Posts filtered by tags: Absalom Absalom[x]


 

When William Faulkner Set the World Record for Writing the Longest Sentence in Literature: Read the 1,288-Word Sentence from Absalom, Absalom!

Image by Carl Van Vechten, via Wikimedia Commons “How did Faulkner pull it off?” is a question many a fledgling writer has asked themselves while struggling through a period of apprenticeship like that novelist John Barth describes in his 1999 talk "My Faulkner." Barth “reorchestrated” his literary heroes, he says, “in search of my writerly self... downloading my innumerable predecessors as only an insatiable green apprentice can.” Surely a great many writers can relate when Barth says, “it was...
Tags: Google, Europe, Books, Maryland, Writing, College, Washington, Literature, Guinness Book of World Records, Lincoln, Sherman, Jonathan Coe, Jones, William Styron, Facebook Twitter, Beckett


When William Faulkner Set the World Record for Writing the Longest Sentence in Literature: 1,288 Words from Absalom, Absalom!

Image by Carl Van Vechten, via Wikimedia Commons “How did Faulkner pull it off?” is a question many a fledgling writer has asked themselves while struggling through a period of apprenticeship like that novelist John Barth describes in his 1999 talk "My Faulkner." Barth “reorchestrated” his literary heroes, he says, “in search of my writerly self... downloading my innumerable predecessors as only an insatiable green apprentice can.” Surely a great many writers can relate when Barth says, “it was...
Tags: Google, Europe, Books, Maryland, Writing, College, Washington, Literature, Guinness Book of World Records, Lincoln, Sherman, Jonathan Coe, Jones, William Styron, Facebook Twitter, Beckett


William Faulkner’s Review of Ernest Hemingway’s The Old Man and the Sea (1952)

Images via Wikimedia Commons In the mid-20th century, the two big dogs in the American literary scene were William Faulkner and Ernest Hemingway. Both were internationally revered, both were masters of the novel and the short story, and both won Nobel Prizes. Born in Mississippi, Faulkner wrote allegorical histories of the South in a style that is both elliptical and challenging. His works were marked by uses of stream-of-consciousness and shifting points of view. He also favored titanically lo...
Tags: Google, Books, Mississippi, Yahoo, College, Washington, Time, Los Angeles, New York Times, Paris, Hemingway, Ernest Hemingway, Facebook Twitter, Hollywood Reporter, Lee University, FAULKNER


Absalom the Just

2 Samuel 18: 5-9, 15, 31-33 John 6:35, 41-51   Choose your bread wisely.   Jesus said, “Whoever comes to me will never be hungry, and whoever believes in me will never be thirsty.” Well, I’ve got news for you:  I am hungry and I am thirsty.   I thirst for justice that rolls down like water, and righteousness like an never-failing stream.  Yet, my observation is that justice fails over and over.   In the belly of my life, I hunger for love and faithfulness to meet, for righteousness an...
Tags: Facebook, Usa, China, Religion, David, Burma, Jesus, Samuel, Ammon, Tamar, Micah, Absalom, Chiang Mai Thailand, NIV, NASB, Speaking to the Soul


Recognizing Structures of Genocide: Toni Morrison's 'The Origin of Others'

Toni Morrison's latest collection of interconnected essays, The Origin of Others (2017), is a slim volume that contains multitudes. It can be read in one sitting, yet it's a book that readers will likely return to frequently for its conceptual richness, catholic knowledge, and political imagination. While the United States may wish to claim Morrison as a national treasure -- her novels have become canonical to the US educational system, from middle school th...
Tags: Music, Virginia, US, Racism, United States, Harvard University, Essays, Birmingham, Toni Morrison, Literary criticism, Morrison, Ernest Hemingway, William Faulkner, Colorism, Absalom Absalom, Racialization


The Ones Who Stay

by Kristin Fontaine   The Old Testament lesson for Friday’s daily office is a bit of a ramble for it is the middle of a series of stories of uprisings against David. In the midst of the passage we are introduced to Barzillai, an 80-year-old man. Barzillai was a very aged man, eighty years old. He had provided the king with food while he stayed at Mahanaim, for he was a very wealthy man. The king said to Barzillai, “Come over with me, and I will provide for you in Jerusalem at my side.” But Barzi...
Tags: Religion, Jerusalem, David, Jordan, Samuel, Mahanaim, Speaking to the Soul, NRSV, Kristin Fontaine, Dailey Data Group, Absalom Absalom, Barzillai, King David, Staying Home, Chimham, King Barzillai


MobileRead April 2017 Book Club Vote

April 2017 MobileRead Book Club Vote Help us choose a book as the April 2017 eBook for the MobileRead Book Club. The poll will be open for 5 days. There will be no runoff vote unless the voting results a tie, in which case there will be a 3 day run-off poll. This is a visible poll: others can see how you voted. It is You may cast a vote for each book that appeals to you. We will start the discussion thread for this book on April 20th. Select from the following Official Choices with t...
Tags: Books, Mississippi, Neil Gaiman, US, Turkey, Canada, Britain, Alaska, Italy, Oxford, Athens, Book Clubs, Miami, Kate, CWA, Harper


Toni Morrison in The New Yorker: "Making America White Again/The choices made by white men, who are prepared to abandon their humanity out of fear of black men and women, suggest the true horror of lost status."

Spoiler alert if you haven't read William Faulkner's "Absalom, Absalom," but Morrison seems to think it's valuable in understanding what just happened in the election. Here's how her essay ends:On Election Day, how eagerly so many white voters—both the poorly educated and the well educated—embraced the shame and fear sowed by Donald Trump....William Faulkner understood this better than almost any other American writer. In “Absalom, Absalom,” incest is less of a taboo for an upper-class Southern ...
Tags: Law, Toni Morrison, Morrison, FAULKNER, William Faulkner, Ann Althouse, Racial Politics, Unconvincing Arguments, Absalom Absalom


Absalom Rebels Against David: Preschool Sunday School Lesson

Lesson Title:  Absalom Rebels Against David Bible Reference: 2 Samuel 15:1-12; 17:1-12; 18:1-18 Target Age Group: Preschool Learning Context: Children’s Church Target Time Frame: 1 ½ hour Gospel Connection: Being David’s son you would think that Absalom would respect his father’s crown and see that God had appointed David to be king. But that’s not the case. Absalom was a selfish man who desired to be king. He was well-liked by many people and used his popularity to his advantage. He tricked eve...
Tags: Religion, David, Samuel, Hebron, Absalom, David Absalom, Absalom Absalom


5 Books You Can Read Again …. and Again and Again: Here’s Our Picks, Now Yours

Recently, a Metafilter user asked the question: which books do you reread again and again, and why— whether for “comfort, difficulty, humour, identification, whatever”? It got me thinking about a few of the ways I’ve discovered such books. Writing an essay or book about a novel is one good way to find out how well it holds up under multiple readings. You stare at plot holes, implausible character development, inconsistent chronologies, and other literary flaws (or maybe features) for weeks, mon...
Tags: Google, Books, Michael Chabon, Kate Bush, Toni Morrison, Catherine, Vladimir Nabokov, Jorge Luis Borges, Morrison, Facebook Twitter, Heathcliff, Solomon, Josh Jones, Pilate, FAULKNER, Borges


"Freaks dressed like clowns": 8 notes on Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice

1) I reacted to Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice much like Quentin Compson responds to the question "Why do you hate the South?" at the end of Faulkner's Absalom, Absalom!: "I don't. I don't! I don't hate it! I don't hate it!"2) Me, soon after seeing the movie: "I liked Wonder Woman."  The wife: "Of course you did."Why does the theater audience cheer when Wonder Woman finally arrives to fight? Because, by then she's a relief from all of the epic male aggression on display. If one views all of...
Tags: Ben Affleck, Superman, America, Batman, Lex, Jesse Eisenberg, Gal Gadot, Martha, FAULKNER, Zack Snyder, James Mason, Hitchcock, Lex Luthor, FilmDr, Lex Luthor Jesse Eisenberg, Batman Ben Affleck


What different novels look like with everything removed but punctuation

Adam J Calhoun wrote on Medium: "I wondered what did my favorite books look like without words. Can you tell them apart or are they all a-mush? In fact, they can be quite distinct. Take my all-time favorite book, Absalom, Absalom! by William Faulkner. It is dense prose stuffed with parentheticals. When placed next to a novel with more simplified prose — Blood Meridian, by Cormac McCarthy — it is a stark difference (see above)."
Tags: Post, Punctuation, Novels, Cormac Mccarthy, William Faulkner, Adam J Calhoun, Absalom Absalom