Posts filtered by tags: Allison Meier[x]


 

Take a Virtual Tour of the Paris Catacombs

The Paris Catacombs is “one of those places,” wrote photographer Félix Nadar, “that everyone wants to see and no one wants to see again.” If anyone would know, Nadar would. He spent three months in and out of the underground city of death, with its macabre piles of skulls and crossbones, taking photographs (see here) that would help turn it into an internationally famous tourist attraction. In these days of quarantine, no one can see it; the site is closed until further notice. But if you’re th...
Tags: Travel, Google, College, Life, History, Paris, Napoleon, Facebook Twitter, Roman, Josh Jones, Nadar, Paris Catacombs, Durham NC Follow, Allison Meier, Felix Nadar, Jean Paul Marat


Behold Félix Nadar’s Pioneering Photographs of the Paris Catacombs (1861)

As a tourist in England, one may be persuaded to pick a piece of merchandise with the now-ubiquitous slogan “Keep Calm and Carry On,” from a little-displayed World War II motivational poster rediscovered in 2000 and turned into the 21st-century's most cheeky emblem of stiff-upper-lip-ness. Travel across the Channel, however, and you’ll find another version of the sentiment, drawn not from war memorabilia but the ancient warning of memento mori. “Keep Calm and Remember You Will Die” say magnets,...
Tags: Google, Photography, England, College, History, Paris, Napoleon, Facebook Twitter, Meier, Josh Jones, Nadar, Paris Catacombs, Durham NC Follow, Allison Meier, Public Domain Review, Felix Nadar


19th-Century Skeleton Alarm Clock Reminded People Daily of the Shortness of Life: An Introduction to the Memento Mori

Victorian culture can seem grim and even ghoulish to us youth-obsessed, death-denying 21st century moderns. The tradition of death photography, for example, both fascinates and repels us, especially portraiture of deceased children. But the practice “became increasingly popular,” notes the BBC, as “Victorian nurseries were plagued by measles, diphtheria, scarlet fever, rubella—all of which could be,” and too often were, “fatal.” Adults did not fare much better when it came to the epidemic sprea...
Tags: Google, Art, College, Life, Boston, Tim Burton, History, Bbc, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, Hyperallergic, Science Museum London, Durham NC Follow, Allison Meier, Lindsey Fitzharris, Mary Queen


Europe’s Oldest Intact Book Was Preserved and Found in the Coffin of a Saint

Photo via the British Library If you’re a British history buff, next month is an ideal time to be in London for the British Library’s “once-in-a-generation exhibition” Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms: Art, Word, War, opening October 19th and featuring the illuminated Lindisfarne Gospels, Beowulf, Bede’s Ecclesiastical History, the “world-famous” Domesday Book, and Codex Amiatinus, a “giant Northumbrian Bible taken to Italy in 716” and returning to England for the first time in 1300 years. But with all of ...
Tags: Google, Europe, Books, England, London, College, History, Ireland, Italy, John, British Library, Mediterranean, Durham, North Africa, St John, Cuthbert


Documentary on legendary fantasy coffin artist Paa Joe now available online

Want to be buried in a giant wooden coffin that looks like a Coke bottle? Coffin artist Paa Joe is the guy who can make that happen. He crafts fantasy wood "proverb coffins" (aka as abebuu adekai in his culture) out of his shop in Ghana. He's considered the grandfather of the fantasy coffin trade and his work is exhibited in museums worldwide. But hard times fell on his business. Paa Joe & The Lion is the 2017 documentary that tells the story of how he and his son are rebuilding the famil...
Tags: Amazon, Post, Death, Video, UK, News, Documentary, Ghana, Coke, Jacob, Pop Art, Allison Meier, Paa Joe, Coffin art, Fantasy coffin, Going Out In Style


Optical Scanning Technology Lets Researchers Recover Lost Indigenous Languages from Old Wax Cylinder Recordings

In an 1878 North American Review description of his new invention, the phonograph, which transcribed sound on wax-covered metal cylinders, Thomas Edison suggested a number of possible uses: “Letter writing and all kinds of dictation without the aid of a stenographer,” “Phonographic books” for the blind, “the teaching of elocution,” and, of course, “Reproduction of music.” He did not, visionary though he was, conceive of one extraordinary use to which wax cylinders might be put—the recove...
Tags: Google, Science, Technology, California, College, History, Berkeley, UC Berkeley, Neh, Thomas Edison, Ucsb, National Science Foundation, Facebook Twitter, Edison, Garrett, NSF


Cornell Creates a Database of Fugitive Slave Ads, Telling the Story of Those Who Resisted Slavery in 18th & 19th Century America

While the value of slaves in the U.S. from the colonial period to the Civil War rose and fell like other market goods, for the most part, enslaved people constituted the most valuable kind of property, typically worth even more than land and other highly valued resources. In one study, three University of Kansas historians estimate that during most of the 18th century in South Carolina, slaves “made up close to half of the personal wealth recorded in probate inventory in most decades.” By the 1...
Tags: Google, College, Life, America, History, The New York Times, South Carolina, Cornell, Cornell University, Mitchell, Billy, University Of Alabama, Facebook Twitter, University of Kansas, Josh Jones, Hyperallergic


300 reasons we love New Orleans

W hen the governor of French Louisiana founded the city of Nouvelle-Orléans back in 1718, he couldn’t possibly have known that — 300 years later — it would be one of the liveliest, most happening places on the planet. To celebrate the tricentennial of The Big Easy, here’s one big embrace of the food, culture, lifestyle, and people that make the city so sought-after among avid travelers. Here’s three hundred reasons to love New Orleans. Let ’em roll! * * * 1. There’s SO much history here. 2. F...
Tags: Travel, Reese Witherspoon, US, America, Anniversary, River, Things To Do, Atlantic, United States, Alaska, House, Paris, Oscar, New Orleans, Elvis Presley, Starbucks


The First Photographs of Snowflakes: Discover the Groundbreaking Microphotography of Wilson “Snowflake” Bentley (1885)

What kind of a blighted society turns the word “snowflake” into an insult?, I sometimes catch myself thinking, but then again, I’ve never understood why “treehugger” should offend. All irony aside, being known as a person who loves nature or resembles one of its most elegant creations should be a mark of distinction, no? At least that’s what Wilson "Snowflake" Bentley surely thought. The Vermont farmer, self-educated naturalist, and avid photographer, was the first person to offer the followin...
Tags: Google, Photography, Science, Washington Post, College, History, Smithsonian, Bentley, Vermont, Harper, Wilson, Facebook Twitter, Meier, Josh Jones, James Clerk Maxwell, Wilson Snowflake Bentley


Global Medieval Sourcebook.

More online goodness; Allison Meier reports for Hyperallergic: Images from medieval manuscripts have had something of a revival on social media, with viral accounts sharing their strange scenes of bizarre beasts or cavorting knights and monks. Yet the reading of those manuscripts by non-scholars remains low, partly due to a lack of access. The recently launched Global Medieval Sourcebook (GMS), curated by Stanford University faculty and students, offers English versions of previously untranslate...
Tags: Uncategorized, Linguistics, Stanford University, Hyperallergic, Allison Meier, Hong Mai, Mae Lyons Penner, Yijian Zhi, Lyons Penner


Photos of 19th-Century Black Women Activists Digitized and Put Online by The Library of Congress

A couple days ago, a visually compelling thread on Twitter exploded with thousands of shares and likes and dozens of users submitting their own contributions. The thread (a series of connected tweets for the Twitter uninitiated) has become an evolving photo essay of women activists standing up to walls of militarized riot police and mobs of angry bigots. The photos feature subjects like Tess Asplund, Leshia Evans, and Saffiyah Khan, and historical inspirations like Gloria Richardson and Bernad...
Tags: Google, Photography, Texas, Congress, College, History, Library Of Congress, Facebook Twitter, Westbrook, Gloria Richardson, Richards, Meier, Josh Jones, Harriet Tubman, Frederick Douglass, Hyperallergic


The Pantone System Of Color Standards We Now Use? It Was Based On Birds

Yes, indeed - it was first developed by an ornithologist in 1886; he expanded it for the rest of us in 1912. Allison Meier explains.
Tags: Art, Visual, Allison Meier, 03.03.17


Stream 8,000 Vintage Afropop Recordings Digitized & Made Available by The British Library

Stability or cultural vitality: many nations seem as if they can only have one or the other. The Republic of Guinea, for instance, has endured quite a turbulent history, yet its musicians have also enjoyed roles as “pioneers in the creation of African popular music styles and as the voice of a new Africa.” That’s the view of the University of Melbourne’s Graeme Counsel, who over the past decade has made a series of trips to the Guinean capital of Conakry on a mission to preserve the ...
Tags: Google, Music, College, France, Africa, Los Angeles, Guinea, Seoul, British Library, Conakry, Facebook Twitter, University of Melbourne, Los Angeles Review of Books, Meier, Hyperallergic, Colin Marshall


Avant-Garde Composer John Cage’s Surprising Mushroom Obsession (Which Began with His Poverty in the Depression)

“You know that my hobby is hunting wild mushrooms,” says John Cage in the 1990 reading at Harvard University you can hear above. “I was sure there was a haiku poem — Japanese — that would have to do with mushrooms, because haikus are related to the seasons: spring, summer, fall, and winter, and fall is the period for mushrooms.” Having found a suitably autumnal piece of verse by seventeenth-century poet-saint Matsuo Bashō featuring a mushroom and a leaf, Cage first reads the Japanese-lan...
Tags: Google, Music, New York, College, Los Angeles, Food & Drink, Harvard University, New York Times, John, Charles, Seoul, John Cage, Facebook Twitter, Carmel, Los Angeles Review of Books, University of California Santa Cruz


The Unsung Woman Artist Behind Your Tarot Cards

Allison Meier writes for Hyperallergic about Pamela Colman Smith who in 1909 collaborated with occultist A. E. Waite on the most popular tarot deck of the 20th century.The Rider Tarot Deck The Hermit with his cloak and lantern, the Hanged Man suspended from one foot, the High Priestess seated between two columns — these are all familiar figures to those who practice divination. The most widely used tarot cards, and the first to be mass-marketed in English with original art, are the ones comprisi...
Tags: England, Smith, Astrology, Bram Stoker, Tarot, University of Pittsburgh, Schumann, Aleister Crowley, Pratt Institute, Alfred Stieglitz, Smithsonian American Art Museum, Hyperallergic, WAITE, Golden Dawn, Peter Bebergal, Allison Meier


Secret society curios: classic Masonic and Odd Fellows folk art

Allison Meier at Hyperallergenic has a fascinating look at The American Folk Art Museum’s exhibit of classic secret society folk art. (more…)
Tags: Crafts, Post, News, Folk Art, Allison Meier, Freemasons, Secret Societies, Masonic Hall


The U.S. National Archives Launches an Animated GIF Archive: See Whitman, Twain, Hemingway & Others in Motion

Does it matter to you if some people insist on pronouncing GIF with a hard “g” rather than saying “Jiff,” as if they were telling you when they’d get back from the store? (I freely admit, I’m one of those people.) Well then, you, reader, certainly belong to a core audience for the National Archives and Records Administration’s online library of animated “jiffs.” Clearly NARA knows the correct pronunciation, since they with the dated pun “Getting’ Giphy With It.” And they know what the internet...
Tags: Google, College, Russia, US, Web/Tech, National Parks, Nuremberg, Mark Twain, National Archives, Archives, New York Public Library, Hemingway, Facebook Twitter, Buster Keaton, Nara, Meier


W.E.B. Du Bois Creates Revolutionary, Artistic Data Visualizations Showing the Economic Plight of African-Americans (1900)

Few people have done more to accurately foresee and help shape the century ahead of them as W.E.B. Du Bois. And perhaps few intellectuals from the early twentieth century still have as much critical relevance to our contemporary global crises. Du Bois’ incisive sociology of racism in The Souls of Black Folk, Black Reconstruction in America, and his articles for the NAACP’s journal, The Crisis, remained rooted in a transcontinental awareness that anticipated globalism as it critiqued tribalism...
Tags: Google, Design, London, Congress, College, Virginia, Berlin, America, History, Paris, Smithsonian, Naacp, Wassily Kandinsky, Latin America, Jim Crow, Caribbean


Crowdsourced Database Will Locate the Burial Sites of Forgotten US Slaves

Image courtesy of National Burial Database of Enslaved Americans The stories are infrequent but deeply compelling: one recent news item in the AP’s The Big Story describes the bones of 14 people from the 18th or early 19th century, discovered in Albany, NY, “wrapped in shrouds, buried in pine boxes and—over centuries—forgotten.” Seven adults, five infants, and two children, soon to be “publically memorialized and [re]buried in personalized boxes beside prominent families in old Albany.” Over th...
Tags: Google, College, New York City, Atlanta, Ap, History, New York Times, Manhattan, Houston, Archives, Memphis, Albany, Arnold, Harlem, Abraham Lincoln, Facebook Twitter


New Crowdsourced Database Will Locate the Burial Sites of Forgotten US Slaves

Image courtesy of National Burial Database of Enslaved Americans The stories are infrequent but deeply compelling: one recent news item in the AP’s The Big Story describes the bones of 14 people from the 18th or early 19th century, discovered in Albany, NY, “wrapped in shrouds, buried in pine boxes and—over centuries—forgotten.” Seven adults, five infants, and two children, soon to be “publically memorialized and [re]buried in personalized boxes beside prominent families in old Albany.” Over th...
Tags: Google, College, New York City, Atlanta, Ap, History, New York Times, Manhattan, Houston, Archives, Memphis, Albany, Arnold, Harlem, Abraham Lincoln, Facebook Twitter


Mapping the Sounds of Greek Byzantine Churches: How Researchers Are Creating “Museums of Lost Sound”

Unless you’re an audio engineer, you’ll have little reason to know what the term “convolution reverb” means. But it’s a fascinating concept nonetheless. Technicians bring high-end microphones, speakers, and recording equipment to a particularly resonant space—a grain silo, for example, or famous concert hall. They capture what are called “impulse responses,” signals that contain the acoustic characteristics of the location. The technique produces a three dimensional audio imprint—enabling u...
Tags: Google, Art, Greece, History, Architecture, Atlantic, Ucla, David Byrne, University Of Southern California, Cbc, Berklee College of Music, Facebook Twitter, Thessaloniki, Adrienne LaFrance, Josh Jones, DONAHUE


Download 14 Free Posters from NASA That Depict the Future of Space Travel in a Captivatingly Retro Style

If I could send a message back in time, I might send it to the wide-eyed and skyward-looking children of 1960s America, apologizing that we never did build those jetpacks, flying cars, and moon colonies, but also letting them know that at least we, the citizens of the 21st century, have developed such technologies as smartphones and a myriad of ways for snack foods to taste both sweet and salty at once. I probably wouldn’t tell them how many of us long for the spirit of their own time, which A...
Tags: Travel, Google, Science, America, Los Angeles, Nasa, Earth, United States, Mars, Seoul, Facebook Twitter, Los Angeles Review of Books, Jet Propulsion Laboratory JPL, Hyperallergic, Colin Marshall, NASA JPL