Posts filtered by tags: Arthur Rimbaud[x]


 

Celine Launches Rimbaud

When in 2019, Hedi Slimane took over as creative director of CÉLINE, he gave new life to the brand. The same year, he also introduced the Celine Haute Parfumerie Collection, featuring nine high-end fragrances. In 2022, the collection is joined by the tenth: Rimbaud, a fragrance named after the French poet Arthur Rimbaud. Recently, Blackpink's Lisa was chosen as the face of the first adverti... Read full article: Celine Launches Rimbaud from Fragrantica Perfumes and Colognes Magazine.
Tags: Fashion, Celine, Hedi Slimane, Lisa, Rimbaud, Arthur Rimbaud, Fragrantica Perfumes, Blackpink, Celine Launches Rimbaud


Footage of Cities Around the World in the 1890: London, Tokyo, New York, Venice, Moscow & More

It is called the Belle Époque, a phrase which brings to mind stylish graphic advertising posters, the baroque Art Nouveau style of Alphonse Mucha, the Beaux Arts architectural monuments of Paris, Chicago, and Newport. These images seem static, backward-looking. Despite their popularity on the poster market, they cannot capture (how could they?) the full expression of what cultural historians also call the fin de siècle. The term is French for “end of the century,” but it describes a peri...
Tags: Facebook, Japan, London, College, France, History, Vienna, Paris, Eiffel Tower, Sherlock Holmes, Arthur Conan Doyle, Bram Stoker, Picasso, Josh Jones, Harvard University Press, Arthur Rimbaud


Footage of Cities Around the World in the 1890s: London, Tokyo, New York, Venice, Moscow & More

It is called the Belle Époque, a phrase which brings to mind stylish graphic advertising posters, the baroque Art Nouveau style of Alphonse Mucha, the Beaux Arts architectural monuments of Paris, Chicago, and Newport. These images seem static, backward-looking. Despite their popularity on the poster market, they cannot capture (how could they?) the full expression of what cultural historians also call the fin de siècle. The term is French for “end of the century,” but it describes a peri...
Tags: Facebook, Japan, London, College, France, History, Vienna, Paris, Eiffel Tower, Sherlock Holmes, Arthur Conan Doyle, Bram Stoker, Picasso, Josh Jones, Harvard University Press, Arthur Rimbaud


Rimbaud's remains will not be moved to Panthéon, rules Macron

President decides against relocating remains of French poet to Parisian memorialThe remains of the famed French poet Arthur Rimbaud will not be moved to the Panthéon mausoleum despite a campaign to honour him as an artist and symbol of gay rights, the French president, Emmanuel Macron, has decided.A petition last year backed by a number of celebrities as well as the culture minister, Roselyne Bachelot, called for Rimbaud to be reinterred alongside his lover and fellow poet Paul Verlaine at the m...
Tags: Europe, Books, France, Poetry, World news, Culture, Paris, Pantheon, Emmanuel Macron, Rimbaud, Macron, Arthur Rimbaud, Paul Verlaine, Roselyne Bachelot


"And just so you know, because all Biden does is talks about COVID. Right? He doesn’t call it the China virus. You know why?"

"Because China has him paid off. He can’t use that term. They gave his son one and a half billion to manage. He makes millions of dollars a year, I assume. Right?... He walked in, he walked out with one and a half billion. Hey, maybe he’s not so stupid after all. Right? That’s the only thing. I thought he was so dumb. Maybe he’s not as dumb as we think.... The biggest story, no, the second biggest story, the worst was when they spied on my campaign and they got caught. That’s the biggest politic...
Tags: Law, China, Russia, Poetry, Biden, Tampa, Trump, Adam Schiff, Rimbaud, Tampa Florida, Adam Gopnik, Arthur Rimbaud, Ann Althouse, Insults, Trump rhetoric, Russia Russia Russia


France divided over calls for Arthur Rimbaud and Paul Verlaine to be reburied in Panthéon

Petition says the poets, who were lovers as young men, were ‘the French Oscar Wildes’ and deserve to rest in the mausoleumFrance’s cultural elite are split over whether the remains of two of the country’s greatest poets, Arthur Rimbaud and his lover Paul Verlaine, should be dug up and re-interred in the Panthéon in Paris.The secular mausoleum is home to French greats including Voltaire, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Émile Zola, Alexandre Dumas and Marie Curie. Now a petition signed by more than 5,000 p...
Tags: Europe, Books, France, Poetry, World news, Culture, Paris, Marie Curie, Pantheon, Emmanuel Macron, Rimbaud, Verlaine, Arthur Rimbaud, Paul Verlaine, Roselyne Bachelot, Oscar Wildes


650 years old (about)

I have made several posts about the Philippe-Auguste wall, built during the years 1190-1215, and also about the several places where you can still find some remains (see here). The Philippe-Auguste wall was later followed by a Charles V-wall, built during the years 1356-1383 … and of course by other later walls. The Charles V-wall was actually only constructed on the Right Bank, the Left Bank was still left with the Philippe-Auguste wall. On the Right Bank, the two walls were linked ...
Tags: Travel, Google, Paris, Charles, Seine, the City, Arthur Rimbaud, Chardin, Right Bank, Paris 4, Philippe Auguste, PeterParis, Charles V wall, Right Bank the Left Bank


Watch Patti Smith’s New Tribute to the Avant-Garde Poet Antonin Artaud

The force of Artaud, you couldn’t kill him! - Patti Smith Found sound enthusiasts Soundwalk Collective join forces with the Godmother of Punk Patti Smith for "Ivry," the musical tribute to poet and theatermaker Antonin Artaud, above. The track, featuring Smith’s hypnotic improvised narration, alternately spoken and sung over Tarahumara guitars, Chapareke snare drums, and Chihuahua bells from Mexico's Sierra Tarahumara, the region that provided the setting for Artaud’s autobiographical Th...
Tags: Psychology, Google, Music, College, Mexico, Life, New York City, Poetry, Ethiopia, Gael Garcia Bernal, Patti Smith, Smith, Joan, Rouen, Dan Zanes, Facebook Twitter


Hear Patti Smith’s New Work With The Soundwalk Collective, a Tribute to the Avant-Garde Poet Antonin Artaud

The Soundwalk Collective has made music art out of found sounds since 2004. They recorded 2012’s Medea while traversing the Black Sea and fishing for sounds using a scanner and high powered aerial antennas; 2014’s Last Beat used contact microphones on the architecture of a music club to collect vibrations instead of music; 2017’s Before Music There Is Blood collaged deep echoing recordings of classical music played in various halls. This time, in their upcoming The Peyote Dance, they hav...
Tags: Google, Music, College, Mexico, France, Russia, India, Paris, Ethiopia, Patti Smith, Smith, Black Sea, Ibiza, Eastern Europe, French Guiana, Nico


CBGB’s Heyday: Watch The Ramones, The Dead Boys, Bad Brains, Talking Heads & Blondie Perform Live (1974-1982)

There are, I guess, still many things people can do these days to tap into the legacy of CBGB, but I wouldn’t recommend going near most of them. The merchandising empire (do, however, new parents, get your tot a CBGB bib and onesie); the “thuddingly banal” 2013 film version, which… the less said about it the better; yes, and CBGB, the restaurant, in the Newark Airport Terminal C—proceed at your own risk. We must sadly also mention this past summer’s “Potemkin village from hell,” a pop-up...
Tags: Google, New York Post, Music, New York, College, History, Punk, Washington Dc, Manhattan, Starbucks, Newark, Patti Smith, Cleveland, Cbgb, Judy, Blondie


Patti Smith’s 40 Favorite Books

Image of Patti Smith performing in Rio de Janeiro by Daigo Oliva As a little girl, Patti Smith found liberation in words -- first through the bedtime prayers she made up herself, and later in books. "I was completely smitten by the book," she writes in her memoir, Just Kids.  "I longed to read them all, and the things I read of produced new yearnings." Smith found a role model in Jo, the tomboy writer in Louisa May Alcott's Little Women. "She gave me the courage of a new goal," writes Smith, "...
Tags: Google, Books, Music, New York, College, David Bowie, Rio De Janeiro, William Shakespeare, Melbourne, Federico García Lorca, Charlotte Brontë, Patti Smith, William Blake, Jack Kerouac, Albert Camus, Smith


Book Notes - Richard F. Thomas "Why Bob Dylan Matters"

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book. Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Jesmyn Ward, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others. Richard F. Thomas's Why Bob Dylan Matters is a must-read book for fans of the recent Nobel Laureate, one that examines the legitimacy of Dylan's lyrics as poetry through the e...
Tags: Music, New York, London, Minnesota, Mississippi, California, Wikipedia, Boston, New York City, John Lennon, US, Woody Guthrie, Barcelona, Bbc, Rome, Gotham


Bohemian Paris 1840s: The Downwardly Mobile Arts.

At once playful and dead-serious, Paris is "the city where artists love and starve together, shock the bourgeoisie, then die tragically young." Visit Girls' Guide to Paris and read Cynthia Rose's "Arthur Rimbaud: The Poet as Pop Star."
Tags: Paris, Arthur Rimbaud, Cynthia Rose


Book Notes - Gunnhild Øyehaug "Knots"

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book. Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Jesmyn Ward, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others. Gunnhild Øyehaug's proves herself one of our finest stortytellers in her short fiction collection Knots, a book marvelously varied in form and theme. Kirkus wrote of the book...
Tags: Music, Wikipedia, Best, Radiohead, David, Roy Andersson, Aaliyah, Norway, Kylie Minogue, Bjork, Lily Allen, PJ Harvey, Glenn Gould, Nick Cave, Jason Derulo, Kirkus


Tips for frustrated literary translators

This post was originally published as a newsletter to my mailing list. An unusually large number of readers told me that they benefited from it, so I’m re-publishing it here while I’m on vacation.It’s book prize season, the time of year when many of us admire, or even envy, our colleagues like Tess Lewis (PEN Translation Prize for her German to English translation of Maja Haderlap’s Angel of Oblivion) or Jessica Cohen (Man Booker International Prize for her Hebrew to English translation of David...
Tags: UK, New York, US, New Jersey, Linguistics, Pen, SANDRA SMITH, Ophelia, David Grossman, Arthur Rimbaud, Times of London, Book translations, Tess Lewis, Maja Haderlap, City University of London, Literary translation


Patti Smith Buys Arthur Rimbaud's House

The dwelling, which is located near the French border with Belgium in a small town called Roche, is a reassembled version of Rimbaud's childhood home. It was here that the late 19th-century French poet wrote his most famous piece, A Season in Hell, when he was merely 19 years old.
Tags: Art, People, House, Belgium, Patti Smith, Roche, Rimbaud, Arthur Rimbaud, 03.23.17


Jim Jarmusch Lists His Favorite Poets: Dante, William Carlos Williams, Arthur Rimbaud, John Ashbery & More

Wikimedia Commons photo by Chrysoula Artemis When it comes to American indie director Jim Jarmusch, we tend to think right away of the importance of music in his films, what with his collaborations with Neil Young, Tom Waits, and Iggy Pop. (Jarmusch is himself a musician who has released two studio albums and three EPs under the moniker Sqürl.) But Jarmusch’s most recent film, Paterson, is an ode to poetry, drawn from his own love of New York School poets like Frank O’Hara and John Ashbery. Set...
Tags: Google, Film, College, Poetry, Time, Williams, Literature, Tokyo, Jim Jarmusch, Werner Herzog, Kurosawa, Facebook Twitter, Paterson, Paterson New Jersey, Josh Jones, Wikimedia Commons


Gun that almost killed Arthur Rimbaud sells for €435,000 at Paris auction

Seven-millimetre revolver poet Paul Verlaine used in failed attempt to kill his lover fetches more than seven times its estimate The most famous gun in French literary history, used by Paul Verlaine when he tried to kill his lover and fellow poet Arthur Rimbaud, has sold for €434,500 (£368,000) at auction in Paris.The price for the 7mm six-shooter which almost changed the course of world literature was more than seven times the estimate, auctioneers Christie’s said on Wednesday. Continue reading...
Tags: Europe, Books, France, Poetry, World news, Culture, Paris, Christie, Arthur Rimbaud, Paul Verlaine


Gun that nearly killed poet Rimbaud fetches 435,000 euros

The most famous gun in French literary history, the revolver with which Paul Verlaine tried to kill his lover and fellow poet Arthur Rimbaud, sold for 434,500 euros ($460,000) at auction in Paris on Wednesday. Verlaine bought the weapon in Brussels on the morning of July 10, 1873, determined to put an end to his torrid two-year affair with his teenage lover. The 29-year-old poet had abandoned his young wife and child to be with Rimbaud, who would later become the symbol of rebellious youth, idol...
Tags: News, Paris, Brussels, Rimbaud, Verlaine, Arthur Rimbaud, Paul Verlaine


Gun that wounded French poet Rimbaud sold at auction

The revolver used to wound French poet Arthur Rimbaud fetches over €430,000 at auction.
Tags: News, Rimbaud, Arthur Rimbaud


France Rimbaud: Gun that wounded poet sells for over €430,000

The revolver used to wound French poet Arthur Rimbaud fetches over €430,000 at auction.
Tags: News, France, Arthur Rimbaud


Gun that nearly killed poet Rimbaud sells for almost half million euros

The most famous gun in French literary history, the revolver with which Paul Verlaine tried to kill his lover and fellow poet Arthur Rimbaud, sold for 434,500 euros ($460,000) at an auction in Paris on Wednesday. Verlaine bought the weapon in Brussels on the morning of July 10, 1873, determined to put an end to his torrid two-year affair with his teenage lover. The 29-year-old poet had abandoned his young wife and child to be with Rimbaud, who would later become the symbol of rebellious youth, i...
Tags: News, Paris, Brussels, Rimbaud, Verlaine, Arthur Rimbaud, Paul Verlaine


The Photography of Poet Arthur Rimbaud (1883)

Arthur Rimbaud, far-seeing prodigy, “has been memorialized in song and story as few in history,” writes Wyatt Mason in an introduction to the poet’s complete works; “the thumbnail of his legend has proved irresistible.” The poet, we often hear, ended his brief but brilliant literary career when he ran off to the Horn of Africa and became a gunrunner… or some other sort of adventurous outlaw character many miles removed, it seems, from the intense symbolist hero of Illuminations and A Season in...
Tags: Google, Europe, Photography, College, Poetry, Ethiopia, Patti Smith, Lyon, Facebook Twitter, Horn of Africa, Rimbaud, Josh Jones, Harar, Arthur Rimbaud, Durham NC Follow, Haile Selassie


Gun that nearly did for poet Rimbaud up for sale

The most famous gun in French literature, the revolver with which the poet Paul Verlaine tried to kill his lover Arthur Rimbaud, is going under the hammer, Christie's said Wednesday. Verlaine bought the 7mm six-shooter in Brussels on the morning of July 10, 1873, determined to put an end to his torrid two-year affair with his teenage lover. The 29-year-old poet had abandoned his young wife and child to be with Rimbaud, who would later become the symbol of rebellious youth.
Tags: News, Brussels, Christie, Rimbaud, Verlaine, Arthur Rimbaud, Paul Verlaine


Jean Nicolas Arthur Rimbaud (1854-1891)

Thank you for free verse, young Arthur Rimbaud. We owe you a great debt.
Tags: Arthur Rimbaud, Jean Nicolas Arthur Rimbaud


Nude Photographs Explore 'Ophelia' As A Symbol Of Women's Oppression

Warning: This article contains nudity and may not be appropriate for work.  A woman's body floats through a brook, her gossamer dress ballooned at the sides. Her hair is a tangle of red, as wild as the shrubs and bushland surrounding her. A garland of multicolored flowers -- crow flowers, nettles, daisies, and long purples -- rests in her loosened grip. Her pale face is turned upward, as if suspended between life and death, the physical world and whatever is beyond. She is Ophelia, one of litera...
Tags: News, Shakespeare, Huffington Post, Mamiya, Priscilla Frank, Edgar Allen Poe, Ophelia, Arthur Rimbaud, John Everett Millais, Millais


U.S. Supreme Court on writers, poets and starving artists.

We are asked to recognize that authors are congenitally irresponsible, that frequently they are so sorely pressed for funds that they are willing to sell their work for a mere pittance, and therefore assignments made by them should not be upheld. --Justice Frankfurter, writing in Fisher Music Co. v. Witmark, 318 U.S. 643, 656 (1943) 37 years in Hell: French Poet-Badass Arthur Rimbaud at age 17, 1871.
Tags: U S Supreme Court, Arthur Rimbaud


Verse Translation: A Call for Harder Work and Greater Care

Too much verse translation is much too free and loose. We must take the time and effort to preserve both meaning AND form (including meter and rhyme where they exist) without sacrificing one for the other. Though we can never fully translate verse from one language to another, we can come close if we're willing to work hard enough. To illustrate this, I want to give some French to English examples of my own. I don't claim they are perfect by any means but I think they make my point. I ask ...
Tags: News, Jean de la Fontaine, Huffington Post, Neptune, Wolf, Arthur Rimbaud, Cicada, MacIntyre, Racine, Harold Lloyd, Paul Verlaine, Madame


The Political Bob Dylan

When the makers of Hollywood movies, documentary films, or TV news programs want to evoke the spirit of the 1960s, they typically show clips of long-haired hippies dancing at a festival, protestors marching at an antiwar rally, or students sitting-in at a lunch counter, with one of two songs by Bob Dylan--"Blowin' in the Wind" or "The Times They Are a-Changin'"--playing in the background. Since he emerged on the music since in 1961, Dylan -- who turned 75 this week -- has gone through many perso...
Tags: New York, Bruce Springsteen, Hollywood, News, Minnesota, Mississippi, Washington, New York City, Pete Seeger, Woody Guthrie, America, San Francisco, Barack Obama, Bob Dylan, New York Times, New Jersey


Jean Nicolas Arthur Rimbaud (1854-1891): Thank you for Free Verse, young Sir.

Thank you, Arthur Rimbaud. We owe you.
Tags: Arthur Rimbaud, Jean Nicolas Arthur Rimbaud