Posts filtered by tags: 21st Century Los Angeles[x]


 

Did a Scottish Poet Invent the F-Word? A 1568 Anthology Compiled Under Plague Quarantine Suggests So

"Wan fukkit funling": as an insult, these words would today land a minor blow at most. Not so in Scotland of the early 16th century, in which William Dunbar and Walter Kennedy, two of the land's well-known poets, faced off before the court of King James IV in a contest of rhyme. The event is memorialized in the poem "The Flyting of Dunbar and Kennedie," one of 400 anthologized in what's known as the Bannatyne Manuscript. Compiled in 1568 by an Edinburgh merchant named George Bannatyne, stuck at...
Tags: Google, Facebook, College, Scotland, Ars Technica, History, Bbc, Language, Ferguson, Edinburgh, Seoul, Kennedy, Steven Pinker, Highland, Facebook Twitter, Dunbar


Classic Songs Re-Imagined as Vintage Book Covers During Our Troubled Times: “Under Pressure,” “It’s the End of the World as We Know It,” “Shelter from the Storm” & More

Even before the COVID-19 pandemic, how many of us sought solace from the turbulent 21st century in cultural artifacts of bygone eras? Our favorite records by the likes of the Beatles, Queen, David Bowie; our favorite novels by the likes of Raymond Chandler, Ian Fleming, Philip K. Dick: all of them now possess a solidity that seems lacking in much current popular culture. The work of all these creators has its own kind of artistic daring, and all of it, too, also came out of times troubled in th...
Tags: Google, Art, Facebook, Books, Music, Etsy, College, Current Affairs, David Bowie, Joni Mitchell, Seoul, Lucy, Facebook Twitter, Planet Earth, Alcott, Colin Marshall


Customize Your Zoom Virtual Background with Free Works of Art

Limitations stimulate creativity. While that phrasing is credited to business-management scholar Henry Mintzberg, the idea itself has a long history. We know we work more fruitfully when we work within boundaries, and we've known ever since our capabilities were limited in ways barely imaginable today. With the ongoing coronavirus pandemic having temporarily redrawn the boundaries of our lives, many of us have already begun to rediscover our own creativity. Some have even done it on Zoom, the t...
Tags: Google, Art, Facebook, Technology, College, Venice, Getty, Seoul, Seinfeld, Van Gogh, Carrie Bradshaw, Facebook Twitter, LA County, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Kanagawa, Colin Marshall


HBO Is Streaming 500 Hours of Shows for Free: The Sopranos, The Wire, and More

We live, one often hears, in a golden age of television. But when did this age begin? Scholars of prestige TV drama — a field that, for both professionals and amateurs, has expanded in recent years — tend to point to The Sopranos, which premiered in 1999. In its eight-year run, David Chase's series about a depressed New Jersey mafia boss, a protagonist analyzed in the Behind the Curtain video essay above, set new standards in its medium for craft and complexity. To understand how much of...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Hbo, Television, College, America, Barack Obama, United States, New Jersey, Silicon Valley, David Chase, Seoul, Trump, David Simon, Facebook Twitter, Scott Fitzgerald


Pandemic Literature: A Meta-List of the Books You Should Read in Coronavirus Quarantine

Describing conditions characteristic of life in the early 21st century, future historians may well point to such epidemic viral illnesses as SARS, MERS, and the now-rampaging COVID-19. But those focused on culture will also have their pick of much more benign recurring phenomena to explain: topical book lists, for instance, which crop up in the 21st-century press at the faintest prompting by current events. As the coronavirus has spread through the English-speaking world over the past month, pa...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Europe, Books, London, College, Stephen King, Edgar Allan Poe, History, Literature, Guardian, Margaret Atwood, Albert Camus, Seoul, Florence, Michael Crichton


Watch Online 75 Short Films from 2020’s South by Southwest Festival

South by Southwest, one of America's biggest cultural events, won't happen this year. The cause, of course, is the coronavirus pandemic, its own status as an event unprecedented in our age evidenced by the fact that South by Southwest has never in its 33-year history been canceled before. When SXSW, as it's now known, launched in Austin, Texas back in 1987, it did so purely as a music festival; cinema came in 1994, when it became the "SXSW Film and Multimedia Conference." Since then quit...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Texas, Film, College, Iraq, America, Austin, Philadelphia, Seoul, Kathryn Bigelow, Mailchimp, Sxsw, Southwest, Austin Texas, Facebook Twitter


Take a 3D Tour Through Ancient Giza, Including the Great Pyramids, the Sphinx & More

Imagine the pyramids of ancient Egypt, and a vivid image comes right to mind. But unless you happen to be an Egyptologist, that image may possess a great deal more vividness than it does detail. We all have a rough sense of the pyramids' size (impressively large), shape (pyramidical), texture (crumbly), and setting (sand), almost wholly derived from images captured over the past century. But what about the pyramids in their heyday, more than 4,500 years ago? Do we know enough even to beg...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Technology, College, History, Harvard, Architecture, Egypt, Nile, Seoul, Giza, Facebook Twitter, Khufu, Great Pyramid Of Giza, Khafre, Colin Marshall


The Cork-Lined Bedroom & Writing Room of Marcel Proust, the Original Master of Social Distancing

Many of us now find ourselves stuck at home, doing our part to put a stop to the global coronavirus pandemic. Some of us are taking the opportunity to write the ambitious works of literature we've long intended to. Such an effort of creativity in confinement has no more suitable precedent than the life of Marcel Proust, who wrote much of his seven-volume masterpiece In Search of Lost Time (À la recherche du temps perdu) in bed. The Paris Review's Sadie Stein quotes Proust's biographer Diana Fus...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Books, Writing, College, France, New York Times, Seoul, Swann, Proust, Marcel Proust, Facebook Twitter, Stein, William Friedkin, Ted Gioia, Colin Marshall


Watch 3,000+ Films Free Online from the National Film Board of Canada

What, exactly, is Canada? The question sometimes occurs to Americans, living as they do right next door. But it might surprise those Americans to learn that Canadians themselves ask the very same question, living as they do in a country that could be defined by any number of its elements — its vastness, its multiculturalism, The Kids in the Hall — but never seems defined by any one of them in particular. Many individuals and groups throughout Canadian history have participated in the pro...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Film, College, Canada, Margaret Atwood, Montreal, Jack Kerouac, Seoul, Leonard Cohen, Morgan, Facebook Twitter, National Film Board of Canada, NFB, Colin Marshall, John Grierson


The National Emergency Library Makes 1.5 Million Books Free to Read Right Now

The coronavirus has closed libraries in countries all around the world. Or rather, it's closed physical libraries: each week of struggle against the epidemic that goes by, more resources for books open to the public on the internet. Most recently, we have the Internet Archive's opening of the National Emergency Library, "a collection of books that supports emergency remote teaching, research activities, independent scholarship, and intellectual stimulation while universities, schools, training ...
Tags: Google, Books, Abc, College, US, United States, Internet Archive, Paris, Libraries, Army, Alvin Schwartz, Margaret Atwood, Haruki Murakami, Albert Camus, Seoul, Kafka


How to Teach and Learn Philosophy During the Pandemic: A Collection of 450+ Philosophy Videos Free Online

The term philosophy, as every introductory course first explains, means the love of wisdom. And as the oldest intellectual discipline, philosophy has proven that the love of wisdom can withstand the worst human history can throw at it. Civilizations may rise and fall, but sooner or later we always find ways to get back to philosophizing. The current coronavirus pandemic, the most frightening global event most of us have seen in our lifetimes, doesn't quite look like a civilization-ender,...
Tags: Google, Greece, College, Online Courses, Philosophy, Jackson, Albert Camus, Seoul, Facebook Twitter, Steinberg, Hume, Nietzsche, Weinberg, Colin Marshall, 21st Century Los Angeles, Liz Jackson


How to Teach and Learn Philosophy During the Pandemic: A Collection of 450+ Course Videos Free Online

The term philosophy, as every introductory course first explains, means the love of wisdom. And as the oldest intellectual discipline, philosophy has proven that the love of wisdom can withstand the worst human history can throw at it. Civilizations may rise and fall, but sooner or later we always find ways to get back to philosophizing. The current coronavirus pandemic, the most frightening global event most of us have seen in our lifetimes, doesn't quite look like a civilization-ender,...
Tags: Google, Greece, College, Online Courses, Philosophy, Jackson, Albert Camus, Seoul, Facebook Twitter, Steinberg, Hume, Nietzsche, Weinberg, Colin Marshall, 21st Century Los Angeles, Liz Jackson


Watch Curated Playlists of Experimental Videos & Films to Get You Through COVID-19: Miranda July, Jan Švankmajer, Guy Maddin & More

When we get sick, many of us habitually use the time away from work and other obligations to do the same thing: watch movies. But old favorites and recent releases we'd missed our first chance to catch can only last us so long: now, with so much of the world either sick or at home trying not to get sick, a combination of isolation and uncertainty about the state of things pushes us to seek out more cinematically daring fare. To satisfy this demand, Los Angeles filmmaker Kate Lain has create...
Tags: Google, Film, College, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Seoul, Vertigo, Kenneth, Facebook Twitter, Chuck Norris, Guy Maddin, Hyperallergic, Colin Marshall, Fernand Léger, Maddin, Charbel


The “Feynman Technique” for Studying Effectively: An Animated Primer

After winning the Nobel Prize, physicist Max Planck "went around Germany giving the same standard lecture on the new quantum mechanics. Over time, his chauffeur memorized the lecture and said, 'Would you mind, Professor Planck, because it’s so boring to stay in our routine, if I gave the lecture in Munich and you just sat in front wearing my chauffeur’s hat?' Planck said, 'Why not?' And the chauffeur got up and gave this long lecture on quantum mechanics. After which a physics profe...
Tags: Google, Productivity, Science, Education, College, Germany, Physics, Munich, Richard, Seoul, Feynman, Cornell, Usc, Max, Richard Feynman, Facebook Twitter


Japanese Artist Has Drawn Every Meal He’s Eaten for 32 Years: Behold the Delicious Illustrations of Itsuo Kobayashi

Since the 1980s, Itsuo Kobayashi has drawn a picture of every single meal he eats. However notable we find this practice now, it would surely have struck us as downright eccentric back then. Kobayashi began drawing his food before the arrival of inexpensive digital cameras and cellphones, and well before the smartphone combined the two into the single package we now keep close at hand. We all know people who take camera-phone pictures of their meals, some of them with the regularity and solemni...
Tags: Google, Art, Japan, New York, College, US, Food & Drink, Wes Anderson, Seoul, Facebook Twitter, Artnet, Kobayashi, Fukuyama, Colin Marshall, 21st Century Los Angeles, Sarah Cascone


How a Virus Spreads, and How to Avoid It: A Former NASA Engineer Demonstrates with a Blacklight in a Classroom

The past few weeks have reminded us just why viruses have been such a formidable enemy of humanity for so long. Though very few of the countless viruses in existence affect us in any way, let alone a lethal one, we can't see them without microscopes. And so when a deadly virus breaks out, we live our daily lives with an invisible killer in our midst. Aggressive testing, as several coronavirus-afflicted countries have proven, does much to lower the rate of transmission. But how, exactly, ...
Tags: Apple, Health, Google, Facebook, Biology, College, Nasa, Seoul, Facebook Twitter, Colin Marshall, YouTuber Mark Rober, Rober, 21st Century Los Angeles, Johns Hopkins Free Courses, Emerging Pandemic Watch Bacteria Become Resistant


The Books We Can Use to Rebuild Civilization, Selected by Neal Stephenson, Brian Eno, Tim O’Reilly & More

With so many of us across the world stuck at home, humanity's thoughts have turned to what we'll do when we can resume our normal lives. This time of quarantine, lockdown, and other forms of isolation urges us to reflect, but also to read — and in many cases to read the important books we'd neglected in our pre-coronavirus lives. Quite a few such volumes appear in the Long Now Foundation's "Manual for Civilization," which longtime Open Culture readers will remember us featuring not long after i...
Tags: Google, Books, College, Ray Bradbury, Britain, Winston Churchill, Albert Camus, Brian Eno, Seoul, Neal Stephenson, Leo Tolstoy, Northern Europe, Richard Feynman, Roger Penrose, Rose, Foundation


Live Performers Now Streaming Shows, from their Homes to Yours: Neil Young, Coldplay, Broadway Stars, Metropolitan Operas & More

You've always read books in the comfort of your own home. Though it may not be the full cinematic experience, you can also watch films there, in a pinch. Now that such a pinch has come, in the form of coronavirus pandemic-related quarantines and other forms of isolation, few art forms must be feeling it more than live music and theatre. Though we've all watched recorded performances now and again, we know full well that nothing can quite replicate the felt energy of the live experience. ...
Tags: Google, Music, New York, Instagram, College, Theatre, San Francisco, House, Broadway, Elton John, Coldplay, Coachella, John Legend, Seoul, Keith Urban, Young


A 5-Hour, One-Take Cinematic Tour of Russia’s Hermitage Museum, Shot Entirely on an iPhone

In 2002, Russian filmmaker Alexander Sokurov made cinema history with Russian Ark, which dramatizes a wide swath of his homeland's history in a single, unbroken 96-minute shot. What's more, he and his collaborators shot it all in a single location, one both rich with historical resonance and not exactly wide-open to movie shoots: St Petersburg's State Hermitage Museum, whose complex includes the former Winter Palace, official residence of Russia's emperors from 1732 to until the 1917 rev...
Tags: Apple, Google, Technology, College, Russia, Museums, Brazil, Seoul, Florence, St Petersburg, Facebook Twitter, Alexander Sokurov, Rubens, Colin Marshall, 21st Century Los Angeles, Tolstoy Chekhov


A 5-Hour, One-Take Cinematic Journey through Russia’s Hermitage Museum, Shot Entirely on an iPhone

In 2002, Russian filmmaker Alexander Sokurov made cinema history with Russian Ark, which dramatizes a wide swath of his homeland's history in a single, unbroken 96-minute shot. What's more, he and his collaborators shot it all in a single location, one both rich with historical resonance and not exactly wide-open to movie shoots: St Petersburg's State Hermitage Museum, whose complex includes the former Winter Palace, official residence of Russia's emperors from 1732 to until the 1917 rev...
Tags: Apple, Google, Technology, College, Russia, Museums, Brazil, Seoul, Florence, St Petersburg, Facebook Twitter, Alexander Sokurov, Rubens, Colin Marshall, 21st Century Los Angeles, Tolstoy Chekhov


Use Your Time in Isolation to Learn Everything You’ve Always Wanted To: Free Online Courses, Audio Books, eBooks, Movies, Coloring Books & More

"I have never let my schooling interfere with my education." Mark Twain may or may not have actually said that, but either way the sentiment resonates — and with a new strength now, since schools have closed all over the world in an attempt to halt the spread of the pandemic coronavirus. For many, this period of isolation (self-imposed or otherwise) represents an opportunity to rediscover the value of education: not the kind directed by an institution, but the much more valuable kind that runs ...
Tags: Google, South Korea, Education, College, Russia, Mit, Italy, Online Courses, Margaret Atwood, Mark Twain, Albert Camus, Seoul, Alfred Hitchcock, Proust, Werner Herzog, Facebook Twitter


Why You Should Read The Plague, the Albert Camus Novel the Coronavirus Has Made a Bestseller Again

The coronavirus, fair to say, isn't good for the economy: not for the economies of individual nations, and not for the world economy as a whole. But that's not to say that every industry has taken a hit. This is hardly the worst time in history to produce and sell toilet paper, for instance, nor to furnish the packages of necessities demanded by "preppers" who foresee the end of society as we know it. One probably wouldn't wish to take the place of the makers of Corona beer right now, but despi...
Tags: Google, Amazon, South Korea, College, France, Italy, Literature, Albert Camus, Seoul, Facebook Twitter, Corona, Oran, Coetzee, Camus, Colin Marshall, Marina Warner


The History of the Plague: Every Major Epidemic in an Animated Map

All of us have tried to come to grips with the coronavirus in different ways. Here on Open Culture we've featured online courses to get you conversant in the science around the pandemic, but readers of this site will also have sought out the most pertinent works of history and literature. That goes especially for those in need of reading material while in states of quarantine or lockdown (self-imposed or otherwise), and any list of recommended books must include Daniel Defoe's A Journal ...
Tags: Health, Google, Europe, Maps, Milan, London, College, France, Africa, History, Middle East, Korea, Albert Camus, Seoul, Seville, John Snow


Take a Drive Through 1940s, 50s & 60s Los Angeles with Vintage Through-the-Car-Window Films

Many claim Los Angeles was "built for the car," a half-truth at best. When the city — or rather, the city and the vast region of southern California surrounding it — first boomed in the late 19th and early 20th century, it grew according to the spread of its electric railway networks. But for early adopters of the automobile (as well as the many aspirants close behind), its sheer size, easily navigable terrain, and still-low population density made greater Los Angeles an ideal place to d...
Tags: Travel, Google, Hollywood, California, College, Los Angeles, History, Quentin Tarantino, Seoul, Facebook Twitter, Hollywood Boulevard, Randy Newman, Robert Aldrich, Bunker Hill, Colin Marshall, 21st Century Los Angeles


See How Traditional Japanese Carpenters Can Build a Whole Building Using No Nails or Screws

If it came down to it, most of us could hammer basic shelter together with enough wood and nails. But what if we just had the wood? And what if we needed to make not just a hut, but a full-fledged building: a livable house, or even a house of worship? That may well sound like an impossible task — unless, of course, you've trained as a miyadaiku (???), the class of Japanese carpenter tasked with building and maintaining buildings like shrines and temples. Without a single nail or screw, m...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Japan, College, Architecture, Seoul, Buddhist, Facebook Twitter, Kamakura, Colin Marshall, 21st Century Los Angeles, Takahiro Matsumoto, Matsumoto Today


See How Traditional Japanese Carpenters Can Build a Whole Building Using No Nails or Wood

If it came down to it, most of us could hammer basic shelter together with enough wood and nails. But what if we just had the wood? And what if we needed to make not just a hut, but a full-fledged building: a livable house, or even a house of worship? That may well sound like an impossible task — unless, of course, you've trained as a miyadaiku (???), the class of Japanese carpenter tasked with building and maintaining buildings like shrines and temples. Without a single nail or screw, m...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Japan, College, Architecture, Seoul, Buddhist, Facebook Twitter, Kamakura, Colin Marshall, 21st Century Los Angeles, Takahiro Matsumoto, Matsumoto Today


Paris Had a Moving Sidewalk in 1900, and a Thomas Edison Film Captured It in Action

It's fair to say that few of us now marvel at moving walkways, those standard infrastructural elements of such utilitarian spaces as airport terminals, subway stations, and big-box stores. But there was a time when they astounded even residents of one of the most cosmopolitan cities in the world. The innovation of the moving sidewalk demonstrated at the Paris Exposition of 1900 (previously seen here on Open Culture when we featured Lumière Brothers footage of that period) commanded even ...
Tags: Google, Technology, College, New York City, History, Chicago, Paris, Smithsonian, Eiffel Tower, Seoul, TreeHugger, New York Observer, White, Thomas Edison, Paleofuture, Facebook Twitter


Hear H.P. Lovecraft Horror Stories Read by Roddy McDowall

"Most daemoniacal of all shocks is that of the abysmally unexpected and grotesquely unbelievable," goes a typical line in the work of H.P. Lovecraft. " Nothing I had before undergone could compare in terror with what I now saw; with the bizarre marvels that sight implied." As a writer of what he called "weird fiction," Lovecraft specialized in the narrator plunged into a loss for words by the sheer incomprehensibility of that which he sees before him. But in the case of this particu...
Tags: Google, College, Edgar Allan Poe, Literature, Seoul, Oscar Wilde, Poe, Facebook Twitter, McDowell, Caesar, Lovecraft, Cornelius, Paul Gallagher, McDowall, Colin Marshall, Roddy McDowall


The Earth Archive Will 3D-Scan the Entire World & Create an “Open-Source” Record of Our Planet

If you keep up with climate change news, you see a lot of predictions of what the world will look like twenty years from now, fifty years from now, a century from now. Some of these projections of the state of the land, the shape of continents, and the levels of the sea are more dramatic than others, and in any case they vary so much that one never knows which ones to credit. But of equal importance to foreseeing what Earth will look like in the future is not forgetting what it looks lik...
Tags: Google, Amazon, Science, College, Mexico, Environment, Nasa, Earth, Seoul, Rodin, Atlas Obscura, Facebook Twitter, Fisher, MichoacAn, Schultz, Michelangelo


Meet ‘The Afronauts’: An Introduction to Zambia’s Forgotten 1960s Space Program

Broadly speaking, the "Space Race" of the 1950s and 60s involved two major players, the United States and the Soviet Union. But there were also minor players: take, for instance, the Zambian Space Program, founded and administered by just one man. A Time magazine article published in November 1964 — when the Republic of Zambia was one week old — described Edward Mukuka Nkoloso as a "grade-school science teacher and the director of Zambia’s National Academy of Science, Space Research and ...
Tags: Google, Science, College, Time, Alabama, History, Nasa, Earth, United States, Zambia, Mars, Seoul, Soviet Union, Facebook Twitter, San Francisco Chronicle, Charles Baudelaire