Posts filtered by tags: 21st Century Los Angeles[x]


 

David Lynch Teaches Creativity and Film: A New Online Course

How many of us became David Lynch fans while first watching one of his films? And how many of those fans also left filled with the desire to make a film themselves? Though the long-circulating term "Lynchian" puts a name to Lynch's distinctively stimulating and disturbing cinematic style, it increasingly seems that no filmmaker, no matter how skilled, can quite pull off that style but Lynch himself. But even if you can never be the man who directed the likes of Eraserhead, Blue Velvet, a...
Tags: Google, Hollywood, Film, College, David, Online Courses, Bob, Seoul, David Lynch, Werner Herzog, Facebook Twitter, Lynch, Mulholland Drive, Colin Marshall, 21st Century Los Angeles, Facebook David Lynch


Isaac Asimov Predicts the Future of Civilization–and Recommends Ways to Ensure That It Survives (1978)

When we talk about what could put an end to civilization today, we usually talk about climate change. The frightening scientific research behind that phenomenon has, apart from providing a seemingly infinite source of fuel for the blaze of countless political debates, also inspired a variety of dystopian visions, credible and otherwise, of no small number of science-fiction writers. One wonders what a science-fictional mind of, say, Isaac Asimov's caliber would make of it. Asimov died in...
Tags: Google, College, Stanford, United States, Sci Fi, Seoul, Mount Everest, Facebook Twitter, Isaac Asimov, Asimov, Edmund Hillary, Paul Ehrlich, Colin Marshall, Tenzing Norgay, 21st Century Los Angeles, Computerization Global Co


Take a Journey Inside Vincent Van Gogh’s Paintings with a New Digital Exhibition

Vincent van Gogh died in 1890, long before the emergence of any of the visual technologies that impress us here in the 21st century. But the distinctive vision of reality expressed through paintings still captivates us, and perhaps captivates us more than ever: the latest of the many tributes we continue to pay to van Gogh's art takes the form Van Gogh, Starry Night, a "digital exhibition" at the Atelier des Lumières, a disused foundry turned projector- and sound system-laden multimedia space i...
Tags: Google, Art, Japan, Technology, College, Paris, Seoul, Arles, Van Gogh, Facebook Twitter, Vincent Van Gogh, Gogh, Auvers, Colin Marshall, Van Gogh Starry Night, 21st Century Los Angeles


The CIA’s Rectal Tool Kit for Spies–Created for Truly Desperate Situations During The Cold War

Though global espionage remains a going concern in the 21st century, somehow the popular stories we tell about it return again and again to the Cold War. Maybe it has to do with the demand those mostly pre-digital decades made upon the physical ingenuity of spies as well as the tools of spycraft. Take, for instance, one particularly ingenious CIA-issued tool kit on display at the International Spy Museum in Washington, D.C. "Filled with escape tools," says the Spy Museum's web site, "thi...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Technology, College, Washington, History, Britain, Cia, John Le Carre, Seoul, Facebook Twitter, International Spy Museum, Colin Marshall, 21st Century Los Angeles, Spy Museum, Atlas Obscura Related Content


Jack Kerouac’s “Beat Paintings:” Now Gathered in One Book and Exhibition for the First Time

Most of us enter Jack Kerouac's world through his 1959 novel On the Road. Those of us who explore it more deeply thereafter may find much more than we expected to: Kerouac's inner life came out not just in his formidable body of written work, but in spoken-word jazz albums, fantasy baseball materials, and even paintings. Though Kerouac has now been gone for nearly half a century, it wasn't until just last year that his works of visual art were brought together: Kerouac: Beat Painting did it in ...
Tags: Google, Art, Milan, College, Literature, Road, Jack Kerouac, Kerouac, Seoul, Truman Capote, First Time, Facebook Twitter, Bandera, Colin Marshall, David Barnett, Pope Paul VI


An Animated Introduction to the Famous Thought Experiment, the “Trolley Problem,” Narrated by Harry Shearer

You don't have to get too deep into the study of ethics before you run across the trolley problem. It comes up so readily that it hardly needs an introduction: a runaway train is on course to collide with and kill five people working on the tracks, but you can pull a lever that will switch it to another section of track on which stands only one person. Do you pull it? According to a purely utilitarian interpretation, you should, since one life lost surely beats five lives lost. But faced...
Tags: Google, College, Animation, Philosophy, Seoul, Aristotle, Harry Shearer, Facebook Twitter, BBC Radio, Philippa Foot, Nelsen, Colin Marshall, 21st Century Los Angeles, Facebook An Animated Introduction, Eleanor Nelsen, Sartre Oxford


The Roman Roads of Spain & Portugal Visualized as a Subway Map: Ancient History Meets Modern Graphic Design

Between the first century BC and the fourth century AD, Rome displayed what we might call an impressive ambition. In his project illustrating those chapters of history in a way no one has before, statistics student Sasha Trubetskoy has shown increasingly Roman-grade ambitions himself, at least in the realm of historical graphic design. We've previously featured his modern subway-style maps of as well as  here on Open Culture. Today, we have , the region today occupied mainly by Spain and Po...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Design, College, Spain, History, Rome, Portugal, Seoul, Iberia, Facebook Twitter, Roman Empire, Colin Marshall, Antoninus, Sasha Trubetskoy, Trubetskoy


Bill Murray Explains How a 19th-Century Painting Saved His Life

You don't understand prewar 20th-century America unless you understand a particular 19th-century French painting: Jules Breton's The Song of the Lark. "In this evocative work, a young peasant woman stands silently in the flat fields of the artist's native Normandy as the sun rises, listening to the song of a distant lark," says a post from the Art Institute of Chicago. Apart from being selected as America's favorite painting in 1934, it was also Eleanor Roosevelt's favorite work of art, ...
Tags: Google, Art, Facebook, UK, College, America, Chicago, Normandy, Bill Murray, Seoul, Thompson, Murray, Eleanor Roosevelt, Facebook Twitter, Willa Cather, John Prine


The Cringe-Inducing Humor of The Office Explained with Philosophical Theories of Mind

"I'm a friend first and a boss second," says David Brent, middle manager at the Slough branch of paper company Wernham-Hogg. "Probably an entertainer third." Those of us who've watched the original British run of The Office — and especially those of us who still watch it regularly — will remember that and many other of Brent's pitiable declarations besides. As portrayed by the show's co-creator Ricky Gervais, Brent constitutes both The Office's comedic and emotional core, at once a fully...
Tags: Google, Photography, Comedy, Television, College, Office, Neuroscience, Bill Murray, Ricky Gervais, Brent, Seoul, David Brent, Slough, Facebook Twitter, Evan Puschak, Colin Marshall


Van Gogh’s Ugliest Masterpiece: A Break Down of His Late, Great Painting, The Night Café (1888)

Ask passersby to name a Vincent van Gogh painting off the top of their heads, and most will come up with works like The Starry Night, The Potato Eaters, one of his self-portraits (probably with his ear bandaged), or maybe the one with the smoking skeleton David Sedaris used for a book cover. How many will mention 1888's The Night Café, an interior, van Gogh wrote to his brother Theo from Arles (the town in the south of France where he had come in search of Japan-like surroundings), "of t...
Tags: Google, Art, Japan, College, France, Seoul, Arles, Van Gogh, Edward Hopper, Vincent, Facebook Twitter, Vincent Van Gogh, Gogh, David Sedaris, Evan Puschak, Theo


100-Year-Old Holocaust Survivor Helen Fagin Reads Her Letter About How Books Save Lives

"Could you imagine a world without access to reading, to learning, to books?" Helen Fagin, who poses that question, doesn't have to imagine it: she experienced that grim reality, and worse besides. "At twenty-one," she continues, "I was forced into Poland’s World War II ghetto, where being caught reading anything forbidden by the Nazis meant, at best, hard labor; at worst, death." There she operated a school in secret where she taught Jewish children Latin and mathematics, soon realizing th...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Books, College, Nazis, Neil Gaiman, History, Poland, Brian Eno, Seoul, Judy Blume, David Byrne, Facebook Twitter, Yo Yo Ma, Jane Goodall, Helen Keller


60 Free-to-Stream Movies for Women’s History Month: Classic Agnès Varda, a Portrait of Susan Sontag, Greta Gerwig’s Lady Bird, and More

March is Women's History Month, and every month is a good one for watching movies. Well aware of both those facts, the people behind free-to-user online streaming service Kanopy have made a range of 60 woman-centric and mostly woman-made films available this month. Some of the women involved include Nouvelle Vague auteur Agnès Varda, director of Cléo from 5 to 7 and The Beaches of Agnès; Susan Sontag, the prolific writer and subject of Regarding Susan Sontag; and Greta Gerwig, who went f...
Tags: Google, Facebook, England, Film, College, China, Berlin, America, Paris, Cameron, Tanzania, Greta Gerwig, Tehran, Seoul, Nouvelle Vague, Mavis Staples


An Animated Introduction to the Chaotic Brilliance of Jean-Michel Basquiat: From Homeless Graffiti Artist to Internationally Renowned Painter

By the late 1970s, New York City had fallen into such a shambolic state that nobody could have been expected to notice the occasional streak of additional spray paint here and there. But somehow the repeated appearance of the word "SAMO" caught the attention of even jaded Lower Manhattanites. That tag signified the work of Al Diaz and Jean-Michel Basquiat, the latter of whom would create work that, four decades later, would sell for over $110 million at auction, a record-breaking number ...
Tags: Google, Art, New York, College, New York City, Animation, Andy Warhol, Seoul, University Of Maryland, Soho, Facebook Twitter, Jean Michel Basquiat, Basquiat, William S Burroughs, Taschen, William Burroughs


The Elaborate Pictogram Ernest Hemingway Received in the Hospital During WWI: Can You Decode Its Meaning?

Everyone who knows the work of Ernest Hemingway knows A Farewell to Arms, and everyone who knows A Farewell to Arms knows that Hemingway drew on his experience as a Red Cross ambulance driver in Italy during World War I. Just a few months after shipping out, the eighteen-year-old writer-to-be — filled, he later said, with "a great illusion of immortality" — got caught by mortar fire while taking chocolate and cigarettes from the canteen to the front line. Recovering from his wounds in a Milanes...
Tags: Google, College, History, Green, Rebecca, Italy, Literature, Red Cross, Bill, Seoul, Hemingway, Ernest Hemingway, Facebook Twitter, Jenks, Colin Marshall, Faulkner Read Faulkner


All the Rembrandts: The Rijksmuseum Puts All 400 Rembrandts It Owns on Display for the First Time

If you've wanted to see some Rembrandts, as most every art lover has, you've wanted to go to the Rijksmuseum. The jewel in the crown of the Netherlands' most popular museum must surely be Rembrandt's masterpiece The Night Watch, whose latest restoration will stream live this summer. But Rembrandt enthusiasts planning their first trip to the Rijksmuseum only after the completion of that restoration may want to reconsider, given that between now and June, they can see not just some Rembran...
Tags: Google, Art, College, Netherlands, Amsterdam, Smithsonian, Rembrandt, First Time, Rijksmuseum, Facebook Twitter, 21st Century Los Angeles, Marissa Fessenden, Smithsonian Artnet Related Content, Masterpiece Rembrandt


The Life & Work of Edvard Munch, Explored by Patti Smith and Charlotte Gainsbourg

Look beyond the highly distressed genderless figure in the foreground of The Scream, one of the most famous painting in existence, and you'll find plenty of women. While its painter Edvard Munch was a man, as his name might suggest, the rest of his body of work featured not a few female bodies: 1895's Woman in Three Stages, 1896's Young Woman on the Beach, and in 1907's The Sick Child, a highly personal work by an artist whose mother and sister both died of tuberculosis. Or take 1895's M...
Tags: Google, Art, College, Pink Floyd, Madonna, Norway, Patti Smith, Smith, Seoul, Munch, Edvard Munch, Facebook Twitter, Charlotte Gainsbourg, Gainsbourg, Colin Marshall, Munch Museum


The Lifespan of Ancient Civilizations Detailed in a Handy Infographic: Are We Headed Towards Our Own Collapse?

Anyone living in the West today surely feels they've heard quite enough about its decline. (Unless, of course, they're fans of 1980s punk rock.) Given how long civilizations usually outlive individuals, how can an individual grasp the prospects for longevity of the civilization in which they find themselves? History, a discipline which has long had everything to do with charting the rise and fall of settlements, cultures, and empires, can provide the context necessary for understanding, but mor...
Tags: Google, College, America, History, Bbc, Rome, West, Cambridge, Isaac Newton, Seoul, Facebook Twitter, Kemp, Colin Marshall, Luke Kemp, 21st Century Los Angeles, Computer Program Alarmingly Predicts


Hear a Six-Hour Mix Tape of Hunter S. Thompson’s Favorite Music & the Songs Name-Checked in His Gonzo Journalism

Of all the musical moments in Hunter S. Thompson's formidable corpus of "gonzo journalism," which one comes most readily to mind? I would elect the scene in Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas when Thompson's alter-ego Raoul Duke finds his attorney "Dr. Gonzo" in the bathtub, "submerged in green water — the oily product of some Japanese bath salts he'd picked up in the hotel gift shop, along with a new AM/FM radio plugged into the electric razor socket. Top volume. Some gibberish by a thing called '...
Tags: Google, Music, London, College, Bob Dylan, Jimmy Carter, Literature, Las Vegas, Terry Gilliam, Haruki Murakami, Seoul, Keith Richards, Duke, Lennon, Thompson, Joy


Hear a Six-Hour Mix of Hunter S. Thompson’s Favorite Music & the Songs Name-Checked in His Gonzo Journalism

Of all the musical moments in Hunter S. Thompson's formidable corpus of "gonzo journalism," which one comes most readily to mind? I would elect the scene in Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas when Thompson's alter-ego Raoul Duke finds his attorney "Dr. Gonzo" in the bathtub, "submerged in green water — the oily product of some Japanese bath salts he'd picked up in the hotel gift shop, along with a new AM/FM radio plugged into the electric razor socket. Top volume. Some gibberish by a thing called '...
Tags: Google, Music, London, College, Bob Dylan, Jimmy Carter, Literature, Las Vegas, Terry Gilliam, Haruki Murakami, Seoul, Keith Richards, Duke, Lennon, Thompson, Joy


The History of Ancient Greece in 18 Minutes: A Brisk Primer Narrated by Brian Cox

Ancient Greece never existed. Before you click away, fearing a truly brazen attempt at historical revisionism, let's put that statement in context. Ancient Greece "was no state with an established border or capital, but rather a multitude of distinct and completely independent cities." So says the video above, "Ancient Greece in 18 Minutes," which makes historical corrections — and often humorous ones — to that and a variety of other common misperceptions about perhaps the main civilizat...
Tags: Google, Hollywood, Greece, College, History, Rome, Yale, Athens, Brian Cox, Parthenon, Seoul, Romans, Cox, Facebook Twitter, Sparta, Roman


Haruki Murakami Announces an Archive That Will House His Manuscripts, Letters & Collection of 10,000+ Vinyl Records

Image by wakarimasita, via Wikimedia Commons It has become the norm for notable writers to bequeath documents related to their work, and even their personal correspondence, to an institution that promises to maintain it all, in perpetuity, in an archive open to scholars. Often the institution is located at a university to which the writer has some connection, and the case of the Haruki Murakami Library at Tokyo's Waseda University is no exception: Murakami graduated from Waseda in 1975, and a d...
Tags: Google, Music, College, Literature, Tokyo, Haruki Murakami, Seoul, New York Times Magazine, Vinyl Records, Facebook Twitter, Sam Anderson, Waseda University, Murakami, Waseda, Colin Marshall, Miles Davis Glenn Gould


Watch Bauhaus World, a Free Documentary That Celebrates the 100th Anniversary of Germany’s Legendary Art, Architecture & Design School

This April 1st marks the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Bauhaus, the German art school that, though short-lived, launched an entire design movement with a stark, functional aesthetic all its own. It can be tempting, looking into that aesthetic that finds the beauty in industry and the industry in beauty, to regard it as purely a product of its time and place, specifically a 20th-century Europe between the wars searching for ways to invent the future. But as revealed in Bauhaus ...
Tags: Google, Europe, Japan, Design, London, College, Mexico, Germany, Architecture, Tokyo, Nazi, Detroit, Seoul, Bauhaus, Amman, Deutsche Welle


Famous Drawings by Leonardo da Vinci Celebrated in a New Series of Stamps

No special occasion is required to celebrate Leonardo da Vinci, but the fact that he died in 1519 makes this year a particularly suitable time to look back at his vast, innovative, and influential body of work. Just last month, "Leonardo da Vinci: A Life in Drawing" opened in twelve museums across the United Kingdom. "144 of Leonardo da Vinci’s greatest drawings in the Royal Collection are displayed in 12 simultaneous exhibitions across the UK," says the exhibition's site, with each venue's dra...
Tags: Google, Art, UK, College, History, Liverpool, United Kingdom, Royal Mail, Cardiff, Belfast, Seoul, Bhutan, San Francisco Bay Area, Kate Brown, Facebook Twitter, Sparta


Watch the Trailers for Tolkien and Catch-22, Two New Literary Films

For decades, fans of J.R.R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings wondered if the books could ever become a film. The Beatles and John Boorman both tried to get adaptations off the ground in the 1960s and 70s, and animator Ralph Bakshi came up with his own cinematic interpretation, if only a partial one, in 1978. But now we live in a world rich with Lord of the Rings and Lord of the Rings-related material on film, thanks to the efforts of director Peter Jackson and his collaborators on not jus...
Tags: Google, Television, Film, College, France, Literature, Finland, George Clooney, Joseph Heller, Mike Nichols, Hulu, Seoul, Peter Jackson, Middle Earth, Tolkien, Ralph Bakshi


Hear Neil Gaiman Read Aloud 15 of His Own Works, and Works by 6 Other Great Writers: From The Graveyard Book & Coraline, to Edgar Allan Poe’s The Raven & Dickens’ A Christmas Carol

Neil Gaiman is a storyteller. That title encompasses quite a few pursuits, most of which seemingly involve writing — writing novels, writing radio dramas, writing comic books — but he also occasionally tells stories the old-fashioned way: speaking aloud, and to an audience of rapt listeners. Traditionally, such storytelling happened in a circle around the campfire, but as a storyteller of the 21st century — albeit a master of timeless techniques who uses those techniques to deal with tim...
Tags: Google, College, Neil Gaiman, Edgar Allan Poe, Ray Bradbury, Literature, Charles Dickens, Lewis Carroll, Ursula K Le Guin, Seoul, Leonard Cohen, Carol, Dickens, Facebook Twitter, Seuss, Gaiman


“Odyssey of the Ear”: A Beautiful Animation Shows How Sounds Travel Into Our Ears and Become Thoughts in Our Brain

As all schoolchildren know, we hear with our ears. And as all schoolchildren also probably know, we hear with our brains — or if they don't know it, at least they must suspect it, given the way sounds around us seem to turn without effort into thoughts in our heads. But how? It's the interface between ear and brain where things get more complicated, but "Odyssey of the Ear," the six-minute video above, makes it much clearer just how sound gets through our ears and into our brains. Suitable ...
Tags: Google, Facebook, College, Neuroscience, Harvard, K-12, David Bowie, Seoul, Odyssey, Facebook Twitter, Colin Marshall, Lotte Reiniger, Evelyn Glennie, 21st Century Los Angeles, Vincent Van Gogh Action Figure Complete


How Talking Heads and Brian Eno Wrote “Once in a Lifetime”: Cutting Edge, Strange & Utterly Brilliant

Few albums of the late 1970s and early 1980s have held up as well as those by Talking Heads, but what to call the music recorded on them? Rock? Pop? New Wave? In the difficulty to pin it down lies its enduring appeal, and that difficulty didn't come about by accident: impatient with musical categorizations and expectations, frontman David Byrne and the rest of the band kept pushing themselves into new territories even after they'd begun to find success. When they set out to create their ...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Music, College, Mtv, Brian Eno, Seoul, David Byrne, Eno, Facebook Twitter, Fela Kuti, Byrne, Tina Weymouth, Colin Marshall, 21st Century Los Angeles, David Byrnes


Dieter Rams Lists the 10 Timeless Principles of Good Design–Backed by Music by Brian Eno

Nearly all of us have heard the dictum "Less, but better," and nearly all of us have used Braun products. But how many of us know that both of those owe their considerable popularity to the same man? After studying architecture, interior decoration, and carpentry, the German industrial designer Dieter Rams spent 40 years at Braun, most of them as the company's chief design officer. There he created such hits as the 606 universal shelving system, the SK61 record player, and the ET66 calculat...
Tags: Apple, Google, Design, College, Netflix, Brian Eno, Seoul, Saul Bass, Braun, Dieter Rams, Facebook Twitter, Rams, Paola Antonelli, Colin Marshall, Gary Hustwit, 21st Century Los Angeles


The Atlas of Endangered Alphabets: A Free Online Atlas That Helps Preserve Writing Systems That May Soon Disappear

The United Nations, as you may or may not know, has designated 2019 the Year of Indigenous Languages. By fortunate coincidence, this year also happens to mark the tenth anniversary of the Endangered Alphabets Project. In 2009, its founder writes, "times were dark for indigenous and minority cultures." Television and the internet had driven "a kind of cultural imperialism into every corner of the world. Everyone had a screen or wanted a screen, and the English language and the Latin alphabet (or...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Writing, College, Egypt, United Nations, Bmw, Seoul, Facebook Twitter, Kottke, Colin Marshall, Esther Mahlangu, 21st Century Los Angeles, Adlam, Mandombe Wancho, Ditema tsa Dinoko


The East German Secret Police’s Illustrated Guide for Identifying Youth Subcultures: Punks, Goths, Teds & More (1985)

Ask Germans who lived under the German Democratic Republic what they feared most in those days, and they'll likely say the agents of the Ministry for State Security, best known as the Stasi. Ask those same Germans what they laughed at most in those days, and they may well give the same answer. As one of the most thoroughly repressive secret police forces in human history, the Stasi kept a close eye and a tight grip on East German society: as one oft-told joke goes, "Why do Stasi officers make s...
Tags: Google, Fashion, College, Germany, Nazis, History, Stasi, Seoul, Leipzig, East Germany, Atlas Obscura, Facebook Twitter, Colin Marshall, Secret Police, Ministry for State Security, German Democratic Republic