Posts filtered by tags: Akira Kurosawa[x]


 

The 69 Pages of Writing Advice Denis Johnson Collected from Flannery O’Connor, Jack Kerouac, Stephen King, Hunter Thompson, Werner Herzog & Many Others

The internet is full of inspirational quotations about writing, many of them from accomplished and respectable writers. But what need could such writers have of inspirational quotations themselves? Surely true literary art flows from its authors without need of encouraging words, demand though it may sustained periods of labor, frustration, and even suffering. These days, more than a few who seek to create such art spend time studying not just its past masterworks but its living masters. “Some ...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Writing, College, Stephen King, Bob Dylan, Jesus, Akira Kurosawa, Johnson, Gore Vidal, Jack Kerouac, Albert Camus, Seoul, Raymond Chandler, Graham Greene, Thompson


Five themes in Asian Shakespeare adaptations

Since the nineteenth century, stage and film directors have mounted hundreds of adaptations of Shakespeare drawn on East Asian motifs, and by the late twentieth century, Shakespeare had become one of the most frequently performed playwrights in East Asia. There are five striking themes surrounding cultural, racial, and gender dynamics. Gender roles in the play take on new meanings in translation, and familiar and unfamiliar accents expanded the characters’ racial identities. 1. What’s in a name?...
Tags: South Korea, Hong Kong, Books, Featured, Literature, Manhattan, William Shakespeare, Akira Kurosawa, Shakespeare, Hamlet, George Lucas, Leia, Romeo, Baz Luhrmann, Lucas, Thich Nhat Hanh


Akira Kurosawa Appears in a Rare Television & Tells Dick Cavett about His Love of Old Tokyo & His Samurai Lineage (1981)

There was a time in America when you could sit down in the evening, turn on a television talk show, and hear a conversation with Akira Kurosawa. That time was the early 1980s, and that talk show came hosted, of course, by Dick Cavett, to whom no cultural current — and indeed no culture — was too foreign for broadcast. With pictures like Rashomon, Ikiru, Seven Samurai, and Throne of Blood, Kurosawa established himself in the 1950s as the most acclaimed Japanese auteur alive, with prominen...
Tags: Google, Japan, Television, Film, College, America, West, Tokyo, Akira Kurosawa, John Wayne, Dick Cavett, Seoul, George Lucas, Hayao Miyazaki, Hiroshima, Suntory


Like it’s 1990

Well, here we go, another year-based movie marathon done (previously 1967, 1968, 1977, 1978, 1980, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, and 1989), this time for 1990. I started it quite a few months ago, stopped for a while (in part for my October marathon), and then started up again in December to finish it now. There are still a few films that I was originally planning on watching, like Flatliners, The Two Jakes, and Miller’s Crossing, but I felt like it was time to stop and move on to something else ...
Tags: Travel, Film, Russia, Akira Kurosawa, Miller, 1990, Jakes, Movie Marathon


Did Ryan Reynolds Just Reveal the (Presumably Old) Plot of ‘Deadpool 3’?

Despite originating at 20th Century Fox before the studio was bought by the Walt Disney Company, the Deadpool franchise will continue in the hands of Marvel Studios. We’ve already gotten confirmation that Deadpool 3 is in development, and it will stick with the R-rated, irreverent approach to superhero movies that fans loved so much in the first two installments. However, if a recent post on Twitter from Ryan Reynolds is to be believed, the merger may have made us miss out on a very different v...
Tags: Movies, Disney, Fox, Canada, Sequels, Hugh-Jackman, Akira Kurosawa, Deadpool, Nickelback, Marvel Comics, Ryan-Reynolds, 20th Century Fox, Marvel Studios, Wolverine, Logan, Merc


Akira Kurosawa’s Dreams

I do remember watching this back in the day and not really enjoying it. I didn’t really remember any aspect of the film, just that it wasn’t for me, and that made me pretty excited to revisit it at this point in my life to see how I would feel this time. Since it’s an anthology — made up of a series of “dreamy” sequences — it’s maybe not too surprising that I’m going to say that there were some segments that I really, really liked (the first two especially, as well as the windmill village ...
Tags: Travel, Film, Akira Kurosawa, Van Gogh, Martin Scorsese, 1990, Kurosawa, Debaser, Movie Marathon, akira Kurosawa dreams


Supporting freedom isn’t a crime, yet

California Democratic Party chair Rusty Hicks ruined it for everybody. Things were going so well for the Democrats. Big tech companies were banning conservatives from social media. The anti-Trump Lincoln Project launched a blacklist aimed at permanently denying employment to anyone who worked in or near the Trump administration. Major corporations including Marriott cut off political donations to the House Minority Leader and more than 100 lawmakers in the GOP caucus. Yes, it was going well, thi...
Tags: Congress, California, Opinion, Sport, Soccer, Gop, Hillary Clinton, House, Marriott, Akira Kurosawa, Nancy Pelosi, Gavin Newsom, Trump, Capitol, Yankee, Pelosi


‘Ikiru’ Remake ‘Living’ Will Star Bill Nighy

While remakes can sometimes be surprisingly great, it’s probably never a great idea to remake an Akira Kurosawa movie. But that’s not going to stop Living, an English-language remake of Kurosawa’s acclaimed 1952 film Ikiru. Lionsgate just picked up UK distribution rights to the film, which comes from director Oliver Hermanus and will star Bill Nighy. Kurosawa’s original followed a civil servant who learns he has cancer and then struggles to leave behind a positive legacy before he dies. T...
Tags: Hbo, UK, England, London, Movies, Lionsgate, Tom Hanks, Roger Ebert, Williams, Dreamworks, Akira Kurosawa, Bill-Nighy, Kazuo Ishiguro, Remakes, Kurosawa, Ishiguro


‘The Art of The Mandalorian’ Digs into the First Live-Action ‘Star Wars’ Series With Stunning Illustrations

The Mandalorian made Star Wars history as the first live-action TV series. Now you can find out how the project came together at Lucasfilm as one of the first original programs on Disney+ thanks to The Art of The Mandalorian. The book not only features ample amounts of concept art that show off the developmental evolution of the characters, settings, weapons, aliens, and more from the first season of The Mandalorian, but it also digs into the inception of the series and behind-the-scenes detail...
Tags: Star-Wars, Books, Television, Movies, Sci-fi, Disney, Features, Sequels, Akira Kurosawa, Jon Favreau, Lucasfilm, Cool Stuff, Concept Art, Mando, Skywalker, Carl Weathers


‘The Mandalorian’ Comes with Major Revelations and More Questions in “The Jedi”

Naturally, there are spoilers here. Dave Filoni, protege of George Lucas and a shepherd of the future of Star Wars, wrote and directed the thirteenth chapter of The Mandalorian. In this episode, Din Djarin finally makes his way to the forest planet of Corvus and the city of Calodan, and it’s there that we meet a familiar face. In the city of Calodan, former Jedi Ahsoka Tano (Rosario Dawson), has besieged a city controlled by an evil magistrate named Morgan Elsbeth (Diana Lee Inosanto), and he...
Tags: Star-Wars, Television, Movies, Sci-fi, Disney, Sequels, Akira Kurosawa, Darth Vader, Lucasfilm, George Lucas, Star Wars Rebels, Grey, Luke Skywalker, Dawn, Anakin Skywalker, Kurosawa


How Akira Kurosawa Used Movement to Tell His Stories: A Video Essay

The history books say that there were three Japanese filmmakers to emerge in the 1950s – Kenji Mizoguchi, Yasujiro Ozu and Akira Kurosawa. Never mind that Mizoguchi and Ozu made many of their best movies in the 1930s. Never mind that masterful, innovative directors like Mikio Naruse and Keisuke Kinoshita have been unfairly overshadowed by the brilliance of these three greats. Mizoguchi was an early modernist who by the end of his career made meditative movies about how women suffer at the h...
Tags: Google, Hollywood, Yahoo, Film, College, Los Angeles, Stanley Kubrick, Tokyo, Akira Kurosawa, David Lynch, Terrence Malick, Frank Capra, Kurosawa, Facebook Twitter, Hollywood Reporter, Tony Zhou


The Cinematography That Changed Cinema: Exploring Akira Kurosawa, Stanley Kubrick, Peter Greenaway & Other Auteurs

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_XiqTYvq-W0 One type of argument made against “auteur theory,” which posits a film’s director as its “author,” holds that certain non-directorial collaborators contribute just as many — or, as Pauline Kael argued about Citizen Kane, more — of a work of cinema’s defining qualities. Surely a video essayist like Lewis Bond, co-creator with Luiza Liz Bond of Youtube channel The Cinema Cartography, subscribes to auteur theory: just look at the increasingly in-d...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Film, College, Akira Kurosawa, Cuba, Seoul, David Lynch, Peter Greenaway, Kane, Lawrence, Facebook Twitter, Lewis Bond, Pauline Kael, Alain Resnais, Mikhail Kalatozov


‘Snake Eyes’ Origin Movie is Influenced by Japanese Cinema, Says Star Henry Golding

Snake Eyes: G.I. Joe Origins, Paramount’s upcoming origin movie that hopes to relaunch the G.I. Joe franchise, evidently is taking inspiration from one of the world’s greatest film directors. Hey, might as well aim high, right? Henry Golding, who plays the title character in the new film, explained in a new interview that audiences may spot some Japanese influences in Snake Eyes – including a specific type of sword-fighting style, as well as nods to the work of cinema legend Akira Kurosawa. ...
Tags: Japan, Movies, Akira Kurosawa, Paramount Pictures, Joe, Robert, Kurosawa, Golding, Action/Adventure, Robert Schwentke, Schwentke, Henry Golding, Akira -RSB- Kurosawa, Snake Eyes: G.I. Joe Origins


Bill Nighy, Aimee Lou Wood to Star in Kazuo Ishiguro’s Kurosawa Adaptation ‘Living’ For Number 9

BAFTA and Golden Globe winner Bill Nighy (“Love Actually,” “Emma”) will headline the cast of “Living,” alongside Aimee Lou Wood, known for her breakout role in Netflix’s “Sex Education.” The screenplay by Nobel and Booker Prize winner Kazuo Ishiguro (“The Remains of The Day”) is an English-language adaptation of the 1952 classic “Ikiru,” written by […]
Tags: Asia, News, Global, Netflix, BAFTA, Akira Kurosawa, Bill Nighy, Kazuo Ishiguro, Kurosawa, Emma, Golden Globe, Aimee Lou Wood, Bill Nighy Aimee Lou Wood


Werner Herzog Lists All the Languages He Knows–and Why He Only Speaks French If (Literally) a Gun’s Pointed at His Head

If you’ve explored the filmography of Werner Herzog, you’ve heard him speak not just his signature Teutonically inflected English — often imitated in recent years, though never quite equaled — but German as well. What else does he speak? In the clip above, the Bavarian-born director of Aguirre, the Wrath of God and Fitzcarraldo responds thus to the question of exactly how many languages he has: “Not too many. I mean, Spanish, English, German… and then I spoke modern Greek better than Eng...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Film, College, Africa, Akira Kurosawa, Seoul, Tolstoy, Werner Herzog, Facebook Twitter, Herzog, Kottke, Aguirre, Colin Marshall, Language Lessons, Fitzcarraldo


‘A Fistful Of Dollars’ TV Series in Development

The other day word broke regarding a Rashomon TV series based on the Akira Kurosawa movie of the same name. Now…here comes news of A Fistful of Dollars TV series, which is, of course, also based on a Kurosawa movie – Yojimbo. Directed by Sergio Leone and released in 1964, A Fistful of Dollars was Clint Eastwood‘s first starring role and turned him into a leading man. He played the Man with No Name, a part he’d play again in For a Few Dollars More (1965), and The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (1966...
Tags: Hollywood, Movies, Western, Clint Eastwood, Italy, Leonardo Dicaprio, Toho, Akira Kurosawa, Quentin Tarantino, San Miguel, Kurosawa, Sergio Leone, Eastwood, Rojo, Film to TV, Bryan Cogman


A Fistful of Dollars Series in the Works at Mark Gordon Pictures

A Fistful of Dollars Series in the Works at Mark Gordon Pictures Deadline brings word that Mark Gordon Pictures is developing a TV series adaptation of A Fistful of Dollars, based on the 1964 spaghetti western starring Clint Eastwood and directed by Sergio Leone. PB = PB || {}; PB.gptStandAlone = PB.gptStandAlone || {}; PB.gptAutoRefresh = PB.gptAutoRefresh || {'gptAds':[], 'gptStandAlone':[]}; admiralCookie = readAdmiralCookie(); googletag.c...
Tags: TV, Movies, Anatomy, Clint Eastwood, TV News, Akira Kurosawa, Grey, Mark Gordon, Sergio Leone, Eastwood, Mark Gordon Pictures, A Fistful Of Dollars, Mark Gordon Pictures Deadline, Ennio Morricone Bryan Cogman, Ryan Grey


How Storyboarding Works: A Brief Introduction to How Ridley Scott, Alfred Hitchcock, Martin Scorsese, Wes Anderson & Other Directors Storyboard Their Films

When you're making a film with complex shots or sequences of shots, it doesn't hurt to have storyboards. Though professional storyboard artists do exist, they don't come cheap, and in any case they constitute one more player in the game of telephone between those who've envisioned the final cinematic product and the collaborators essential to realizing it. It thus greatly behooves aspiring directors to develop their drawing skills, though you hardly need to be a full-fledged draftsman li...
Tags: Google, Art, Facebook, Star Wars, Christopher Nolan, Film, College, Akira Kurosawa, Ridley Scott, Seoul, Coen Brothers, Werner Herzog, Facebook Twitter, Bong Joon, Colin Marshall, 21st Century Los Angeles


Understanding Chris Marker’s Radical Sci-Fi Film La Jetée: A Study Guide Distributed to High Schools in the 1970s

Pop quiz, hot shot. World War III has devastated civilization. As a prisoner of survivors living beneath the ruins of Paris, you're made to go travel back in time, to the era of your own childhood, in order to secure aid for the present from the past. What do you do? You probably never faced this question in school — unless you were in one of the classrooms of the 1970s that received the study guide for Chris Marker's La Jetée. Like the innovative 1962 science-fiction short itself, this educati...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Hollywood, Education, Film, College, Connecticut, Paris, Akira Kurosawa, William Gibson, Terry Gilliam, Kubrick, Seoul, Francois Truffaut, Scott, Facebook Twitter


‘Rashomon’ TV Series Heading to HBO Max

Back in 2018, word surfaced that a Rashomon TV show, based on Akira Kurosawa‘s 1950 classic, was in the works. Now, a few years later, here’s an update: the Rashomon TV series is still happening, and it’s headed to HBO Max. The Comey Rule‘s Billy Ray and Mudbound‘s Virgil Williams are tackling the script, which will not be a direct adaptation of the Kurosawa film. That film was set in 8th century Japan, whereas the TV series will take place in a modern setting. THR says that HBO Max is te...
Tags: Japan, Hbo, Television, Movies, Akira Kurosawa, Amblin Partners, Kurosawa, Mark Canton, Nara, Amblin Television, Rashomon, Film to TV, Billy Ray, Virgil Williams, Ryunosuke Akutagawa, HBO Max


Amblin TV’s Rashomon Series Acquired by HBO Max

Amblin TV’s Rashomon Series Acquired by HBO Max It’s been two years since word first broke that Amblin TV was developing a series adaptation of Akira Kurosawa’s acclaimed drama Rashomon and now the studio has revealed it is partnering with HBO Max for the forthcoming project. RELATED: Amma Asante to Helm Series Adaptation of Smilla’s Sense of Snow PB = PB || {}; PB.gptStandAlone = PB.gptStandAlone || {}; PB.gptAutoRefresh = PB.gptAutoRefresh || {'gpt...
Tags: Hbo, TV, Movies, Clint Eastwood, TV News, Akira Kurosawa, Amblin Partners, Frank, Kurosawa, Canton, Hill House, Amblin Television, Rashomon, Darryl Frank, Yojimbo, Billy Ray


‘Rashomon’ Series From Amblin Television in Development at HBO Max

Amblin Television’s TV series based on “Rashomon” has landed at HBO Max for development. The project, which has been in the works since late 2018, will not be a direct adaptation of Akira Kurosawa’s classic film, but will retain the key plot device. It is described as a drama centering around a grisly sexual assault and murder, […]
Tags: News, Akira Kurosawa, Amblin Television, Rashomon, HBO Max


How Bong Joon-ho’s Storyboards for Parasite (Now Published as a Graphic Novel) Meticulously Shaped the Acclaimed Film

In Seoul, where I live, the success of Bong Joon-ho's Parasite at this year's Academy Awards — unprecedented for a non-American film, let alone a Korean one — did not go unnoticed. But even then, the celebration had already been underway at least since the movie won the Palme d'Or at Cannes. Something of a homecoming for Bong after Snowpiercer and Okja, two projects made wholly or partially abroad, Parasite takes place entirely in Seoul, staging a socioeconomic grudge match between three...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Books, Film, College, Korea, Akira Kurosawa, Woody Allen, Ridley Scott, Seoul, Cannes, Martin Scorsese, Thomas, Facebook Twitter, Bong, Bong Joon


CS Interview: Hugo Weaving Talks Measure for Measure

CS Interview: Hugo Weaving Talks Measure for Measure To celebrate the release of Paul Ireland’s gritty adaptation of William Shakespeare’s Measure for Measure, ComingSoon.net had the opportunity to speak with the film’s star Hugo Weaving (The Lord of the Rings franchise, The Matrix franchise, V for Vendetta). The actor discussed his role in the flick and also went into great detail about all things Shakespeare and acting. You can purchase or rent the new film here! Here’s the official synops...
Tags: Movies, Australia, William Shakespeare, Akira Kurosawa, Melbourne, Shakespeare, Hamlet, Duke, Tim Minchin, Macbeth, PAUL, Lear, Claudio, Angelo, Sydney Theatre Company, Damian


New to Stream: The Criterion Channel’s September 2020 Lineup

New to Stream: The Criterion Channel’s September 2020 lineup The Criterion Channel, a streaming service from the niche home video distributor for film aficionados, has unveiled its lineup of programming for the month of September, which will include Richard Linklater’s groundbreaking drama Boyhood, along with a large roster of contemporary and classic films and double features! RELATED: New to Stream: Arrow Video Channel’s September 2020 Lineup PB = PB || {}; ...
Tags: Movies, Movie News, Streaming, The Criterion Channel


CS Plays: Ghost of Tsushima – Kurosawa Edition!

CS Plays: Ghost of Tsushima — Kurosawa Edition! Sucker Punch’s Ghost of Tsushima comes with a wide variety of unique features, one of which allows the player to apply a filter to the gameplay that makes it resemble one of those old Akira Kurosawa chambara classics from the 1950s and 60s (Seven Samurai, Yojimbo, etc). The filter essentially just makes the visuals black and white with some film grain added for good measure. Jason Connell and Nate Fox, the creative directors behind Tsushima, re...
Tags: Games, Movies, Akira Kurosawa, Kurosawa, Connell, Jin, Tsushima, Video Game News, Nate Fox, Ghost of Tsushima, Jason Connell, Tsushima Kurosawa Edition


The most prolific actor in Hollywood history

CNN profiles 91-year-old James Hong, whose imdb filmography counts 439 roles, making him a top candidate as the most prolific actor in Hollywood. Hong says the true count is even higher: he's to be seen in at least 600 movies stretching back nearly 70 years. Realizing that Hollywood wouldn't be able to provide the roles Asian Americans deserved, Hong set out to carve his own space. Along with actor Mako Iwamatsu, Hong helped organize an Asian American acting group in Los Angeles. Their first pro...
Tags: Post, Hollywood, News, Actors, Los Angeles, Cnn, Akira Kurosawa, Hong, James Hong, Ryunosuke Akutagawa, Hollywood Hong, Mako Iwamatsu Hong, East West Players East West Players


Lady Macbeth YA Musical in the Works From ‘Anna and the Apocalypse’ Director

It’s been a little while since we’ve seen a teen movie adaptation of a William Shakespeare play, but get ready to party like it’s the year 2000, because a new one is in development at Amazon Studios. John McPhail, who directed the delightful Christmas-themed zombie musical Anna and the Apocalypse, is keeping his musical streak alive: he’s attached to direct a new film musical that’s inspired by Shakespeare’s Macbeth, but with young adult-centric approach. Details about the Lady Macbeth YA mu...
Tags: Amazon, Movies, Teen, Netflix, Justin Bieber, Adaptation, Cbs, William Shakespeare, Akira Kurosawa, Musical, Anna, Shakespeare, Macbeth, Disney Channel, Lady Macbeth, Amazon Studios


Ghost of Tsushima Review: An Engaging & Dazzling New World

Rating 8.7/10 Cast Daisuke Tsuhi as Jin Sakai/Young Jin Eric Steinberg as Lord Shimura Sumalee Montano as Yuna Patrick Gallagher as Khotun Khan François Chau as Sensei Ishikawa James Hiroyuki Liao as Kenji Lauren Tom as Masako Adachi Earl T. Kim as Norio Leonard Wu as Ryuzo Eddie Shin as Taka Karen Huie as Yuriko PB = PB || {}; PB.gptStandAlone = PB.gptStandAlone || {}; PB.gptAutoRefresh = PB.gptAutoRefresh || {'gptAds':[], 'gptStandAlone':[]}; adm...
Tags: Games, Japan, Movies, Playstation 4, Akira Kurosawa, Batman, Khan, Seattle, Creed, Assassin, Templars, Jin, Tsushima, Video Game News, Red Dead Redemption, Yuna


You Can Play the New Samurai Video Game Ghost of Tsushima in “Kurosawa Mode:” An Homage to the Japanese Master

Video games are starting to look and feel like movies: even those of us who haven't gamed seriously in decades have taken notice. Nor has the convergence between the art forms — if, unlike the late Roger Ebert, you consider video games an art form in the first place — been lost on game developers themselves. While the most ambitious creators in the industry looked for inspiration from cinema even when they were working with relatively primitive digital tools, they can now pay practically...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Japan, Greece, Video Games, Film, College, History, Roger Ebert, Akira Kurosawa, Seoul, Kurosawa, Facebook Twitter, Kotaku, MacDonald, Keza Macdonald