Posts filtered by tags: BPS Research Digest[x]


 

Researchers have identified an area of the dog brain dedicated to processing human faces

If you want to know about the special relationship between human and canine you need only watch a dog owner slavishly feed, cuddle and clean up after her furry companion, day after day after day. But is this unique cross-species relationship also reflected at a deeper level, in the workings of the canine brain? A recent study in Learning and Behavior suggests so, finding that highly trained dogs have a dedicated neural area for processing human faces, separate from the area involved in processin...
Tags: Psychology, Dogs, Animals, Intelligence, Brain, Nature, Innovation, Evolution, Emotions, BPS Research Digest, Auburn University, Andie Thompkins


Some perfectly healthy people can’t remember their own lives

Psychologists in Canada think they've identified an entirely new memory syndrome in healthy people characterised by a specific inability to re-live their past. This may sound like a form of amnesia, but the three individuals currently described have no history of brain damage or illness and have experienced no known recent psychological trauma or disturbance.In light of the recent discovery that some people have an uncanny ability to recall their lives in extreme detail, known as hyperthymesia o...
Tags: Science, Cc, Memory, Neuroscience, Brain, Canada, Innovation, Christian Jarrett, BPS Research Digest, Palombo, Cognitive Science, Pscyhology, Daniela Palombo


“My-side bias” makes it difficult for us to see the logic in arguments we disagree with

In what feels like an increasingly polarised world, trying to convince the "other side" to see things differently often feels futile. Psychology has done a great job outlining some of the reasons why, including showing that, regardless of political leanings, most people are highly motivated to protect their existing views.However a problem with some of this research is that it is very difficult to concoct opposing real-life arguments of equal validity, so as to make a fair comparison of people's...
Tags: Psychology, Science, Neuroscience, Innovation, Poland, Slovakia, Mind, Debate, BPS Research Digest, Cognitive Biases, Cognitive Science, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Journal of Cognitive Psychology, Vladimíra Čavojová


The public “deserve to know” that there is an overlooked subset of people who thrive after major depression

Depression is a chronic, recurrent, lifelong condition. Well, that's the current orthodox view – but it is overstated, argues a team of psychologists led by Jonathan Rottenberg at the University of South Florida. "A significant subset of people recover and thrive after depression, yet research on such individuals has been rare," they write in their recent paper in Perspectives on Psychological Science. They propose a definition for "high functioning after depression" (HFAD); argue that the advic...
Tags: Psychology, Happiness, Mental Health, Depression, Innovation, Emotions, Health Care, BPS Research Digest, University of South Florida, Jonathan Rottenberg, Emma Young, Rottenberg, HFAD


What are we like? 10 psychology findings that reveal the worst of human nature

It's a question that's reverberated through the ages – are we humans, though imperfect, essentially kind, sensible, good-natured creatures? Or deep down are we wired to be bad, blinkered, idle, vain, vengeful and selfish? There are no easy answers and there's clearly a lot of variation between individuals, but this feature post aims to shine some evidence-based light on the matter. Here in the first part of a two-part feature – and deliberately side-stepping the obviously relevant but controvers...
Tags: Psychology, New York, Sex, Stanford, Future, Evil, Cnn, Innovation, Philosophy, Emotions, Morality, Donald Trump, Humanity, Cornell, Trump, Don


A cartography of consciousness – researchers map where subjective feelings are located in the body

"How do you feel?" is a simple and commonly asked question that belies the complex nature of our conscious experiences. The feelings and emotions we experience daily consist of bodily sensations, often accompanied by some kind of thought process, yet we still know very little about exactly how these different aspects relate to one another, or about how such experiences are organised in the brain. Now, reporting their results in PNAS, a team of researchers in Finland, led by neuroscientist Lauri ...
Tags: Psychology, Love, Happiness, Body, Innovation, Fear, Finland, Emotions, Physiology, BPS Research Digest, PNAS, American Psychological Association, Lauri Nummenmaa, University of Turku, Mo Costandi, BPS Research Digest Mo


Do You Need a Happiness Makeover?

How often have you said to yourself that you just want to be happy? Or how often have you said to someone else that you just want them to be happy? What is happiness to you and can you identify what matters most? What Is Happiness? Happiness is that feeling of satisfaction and fulfillment. It’s that feeling of contentment – that life is just as it should be. Enlightenment and perfect happiness come when you have all of your needs satisfied. Perfect happiness and enlightenment can be very hard ...
Tags: Happiness, BPS Research Digest, GTD, Positive Life, Tom G Stevens


Booze aids foreign language skills, plus our 9 other most popular posts of 2017

In 2017, the BPS Research Digest welcomed 2,228,968 visitors, who together helped us reach over 3 million page views. Our…
Tags: Psychology, Announcements, BPS Research Digest


Apparently Being Your "True" Self Is Not The Key To A Successful Relationship

There’s a fine line between being your true self and being your best self. Often in relationships we strive for the former when considering our partners, while the later becomes more of a personal goal. Though according to a recent study from the Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, and as noted in BPS Research Digest, when it comes to relationships it’s all about being your best self.After asking members of the public what they felt was more important, researchers discovered that 70% f...
Tags: Fashion, Music, BPS Research Digest, Michelangelo, Jarrett


Huh? Study finds taboo billboards improve driving performance

By guest blogger Richard StephensThe 1994 Wonderbra© billboard campaign with its distinctive “Hello Boys!” catchphrase regularly gets a mention as one of most iconic advert series of all time. Its portrayal of super model Eva Herzigova clad only in black lacey pants and gravity-defying bra is said to have sent drivers veering off the roads. However a new study published in the esteemed journal Acta Psycologica suggests that attention grabbing billboard ads may actually have the opposite effect o...
Tags: Psychology, Richard, Research Digest, CHAN, BPS Research Digest, Keele University, Richard Stephens


135 Couples Told Scientists How Depression Affects Their Relationships

(Photo: Neil Bradfield) By Melissa Dahl Depression can feel isolating, like it's you -- and only you -- against your own mind. And yet, the mental illness affects the people closest to you too; this is perhaps especially true if you're in a long-term romantic relationship. In a new study, highlighted today by BPS Research Digest, a team of psychologists consider the impact the mental illness can have on a relationship, by doing something novel: asking couples about it. Related: Kristen Bell Wri...
Tags: News, Kristen Bell, Huffington Post, University Of Illinois, Science Of Us, Urbana Champaign, BPS Research Digest, Melissa Dahl


Why do so many people dislike the word "moist"?

By guest blogger Richard StephensA few years ago the New Yorker ran a social media campaign asking what word should be deleted from the English language. Nominations ranged from the political (Obama) to the superfluous (actually) and from the expression of hyperbole (awesome) to an outdated word for trousers (slacks). Intriguingly, the most popular suggestion – the so-called “runaway un-favourite” – might surprise a few people and especially those who enjoy baking. Psychologist Paul H. Thibodea...
Tags: Psychology, London, Obama, US, Richard, New Yorker, Research Digest, BPS Research Digest, Thibodeau, Keele University, Oberlin College, Richard Stephens


Link feast

Our editor's pick of this week's 10 best psychology and neuroscience linksAnyone Can Give a Memorable TED TalkRules from the head of the famed conferences: focus, connect, practice—and have something to say.The Two Word Games That Trick Almost EveryonePlaying two classic schoolyard games can help us understand everything from sexism to the power of advertising, writes Tom Stafford at his Neurohacks column for BBC Future.Get Angry!After listening to a podcast on the psychology of climate change ...
Tags: Psychology, Bbc, Research Digest, Christian Jarrett, BPS Research Digest, PNAS, BBC Radio, Tom Stafford, Susan Pinker, Neurocritic, Alok Jha, Andrew Gelman, Sasha Mirzoyan, National Museum of Psychology KickstartHistorySome, Chris Frith


Smartphone study reveals the world's sleeping habits

Middle aged men get the least sleep, the research found Researchers in the USA have used a smartphone app to see how people's sleep habits vary around the world. More specifically they've investigated how much the timing of sunrise and sunset affect people's sleep times or if social and cultural factors are more important. "Quantifying these social effects is the next frontier in sleep research," they write in the paper in Science Advances.The study involved the ENTRAIN smartphone app whi...
Tags: Psychology, Usa, UK, Singapore, University Of Michigan, Research Digest, Christian Jarrett, BPS Research Digest, Olivia Walch, Daniel Forger


Literally "knowing by heart": Signals from heart to brain prompt feelings of familiarity

The idea that the body affects the mind is not new. The eminent American psychologist William James famously proposed that it is actually the physical sensation of fear that causes us to feel afraid. In more recent years, researchers have extended this principle, exploring the possibility that physical sensations play an important role in moral decisions and other processes usually seen as more purely cognitive or cerebral, such as memory.It's already known that physical markers of arousal such...
Tags: Psychology, Memory, Brain, Research Digest, William James, Christian Jarrett, BPS Research Digest, Western University, Kohler, Biological, Chris Fiacconi, Fiacconi, Peter E Owais


Signals from the heart to brain prompt feelings of familiarity

The idea that the body affects the mind is not new. The eminent American psychologist William James famously proposed that it is actually the physical sensation of fear that causes us to feel afraid. In more recent years, researchers have extended this principle, exploring the possibility that physical sensations play an important role in moral decisions and other processes usually seen as more purely cognitive or cerebral, such as memory.It's already known that physical markers of arousal such...
Tags: Psychology, Memory, Brain, Research Digest, William James, Christian Jarrett, BPS Research Digest, Western University, Kohler, Biological, Chris Fiacconi, Fiacconi, Peter E Owais


A preliminary psychology of binge TV watching

A new study in the Journal of Health Psychology is the first to provide a scholarly definition of binge TV watching and to investigate some of the factors that explain how much people indulge in it.According to Emily Walton-Pattison at Newcastle University and her colleagues, binge TV watching is when you "watch more than two episodes of the same TV show in one sitting" – a habit that's become more frequent since the popularity of DVD box sets and streaming TV services.I have fond memories of m...
Tags: Psychology, Bbc, Netflix, Lake District, Newcastle University, Research Digest, Christian Jarrett, BPS Research Digest, Journal of Health Psychology, Emily Walton Pattison


Genetic research can promote peace or conflict, depending on how it's used

It's becoming easier than ever to research the genetic roots of different ethnic groups and these findings can be framed differently to either emphasise that groups are similar or different. For example, a BBC headline from 2000 stated "Jews and Arabs are 'genetic brothers'" while a 2013 Medical Daily headline claimed "Genes of most Ashkenazi Jews trace back to indigenous Europe, not Middle East". As political leaders have started citing this kind of evidence to promote their particular agenda, ...
Tags: Psychology, Europe, Israel, US, Bbc, Middle East, North, Mohammed, Research Digest, Christian Jarrett, BPS Research Digest, Social Psychology Bulletin, Sasha Kimel, South Israel, e g International Crisis Group Genocide Watch, Kimel


Following the latest psychology research just got really easy

Introducing the Research Digest App for iOS and AndroidTo day we've launched the free Research Digest app for Apple and Android smartphones and tablets, bringing you a new and convenient way to keep up-to-date with all our latest research reports.The in-app help screens will show you how to customise your home screen according to your preferred subject categories. You can also share our reports quickly and easily from within the app, as well as creating a scrapbook of your favourite items.Search...
Tags: Psychology, Apple, Amazon, Research Digest, Christian Jarrett, BPS Research Digest, Apple Google, Twitter and Facebook, Research Digest App


A laughing crowd changes the way your brain processes insults

We usually think of laughter as a sound of joy and mirth, but in certain contexts, such as when it accompanies an insult, it takes on a negative meaning, signaling contempt and derision, especially in a group situation. Most of us probably know from experience that this makes insults sting more, now a study in Social Neuroscience has shown the neural correlates of this effect. Within a fraction of a second, the presence of a laughing crowd changes the way that the brain processes an insult.Mart...
Tags: Psychology, Research Digest, Christian Jarrett, BPS Research Digest, Otten, Social Neuroscience, Marte Otten, Otten M Mann L van Berkum J Jonas


Link feast

Our editor's pick of this week's 10 best psychology and neuroscience links:Leicester's Lesson In LeadershipA leader is not "the special one", but "the one who makes us special", argue S. Alexander Haslam and Stephen D. Reicher at The Psychologist.The Imposter's Survival Guide (BBC radio show)Oliver Burkeman explores the imposter phenomenon. That inexplicable feeling of fraudulence that plagues the working lives of so many people.Why You Should Never Spank a Child - Major Research Project Confir...
Tags: Psychology, Bbc, Leicester, Research Digest, Christian Jarrett, BPS Research Digest, Minda, Oliver Burkeman, Suzanne O'Sullivan, Alexander Haslam, Stephen D Reicher, StudyRob Dimeo, Psychotherapy University of Salford, FictionDavid Robson


Looking back on your past can make you less likely to suffer depression in the future

Is spending time looking back on our lives good for our mental health? A lot of research suggests it is, but these studies have been cross-sectional, making it hard to form a clear causal story – for example, perhaps being happier makes it more likely that people will reminisce. On the other hand, there are therapeutic trials that show purposeful reminiscence can bring about clinically meaningful decreases in depression. Now, a longitudinal investigation in Applied Cognitive Psychology provides...
Tags: Psychology, Amazon, Time, Memory, US, Mental Health, Mellor, Research Digest, BPS Research Digest, Alex Fradera, Deakin University, David Mellor, David Hallford, Hallford


The psychological case for decluttering your home

As a house evolves into a home it becomes a place of refuge and ultimately an extension of the self. Each room is a witness to your life: the arguments, the passions and the change. Your photos on the walls, your stuff on the shelves, these are more than mere objects, they tell the story of places you've been and people you've known. All of this helps create what psychologists call a sense of "psychological home". But it can go too far. There's a saturation point beyond which your possessions tu...
Tags: Psychology, US, Chicago, New Mexico, Research Digest, Christian Jarrett, BPS Research Digest, Journal of Environmental Psychology


Why organisations should encourage their staff to become friends

They say you should never mix business and pleasure but in reality many of us find that we become friends with the people who we work with. No wonder, when you consider the hours spent together and the deep bonds formed through collaboration and sharing the highs and lows of the job.A new study in Personnel Psychology is among the first to examine the effects on job performance of having more "multiplex relationships" – colleagues you work with directly who are also your friends outside of work...
Tags: Psychology, United States, Research Digest, Christian Jarrett, BPS Research Digest, Methot, Jessica Methot, Methot J Lepine J Podsakoff


Are certain groups of people more likely to leave suicide notes?

It is a sad fact that we can never ask of the hundreds of thousands of people around the world who take their own lives each year – why did you do it? Instead, psychologists talk to people who attempted, but failed, to kill themselves, and they also look into the minds' of suicide victims through the notes that they leave. But in fact only a minority of suicide victims leave notes, and the validity of studying these notes depends in part of the assumption that victims who leave notes are the sam...
Tags: Psychology, Research Digest, Christian Jarrett, BPS Research Digest, Queensland Australia, Archives of Suicide Research, Belinda Carpenter, Carpenter B Bond C Tait G Wilson M White K, Queensland Archives of Suicide Research


Teaching children the ancient "mental abacus" technique boosted their maths abilities more than normal extra tuition

Seeing an expert abacus user in action is a sight to behold. Their hands are a blur as they perform arithmetic operations far quicker than anyone using an electronic calculator. The mental abacus technique is even more impressive – it works just the same as a real abacus, except that you visualise moving the beads in your mind's eye (check out this video of people using mental abacus to perform amazing feats of arithmetic).Surprisingly, there is little research on the benefits of teaching the m...
Tags: Psychology, US, Srinivasan, Research Digest, Christian Jarrett, BPS Research Digest, Barner, Vadodara India, Alvarez G Sullivan J Brooks


Becoming a parent seems to make us less aggressive

To watch parents vie for parking spaces at the school gates, you might not think it, but a new study in Aggressive Behavior claims that becoming a parent reduces both men's and women's aggressive tendencies, although the caveat with men is that they need to be living with a partner too.Lynda Boothroyd and Catharine Cross analysed all the sentences handed down for robbery or larceny by US federal courts between 1994 and 1999. They focused on these two crimes because both involve theft, but robbe...
Tags: Psychology, US, Research Digest, Christian Jarrett, BPS Research Digest, Lynda Boothroyd, Catharine Cross


Link feast

Our editor's pick of this week's 10 best psychology and neuroscience links:Are We Punching Our Weight?The Psychologist magazine's Ella Rhodes asks whether psychology is having the desired impact, through the media and policy.The Trippy State Between Wakefulness and SleepAnd how it can help solve the mystery of human consciousness.Why The Internet Isn't Making Us Smarter And How To Fight BackAdvice from psychologist David Dunning.Weeping Britannia: Portrait of a Nation in TearsThere's a new book...
Tags: Psychology, Boston, Bbc, Fbi, Research Digest, Christian Jarrett, BPS Research Digest, Ella Rhodes, David Dunning, Vincent Walsh, SocietyCliodhna O'Connor, Helene Joffe, Enzo Yaksic, Emily Underwood


We're less likely to help each other out when near a luxury store

Tripping up in the street or dropping your things in a puddle. These are never happy events, but the outcome could be worse in some places than others. According to a new study in Social Influence, strangers are less likely to come to your assistance if they've just exited a luxury store, or even if you just happen to be in an exclusive part of town with lots of pricey shops.Past research has already shown that reminders of money and materialism encourage us to be more selfish and less helpful,...
Tags: Psychology, Paris, Research Digest, Christian Jarrett, BPS Research Digest, Vendome


One woman's deradicalisation: from right-wing extremist to preacher of tolerance

An in-depth interview with a formerly violent right-wing extremist has provided psychologists with rare insights into the processes of disengagement and deradicalisation. John Horgan at Georgia State University and his colleagues interviewed "Sarah" face-to-face for several hours, and also followed up with telephone calls. Their account is published in Behavioral Sciences of Terrorism and Political Aggression. The woman had previously been a member of various Neo-Nazi right-wing groups and was ...
Tags: Psychology, Taylor, Sarah, Oklahoma City, Research Digest, Christian Jarrett, BPS Research Digest, Georgia State University, Sarah She, John Horgan, Neo Nazi, Horgan J Altier