Posts filtered by tags: Ayun Halliday[x]


 

How to Be a Samurai: A 17th Century Code for Life & War

Many today draw inspiration from Bushid?, the Way of the Warrior, a comprehensive code of conduct for premodern Japan’s samurai (or bushi). The above installment of History Brothers David and Pete Kelly’s primary source web series Voices of the Past suggests that some aspects of the samurai code are more applicable to 21st century life than others. For instance, when was the last time you slaughtered someone for rendering offense to your Lord? Not that the best practices surrounding ...
Tags: Travel, Facebook, Japan, College, Life, History, David, Pete Kelly, Ayun Halliday, Ninja Natori Masazumi, Yoshie Minami, Natori Masazumi


Watch Hilarious Spoofs of Classic Film Genres: Film Noir, Spaghetti Westerns, Scandinavian Crime Dramas, Time Travel Films & More

Comedian Alasdair Beckett-King has a keen ear for entertainment tropes and subscribes to the belief that “putting too much effort into things makes them funnier.” The result is a series of one-minute videos in which he spoofs the conventions of a particular genre or long running series, with perfect visuals, meta dialogue, and faithfully rendered performance styles. Beckett-King put his London Film School training to use with this project during lockdown, spending “absolutely ages puttin...
Tags: Facebook, England, Comedy, Television, Podcasts, Film, College, North East, Picard, Eric Johnson, Ayun Halliday, London Film School, Alasdair Beckett King, Beckett King, Rachel Anne Smith


The Secrets of Beethoven’s Fifth, the World’s Most Famous Symphony

Revered by music lovers of temperaments as varied as Peanuts’ Schroeder and A Clockwork Orange’s Alex, Ludwig van Beethoven is one of the most celebrated composers in the Western classical music canon. Symphony No. 5 in C minor is surely one of his most recognized, and frequently performed works, thanks in large part to its dramatic opening motif — dun-dun-dun-DAH! Music educator Hanako Sawada’s entertaining TED-Ed lesson, animated by Yael Reisfeld above, delves into the story behind thi...
Tags: Facebook, Music, College, Animation, K-12, Beethoven, TED Talks, Schroeder, Clockwork Orange, Ayun Halliday, Alex Ludwig van Beethoven, Hanako Sawada, Yael Reisfeld


Elvis Costello’s Musician Father (and Doppelgänger) Performing in 1963

If you were an English boy growing up in the 1960s, and your dad met the Queen mum, you’d come away with some pretty heavy duty bragging rights. What if your dad didn’t just meet her, but commanded her attention for a full three minutes… an event you witnessed on the telly, along with 21.2 million others? That’s what happened to young Declan Patrick McManus, or Elvis Costello as he’s more commonly known these days. Unfortunately, his musician father Ross’s calypso-inflected, Trini Lopez-inspired...
Tags: Facebook, Music, Australia, College, John Lennon, The Beatles, Pete Seeger, Elvis Presley, Elvis Costello, Ross, Mersey, Margaret, Bill Brown, McManus, Declan, Lilian


Watch All of Vivaldi’s Four Seasons Performed on Original Baroque Instruments

Antonio Vivaldi’s The Four Seasons reigns as one of the world’s most recognizable early 18th-century pieces, thanks to its frequent appearances in films and television commercials. Upon its debut in 1725, The Four Seasons stunned listeners by telling a story without the help of a human voice. Vivaldi drew on four existing sonnets (possibly of his own provenance), using strings to paint a narrative filled with spring thunderstorms, summer’s swelter, autumnal hunts and harvests, and the ic...
Tags: Facebook, Music, College, San Francisco, Vivaldi, Rick Wakeman, Antonio Vivaldi, Tayler, Ayun Halliday, Hanneke van Proosdij, David Tayler


Watch 30+ Exceptional Short Films for Free in The New Yorker’s Online Screening Room

For short films, finding an audience is an often uphill battle. Even major award winners struggle to reach viewers outside of the festival circuit. Thank goodness for The Screening Room, The New Yorker’s online platform for sharing short films. It’s a magnificent free buffet for those of us who’d like nothing better than to gorge ourselves on these little gems. If you’re not yet a fan of the form, allow us to suggest that any one of the 30 fictional shorts posted in The Screening Roo...
Tags: Facebook, Comedy, Film, College, Mexico, Brooklyn, Magazines, Animation, Yale, Black, Sutton, Applebee, Tanaka, Flushing Queens, Ayun Halliday, Joey Ally


Watch the Jackson 5’s First Appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show (1969)

Who discovered the Jackson 5? Motown founder Berry Gordy? Empress of Soul Gladys Knight? Diva Diana Ross? Everyone in attendance for Amateur Night at the Apollo on August 13, 1967? For many unsuspecting Americans, the answer may as well have been television host Ed Sullivan, who introduced the “sensational group” of five young brothers from Gary, Indiana to viewers in December 1969, two years after their Amateur Night triumph. Thirteen years earlier, a wall of sound emanating from a live...
Tags: Facebook, Music, Television, College, Animation, Smokey Robinson, Elvis Presley, Jackson, Michael Jackson, Elvis, Diana Ross, Jacksons, Michael, David Byrne, Ed Sullivan, Gladys Knight


An Introduction to the Chrysler Building, New York’s Art Deco Masterpiece, by John Malkovich (1994)

No old stuff for me, no bestial copyings of arches and columns and cornices. Me, I’m new.                — architect William Van Alen, designer of the Chrysler Building Many people claim the Chrysler Building as their favorite New York City edifice and actor John Malkovich is one such: It’s so crazy and vigorous in its execution, so breathtaking in its vision, so brilliantly eccentric. Malkovich, who’s not shy about taking potshots at the city’s “violence and filth” in the BBC documentar...
Tags: Facebook, New York, Design, Film, College, New York City, History, Bbc, Architecture, New York Times, Manhattan, John Malkovich, Chrysler, Detroit, Empire State Building, Art Deco


9-Year-Old Henry Thomas Delivers a Remarkable Screen Test for E.T.

I can guarantee almost every day I get someone going, ‘Hey, you’re the guy from E.T.’, usually followed by, ‘What are you doing now?’ And not a day has gone by when someone hasn’t shouted ‘E.T. phone home’ at me.” —  Actor Henry Thomas Should I ever bump into Henry Thomas, I may exclaim, “Okay, kid, you got the job,” just like director Steven Spielberg does at the end of the remarkable screen test, above. Thomas, now — brace yourself — 50, was just 9 when Spielberg flew him in from Texas...
Tags: Facebook, Hollywood, Texas, Film, College, Peter Pan, Audrey Hepburn, Spielberg, Steven Spielberg, San Antonio, Thomas, Henry, Elliott, Elliot, Kathleen Kennedy, Esquire


Behold 84 Great Novels Reinterpreted as Modernist Postage Stamps

Ali Johnson and Jim Quail of Liverpool-based design studio Dorothy had a hit with their music-based graphics, which recast seminal alternative, psychedelic, electronic, and post-punk albums as oversized postage stamps. Now, they’ve turned their attention and knack for highly condensed visual responses to the realms of literature. Their Modern Classics collection, above, synthesizes 42 titles into something emblematic and essential. How many have you read? How many would you be able to identify ...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Music, Design, Education, College, Liverpool, K-12, Literature, Johnson, Les Miserables, Dorothy, Tess, Philistine, Holden Caulfield, J Eckleburg


Elvis’ Three Appearances on The Ed Sullivan Shows: Watch History in the Making and from the Waist Up (1956)

Oh, to be in the studio audience of CBS’ Television City in Hollywood on September 9th, 1956, to see Elvis Presley’s gyrating pelvis rocket him to superstardom on The Ed Sullivan Show. His appearance made television history, but 60 million home viewers were left to fill in some major blanks, as the rising heartthrob was filmed from the waist up whenever he was in motion. Sullivan had been hesitant to book Elvis, not wanting to court the outrage the magnetic young singer had sparked in tw...
Tags: Facebook, Music, New York, Hollywood, Television, College, Life, History, Carol Burnett, New York Times, Elvis Presley, Nashville, Richard, Presley, Elvis, Ed Sullivan


Elvis’ Three Appearances on The Ed Sullivan Show: Watch History in the Making and from the Waist Up (1956)

Oh, to be in the studio audience of CBS’ Television City in Hollywood on September 9th, 1956, to see Elvis Presley’s gyrating pelvis rocket him to superstardom on The Ed Sullivan Show. His appearance made television history, but 60 million home viewers were left to fill in some major blanks, as the rising heartthrob was filmed from the waist up whenever he was in motion. Sullivan had been hesitant to book Elvis, not wanting to court the outrage the magnetic young singer had sparked in tw...
Tags: Facebook, Music, New York, Hollywood, Television, College, Life, History, Carol Burnett, New York Times, Elvis Presley, Nashville, Richard, Presley, Elvis, Ed Sullivan


Nick Cave’s Online Store: Pencils Adorned with Lyrics, Mugs, Polaroids & More

I’m sitting on the balcony Reading Flannery O’Connor With a pencil and a plan – Nick Cave, Carnage Access to technology has transformed the creative process, and many artists who’ve come to depend on it have long ceased to marvel at the labor and time saved, seething with resentment when devices and digital access fails. Musician Nick Cave, founder and frontman of The Bad Seeds, is one who hasn’t abandoned his analog ways, whether he’s in the act of generating new songs, or seeking respite from...
Tags: Facebook, Music, Design, Instagram, Writing, College, Creativity, Vikings, Polaroid, Staffordshire, Nick Cave, Bic, Wim Wenders, Warren Ellis, Flannery O'Connor, Ayun Halliday


A 110-Year-Old Book Illustrated with Photos of Kittens & Cats Taught Kids How to Read

  Unlike our 21st-century cat memes and other such online feline-based entertainments, children’s author Eulalie Osgood Grover’s 1911 work, Kittens and Cats: A First Reader was intended to educate. Its related poems will almost certainly strike those of us whose understanding of feline attitude has been shaped by LOLCats, Grumpy Cat, the existential Henri, Talking Kitty Cat’s acerbic Sylvester, and the mordant 1970s TV spokescat Morris as sweet to the point of sickly. But it boasts six hundred...
Tags: Facebook, Books, Photography, Education, College, K-12, Internet Archive, Sylvester, Morris, Beatrix Potter, Eliot, Grover, Ayun Halliday, Tom Kitten, Public Domain Review Related Content, Secret Lives of Outdoor Cats


Medieval Tennis: A Short History and Demonstration

British You Tuber Nikolas “Lindybiege” Lloyd is a man of many, many interests. Wing Chun style kung fu… Children’s television produced in the UK between 1965 and 1975… Ancient weaponry, chainmail, and historically accurate WWII model miniatures… Actress Celia Johnson, star of the 1945 romantic drama Brief Encounter… Evolutionary psychology… …and it would appear, tennis. But not the sort you’ll find played on the grass courts of Wimbledon, or for that matter, the hard courts of the US...
Tags: Facebook, UK, Design, London, Youtube, College, France, Sports, History, Paris, Shakespeare, Henry V, Penn, Wilson, Henry Viii, Anne Boleyn


Andy Warhol’s Vibrant, Impractical, Illustrated Cookbook from 1959: A Feast for the Eyes

Gorgeously illustrated cookbooks featuring sumptuous images of fancy desserts and other special occasion food can be quite an intimidating proposition to self-doubting beginners. The recipes themselves are daunting, and as every Great British Baking Show viewer learns, watching the top contestants squirm in advance of co-host Paul Hollywood‘s icy judgment, flavor can’t save an edible creation that fails as art. Andy Warhol’s approach to cookery appears rather more blithe. His 1959 cookbook, Wil...
Tags: Art, Facebook, Books, Design, Rizzoli, College, New York City, Frankfurt, Food & Drink, New York Times, Andy Warhol, Warhol, Upper East Side, Portlandia, Fdr, Stanford University


Explore Thousands of Free Vintage Cocktail Recipes Online (1705-1951)

Where do the hipster mixologists of Tokyo, Mexico City and Brooklyn take their inspiration? If not from the Exposition Universelle des Vins et Spiritueux’ free collection of digitized vintage cocktail recipe books, perhaps they should start. An initiative of the Museum of Wine and Spirits on the Ile de Bendor in Southeastern France, the collection is a boon to anyone with an interest in cocktail culture …ditto design, illustration, evolving social mores… 1928’s Cheerio, a Book of Punches and Co...
Tags: Facebook, London, College, History, Brooklyn, Food & Drink, Museums, Venice, Charles, Eddie, Shirley Temple, Clark, Potato Soup, Eddie Clark, Cheerio, Delmonico


Art History School: Learn About the Art & Lives of Toulouse-Lautrec, Gustav Klimt, Frances Bacon, Edvard Munch & Many More

Artist and videographer Paul Priestly is an enthusiastic and generous sort of fellow. His free online drawing tutorials abound with encouraging words for beginners, and he clearly relishes lifting the curtain to reveal his home studio set up and self designed camera rig. But we here at Open Culture think his greatest gift to home viewers are his Art History School profiles of well-known artists like Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec and Vincent Van Gogh. An avid storyteller, he’s drawn to th...
Tags: Art, Facebook, College, Life, History, Montmartre, Van Gogh, Manet, Vincent Van Gogh, Gustav Klimt, Degas, Moulin Rouge, Demi, Henri de Toulouse Lautrec, Lautrec, Ayun Halliday


Watch an Exquisite 19th Century Coffee Maker in Action

Pourover… Cold brew… Single origin… Coffee snobbery may seem like a recent phenomenon, but the quest for the perfectly brewed cup has been going on for a very long time. Behold the Continental Balancing Siphon, above — a completely automatic, 19th-century table top vacuum brewer. There’s an unmistakable element of coffee making as theater here… but also, a fascinating demonstration of physical principles in action. Vintage vacuum pot collector Brian Harris breaks down how the balanci...
Tags: Facebook, Science, College, Physics, Vienna, Brooklyn, Food & Drink, Paris, Reddit, Oakland, Coffee Bean, HARRIS, Brian Harris, Ayun Halliday, Bacarrat, Maria Tindemans


What Made Marcel Duchamp’s Famous Urinal Art–and an Inventive Prank

To our way of thinking, the question is not whether Marcel Duchamp conceived of Fountain, history’s most famous urinal, as art or prank. Nor is it the ongoing controversy as to whether the piece should be attributed to Duchamp or his friend, avant-garde poet and artist Baroness Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven. The question is why more civilians don’t head for the men’s room armed with black paint pens (or alternatively, die-cut stickers) to enhance every urinal they encounter with the signa...
Tags: Art, Facebook, College, Green, The New York Times, Tate Modern, Brian Eno, Fountain, Duchamp, Charles Simic, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Mike Kelley, Marcel Duchamp, Chris Ofili, Ayun Halliday, Baroness Elsa von Freytag Loringhoven


Discover the Stettheimer Dollhouse: The 12-Room Dollhouse Featuring Miniature, Original Modernist Art, Including Duchamp’s Nude Descending a Staircase

The Stettheimer Dollhouse has been wowing young New Yorkers since it entered the Museum of the City of New York’s collection in 1944. The luxuriously appointed, two-story, twelve-room house features tiny crystal chandeliers, trompe l’oeil panels, an itty bitty mah-jongg set, and a delicious-looking dessert assortment that would have driven Beatrix Potter’s Two Bad Mice wild. Its most astonishing feature, however, tends to go over its youngest fans’ heads — an art gallery filled with orig...
Tags: Art, Facebook, Design, Sweden, College, Museums, Venus, Bermuda, Beatrix Potter, Carrie, Duchamp, Paul Rosenberg, Marcel Duchamp, Johanna Fateman, Florine, Ayun Halliday


Discover the Stettheimer Dollhouse: The 12-Room Dollhouse Featuring Miniature, Original Modernist Art by Marcel Duchamp

The Stettheimer Dollhouse has been wowing young New Yorkers since it entered the Museum of the City of New York’s collection in 1944. The luxuriously appointed, two-story, twelve-room house features tiny crystal chandeliers, trompe l’oeil panels, an itty bitty mah-jongg set, and a delicious-looking dessert assortment that would have driven Beatrix Potter’s Two Bad Mice wild. Its most astonishing feature, however, tends to go over its youngest fans’ heads — an art gallery filled with orig...
Tags: Art, Facebook, Design, Sweden, College, Museums, Venus, Bermuda, Beatrix Potter, Carrie, Duchamp, Paul Rosenberg, Marcel Duchamp, Johanna Fateman, Florine, Ayun Halliday


Watch 15 Hours of The Pink Panther for Free

Remember Saturday mornings? If you’re an American of a certain age, you probably spent a good chunk of them sprawled in front of the TV, absorbing a steady stream of network cartoons peppered with ads for toys and sugared cereal. One of Saturday morning’s animated stars stood out from the crowd, a lanky, bipedal feline of a distinctly rosy hue. He shared Bugs Bunny’s anarchic streak, without the hopped-up, motormouthed intensity. In fact, he barely spoke, and soon went entirely mut...
Tags: Facebook, Post, Nbc, Film, College, Animation, K-12, Edward, Cork, Edwards, Blake Edwards, Peter Sellers, United Artists, Henry Mancini, Ayun Halliday, Friz Freleng


Watch 11 Hours of The Pink Panther for Free

Remember Saturday mornings? If you’re an American of a certain age, you probably spent a good chunk of them sprawled in front of the TV, absorbing a steady stream of network cartoons peppered with ads for toys and sugared cereal. One of Saturday morning’s animated stars stood out from the crowd, a lanky, bipedal feline of a distinctly rosy hue. He shared Bugs Bunny’s anarchic streak, without the hopped-up, motormouthed intensity. In fact, he barely spoke, and soon went entirely mut...
Tags: Facebook, Post, Nbc, Film, College, Animation, K-12, Edward, Cork, Edwards, Blake Edwards, Peter Sellers, United Artists, Henry Mancini, Ayun Halliday, Friz Freleng


The Life & Art of Hilma Af Klint: A Short Art History Lesson on the Pioneering Abstract Artist

Like many artists whose abstractions cemented their legacy, Hilma af Klint was trained to paint portraits, botanicals, and landscapes. The naturalist works of her early adulthood depict bourgeois, late-19th century Swedish life, and, by association, the sort of subject matter and approach that were deemed most fitting for a female artist, even in a society where women were allowed to work alongside men. But something else was afoot with Hilma, as artist and educator Paul Priestley ...
Tags: Art, Facebook, College, Religion, New York Times, Paris, The Guardian, Sci Fi, First Time, Hudson New York, Leonardo, Steiner, Mondrian, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Hilma, Kandinsky


How Radical Gardeners Took Back New York City

New Yorkers’ relationship to New York City community gardens is largely informed by how long we’ve lived here. Do you remember the 60s, when a fiscal crisis and white flight resulted in thousands of vacant lots and abandoned buildings in low income neighborhoods? Activists like Hattie Carthan and Liz Christy sprung from such soil, creating youth programs, hauling away debris, and putting constant pressure on elected officials to transform those urban wastelands into green oases. Verd...
Tags: Travel, Facebook, College, New York City, Environment, History, Nature, Brooklyn, Vox, Stuyvesant, Rudy Giuliani, Christy, East Harlem, New York City New York City, Ayun Halliday, Hattie Carthan


Buddhist Monk Sings The Ramones: “Rock ’n’ Roll High School,” “Teenage Lobotomy” & “Beat on the Brat”

The Ramones restored speed and simplicity to 70s rock. It’s rare to find a Ramones tune clocking in over three minutes. The sweet spot’s closer to 2 1/2. “We play short songs and short sets for people who don’t have a lot of spare time,” original drummer Tommy Ramone remarked. It took them all of 2 minutes and 20 seconds to bomb through their single for “Rock ’n’ Roll High School.” So why does Japanese Buddhist monk Kossan’s cover take more than twice that long? Because meditation is...
Tags: Facebook, Music, College, Religion, Metallica, Ramones, Yankovic, Ayun Halliday, Tommy Ramone, Kossan, Kazutaka Yamada, Meditation Buddhist Monk Covers Judas Priest


The Bob Ross Virtual Art Gallery: A New Site Presents 403 Paintings from The Joy of Painting Series (and Uses Data Analysis to Demystify Bob Ross’ Craft)

“We don’t make mistakes. We have happy accidents,” the late Bob Ross soothed fans painting along at home, while brushing an alarming amount of black onto one of his signature nature scenes. His mellow on-camera demeanor and flowing, wet-on-wet oil painting style were perfectly calibrated to help tightly-wound viewers relax into a right-brained groove. The creators of the Bob Ross Virtual Art Gallery take a more left brained approach. Having collected data on Ross’ evergreen series, The Joy ...
Tags: Art, Facebook, Technology, Television, College, Data, Ross, Bob Ross, Van Dyke Brown, Ayun Halliday, Bob Ross Banksy, Bob Ross Virtual Art Gallery, John Thamm, Thamm, Connor Rothschild, Virtual Art Gallery


The Bob Ross Virtual Art Gallery: A New Site Presents 403 Paintings from The Joy of Painting Series

“We don’t make mistakes. We have happy accidents,” the late Bob Ross soothed fans painting along at home, while brushing an alarming amount of black onto one of his signature nature scenes. His mellow on-camera demeanor and flowing, wet-on-wet oil painting style were perfectly calibrated to help tightly-wound viewers relax into a right-brained groove. The creators of the Bob Ross Virtual Art Gallery take a more left brained approach. Having collected data on Ross’ evergreen series, The Joy o...
Tags: Art, Facebook, Technology, Television, College, Data, Ross, Bob Ross, Van Dyke Brown, Ayun Halliday, Bob Ross Banksy, Bob Ross Virtual Art Gallery, John Thamm, Thamm, Connor Rothschild, Virtual Art Gallery


The Mistake Waltz

This is a 3-minute clip of The Concert (or The Perils of Everybody) by choreographer Jerome Robbins, in which the dancers are intentionally, and comically, out of sync. You can see why it’s colloquially called the Mistake Waltz. Open Culture’s Ayun Halliday has collected several more of these performances in this post. It must be incredibly hard for dancers to execute this piece, to deliberately perform out of step with the music and their fellow performers after a lifetime of practice & pe...
Tags: Jason Kottke, Jerome Robbins, Ayun Halliday