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Revealed: UK's rapid Covid test not yet approved by regulators

Exclusive: no data on accuracy of this and other test bought by government has been published‘Wishful thinking’: dangers of UK hype during Covid-19Coronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageOne of two 90-minute rapid coronavirus tests bought by the UK government and announced on Monday has yet to be approved by regulators, while no data on the accuracy of either has been published, the Guardian has learned.The test, from Oxford Nanopore, a young biotech company spun off from Oxf...
Tags: UK, Science, Biology, UK News, Medical Research, Infectious Diseases, Microbiology, Oxford University, Oxford Nanopore, Coronavirus outbreak


Spiders lace webs in toxins to paralyze prey

A new study suggests some spiders might lace their webs with neruotoxins similar to the ones in their venom. The toxins were shown to be effective at paralyzing insects injected with them. Previous studies showed that other spiders lace their webs with chemicals that repel large insects. Everybody knows how spiders catch bugs to eat. They weave a sticky web and wait for something to land in it. These webs are remarkably tough, elastic, and have been the focus of engineers hoping to replicate the...
Tags: Biology, Animals, Chemistry, Innovation, Insects, Spiders, Mario Palma, Paralysis, Journal of Proteome Research, University of São Paulo State, Franciele Esteves


Scientists follow the nose to solve mystery of long-necked reptile

Scans suggest Tanystropheus, which lived 242m years ago, lived in water, researchers sayThe mystery of an ancient reptile with a tremendously long neck has been solved, according to researchers who say the creature lived in the water.Fossils of the creature, known as Tanystropheus, were first unearthed in Germany around 150 years ago and further specimens have turned up over the decades, largely at Monte San Giorgio on the Swiss-Italian border. Continue reading...
Tags: Science, Biology, Germany, Fossils, Palaeontology, Monte San Giorgio


Weird science shows unseemly way beetles escape after being eaten

A Japanese scientist shows that some beetles can wiggle out of frog's butts after being eaten.The research suggests the beetle can get out in as little as 7 minutes.Most of the beetles swallowed in the experiment survived with no complications after being excreted. In what is perhaps one of the weirdest experiments ever that comes from the category of "why did anyone need to know this?", scientists have proven that the Regimbartia attenuata beetle can climb out of a frog's butt after being e...
Tags: Japan, Biology, Research, Innovation, Insects, Experiment, Kobe University, Weird Science, Sugiura, Shinji Sugiura


Scientists revive 100-million-year-old microbes buried in the ocean floor

Researchers successfully revived ancient microbes, some more than 100 million years old, that were buried in the seafloor. During an expedition to the South Pacific Gyre, the scientists from the Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC) and their colleagues drilled into the ocean sediment almost 6,000 meters below the surface. “Our main question was whether life could exist in such a nutrient-limited environment or if this was a lifeless zone,” JAMSTEC senior scientist Y...
Tags: Post, Japan, Science, News, Biology, Bacteria, Oceans, Microbiology, Microbes, Oceanography, Yuki Morono, Morono, URI Graduate School of Oceanography, Steven -RSB- D'Hondt


In a First, Paleontologists Identify Cancer in a Dinosaur Fossil

A re-analysis of a shin bone belonging to a horned dinosaur from the Cretaceous period has revealed signs of a malignant tumor, in what’s considered a first for dinosaur paleontology.Read more...
Tags: Science, Biology, Cancer, Dinosaurs, Fossils, Paleontology, Tumors, Dinosaur Fossils


Paleontologists Identify Cancer in a Dinosaur Fossil for the First Time

A re-analysis of a shin bone belonging to a horned dinosaur from the Cretaceous period has revealed signs of a malignant tumor, in what’s considered a first for dinosaur paleontology.Read more...
Tags: Science, Biology, Cancer, Dinosaurs, Fossils, Paleontology, Tumors, Dinosaur Fossils


How Do People Actually 'Die From Old Age'?

Thousands are currently engaged in solving the problem of death. Maybe they’ll succeed, and out of sheer boredom I’ll reread this sentence when I’m 900 years old, reflecting fondly on the first wasted century of my life. In the meantime, billions are going to die—some from disease, some in freak accidents, and a…Read more...
Tags: Death, Science, Biology, Medicine, Old Age, Disease, Dying In Your Sleep, Dying Of Old Age


Cramped workplaces, parties … the factors fuelling local Covid-19 spikes

What have resurgences around the world taught us about how local clusters emerge?Coronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageIt is not always possible to pinpoint the origin of a local spike in cases, particularly in countries like the UK, where the disease is still circulating at relatively significant levels.But in countries where overall caseloads are lower, and with rigorous test-and-trace schemes, it has been possible to pinpoint the factors that have sparked or fuelled loca...
Tags: South Korea, Hong Kong, UK, Science, Biology, Singapore, World news, Medical Research, Asia Pacific, Infectious Diseases, Microbiology, Coronavirus outbreak


How Sperm 'Swim' May Be Nothing But an Optical Illusion

An international group of scientists say their latest research will upturn one of the earliest scientific discoveries ever made about human sperm. In a new paper out Friday, they seem to show that sperm cells don’t propel themselves by simply flicking their tails back and forth, as is commonly believed. Rather, sperm…Read more...
Tags: Science, Biology, Sex, Sperm, Semen


Size matters: Bigger brains equal more complex hand movements in primates

A recent study examined the relationship between brain size and the development of motor skills across 36 primate species.The researchers observed more than 120 captive primates in 13 zoos for over seven years.The results suggest that primates follow rigid patterns in terms of which manipulative skills they learn first, and that the ultimate complexity of these skills depends on brain size. Some animals waste no time developing. A baby giraffe, for example, can stand and even run from predators...
Tags: Learning, Biology, Animals, Brain, Innovation, Evolution, Mind, Apes, University of Zurich, Department of Anthropology, Sandra Heldstab, Heldstab


How should we study sex differences in a polarized age?

A new study found brain volume differences between men and women.The research focuses on regional grey matter volume, a contentious measurement in neuroscience. Without environmental conditions being considered, how trustworthy is our emphasis on biology? In his book, "Chemically Imbalanced," University of Virginia research professor, Joseph E. Davis, questions the 20th century paradigm shift that created the belief that the brain is the last scientific frontier in understanding ourselves and t...
Tags: Gender, UK, London, Biology, America, Neuroscience, Sociology, Innovation, Davis, Gender Pay Gap, MMA, Grey, Derek, National Academy of Sciences, Twitter Facebook, National Institute of Mental Health


Mammoth Biosciences’s CRISPR-based COVID-19 test receives NIH funding through RADx program

CRISPR tech startup Mammoth Biosciences is among the companies that revealed backing from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Rapid Acceleration of Diagnostics (RADx) program on Friday. Mammoth received a contract to scale up its CRISPR-based SARS-CoV-2 diagnostic test in order to help address the testing shortages across the U.S. Mammoth’s CRISPR-based approach could potentially offer a significant solution to current testing bottlenecks, because it’s a very different kind of test when c...
Tags: Health, Startups, TC, Science, Biology, Funding, Tech, United States, Fda, Biotech, Nih, Genetic Engineering, Crispr, Biotechnology, UCSF, GSK


Mammoth Biosciences’s CRISPR-based COVID-19 test receives NIH fundings through RADx program

CRISPR tech startup Mammoth Biosciences is among the companies that revealed backing from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Rapid Accleration of Diagnostics (RADx) program on Friday. Mammoth received a contract to scale up its CRISPR-based SARS-CoV-2 diagnostic test in order to help address the testing shortages across the U.S. Mammoth’s CRISPR-based approach could potentially offer a significant solution to current testing bottlenecks, because it’s a very different kind of test when co...
Tags: Health, TC, Science, Biology, Articles, Tech, United States, Fda, Biotech, Nih, Genetic Engineering, Crispr, Biotechnology, Startup Company, UCSF, GSK


Scientists have revived 100-million-year-old marine microbes

Seemingly dead microbes from 100 million years ago spring back to life.The microbes were buried deep beneath the Pacific's "Point Nemo."There's crushing pressure beneath the seabed, but these microbes apparently survived anyway. There is a place in the South Pacific that's as far as you can get from land. This "oceanic pole of inaccessibility" lies beneath the South Pacific Gyre that covers 10 percent of Earth's ocean surface. It's so remote that spacecraft are regularly guided down into its w...
Tags: Energy, Japan, Biology, Nasa, Earth, Discovery, Oceans, Innovation, Evolution, South Pacific, Pacific, Pacific Ocean, Marine Biology, Microbes, University of Rhode Island, South Pacific Gyre


Baldness and rashes? Experts split over unusual Covid-19 risk factors and symptoms

Academics analyse whether hair and hearing loss may also be linked to coronavirusCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageFrom hearing loss and rashes, to being tall and bald, as the Covid-19 pandemic develops, a host of new symptoms and risk factors are being linked to the virus. We take a look at the evidence. Continue reading...
Tags: Health, Fashion, Science, Biology, Life and style, Society, UK News, World news, Disability, Medical Research, Infectious Diseases, Beauty, Microbiology, Deafness And Hearing Impairment, Hair Loss, Coronavirus outbreak


Does porn cause erectile dysfunction...or not?

According to UW Health, around 5 percent of men that are 40 years old have complete erectile dysfunction. That number increases to about 15 percent by age 70.While there are many things that can cause or contribute to ED (such as high blood pressure, smoking, the use of drugs or alcohol, depression, and anxiety), there has been wide debate over the impacts of pornography use. Several studies outlined in this article look at the supposed link between ED and pornography use.Erectile dysfunction (c...
Tags: Psychology, Health, Biology, Sex, Relationships, Love, Mental Health, Disability, Innovation, San Diego, Men, Ed, Debate, Ansa, Naval Medical Center, UW Health


Discovery of metal-breathing bacteria can change electronics

Scientists discover Shewanella oneidensis bacterium can "breathe in" certain metals and compounds.The bacteria produces a material that can be used to transfer electrons.Applications of the finding range from medical devices to new generation of sensors. Researchers discovered an unusual property of a bacteria that can "breathe" in some metal and sulfur compounds and create materials that can improve electronics, energy storage, and medical devices.Specifically, the anaerobic Shewanella oneiden...
Tags: Technology, Biology, Research, Chemistry, Medical Research, Engineering, Innovation, Sawyer, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Rees, Shayla Sawyer, James Rees, Yuri Gorby


Scientists successfully revive 100m-year-old microbes from the sea

Microbes had lain dormant at the bottom of the sea since the age of the dinosaurs Scientists have successfully revived microbes that had lain dormant at the bottom of the sea since the age of the dinosaurs, allowing the organisms to eat and even multiply after eons in the deep.Their research sheds light on the remarkable survival power of some of Earth’s most primitive species, which can exist for tens of millions of years with barely any oxygen or food before springing back to life in the lab. ...
Tags: Science, Biology, Environment, Evolution, Fossils


Ancient Microbes Spring to Life After 100 Million Years Under the Seafloor

Scientists have revived microbes found deep beneath the seafloor in 100-million-year-old sediment, dramatically expanding our view of where life exists on Earth and for how long.Read more...
Tags: Science, Biology, Earth, Microbiology, Microbes, Extremophiles, Seafloor Sediments


Soap dodger: meet the doctor who says we have been showering wrong

Hand-washing aside, James Hamblin has not used soap for five years. He warns that our obsession with being clean is harming the microbiome that keeps us healthyWhen James Hamblin tells people he has not used soap in the shower for five years, they tend not to hold back in expressing their disgust. “It’s one of the few remaining things for which we feel fine telling someone that they’re gross,” he says. “It’s amazing to me, honestly.”Yet despite people’s “clearly moralising judgments”, Hamblin is...
Tags: Health, Science, Biology, US, Life and style, Society, Atlantic, Health & wellbeing, Microbiology, Yale School of Public Health, Hamblin, James Hamblin, Doogie Howser


Almost 3 billion animals affected by Australian bushfires, report shows

Exclusive: megafires ‘one of the worst wildlife disasters in modern history’, say scientistsNearly 3 billion animals were killed or displaced by Australia’s devastating bushfire season of 2019 and 2020, according to scientists who have revealed for the first time the scale of the impact on the country’s native wildlife.The Guardian has learned that an estimated 143 million mammals, 180 million birds, 51 million frogs and a staggering 2.5 billion reptiles were affected by the fires that burned ac...
Tags: Science, Biology, Climate Change, Australia, Environment, World news, Australia news, Wildlife, Conservation, Biodiversity, Bushfires


Hear the Sound Of Endangered Birds Get Turned Into Electronic Music

Bird-watching is having a moment, thanks to the pandemic. As non-essential workers adjusted to spending more time at home, their ears adjusted to the increasingly non-foreign sound of birdsong outside their windows. Those sweet tweets are no doubt largely responsible for the record breaking turnout at this year’s Global Big Day, the Cornell Lab of Ornithology's annual birding event, held earlier this spring. 50,000 participants logged 2.1 million individual observations, and 6,479 sp...
Tags: Travel, Google, Music, Biology, College, Mexico, America, Nature, Current Affairs, South America, Jordan, Guatemala, Gizmodo, Costa Rica, Caribbean, Cornell


Almost 3 billion animals affected by Australian megafires, report shows

Exclusive: Bushfires ‘one of the worst wildlife disasters in modern history’, say scientists Nearly 3 billion animals were killed or displaced by Australia’s devastating bushfire season of 2019 and 2020, according to scientists who have revealed for the first time the scale of the impact on the country’s native wildlife.The Guardian has learned that an estimated 143 million mammals, 180 million birds, 51 million frogs and a staggering 2.5 billion reptiles were affected by the fires that burned a...
Tags: Science, Biology, Climate Change, Australia, Environment, World news, Australia news, Wildlife, Conservation, Biodiversity, Bushfires


Know sweat: scientists solve mystery behind body odour

University of York researchers trace the source of underarm aromas to a particular enzymeScientists have unravelled the mysterious mechanism behind the armpit’s ability to produce the pungent smell of body odour.Researchers at the University of York traced the source of underarm odour to a particular enzyme in a certain microbe that lives in the human armpit. Continue reading...
Tags: Health, Science, Biology, Society, UK News, Microbiology, York, University of York


Polar bears could be extinct by 2100, says heartbreaking new study

A new report on climate change by the University of Toronto is projecting that most of the polar bear population could reach extinction in under 100 years due to starvation.Polar bears are dependent on sea ice for hunting seals, a primary component of their diet. As temperatures rise and sea ice continues to shrink it has become increasingly challenging for the carnivores to hunt for food. The Arctic is likely to have warmed more than double the amount of the global average this year compared to...
Tags: Biology, Climate Change, Russia, Environment, Nature, Canada, Oceans, Innovation, Arctic, Endangered Species, Holland, Ecology, Polar Bears, International Union For Conservation Of Nature, Extinction, University of Toronto


'Major' breakthrough in Covid-19 drug makes UK professors millionaires

Synairgen’s share price rises 540% on morning of news of successful drugs trialCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageThree professors at the University of Southampton school of medicine have this week made a “major breakthrough” in the treatment of coronavirus patients and become paper millionaires at the same time.Almost two decades ago professors Ratko Djukanovic, Stephen Holgate and Donna Davis discovered that people with asthma and chronic lung disease lacked a protein ...
Tags: Business, UK, Science, Education, Biology, UK News, World news, Stock Markets, Medical Research, Infectious Diseases, Higher Education, Microbiology, University Of Southampton, Donna Davis, Coronavirus outbreak, Synairgen


Study finds the real reason you get goosebumps

A new study suggests that goosebumps are part of a larger system that not only keeps us warm, but also helps hair to heal. The sympathetic nerve system reacts to cold air with goose skin. If it stays on long enough, it orders new hair growth. The authors note that other, currently unknown, connections between this system and other parts of the body are likely to exist. Everybody gets goosebumps, but have you ever wondered why? Until now, the leading hypothesis was that by elevating hair-follicle...
Tags: Biology, Medicine, Chemistry, Medical Research, Innovation, Evolution, Biomechanics, Human body, Yulia Shwartz


Acquired taste: mosquitoes may evolve to favour humans over animals

Study of mosquitoes’ biting preferences reveals that urbanisation is shaping behaviour More species of mosquito may evolve to bite humans instead of other animals and spread disease because of urbanisation, according to a scientific study.While the vast majority of the 3,500 species of mosquito do not bite humans, scientists studied Aedes aegypti, an invasive species which has evolved a taste for humans, and become the primary spreader of infectious diseases including dengue and yellow fever. Co...
Tags: Science, Biology, Environment, Animal behaviour, Insects


Autopsies of COVID-19 patients reveal surprising effects of heart damage

LSU Health New Orleans pathologists conducted autopsies on 22 patients that died of the novel coronavirus.The team discovered that damage is not typical inflammation of the heart, as is common with myocarditis.These research findings could have implications in treating COVID-19. Science is not an infallible truth waiting to be discovered, but the process of acquiring knowledge through experimentation, observation, and confirmation. The fact that science—in the case of the novel coronavirus pan...
Tags: Health, Biology, LSU, Public Health, Innovation, Heart, Derek, LSU Health New Orleans, Twitter Facebook, Human body, LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, COVID-19, COVID, Research Letter, Richard Vander Heide, Pathology Research