Posts filtered by tags: Archaeology[x]


 

Photos show ancient Egyptian artifacts and skeletons found in a 'lost golden city' built by King Tut's grandfather

An ancient Egyptian artifact at the site of the newly discovered "lost golden city" in present-day Luxor. Hassan Mohamed/picture alliance via Getty Images Egyptian archaeologists have unearthed a 3,400-year-old "lost golden city" in Luxor over the last seven months. In 1935, a French excavation team searched for the city - which may be the largest ever built in Ancient Egypt - but never found it. The city, named "tehn Aten," or the dazzling Aten, was built by Amenhotep III, King Tut's...
Tags: Photos, Science, News, Trends, Features, Egypt, Archaeology, Luxor, King Tut, Cairo, Reuters, Bryan, Pharoah, Johns Hopkins University, Tut, Amon


Roman site uncovered in Scarborough hailed as first of its kind in UK

Remains of buildings near Yorkshire town said to be ‘most important Roman discovery of last decade’ When developers broke ground on the outskirts of Scarborough, they were hoping to build a housing estate ideal for first-time buyers, families and professionals, with en suites, off-street parking and integrated kitchens galore. But before shovels had even hit earth, they found someone else had got there first: the Romans.The remains of a Roman settlement believed to be the first of its kind disco...
Tags: UK, Housing, UK News, Britain, Heritage, Yorkshire, Archaeology, Scarborough, North Yorkshire, Roman Britain


Prehistoric cave painters may have been hallucinating due to lack of oxygen

The artists behind some prehistoric cave paintings have been hallucinating due to a shortage of oxygen, according to a new archaeological study. Tel Aviv University archaeologists Yafit Kedar, Gil Kedar, and Ran Barkai report on their findings in the Journal of Archaeology, Consciousness, and Culture. — Read the rest
Tags: Post, News, Archaeology, Hallucinations, Tel Aviv University, Ran Barkai, Cave Paintings, Stoned Age, Strange Visions, Yafit Kedar Gil Kedar


Ancient cave artists were getting high on hypoxia

Hundreds of prehistoric paintings have been found in subterranean chambers with barely enough oxygen to breathe.Low oxygen causes hypoxia that can induce exalted mental states.A new study says the artists chose these hard-to-each caverns in search of an oxygen-starved high.Artists of all types have been known to ingest a—shall we say—creative lubricant or two. One of the paradoxical things about art, even for people who love making it—maybe especially for those people—is that it's sometimes hard...
Tags: Archaeology, Cave art cave paintings, Creativity, Narcotics, Visualizations


3,000-year-old ‘lost golden city’ of ancient Egypt discovered

Experts say Aten is the largest such city ever found and one of the most important finds since unearthing Tutankhamun’s tomb Archaeologists have hailed the discovery of what is believed to be the largest ancient city found in Egypt, buried under sand for millennia, which experts said was one of the most important finds since the unearthing of Tutankhamun’s tomb.The famed Egyptologist Zahi Hawass announced the discovery of the “lost golden city”, saying the site was uncovered near Luxor, home of ...
Tags: Africa, Middle East and North Africa, Egypt, Archaeology, Luxor, Tutankhamun, Valley, Zahi Hawass, Aten


Stone slab found in France thought to be Europe’s oldest 3D map

Archaeologists believe 4,000-year-old engravings on Saint-Bélec Slab resemble topological featuresArchaeologists in France have uncovered a stone with 4,000-year-old etchings they believe may be the oldest three-dimensional map in Europe.The engravings on the broken stone appear to resemble topological features including hills and a river network. Continue reading...
Tags: Europe, Maps, France, World news, Archaeology


Skull From Czech Cave May Contain Oldest Modern Human Genome

A genome sequenced from a modern human skull has been dated at approximately 45,000 years old, making it the oldest discovery of its kind. It’s a significant archaeological discovery, but the use of an unconventional dating method leaves the result in doubt. In a related study, scientists also show that intermixing…Read more...
Tags: Science, Archaeology, Neanderthals, Stone Age, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Paleolithic, Upper Paleolithic, Specimen, Neanderthal, Cosimo Posth, Ishim, Israel Hershkovitz, Hershkovitz, Bacho Kiro, Middle Stone Age, Early Modern Human


Gaming technology recreates 16th-century music in Scottish chapel

Researchers capture how choral music would have sounded in birthplace of Mary Queen of ScotsThe sounds of an Easter concert performed for James IV in a Scottish chapel have been recreated using gaming technology alongside groundbreaking recording techniques that allow specialists to model how acoustics would have been affected by long-destroyed interior details, such as the curve of an alabaster sculpture or an oak roof beam.Researchers have captured how they believe choral music would have soun...
Tags: Music, Science, Scotland, UK News, Culture, Heritage, Archaeology, Mary Queen of Scots, James IV, Linlithgow Palace, Mary Queen of ScotsThe


Arabian coins found in US may unlock 17th-century pirate mystery

Discovery may explain escape of Capt Henry Every after murderous raid on Indian emperor’s shipA handful of coins unearthed from a pick-your-own-fruit orchard in the US state of Rhode Island and other random corners of New England may help solve a centuries-old cold case.The villain in this tale: a murderous English pirate who became the world’s most-wanted criminal after plundering a ship carrying Muslim pilgrims home to India from Mecca, then eluded capture by posing as a slave trader. Continue...
Tags: India, US, World news, US news, Archaeology, Mecca, Rhode Island, New England


Stalin statue site reveals chilling remains of Prague labour camp

Archaeologists have discovered foundations of the previously unknown structure in the city’s Letná parkThe colossal monument to Joseph Stalin that towered over Prague at the height of the cold war stood as a frightening reminder of the Soviet dictator’s tyranny and communism’s seemingly unshakeable grip on the former Czechoslovakia.Nearly 60 years after its demolition, the brooding 15.5-metre (51ft) shrine retains a hold on the popular imagination, with locals referring to the now popular meetin...
Tags: Europe, World news, Czech Republic, Prague, Communism, Archaeology, Joseph Stalin, Stalin, Czechoslovakia, Forced Labour


Be Gentle with the Land

Garden Making For some people in the UK making a new garden means getting a designer in, or at least thinking radically about what to keep and what to change. This may then be followed by bulldozers and backhoes – or JCBs, as we call them in the UK. We were never able to afford much land sculpting of that kind. A little was inevitable – just levelling for a pool and a path, and the removal of a dead tree and a large amount of soil by the house. We have large sloping areas which we couldn’t eve...
Tags: Gardening, UK, History, Archaeology, Charles, Neil Oliver, Don, Wordsworth, Regular Gardens, Garden Designing, Garden Making


Mysterious "Plain of Jars" in Laos has been dated

The Plain of Jars consists of over 90 sites containing thousands of jars scattered across Laos. According to new research, these jars were constructed sometime between 1240 and 660 BCE.In 2019, UNESCO named a cluster of 11 regions as a World Heritage Site. The stone jar sites scattered around Laos are considered the most unique and important archaeological finds in all of Southeast Asia. In total, over 90 sites have been identified, with each site containing between one and 400 jars, some of w...
Tags: Travel, Facebook, Asia, England, Scotland, Southeast Asia, Religion, Unesco, Innovation, Anthropology, Archaeology, Laos, Usaf, World Heritage Site, Derek, University of Melbourne


Ancient "Plain of Jars" in Laos has been dated

The Plain of Jars consists of over 90 sites containing thousands of jars scattered across Laos. According to new research, these jars were constructed sometime between 1240 and 660 BCE.In 2019, UNESCO named a cluster of 11 regions as a World Heritage Site. The stone jar sites scattered around Laos are considered the most unique and important archaeological finds in all of Southeast Asia. In total, over 90 sites have been identified, with each site containing between one and 400 jars, some of w...
Tags: Travel, Facebook, Asia, England, Scotland, Southeast Asia, Religion, Unesco, Innovation, Anthropology, Archaeology, Laos, Usaf, World Heritage Site, Derek, University of Melbourne


Archaeologists found the oldest mass-production brewery in ancient Egyptian ruins

From the BBC: A joint Egyptian-American team discovered the brewery in Abydos, an ancient burial ground in the desert. They found a number of units containing about 40 pots used to heat a mixture of grain and water to make beer.  — Read the rest
Tags: Post, News, Bbc, Beer, Egypt, Archaeology, Egyptology, Brewing, Brewery, Dogfish Head, Abydos, Archaeological Find, Hold My Beer


6,000-year-old child skeleton found in Israel's 'Cave of Horrors' along with ancient Dead Sea scrolls and world's oldest basket

Archeologists Hagay Hamer and Oriah Amichai at the 'Cave of Horror' in the Judean Desert, Israel. Eitan Klein/Israel Antiquities Authority Archeologists found the child's skeleton preserved naturally mummified in the dry cave. The "Cave of Horrors" takes its name from the 40 skeletons found during excavations in the 1960s. A CT scan revealed the child was aged between 6 and 12 and is thought to have been a girl. See more stories on Insider's business page. Archeologists hav...
Tags: Science, Israel, Nbc News, Jerusalem, Trends, Rome, Archaeology, Afp, Zechariah, Dead Sea, Smithsonian Magazine, Israel Antiquities Authority IAA, IAA, Dead Sea Scrolls, Judean Desert, Menahem Kahana


Rain uncovers bull idol at ancient Olympia

‘Chance discovery’ near the temple of Zeus was probably used as votive offering, Greek ministry says Rain has helped uncover a small bull idol at ancient Olympia in what the Greek culture ministry said on Friday was a “chance discovery”.It said the bronze idol, found intact, was spotted by an archaeologist at the sprawling ancient site that inspired the modern Olympic Games during a scheduled visit by ministry officials. Continue reading...
Tags: Science, Greece, World news, Archaeology, Olympic Games, Zeus, Olympia


A pit full of 6,200-year-old skeletons is now the oldest known example of 'indiscriminate, mass killing'

Commingled skeletons in the Potočani mass burial site in Croatia. Jacqueline Balen, Archaeological Museum of Zagreb Archaeologists discovered 41 skeletons buried 6,200 years ago in a giant pit in Croatia. The victims, most of whom were unrelated, were executed at the same time. A new study suggests the grave is the site of the oldest documented massacre ever found. See more stories on Insider's business page. A man in a Croatian village was digging a foundation for his new garage in ...
Tags: Europe, Science, News, Trends, Peru, Archaeology, Croatia, National Geographic, Massacre, Zagreb, Grave, Novak, University of Wyoming, James Ahern, Ahern, Aylin Woodward


Dead Sea scroll fragments and 'world's oldest basket' found in desert cave

Six-millennia-old skeleton of child also unearthed during dig in Judean Desert by Israeli archeologists Israeli archaeologists have unearthed two dozen Dead Sea scroll fragments from a remote cave in the Judean Desert, the first discovery of such Jewish religious texts in more than half a century.“For the first time in approximately 60 years, archaeological excavations have uncovered fragments of a biblical scroll,” the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA) said in a statement. Continue reading...
Tags: Science, Israel, Religion, World news, Middle East and North Africa, Judaism, Christianity, Archaeology, Israel Antiquities Authority IAA, Judean Desert


Israeli archeologists find new Dead Sea scroll fragments

Judean Desert dig also finds six-millennia-old skeleton of child described as world’s oldestIsraeli archaeologists have unearthed two dozen Dead Sea scroll fragments from a remote cave in the Judean Desert, the first discovery of such Jewish religious texts in more than half a century.“For the first time in approximately 60 years, archaeological excavations have uncovered fragments of a biblical scroll,” the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA) said in a statement. Continue reading...
Tags: Science, Israel, Religion, World news, Middle East and North Africa, Judaism, Christianity, Archaeology, Dead Sea, Israel Antiquities Authority IAA, Judean Desert


Neanderthals helped create early human art, researcher says

Archaeologist says ability to think and create objects may not have been restricted to homo sapiensWhen Neanderthals, Denisovans and homo sapiens met one another 50,000 years ago, these archaic and modern humans not only interbred during the thousands of years in which they overlapped, but they exchanged ideas that led to a surge in creativity, according to a leading academic.Tom Higham, a professor of archaeological science at the University of Oxford, argues that their exchange explains “a pro...
Tags: Science, Anthropology, Archaeology, Evolution, University of Oxford, Neanderthals, Tom Higham


What happened on HMS Terror? Divers plan return to Franklin wrecks

Scientists hope that ice will give up more clues to the fate of the 1845 Arctic expedition to find the Northwest PassageIt remains one of the greatest mysteries of naval exploration. What doomed John Franklin’s 1845 attempt to sail the Northwest Passage, from the Atlantic to the Pacific, in his ships Erebus and Terror?The expedition claimed the lives of all 129 men and has gripped the public’s imagination for the past century and a half. Now Canadian researchers are facing a crucial decision on ...
Tags: Science, Atlantic, Heritage, Arctic, Archaeology, Exploration, Pacific, Franklin, John Franklin, Northwest PassageIt


Ancient Christian ruins discovered in Egypt reveal 'nature of monastic life'

Archaeologists unearth monks’ cells and churches with biblical inscriptions dating back to fourth century ADA French-Norwegian archaeological team has discovered new Christian ruins in Egypt’s Western Desert, revealing monastic life in the region in the fifth century AD, the Egyptian antiquities ministry said.“The French-Norwegian mission discovered during its third excavation campaign at the site of Tal Ganoub Qasr al-Agouz in the Bahariya Oasis several buildings made of basalt, others carved i...
Tags: Science, Africa, World news, Middle East and North Africa, Egypt, Archaeology, Bahariya Oasis, Tal Ganoub Qasr al Agouz


Bronze age burial site in Spain suggests women were among rulers

Researchers in Murcia find exquisite objects at women’s graves later used as sites for elite warrior burialsA burial site found in Spain – described by archaeologists as one of the most lavish bronze age graves discovered to date in Europe – has sparked speculation that women may have been among the rulers of a highly stratified society that flourished on the Iberian peninsula until 1550BC.Since 2013, a team of more than a dozen researchers have been investigating the site of La Almoloya in the ...
Tags: Europe, Spain, World news, Culture, Heritage, Archaeology, Murcia, La Almoloya


Brutal 6,200-Year-Old Massacre Shows Humans Have Sucked for a Really Long Time

Dozens of savagely murdered individuals found buried in a Copper Age mass grave is shedding new light onto the lives of these early farmers—and the unspeakable violence they occasionally had to endure. Read more...
Tags: Science, Archaeology, Cemeteries, Emergency Management, David Reich, Mass Grave, Continents, Ron Pinhasi, Genetic History Of Europe, Periodization, Mario Novak, Western Hunter Gatherer


Medieval women 'put faith in birth girdles' to protect them during childbirth

New findings cement idea that ritual and religion was invoked using talismans to soothe nervesWith sky-high levels of maternal mortality, the science of obstetrics virtually nonexistent and the threat of infectious disease always around the corner, pregnant medieval women put their faith in talismans to bring them divine protection during childbirth.From amulets to precious stones, the list of items that the church lent to pregnant women was substantial, but the most popular lucky charm was a “b...
Tags: Science, Religion, Pregnancy, Archaeology, University of Cambridge, Durham University


Turning geology into archaeology: how two businessmen changed the face of time

On the afternoon of 27 April 1859, two top-hatted businessmen, standing in a gravel pit outside the French city of Amiens, were about to change history. Joseph Prestwich and John Evans had brought with them a photographer, scientific witnesses, and a great deal of zeal and perseverance to answer a longstanding question: how old was humanity? They were not the first to put the question or seek its answer; nearby, in the small town of Abbeville, Jacques Boucher de Perthes, the Somme’s leading anti...
Tags: Europe, Books, Featured, History, Geology, Archaeology, Isaac Newton, Evans, British, Royal Society, Darwin, Lubbock, Amiens, Falconer, John Evans, Prestwich


How This Ancient, Defleshed Human Skull Ended Up in Such a Strange Spot

Archaeologists may have finally figured out how a 5,300-year-old skull ended up on the ledge of a deep vertical cave shaft in northern Italy. Read more...
Tags: Science, Anatomy, Articles, Archaeology, Skull, Mummy, Neanderthal, Marcel Loubens, Alessia Zielo, Human Skull Symbolism, Maria Giovanna Belcastro, Vertebrate Anatomy


Archaeologists find unique ceremonial vehicle near Pompeii

Well-preserved iron, bronze and tin carriage discovery is ‘without precedent in Italy’Archaeologists have unearthed a unique Roman ceremonial carriage from a villa just outside Pompeii, the city buried in a volcanic eruption in 79 AD.The almost perfectly preserved four-wheeled carriage made of iron, bronze and tin was found near the stables of an ancient villa at Civita Giuliana, about 700 metres north of the walls of ancient Pompeii. Continue reading...
Tags: Science, World news, Italy, Archaeology, Pompeii, Civita Giuliana


Pompeii 's new director: 'Excavation is always a kind of destruction'

Archaeologist Gabriel Zuchtriegel takes controversy in his stride as he develops programme for siteGabriel Zuchtriegel is used to ruffling a few feathers. In 2015, the German archaeologist was hired to manage Paestum, a vast park of ancient Greek ruins in the southern Italian region of Campania. He was among the first crop of foreigners picked to direct an Italian museum or cultural site as part of what was a contentious drive to revamp the management of the country’s heritage. Not only was he f...
Tags: Europe, World news, Culture, Heritage, Italy, Archaeology, Pompeii, Campania, Dario Franceschini, Paestum, Gabriel Zuchtriegel, Zuchtriegel, Pompeii Continue


Pompeii vexes board with appointment of German director

Archaeologist Gabriel Zuchtriegel takes controversy in his stride as he develops programme for siteGabriel Zuchtriegel is used to ruffling a few feathers. In 2015, the German archaeologist was hired to manage Paestum, a vast park of ancient Greek ruins in the southern Italian region of Campania. He was among the first crop of foreigners picked to direct an Italian museum or cultural site as part of what was a contentious drive to revamp the management of the country’s heritage. Not only was he f...
Tags: Europe, World news, Culture, Heritage, Italy, Archaeology, Pompeii, Campania, Dario Franceschini, Paestum, Gabriel Zuchtriegel, Zuchtriegel, Pompeii Continue