Posts filtered by tags: Alain De Botton[x]


 

An Animated Introduction to Friedrich Nietzsche’s Life & Thought

There’s no shame if you’ve never known how to pronounce Friedrich Nietzsche’s name correctly. Even less if you never remember how to spell it. If these happen to be the case, you may be less than familiar with his philosophy. Let Alain de Botton’s animated School of Life video briefly introduce you, and you’ll never forget how to say it: “Knee Cha.” (As for remembering the spelling, you’re on your own.) You’ll also get a short biography of the disgruntled, dyspeptic German philosophe...
Tags: Google, College, Nazis, Philosophy, Alain De Botton, Elizabeth, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, Friedrich Nietzsche, University of Basel, Nietzsche, Babich, de Botton, Durham NC Follow, Dionysus, Arthur Schopenhauer Richard


Open Mike: Video Chautauquas* (OT)

["Open Mike" is the often off-topic Editorial page of TOP. It appears on Wednesdays. Off-topic posts on TOP are labeled "OT" in the title in case you prefer to avoid them.] While I delve into the no doubt delightful comments on yesterday's post (127 of 'em!), which should be fun, I thought I'd share a few of my favorites among recent YouTube discoveries. If you think I'm trying to distract you before you add more to today's workload, well, I take the Fifth. • A book author whose work I've enjoye...
Tags: Photography, New York, David Letterman, George Carlin, David, Malcolm Gladwell, Alain De Botton, Off-topic Posts, Open Mike, Michael Johnston, George, Mike, Scott, Merriam Webster, Michael C Johnston, Johnny Appleseed


Live Your Rom-Com Dreams With These Charming Airbnb Rentals

This winter, instead of leaving cold weather behind for tropical vacations on the beach, we're envisioning an escape to a charming countryside oasis — specifically, one that mirrors Iris Simpkins' (played by the luminous Kate Winslet) abode in seasonal film favorite, The Holiday. For those unfamiliar with this VIP piece of rom-com gold, Winslet's character lives in a cozy cottage that's nestled into the picturesque English countryside and swaps homes with L.A.-living Cameron Diaz's character ov...
Tags: Fashion, Music, Virginia, Brooklyn, Tennessee, Paris, Cameron Diaz, Portland, Manhattan, Croatia, Kate Winslet, Airbnb, Bristol, Portland Oregon, Jetblue, Alain De Botton


Live Like Cameron Diaz In The Holiday With These Coziest Airbnb Rentals

Some stay home for the holidays, while others prefer to flee for a little trip away. This year, instead of leaving cold weather behind for tropical vacations on the beach, we're envisioning an escape to a charming countryside oasis — specifically, one that mirrors Iris Simpkins' (played by the luminous Kate Winslet) abode in seasonal film favorite, The Holiday. For those unfamiliar with this VIP piece of festive movie gold, Winslet's character lives in a cozy cottage that's nestled into the pic...
Tags: Fashion, Music, Brooklyn, Tennessee, Paris, Cameron Diaz, Portland, Manhattan, Croatia, Kate Winslet, Airbnb, Bristol, Portland Oregon, Washington State, Alain De Botton, Tivoli


What Is Stoicism? A Short Introduction to the Ancient Philosophy That Can Help You Cope with Our Modern Times

The word “stoic” (from the Greek stoa) has come to mean a few things in popular parlance, most of them related directly to the ancient Greek, then Roman, philosophy from which the term derives. Stoic people seem unmovable. They stay cool in a crisis and “keep calm and carry on” when others lose their heads. For several, perhaps obvious, reasons, these qualities of “calm, resilience, and emotional stability” are particularly needed in a time like ours, says Alain de Botton in his School o...
Tags: Google, College, Life, Philosophy, Alain De Botton, Tim Ferriss, Facebook Twitter, Durham NC, Seneca, Josh Jones, Friedrich Nietzsche, Debbie Downers, Lucilius


An Animated Introduction to Anna Freud: The Psychoanalyst (and Daughter of Sigmund) Who Theorized Denial, Projection & Other Defense Mechanisms for Our Egos

Being in denial, engaging in projection, rationalizing or intellectualizing events, regressing into childhood, displacing your anger, retreating into fantasy: who among us hasn't been subject to accusations of doing these things at one time or another? And even if you haven't, all of those terms surely sound familiar. They owe their place in the culture in large part to the psychoanalyst Anna Freud, who catalogued these and other "defense mechanisms" in her 1934 book The Ego and Mechanis...
Tags: Psychology, Google, College, Lewis Carroll, Lucian Freud, Seoul, Sigmund Freud, Alice, Alain De Botton, Freud, Facebook Twitter, Colin Marshall, Sigmund, Anna Freud, Jacques Lacan, 21st Century Los Angeles


The Causes & Prevalence of Suicide Explained by Two Videos from Alain de Botton’s School of Life

“Suicide,” writes Albert Camus in “The Myth of Sisyphus,” has never been dealt with except as a social phenomenon.” And yet, as Alain de Botton argues in his School of Life video above, at least when it comes to media and government priorities, contemporary societies prefer to hardly deal with the problem at all, even though it claims the lives of some 800,000 people every year. “It remains entirely strange,” says De Botton, “that through the media we should hear so much about killers an...
Tags: Google, South Korea, College, Life, China, United States, Stephen Fry, Philosophy, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Albert Camus, Kuwait, Alain De Botton, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, de Botton, Schopenhauer


The School of Life Conference

I’ve been following Alain de Botton and his wonderful School of Life content for years. When I saw that they were hosting one of their weekend conferences in San Francisco, I signed up immediately. The conference — best described as philosophical self-help programming focused on emotional intelligence — took place over Friday afternoon, Saturday, and Sunday morning. It was mostly Alain de Botton himself lecturing charismatically from on stage, interspersed with short video clips, pair-up exercis...
Tags: Sales, San Francisco, Philosophy, Alain De Botton, Buddhist, School of Life, Alain, School of Life Life


Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week - March 15, 2018

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics. Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal's premiere independent bookstores. Von Spatz by Anna Haifisch An imaginative comic story of Walt Disney going to a paradise rehabilitation centre after a nervous breakdown. There, he meets Tomi Ungerer and Saul Steinberg and, together, they embark on a regimen of relaxation and art the...
Tags: Music, David, Montreal, British Columbia, Walt Disney, Alain De Botton, Atomic Books Comics Preview, Librairie Drawn Quarterly Books of the Week, Saul Steinberg, Librairie Drawn Quarterly, Mallory Ortberg, Maria Bamford, Kelly Link, Carmen Maria Machado, Tracy K Smith, Anna Haifisch


What Are the Keys to Happiness?: Take “The Science of Well-Being,” a Free Online Version of Yale’s Most Popular Course

Don't listen to people who tell you they've found the one true path to happiness — but do listen to people who seem seriously in search of it. One such person, Yale psychology and cognitive science professor Laurie Santos, teaches a whole course on the subject: Psych 157, also known as "Psychology and the Good Life." And even though college students are living the best time of their lives — or so the culture keeps insisting to them — enough of them desire its insights to make it the most...
Tags: Psychology, Google, College, Yale, Online Courses, Albert Einstein, Albert Camus, Seoul, Santos, Alain De Botton, Don, Facebook Twitter, Colin Marshall, Laurie Santos, 21st Century Los Angeles, New York Times David Shimer Students


Taken a Free Online Version of Yale’s Most Popular Course (“The Science of Well-Being”) and Learn the Keys to Happiness

Don't listen to people who tell you they've found the one true path to happiness — but do listen to people who seem seriously in search of it. One such person, Yale psychology and cognitive science professor Laurie Santos, teaches a whole course on the subject: Psych 157, also known as "Psychology and the Good Life." And even though college students are living the best time of their lives — or so the culture keeps insisting to them — enough of them desire its insights to make it the most...
Tags: Psychology, Google, College, Yale, Online Courses, Albert Einstein, Albert Camus, Seoul, Santos, Alain De Botton, Don, Facebook Twitter, Colin Marshall, Laurie Santos, 21st Century Los Angeles, New York Times David Shimer Students


An Animated Introduction to Epicurus and His Answer to the Ancient Question: What Makes Us Happy?

These days the word Epicurean tends to get thrown around in regard to things like olive oil, cutting boards, and wine aerators. The real Epicurus, an ancient Greek philosopher of the third and fourth century BCE, might not have approved, knowing as he did that happiness doesn't come from products that signal one's appreciation of high-end comestibles. But where, then, does happiness come from? Epicurus devoted his school of philosophy to finding an answer to that ancient question, and th...
Tags: Google, College, Life, Philosophy, Johnson, Albert Camus, Seoul, Alain De Botton, University Of California San Diego, Facebook Twitter, Williams Sonoma, BCE, de Botton, Colin Marshall, Nietzsche Socrates, 21st Century Los Angeles


To Read Aloud is a portal straight to that Middle Earth where magic happens

The Act of Reading It's been 10 years since the writing of The Atlantic's now classic essay Is Google Making Us Stupid? in which Nicholas Carr addressed how our reading habits (and our cognition in general) have been collectively affected by the use of the Internet. Carr observed his own scattering of attention, a lessening of concentration for extended periods of time, which overall makes the act of reading more and more fragmented, impoverished and shallow. To quote Carr's eloquent metaphor: ...
Tags: Post, London, News, Book Reviews, Harvard, Atlantic, Italy, Middle Earth, Alain De Botton, Carr, Dimitri, School of Life, Nicholas Carr, Edward M Hallowell, Francesco Dimitri Born


If It’s Important, Learn It Repeatedly

A little more than a year ago, a friend took me for lunch in downtown Toronto, and we talked mostly about what we’d been reading. Immediately afterward she marched me to a nearby bookstore and insisted I buy Cal Newport’s Deep Work. She was the second person that week to describe it to me as potentially life-changing, so I bought it with great enthusiasm. Later that day, I sat reading it in a tea shop for two hours, riveted by the possibilities of working in the uncompromising, undistracted way...
Tags: Uncategorized, Toronto, Islam, Lifehacks, Ecuador, Alain De Botton, Cal Newport, Newport, Julia Cameron, Steven Covey, de Botton, Ben White, Deep Work, Tao Te Ching the Dhammapada


How to Use Your Social Network to Travel the World

One of my favorite websites is Couchsurfing. This website allows you to connect with locals abroad and get a place to stay, a friend to show you around, and local information. I remember I used it when I was first traveling and stayed at this lovely home in Athens. I’ve grown to love it even more since they have a “who’s nearby” feature on their app, which I heavily used in France last year. Celinne, on the other hand, created – and used – her own personal social network. She traveled the world...
Tags: Travel, Europe, Instagram, Interview, Bali, Interviews, Australia, France, Southeast Asia, US, Thailand, Philippines, Nepal, Italy, Athens, Myanmar


An Animated Introduction to Friedrich Nietzsche’s Philosophical Recipe for Getting Over the Sources of Regret, Disappointment and Suffering in Our Lives

The idea of acceptance has found much, well… acceptance in our therapeutic culture, by way of Elisabeth Kübler-Ross’ five stages of grief, 12-step programs, the wave of secular mindfulness practices, the body-acceptance movement, etc. All of these interventions into depressed, bereaved, guilt-ridden, and/or anxious states of mind have their own aims and methods, which sometimes overlap, sometimes do not. But what they all share, perhaps, for all the struggle involved, is a general sense ...
Tags: Google, College, Philosophy, Alain De Botton, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, Friedrich Nietzsche, Elisabeth Kübler Ross, Nietzsche, Leiden University, de Botton, Durham NC Follow, Download Nietzsche, Major Works


A Short Animated Introduction to Karl Marx

Is Karl Marx’s critique of capitalism still relevant to the 21st century? Can we ever read him independently of the movements that violently seized state power in his name, claiming to represent the workers through the sole will of the Party? These are questions Marxists must confront, as must all serious defenders of capitalism, who cannot afford to ignore Marx. He understood and articulated the problems of political economy better than any theorist of his day and posed a formidable int...
Tags: Google, Politics, College, Economics, Bbc, Karl Marx, Party, Alain De Botton, Marx, Facebook Twitter, Harvey, Josh Jones, David Harvey, de Botton, Durham NC Follow, Das Kapital


Why Should We Read Charles Dickens? A TED-Ed Animation Makes the Case

You can’t go near the literary press lately without hearing mention of Nathan Hill’s sprawling new novel, The Nix, widely praised as a comic epic on par with David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest. Novelist John Irving, to whom Hill has drawn comparisons, goes so far as to compare the novelist to Charles Dickens. Such praise goes too far, if you ask Current Affairs editor Brianna Rennix. In a caustic review essay, Rennix unfavorably measures not only The Nix, but also the postmodern novels...
Tags: Google, College, Literature, Charles Dickens, George Eliot, Virginia Woolf, David Foster Wallace, Alain De Botton, Nix, John Irving, Hill, Dickens, Facebook Twitter, Durham NC, Josh Jones, Eliot


Learn Philosophy, from the Ancients to the Moderns, with 350 Animated Videos

Philosophy is not an idle pursuit of leisured gentlemen and tenured professors, though the life circumstances of many a philosopher might make us think otherwise. The foremost example of a privileged philosopher is Marcus Aurelius, famous expositor of Stoicism, and also, incidentally, Emperor of Rome. Yet we must also bear in mind that Epictetus, the other most famous expositor of Stoicism, whom Aurelius quotes repeatedly in his Meditations, was born a slave. Against certain tendencies o...
Tags: Google, College, Bbc, Rome, Animation, Stephen Fry, Philosophy, Gillian Anderson, Martin Luther King Jr, Alain De Botton, Aristotle, Harry Shearer, Facebook Twitter, Plato, Gandhi, Sartre


350 Animated Videos That Will Teach You Philosophy, from Ancient to Post-Modern

Philosophy is not an idle pursuit of leisured gentlemen and tenured professors, though the life circumstances of many a philosopher might make us think otherwise. The foremost example of a privileged philosopher is Marcus Aurelius, famous expositor of Stoicism, and also, incidentally, Emperor of Rome. Yet we must also bear in mind that Epictetus, the other most famous expositor of Stoicism, whom Aurelius quotes repeatedly in his Meditations, was born a slave. Against certain tendencies o...
Tags: Google, College, Bbc, Rome, Animation, Stephen Fry, Philosophy, Gillian Anderson, Martin Luther King Jr, Alain De Botton, Aristotle, Harry Shearer, Facebook Twitter, Plato, Gandhi, Sartre


Celebrity Picks: Tim O'Reilly's Favorite Reads of 2017

Photo credit: Peter Reilly, Faces of Open Source When Tim O'Reilly speaks, Silicon Valley listens. So maybe we should listen, too. His new book WTF?: What's the Future and Why It's Up to Us does not mean what you might initially suppose. True, WTF? can represent a sense of dismay, but in O'Reilly's book title it represents a spirit of optimism--What's The Future?-- specifically, his belief that technology will change our lives for the good if we focus on that goal. What books inform Tim O'R...
Tags: Amazon, Books, Silicon Valley, Alain De Botton, Adam Smith, Ray, Reilly, Jonathan, Roth, Tim O Reilly, Ray Dalio, Chris Schluep, Peter Reilly, Russ Roberts, Alvin E Roth Jonathan Hall, Airbnb Facebook Google


Three Huge Volumes of Stoic Writings by Seneca Now Free Online, Thanks to Tim Ferriss

"The greatest obstacle to living is expectancy, which hangs upon tomorrow and loses today," wrote Lucius Annaeus Seneca the Younger. "You are arranging what is in Fortune's control and abandoning what lies in yours." That still much-quoted observation from the first-century Roman philosopher and statesman, best known simply as Seneca, has a place in a much larger body of work. Seneca's writings stand, along with those of Zeno, Epictetus, and Marcus Aurelius, as a pillar of Stoic philosophy, a s...
Tags: Google, College, NFL, Philosophy, Silicon Valley, Seoul, Alain De Botton, Tim Ferriss, Tao, Facebook Twitter, Ferris, Audible, Seneca, Marcus Aurelius, Colin Marshall, Ferriss


An Animated Introduction to Michel de Montaigne

Considered the first great humanist essayist, Michel de Montaigne was also the first to use the word “essay” for the casual, often meandering, frequently first-person explorations that now constitute the most prevalent literary form of our day. "Anyone who sets out to write an essay,” notes Anthony Gottlieb in The New York Times, “for a school or college class,” a magazine, newspaper, Tumblr, or otherwise, “owes something” to Montaigne, the French “magistrate and landowner near Bordeaux ...
Tags: Google, College, New York Times, Philosophy, Bordeaux, Alain De Botton, Montaigne, Facebook Twitter, Foucault, Cicero, Michel de Montaigne, Josh Jones, Gottlieb, Kierkegaard, Kant, de Botton


Why Should We Read Virginia Woolf? A TED-Ed Animation Makes the Case

Virginia Woolf dissuaded readers from playing the critic in her essay “How Should One Read a Book?” But in addition to her novels, she is best known for her literary criticism and became a foundational figure in feminist literary theory for her imaginative polemic “A Room of One’s Own,” an essay that takes traditional criticism to task for its presumptions of male literary superiority. Women writers like herself, she argues, had always been a privileged few with the means and the freedom...
Tags: Google, College, Virginia, Oxford, Cambridge, Literature, Jane Austen, Gillespie, Patti Smith, Shakespeare, James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, Alain De Botton, Mozart, Facebook Twitter, Milton


The Philosophical Appreciation of Rocks in China & Japan: A Short Introduction to an Ancient Tradition

In addition to summing up Socrates and his European heirs, Alain de Botton has also applied his five-minute animated video approach to the very basics of Eastern philosophy. While offering its introductory surveys, the series may hopefully spur viewers on to greater appreciation of, for example, the Buddha, Lao Tzu, and Japanese Zen master Sen no Rikyu, who refined the tea ceremony as a meticulous meditative ritual. Rikyu’s practice shows us how much philosophical and religious tradition...
Tags: Google, Japan, College, China, Environment, Netherlands, Philosophy, Alain De Botton, Metropolitan Museum Of Art, Zen Buddhism, Facebook Twitter, China Japan, Socrates, Kant, Daoism, Durham NC Follow


Delightful At-Home Wedding in Virginia :: Meg & Rue

Photography by Sarah Mattozzi. I am completely besotted with this wedding! Meg & Rue married in their apartment surrounded by ten family members – including their officiant, Rue’s sister! – and then walked through the rain to celebrate with twenty-seven guests at a favorite local restaurant. Even though the whole day was so intimate, I think my favorite part was the one with no guests at all, when they read their own vows to each other in their new home. The Ceremony Why did you choose this...
Tags: Fall, Virginia, Green, Wedding, J. Crew, Ralph Lauren, Blue, Richmond, Romantic, Alain De Botton, Minted, Modern, Aldo, Meg, Mary, Custom


An Animated Introduction to Ludwig Wittgenstein & His Philosophical Insights on the Problems of Human Communication

In the recorded history of philosophy, there may be no sharper a mind than Ludwig Wittgenstein. A bête noire, enfant terrible, and all other such phrases used to describe affronts to order and decorum, Wittgenstein also represented an anarchic force that disturbed the staid discipline. His teacher Bertrand Russell recognized the existential threat Wittgenstein posed to his profession (though not right away). When Wittgenstein handed Russell the compact, cryptic Tractatus Logico-Philosoph...
Tags: Google, College, Bbc, Austria, Philosophy, Ricky Gervais, Norway, Hitler, Aidan Turner, Alain De Botton, Ludwig Wittgenstein, Nigel Warburton, Facebook Twitter, Russell, Josh Jones, Bertrand Russell


How To Deliver Criticism To Your Partner So They Really Hear It

Even if you consider your relationship rock-solid, chances are there's something your partner does that ticks you off. Maybe they're always late to meet up with you, even on important dates. Perhaps they don't bother helping you schedule the dog walker. The way they sigh when you ask them to do you a favor might be the thing that sets you off. These grievances are normal in a relationship, and they can even be healthy — if you talk about them the right way.In a lecture about love in the modern ...
Tags: Fashion, Music, Alain De Botton, Higgins, Ludden, Tips For Hot Skype, David Ludden


An Animated Introduction to Economist John Maynard Keynes

If you know anything about modern economic theory, you’ve learned the names Milton Friedman and John Maynard Keynes—generally pitted against each other as representing the divide down the center in Western political economy. While more radical thinkers like F.A. Hayek and, of course, Marx and Engels, hold sway over a significant part of the population, when it comes to the entrenched two-party system in the U.S. and so-called moderate Democratic and Republican politicians, we can handily...
Tags: Google, College, Economics, Bbc, Britain, Cambridge, World Bank, Virginia Woolf, Imf, Alain De Botton, Marx, Facebook Twitter, John Maynard Keynes, Friedman, Hayek, Josh Jones


An Animated Introduction to Stoicism, the Ancient Greek Philosophy That Lets You Lead a Happy, Fulfilling Life

Forever known, it seems, as keeping a “stiff upper lip,” Stoicism—like its predecessor, Cynicism—is an ancient school of Greek philosophy that has been reduced into an attitude, a pose rather than a way of life. “We do this to our philosophies,” writes Lary Wallace at Aeon, “We redraft their contours based on projected shadows, or give them a cartoonish shape like a caricaturist emphasizing all the wrong features.” We do this especially to schools as obscure to most people as Stoicism an...
Tags: Google, College, Cyprus, Star Trek, Rome, Spock, Athens, Philosophy, Alain De Botton, Gene Roddenberry, Facebook Twitter, Zeno, Socrates, Josh Jones, Marcus Aurelius, School of Life