Posts filtered by tags: Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation[x]


 

The Gulf Stream, the Cold Blob, and a Potentially Frozen Europe

The NY Times has a fantastic interactive piece about a particularly disturbing aspect of the climate crisis: the evidence that a huge Atlantic circulation pattern is weakening and could collapse, leading to “a monstrous change” in temperature, precipitation, and other chaotic effects across the globe. Now, a spate of studies, including one published last week, suggests this northern portion of the Gulf Stream and the deep ocean currents it’s connected to may be slowing. Pushing the bounds of ...
Tags: Europe, France, China, Africa, Earth, Atlantic, Morocco, Paris, South America, Greenland, North Atlantic, Jason Kottke, Ny Times, Eastern United States, Gulf Stream, Southeastern United States


A Major Ocean Current May Be Hurtling Towards Collapse

The ocean may have less time than we thought before massive, irreversible shifts take place. A new study finds that a crucial ocean system may reach its “tipping point” sooner than predicted if the rate of climate change continues at a breakneck pace.Read more...
Tags: Science, Climate Change, Environment, Climatology, Earth Sciences, Effects Of Climate Change, Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation, Physical Geography, Physical Oceanography, Climate Variability And Change, Chemical Oceanography, Abrupt Climate Change, Tipping Points In The Climate System, Thermohaline Circulation


North Atlantic Current could stop within the next century

The Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation, or AMOC, delivers warm water from the Gulf of Mexico to Europe, stabilizing its climate.Increasing rainfall and glacial meltwater could seriously disrupt the current, which has been slowing down for the past 150 years.Not all of the effects of an AMOC shutdown are clear, but it is likely that Europe will begin to see far colder winters should the current cease. None Despite its frequent rain and cloudy skies, the weather in London rarely dips in...
Tags: Europe, London, Climate Change, Environment, Water, Earth, Atlantic, Oceans, Innovation, Newfoundland, Greenland, North America, Rivers, Gulf of Mexico, North Atlantic, Glacier


Ocean-wide Sensor Array Provides New Look at Global Ocean Current

An anonymous reader shares a Nature article: The North Atlantic Ocean is a major driver of the global currents that regulate Earth's climate, mix the oceans and sequester carbon from the atmosphere -- but researchers haven't been able to get a good look at its inner workings until now. The first results from an array of sensors strung across this region reveal that things are much more complicated than scientists previously believed. Researchers with the Overturning in the Subpolar North Atlanti...
Tags: Florida, Tech, Portland Oregon, Canary Islands, North Atlantic Ocean, Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation, Global Ocean Current, Subpolar North Atlantic Program OSNAP


Global ocean circulation may be slowing down due to Arctic ice loss

Humanity is entering a phase of grave uncertainty as rising temperatures wreck havoc on our planet. Researchers from Yale University and the University of Southhampton have found evidence that Arctic ice loss may be having a negative impact on the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), the largest ocean circulation system on the planet. A complex system not easily explained by talking heads scoring political points, AMOC helps regulate ocean and atmospheric temperatures – and its c...
Tags: Europe, Science, Design, News, Climate Change, Climate, Nasa, Earth, Arctic, Noaa, North Atlantic, Yale University, Rising Sea Levels, Arctic sea, Northern Atlantic Ocean, Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation AMOC


Global Warming Hiatus And Internal Natural Climate Variability

This is worth sharing. A short but useful explanation of the global warming "hiatus" and the natural variability of different atmosphere-ocean phenomenon that influence global mean surface temperature (GMST) trends.From the article-  Every decade since the 1960s has been warmer than the one before, with 2000 to 2009 by far the warmest decade on record (see the figure). However, the role of human-induced climate change has been discounted by some, owing to a markedly reduced increase in global m...
Tags: Climate Change, Global Warming, Atlantic, Pacific, Pacific Ocean, Pdo, Northern Hemisphere, Suvrat Kher, Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation IPO, Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation