Posts filtered by tags: Ayun Halliday[x]


 

The Musical Instruments in Hieronymus Bosch’s The Garden of Earthly Delights Get Brought to Life, and It Turns Out That They Sound “Painful” and “Horrible”

Welcome to The Garden of Earthly Delights. You’ll find no angelic strings here. Those are reserved for first class citizens whose virtuous lives earned them passage to the uppermost heights. Down below, stringed instruments produce the most hellish sort of cacophony, a fitting accompaniment for the horn whose bell is befouled with the arm of a tortured soul. How do we know that's what they sounded like? A group of musicologists, craftspeople and academics from the Bate Collection of Musical...
Tags: Google, Art, Music, Comedy, College, New York City, Religion, Museums, University of Oxford, Lamb, Slayer, Bosch, Facebook Twitter, Hieronymus Bosch, Ayun Halliday, Andrew Lamb


An Animated History of Cats: How Over 10,000 Years the Cat Went from Wild Predator to Sofa Sidekick

Dogs sees us as their masters while cats sees us as their slaves. - Anonymous The next time your friend’s pet cat sinks its fangs into your wrist, bear in mind that the beast is probably still laboring under the impression that it’s guarding the granaries. Anthropologist Eva-Maria Geigl’s animated Ted-Ed Lesson, The History of the World According to Cats, above, awards special recognition to Unsinkable Sam, a black-and-white ship’s cat who survived three WWII shipwrecks (on both Axis and...
Tags: Health, Google, Instagram, College, New York City, History, Animation, Edward Gorey, Ken, Facebook Twitter, Hitchcock, Freya, Ayun Halliday, Eva Maria Geigl, Unsinkable Sam


10 Rules for Appreciating Art by Sister Wendy Beckett (RIP), the Nun Who Unexpectedly Popularized Art History on TV

While life lasts, let us live it, not pass through as zombies, and let us find in art a glorious passageway to a deeper understanding of our essential humanity. - Sister Wendy Beckett (1930-2018) Sister Wendy, a cloistered nun whose passion for art led her to wander out into the world, where she became a star of global proportions, entertained the television masses with her frank humanist assessments. Unphased by nudity, carnality, and other sensual excesses, she initially came across ...
Tags: Google, Amazon, Art, Television, College, New York City, Religion, History, Bbc, Catholic Church, Francis Bacon, Bacon, Norfolk, Christ, Bill Moyers, Wendy


A Short Video Introduction to Hilma af Klint, the Mystical Female Painter Who Helped Invent Abstract Art

It can be both a blessing and curse for an artist to toil at the behest of an influential patron. Financial support and powerful connections are among the obvious perks. Being hamstrung by someone else’s ego and timeframe are some of the less welcome realities on the flip side. Hilma af Klint, the subject of a high profile exhibition at the Guggenheim, does not fit the usual artist-patron mold. She made her paintings to suit a spirit named Amaliel, with whom she connected in a seance. Amali...
Tags: Google, Art, College, New York City, Religion, Chicago, New York Times, Guardian, Paul Klee, Wassily Kandinsky, Stockholm, Guggenheim, Frank Lloyd Wright, Moma, Facebook Twitter, Royal Academy


Movie Accent Expert Analyzes 31 Actors Playing Other Famous People: Jamie Foxx as Ray Charles, Natalie Portman as Jackie Kennedy, Cate Blanchett as Bob Dylan, and More

Well-known figures' voices are often as distinctive as their thousand-watt smiles and influential hairdos. While there is some evidence as to the accents and idiosyncratic speech patterns of such historical heavy hitters as Thomas Edison, Florence Nightingale, and Harry Houdini, technological improvements have really upped the ante for those charged with impersonating real life people from the mid 20th-century onward. Natalie Portman had to sustain her Jackie Kennedy impersonation fo...
Tags: Google, London, Film, College, Life, White House, New York City, Bob Dylan, Jamie Foxx, Charles, Ben Kingsley, Natalie Portman, Jackie, Kennedy, Ray Charles, Harry Houdini


Anatomy of a Fake: Forgery Experts Reveal 5 Ways To Spot a Fake Painting by Jackson Pollock (or Any Other Artist)

In the old days, determining an art forgery was mostly a matter of narrative deduction, a la Sherlock Holmes. Thiago Piwowarczyk and Jeffrey Taylor, founders of New York Art Forensics, employ such techniques to establish provenance, tracing the chain of ownership of any given work back to its original sale by researching catalogues, title transfers, and correspondence. But they also bring a number of high tech tools to the table, to further prove—or in the case of the alleged Jackson...
Tags: Google, Art, Science, Technology, College, History, Chemistry, Taylor, Jackson Pollock, Facebook Twitter, Galileo, Pollock, Jeffrey Taylor, Ayun Halliday, Greg Kotis, Truth About Santa


A New Christmas Commercial Takes You on a Sentimental Journey Through Elton John’s Rich Musical Life

The Bitch is Back…or is he? Yes, Elton John is spending the next couple of years bidding adieu to fans on his Goodbye Yellow Brick Road world tour. And yes, there’s a soon-to-be released biopic, Rocketman. On the other hand, there’s the ridiculously pneumatic two-minute television commercial above, upscale department store John Lewis’s attempt to best rivals Sainsbury’s and Marks & Spencer in the unofficial British holiday advert bowl. These annual productions are as hotly anticipate...
Tags: Google, Music, John Lewis, Television, NYC, College, Life, Elton John, Sainsbury, Madonna, Raf, Dick Cavett, Henrik Ibsen, Elton, Facebook Twitter, Stuart Heritage


Pachelbel’s Chicken: Your Favorite Classical Pieces Played Masterfully on a Rubber Chicken

Music lovers bracing against the annual onslaught of the Singing Dogs’ "Jingle Bells" may find their savage beasts soothed somewhat by Eddy Chen’s performance of Pachelbel’s Canon, above. Never mind that the instrument on which he plays four different tracks is a rubber chicken… or more accurately, as per Amazon, a Screaming Yellow Rubber Chicken Non Toxic Bite-resistant Squeaky Toy. It retains its relaxing musicality. Chen, one half of Australian duo TwoSetViolin, plays that bird like t...
Tags: Google, Amazon, Music, Comedy, NYC, College, K-12, Sydney, Beethoven, Canon, Jingle Bells, Schumann, Facebook Twitter, Yang, Tchaikovsky, Chen


Living Paintings: 13 Caravaggio Works of Art Performed by Real-Life Actors

Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio, the father of Baroque painting, shocked the upper class aesthetes of his day by drafting prostitutes and proletariats as models for his primarily Biblical subjects. Ten years ago, under the direction of founder  Ludovica Rambelli,  eight members of the Italian company, Malatheatre, discovered first hand the insanely rigorous poses Caravaggio demanded of his models, creating 23 tableaux vivants inspired by the master’s oeuvre. The company sought less to ...
Tags: Google, Art, College, Theatre, Egypt, Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio, Naples, Vivaldi, Mozart, Facebook Twitter, Caravaggio, Assisi, Lux Aeterna, Ayun Halliday, Flashmob Recreates Rembrandt, Christ Mary Magdalene


157 Animated Minimalist Mid-Century Book Covers

Graphic and motion designer Henning M. Lederer can’t get enough of those minimalist midcentury book covers. Apparently, the over-the-top pulp scenarios that inspire leave Lederer cold. He’s drawn to the stark, the geometric, the abstract. No heaving bosoms, no forbidden love, though there’s no denying that sex was a topic of great clinical interest to several of the authors featured above, including psychiatrists Charles Rycroft, H. R. Beech, and R.D. Laing. ( = window.a...
Tags: Google, Books, Design, College, Animation, Facebook Twitter, Ayun Halliday, Lederer, Henning M Lederer, Bookstore Blends Real People 's Faces, Charles Rycroft H R Beech, Tilman Grundig, Rupert Taylor


Hear How Queen’s “Bohemian Rhapsody” Would Sound If Sung by Johnny Cash, David Bowie, Janis Joplin, Frank Sinatra & 38 Other Artists

I consider Freddy Mercury and Michael Jackson as the greatest performers of all time. Their vocal abilities are what I look up to as a vocalist.  - Anthony Vincent Anthony Vincent, the creator of Ten Second Songs, has a flowing mane, a lean physique, and the cocksure manner of a 20th century rock god. He also spends hours in his home studio, peering at a computer monitor through reading glasses. His latest effort, above, Queen’s "Bohemian Rhapsody" in the style of 42 other artists, could...
Tags: Google, Music, Comedy, Technology, College, Aretha Franklin, Daft Punk, Creativity, Ozzy Osbourne, David Bowie, Kendrick Lamar, Elvis Presley, Bruno Mars, Muse, Michael Jackson, Janis Joplin


RIP Todd Bol, Founder of the Little Free Library Movement: He Leaves Behind 75,000 Small Libraries That Promote Reading Worldwide

"The Little Free Library: Billions and billions read." In the 2013 Ted-X talk above, Todd Bol, founder of the Little Free Library movement, expressed the desire that one day, he might be able to boast that his labor of love had surpassed McDonalds with regard to the number of customers’ served. It's closing in... ( = || []).push({}); Bol, who passed away earlier this month, was inspired by Andrew Carnegie's mission of repaying his own good fortune...
Tags: Google, Books, Bruce Springsteen, College, Life, America, Indianapolis, K-12, Libraries, Literature, Mcdonalds, Matt Groening, Detroit, New York Public Library, Alexandria, Facebook Twitter


The CIA’s Former Chief of Disguise Show How Spies Use Costumes in Undercover Operations

Think on this as you ready your Halloween finery. Sometimes its not a case of winning a costume contest, or impressing your friends with your witty take on current events or pop culture. Sometimes, masquerade is a thin line between life and death. The CIAs former Chief of Disguise, Jonna Mendez, rose up through the ranks, having signed on as receptionist shortly after her fiancé revealedthree days before the weddingthat he was actually an undercover agent. ( = window...
Tags: Google, Politics, College, Life, Wikipedia, Theatre, Ben Franklin, New York Times, Moscow, Cia, Argo, George Hw Bush, KGB, Facebook Twitter, Mendez, Ayun Halliday


Behold Kurt Vonnegut’s Drawings: Writing is Hard. Art is Pure Pleasure.

I see hints of blueprints, tile work, leaded-glass windows, William Blake, Paul Klee, Saul Steinberg, Al Hirschfeld, Edward Gorey, my mother’s wasp waist, cats and dogs. I see my father, at age four, forty, and eighty-four, doodling his heart out. —Nanette Vonnegut Cartoonist, educator, and neurology buff Lynda Barry believes that doodling is good for the creative brain. In support of that theory, we submit author Kurt Vonnegut, a very convincing case. His daughter, Nanette, notes that h...
Tags: Google, Art, College, Creativity, Literature, Kurt Vonnegut, Facebook Twitter, Greenwich Village, Kilgore, Lynda Barry, Vonnegut, Nanette, Ayun Halliday, Nanette Vonnegut, Seymour Cassel


The Library of Congress Launches the National Screening Room, Putting Online Hundreds of Historic Films

Public domain fans, pull your noses out of those musty old books on Project Gutenberg, but keep your eyes glued to the screen! The Library of Congress just cut the ribbon on the National Screening Room, an online trove of cinematic goodies, free for the streaming. Given that the collection spans more than 100 years of cinema history, from 1890-1999, not all of the featured films are in the public domain, but most are, and those are free to download as well as watch. Archivist Mike Mashon, who h...
Tags: Google, Instagram, Congress, Film, College, America, History, Library Of Congress, Thomas Edison, Coney Island, Facebook Twitter, Gershwin, Sita, Liza Minnelli, Griffith, Gutenberg


Was Jackson Pollock Overrated? Behind Every Artist There’s an Art Critic, and Behind Pollock There Was Clement Greenberg

Abstract expressionist Jackson Pollock is one of the few painters whose work is easily identified by people who don’t care much for modern art. More often than not, they’ll cite him as a prime reason they don’t want to spend a sunny Saturday at MoMA with you. They’re entitled to their opinions, just as author Phil Edwards, host of the Vox series Overrated and a Pollock fan, is entitled to his. In the most recent episode of Overrated, above, Edwards examines the driving force behind Pollo...
Tags: Google, Art, College, United States, Magazines, Melvyn Bragg, Jackson, Vox, Jackson Pollock, Moma, Facebook Twitter, Edwards, Lee Krasner, Greenberg, Ed Harris, Phil Edwards


The Joy of Experiencing Queen’s Bohemian Rhapsody for the Very First Time: Watch Three Reaction Videos

Remember when you first encountered Queen’s "Bohemian Rhapsody"? I suspect many of us don’t. It’s not the Kennedy assassination. Nor does it take long for Freddy Mercury’s soaring vocals and monumental lyrics to leach into the blood stream, creating the impression that we were born knowing every note, every word, every staggering transition… (Note to those unfamiliar with this impossible to categorize 1975 masterpiece: Go give it a listen RIGHT NOW, while the rest of us wait for you here...
Tags: Google, Music, Comedy, College, Life, Pennsylvania, Web/Tech, Queen, Kate Bush, Kennedy, Joey, Facebook Twitter, Freddy Mercury, Ayun Halliday, Wembley Tuscaloosa, Joey Da Prince


The Hieronymus Bosch Demon Bird Was Spotted Riding the New York City Subway the Other Day…

To me, the great promise of homeschooling is that one day your child might, on their own initiative, ride the New York City subways dressed in a homemade, needlefelted costume modeled on the ice-skating bird messenger from Hieronymus Bosch’s The Temptation of St. Anthony. Rae Stimson, aka Rae Swon, a Brooklyn-based artist who did just that a little over a week ago, describes her upbringing thusly: Growing up I was home schooled in the countryside by my mom who is a sculptor and my dad who is ...
Tags: Google, Art, Comedy, Etsy, College, Life, New York City, Creativity, Brooklyn, Smithsonian, Rockefeller Center, Anthony, Joyce Carol Oates, Bosch, Priscilla Frank, Facebook Twitter


The Hieronymus Bosch Demon Bird Caught Was Spotted Riding the New York City Subway the Other Day…

To me, the great promise of homeschooling is that one day your child might, on their own initiative, ride the New York City subways dressed in a homemade, needlefelted costume modeled on the ice-skating bird messenger from Hieronymus Bosch’s The Temptation of St. Anthony. Rae Stimson, aka Rae Swon, a Brooklyn-based artist who did just that a little over a week ago, describes her upbringing thusly: Growing up I was home schooled in the countryside by my mom who is a sculptor and my dad who is ...
Tags: Google, Art, Comedy, Etsy, College, Life, New York City, Creativity, Brooklyn, Smithsonian, Rockefeller Center, Anthony, Joyce Carol Oates, Bosch, Priscilla Frank, Facebook Twitter


Dolly Parton’s “Jolene” Slowed Down to 33RPM Sounds Great and Takes on New, Unexpected Meanings

The Walrus is… Dolly Parton? Not every record yields gold when played backwards or spun more slowly than recommended, but a 45 of Parton’s 1973 hit “Jolene” played at 33RPM not only sounds wonderful, it also manages to reframe the narrative. As Andrea DenHoed notes in The New Yorker, “Slow Ass Jolene,” above, transforms Parton’s “baby-high soprano” into something deep, soulful and seemingly, male. In its original version, the much-covered “Jolene” is a straight up woman-to-woman ches...
Tags: Google, Gender, Music, Technology, NYC, College, Life, Radiohead, Dolly Parton, David Bowie, Npr, Roy Orbison, Facebook Twitter, Parton, Jolene, Ayun Halliday


A Classic Video of Pablo Picasso Marking Art, Set to the Song, “Pablo Picasso,” by Jonathan Richman & The Modern Lovers

Before the Sex Pistols and the Ramones, there were the Modern Lovers, the Boston proto-punk band helmed by lead singer Jonathan Richman. Their sound owed a lot to the Velvet Underground, a band the teenaged Richman idolized, following them to New York City and ingratiating himself to such a degree that their manager allowed him to couch surf for a few weeks. Their sole album, released two years after they broke up, was cobbled together from two different demo sessions, one of them produc...
Tags: Google, Art, Music, New York, NYC, College, Boston, Massachusetts, New York City, Pablo Picasso, Rolling Stone, Monet, Edward Hopper, Picasso, Ramones, Facebook Twitter


The New York Public Library Puts Classic Stories on Instagram: Start with Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and Read Kafka’s The Metamorphosis Soon

I'd be happy if I could think that the role of the library was sustained and even enhanced in the age of the computer. —Bill Gates The New York Public Library excels at keeping a foot in both worlds, particularly when it comes to engaging younger readers. Visitors from all over the world make the pilgrimage to see the real live Winnie-the-Pooh and friends in the main branch’s hopping children’s center. And now anyone with a smartphone and an Instagram account can “check out” their digita...
Tags: Google, Books, Technology, Cook, Instagram, NYC, College, K-12, Libraries, Literature, Lewis Carroll, New York Public Library, Kafka, Alice, Winnie, Carroll


Watch 13 Comedians Take “The Bob Ross Challenge” & Help Raise Money for The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society

The late Bob Ross, the almost laughably calm host of PBS’ popular how-to series, the Joy of Painting, was a boss of many things—business, branding, the 16th-century wet-on-wet ”Alla Prima” technique... Also speed, as thirteen New York City comedians recently discovered firsthand. Invited to participate in The Bob Ross Challenge, a web series-cum-fundraiser hatched by comedians Micah Sherman and Mark Stetson, they gamely plunged ahead, regardless of artistic talent or familiarity with the...
Tags: Google, Art, Comedy, Television, College, New York City, Mexico City, Bob, Pbs, Sherman, Ross, Facebook Twitter, Aparna Nancherla, Bob Ross, Leukemia Lymphoma Society, Lymphoma Society


Hear Singers from the Metropolitan Opera Record Their Voices on Traditional Wax Cylinders

Vinyl is back in a big way. Music lovers who booted their record collections during the compact disc’s approximately 15 year reign are scrambling to replace their old favorites, even in the age of streaming. They can’t get enough of that warm analog sound. Can a wax cylinder revival be far behind? A recent wax cylinder experiment by Metropolitan Opera soprano Susanna Phillips and tenor Piotr Beczala, above, suggests no. This early 20th-century technology is no more due for a comeback tha...
Tags: Google, Music, Technology, College, History, The New York Times, Enrico Caruso, Opera, Verdi, Mozart, Thomas Edison, Ucsb, Phillips, Facebook Twitter, Tchaikovsky, Metropolitan Opera


Hear Freddie Mercury & Queen’s Isolated Vocals on Their Enduring Classic Song, “We Are The Champions”

In the age of Auto-Tune, it’s a pleasure to have proof that certain greats had no need of pitch correction. Queen front man Freddie Mercury’s legendarily angelic, five octave-range pipes deliver extra chills on the isolated vocal track for "We Are the Champions." Playback.fm, a free online radio app, stripped the beloved Queen hit of everything but the vocal wave form, then synched it to footage from four concert films and a rare recording session, above. You’ll also hear backing voc...
Tags: Psychology, Google, Music, Technology, College, Freddie Mercury, Zanzibar, Brian May, Facebook Twitter, Roger Taylor, Ayun Halliday, John Deacon, Deacy, Daniel Müllensiefen


Meet Ellen Rubin (aka The Popuplady) and Her Collection of 9,000 Pop-Up Books

It’s unusual to encounter a pop-up book for sale in a thrift store. Their enthusiastic child owners tend to work them so hard, that eventually even sentimental value is trashed. Stuck slider bars and torn flaps scotch the element of surprise. Scenes that once sprang to crisp attention can barely manage a flaccid 45° angle. One good yank and Cinderella’s coach gives way forever, leaving an unsightly crust of dried glue. Their natural tendency toward obsolescence only serves to make au...
Tags: Google, Art, Books, Design, College, Edgar Allan Poe, History, Yale, Smithsonian, Cinderella, Atlas Obscura, Facebook Twitter, Rubin, Ayun Halliday, Ellen Rubin, Literary Arts


A New Series About A Young Crime-Fighting Sigmund Freud Is Coming to Netflix

A recently announced, as-yet-uncast Netflix series centering on the exploits of young, crimefighting Sigmund Freud, tracking a serial killer in 19th-century Vienna, has been causing great excitement. Though as Chelsea Steiner points out in the Mary Sue, Freud’s equation of clitoral orgasms with sexual immaturity and mental illness could put a damper on any sex scene in which a female character takes an active role. Perhaps the youthful Father of Psychology won’t be hooking up with his femal...
Tags: Psychology, Google, Television, College, Netflix, Vienna, Sigmund Freud, Freud, Facebook Twitter, Ayun Halliday, Havelock Ellis, Marvin Kren, Chelsea Steiner, Mary Sue Freud, Plato Michelangelo Leonardo da Vinci


How to Paint Like Kandinsky, Picasso, Warhol & More: A Video Series from the Tate

Learn How to Print like Warhol… in five minutes? That sounds like fun! My Saturday’s pretty open… Unfortunately, The Tate’s How To series is a bit of a misnomer. This is not the anyone-can-do-it approach of PBS legend Bob Ross and his Happy Little Trees… Yes, the short video demonstrations come with supply lists and step-by-step instructions, but without an existing fine arts background, you may feel more than a little bit daunted, pining for the sort of kid-friendly modifications that h...
Tags: Google, Art, College, David, Museums, Warhol, Pbs, Wassily Kandinsky, Turner, Odessa, Picasso, Facebook Twitter, Keating, Socrates, Tate, Piet Mondrian


What It Would Look Like If Wes Anderson, Quentin Tarantino & Other Directors Filmed Cooking Videos

I usually chafe when director Wes Anderson is labelled “twee,” but as an enthusiastic, sticky-fingered gobbler of bark and ash encrusted campfire s’mores, I did enjoy a rather rowdy laugh at his expense while watching the above video. Each entry in filmmaker David Ma’s #FoodFilms series starts with a hypothesis that pairs a simple, familiar dish with a director whose visual style is well established. What if Wes Anderson made S’mores?  Ma’s early marination in the realms of food styling ...
Tags: Google, Comedy, Film, College, Michael Bay, Tim Burton, Food & Drink, Wes Anderson, Alfonso Cuarón, Kubrick, Quentin Tarantino, Woody Allen, Grand Budapest Hotel, Steven Spielberg, Anderson, Guy Ritchie


French Bookstore Blends Real People’s Faces with Book Cover Art

You can lead the I-generation to a bookstore, but can you make them read? Perhaps, especially if the volume has an eye-catching cover image that bleeds off the edge. If nothing else, they can be enlisted to provide some stunning free publicity for the titles that appeal to their highly visual sense of creative play. (An author’s dream!) France's first indie bookstore, Bordeaux’s Librairie Mollat, is reeling ‘em in with Book Face, an irresistible selfie challenge that harkens back to DJ Carl Mor...
Tags: Travel, Google, Art, Books, Photography, Instagram, College, France, New York Times, Literature, Bordeaux, Facebook Twitter, Ayun Halliday, Librairie Mollat, Bookstore Blends Real People 's Faces, Carl Morris