves? Can They Afford To?

“In the space of barely a year, the very foundations of museums — the money that sustains them, the art that fills them, the decision makers that run them — have been called into question. And there’s no end to questioning in sight.” Holland Carter considers the issues. – The New York Times
Tags: Art, Issues, Visual, SJ, Holland Carter, 05.09.19


As Ethical Controversies Arise Around Their Donors And Collections, Can Museums Correct Themselves? Can They Afford (Not) To?

“In the space of barely a year, the very foundations of museums — the money that sustains them, the art that fills them, the decision makers that run them — have been called into question. And there’s no end to questioning in sight.” Holland Carter considers the issues. – The New York Times
Tags: Art, Issues, Visual, SJ, Holland Carter, 05.09.19


Strong Links Between Air Pollution And Dementia

The evidence is so compelling, in fact, that many leading researchers now believe it’s conclusive. “I have no hesitation whatsoever to say that air pollution causes dementia,” says Caleb Finch, gerontologist and the leader of USC’s Air Pollution and Brain Disease research network, which has completed many of these new studies. – Wired
Tags: Art, Usc, Issues, 05.09.19, Caleb Finch


Teenagers Who Assaulted Cleveland Orchestra Member And Stole His Violin And Car Sentenced To Prison

Two defendants, aged 17 and 15, were convicted of attacking violinist Yun-Ting Lee, pistol-whipping his husband, forcing their way into the couple’s house, and stealing some electronics and the couple’s car, which contained Lee’s 18,000 violin and $20,000 bow, which got pawned the next day for $30. – The Plain Dealer (Cleveland)
Tags: Art, Music, Lee, 05.09.19, Teenagers Who Assaulted Cleveland Orchestra, Yun Ting Lee


St. Paul Chamber Orchestra Eliminates Its ‘Liquid Music’ Alt-Classical Series

Having just lost $230,000 in corporate sponsorship (due to changing corporate priorities), the SPCO has announced “that it would no longer sponsor the boundary-bending music series beyond three projects next season, a move that will help it eliminate three positions.” – The Star Tribune (Minneapolis)
Tags: Art, Music, Star Tribune, St Paul Chamber Orchestra, SPCO, 05.09.19


Jim Fowler, Co-Host Of ‘Mutual Of Omaha’s Wild Kingdom’, Dead At 89

“He was charged by a herd of 200 elephants, escaping only with the help of a flatbed truck, and was once knocked unconscious by a surly chimpanzee named Mr. Moke who punched him ‘square between the eyes.’ But neither incident compared to the time a 22-foot anaconda swallowed his arm, up to the shoulder.” – The Washington Post
Tags: Art, People, Omaha, Moke, Jim Fowler, 05.09.19


Thomas Nozkowski, Painter Of ‘Gentle’ Abstract Art, Dead At 75

“With their Matisse-like color schemes and Miro-esque organic forms, Nozkowski’s works recalled places or things their creator had glimpsed in the world. He described his paintings as memory devices.” – ARTnews
Tags: Art, People, Miró, Thomas Nozkowski, 05.09.19, Nozkowski


Sontagian Revulsion: My Notes on “Camp” at the Metropolitan Museum

Camp: Notes on Fashion begins promisingly with a deep dive into the early history of camp, including the derivation of that designation as an aesthetic category (first known usage: Molière). But its sprawling, diffuse finale embodies the “camp” worldview at its worst, as it devolves into a parody of a museum exhibition. – Lee Rosenbaum
Tags: Art, Ajblogs, 05.09.19


Then There’s This: Brecker With Holmquist And The UMO

We have been meaning to call to your attention to an instance in which – unlike, say, the trade talks between the US and China – international cooperation works beautifully. – Doug Ramsey
Tags: Art, China, US, Ajblogs, 05.09.19, Brecker With Holmquist


We need to unearth some history

There should be a book about all the changes orchestras went through in the last few decades. I’ll be doing posts on some of the things I think should be in this book, often things that aren’t revealed publicly. Here, to start, are a couple of examples. – Greg Sandow
Tags: Art, Ajblogs, 05.09.19


4 Musicians Chart 100 Years in the Life of a Man Who Ran Away From Slavery

“Esteban Montejo was over 100 before the world knew his story. Born a slave in Cuba in 1860, he escaped and lived for years in the jungle until slavery was abolished on the island in 1886. He fought in Cuba’s war for independence from Spain and lived through Castro’s communist revolution.” Composer Hans Werner Henze read a book about Montejo’s life and went to visit him, and the result was Henze’s “recital for four musicians,” El Cimarrón — which soprano Julia Bullock programmed as the finale o...
Tags: Art, Uncategorized, Spain, Cuba, Castro, Bullock, SJM, Henze, Montejo, Julia Bullock, Hans Werner Henze, Zack Winokur, Davóne Tines, 05.09.19, Esteban Montejo, Metropolitan Museum of Art Zachary Woolfe


Just How Enlightened Was The Age Of Enlightenment?

“It has been said, indeed, that the eighteenth century was less the Age of Reason than the Age of Feelings—because so many Enlightenment thinkers took pride in recognizing the importance of the sentiments, as their intellectual predecessors often had not. (In Hume’s famous line: “Reason is and ought only to be the slave of the Passions.”) The aim of building a rational society meant contending with the ways in which human beings are not creatures of sweet reason. And that meant, in turn, having...
Tags: Art, Ideas, Hume, 05.09.19