Posts filtered by tags: Brain[x]


 

Brain-controlled chess is here

A brain-controlled interface implements a two-step process: Identify the chess piece, then place it on the board. The program was 96 percent accurate at correctly moving chess pieces.This research opens up opportunities for physically impaired people to express themselves in new ways.By November 2020, The Queen's Gambit had been watched in over 62 million households, making it the most-watched scripted limited series in Netflix history. The thoughtful, stylized show on the patient pursuit of ch...
Tags: Programming, Facebook, Neuroscience, Brain, Creativity, Innovation, Consciousness, Derek, Elizabeth Harmon, Human body, David Hubner Albrecht Schall, Michael Tangermann


Our ancestors first developed humanlike brains 1.7 million years ago

Using computed tomography, a team of researchers generated images of what the brains of early Homo species likely looked like. The team then compared these images to the brains of great apes and modern humans.The results suggest that Homo species developed humanlike brains about 1.7 million years ago and that this cognitive evolution occurred at the same time early Homo culture and technology were becoming more complex.For nearly two centuries, scientists have known that humans descended from t...
Tags: Indonesia, Animals, Southeast Asia, Africa, Georgia, Brain, Innovation, Evolution, Mind, Homo


VR experiments manipulate how people feel about coffee

Images can affect how people perceive the quality of a product.In a new study, researchers show using virtual reality that images of farms positively influence the subjects' experience of coffee.The results provide insights on the psychology and power of marketing.Are coffee consumers influenced by the imagery and story around the production of the drink? Such was one of the central questions of a new study that explored the power of marketing on how "premium" aficionados consider coffee to be. ...
Tags: Psychology, Coffee, UK, Technology, New York City, Brain, Innovation, Vr, Virtual Reality, Kenya, Addiction, Denmark, Norway, Mind, Times Square, Marseille France


Elon Musk's Neuralink scientists are not the first to get a monkey to control a computer with its mind

Elon Musk. Britta Pedersen-Pool/Getty Images Elon Musk's Neuralink showed off its technology allowing a monkey to play video games with its mind. Scientists have been able to get monkeys to control computer cursors via neural interfaces since 2002. It's an important test of Neuralink's technology, but not a revolutionary piece of science. See more stories on Insider's business page. This week, Neuralink, a company founded by Elon Musk that specialises in neural interface te...
Tags: Elon Musk, Trends, Tech, Monkey, Brain, Jackson, Pong, University Of California, Videogames, Imperial College London, Musk, Andrew Jackson, University of Newcastle, Pager, Tech Insider, Neuralink


Information Capacity: Getting Our Presentation To Sink In

Information capacity. Bandwidth. Attention span. These are all ways of asking, how much of what I present is actually going to sink in with my audience? And it’s a great question. But it’s a complicated one. Mirko Di Bernardo says in his 2009 book on neuroplasticity and memory that, “It is estimated that the brain of a mammal is composed of about a hundred billion nerve cells and connections between these cells are many times more numerous.” With all that we’ve got going on in our brains from mo...
Tags: Neuroscience, Pace, Brain, New York Times, Delivery, Logos, Speaking, Relevance, Judy Willis, Presentation Science, Edutopia, Pathos, Information Capacity, Internal Noise, Mirko Di Bernardo


Researchers Say Their 'Brain Glue' Could Someday Help People With Severe Brain Injuries

Scientists say they’re one step closer to showing that their experimental hydrogel technology—more plainly known as “brain glue”—can help people with traumatic brain injuries. In a recent study, they found that their brain glue helped prevent long-term damage and tissue loss in the injured brains of rats, while also…Read more...
Tags: Science, Brain, Traumatic Brain Injury, Brain Damage, Lohitash Karumbaiah, Clinical Medicine, Branches Of Biology, Medical Specialties, Neurotrauma, Health Medical Pharma


A genetic link between your face and brain shape

Studies have revealed a relationship between the shapes of the brain and face, but the nature of this relationship has remained poorly understood.In a recent study, researchers used 3D facial images, genetic data, and MRIs to identify genetic regions responsible for shaping both the brain and face.The results revealed a much more complex face-brain relationship than previously understood, though they don't suggest that facial structure can be used to predict intelligence or behavior.Scientists h...
Tags: UK, Brain, Genetics, Innovation, Belgium, Stanford University, Nature Genetics, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Peter Claes, Joanna Wysocka, Biobank, Human body, Stanford Medicine News Center, Laboratory for Imaging Genetics, Wysocka, Stanford Medicine News Center Many


The great free will debate

What does it mean to have—or not have—free will? Were the actions of mass murderers pre-determined billions of years ago? Do brain processes trump personal responsibility? Can experiments prove that free will is an illusion?Bill Nye, Steven Pinker, Daniel Dennett, Michio Kaku, Robert Sapolsky, and others approach the topic from their unique fields and illustrate how complex and layered the free will debate is. From Newtonian determinism, to brain chemistry, to a Dennett thought experiment, explo...
Tags: Decision Making, Science, Biology, Neuroscience, Brain, Innovation, Philosophy, Mind, Self, Free Will, Dennett


‘Zombie’ genes in the brain get to work after you die

While most brain cells do nothing or quickly degrade at death, others swing into high gear, sprouting long arms.While you're alive, the cells are involved in inflammation.Over the course of 24 hours after death, they get busier and busier. As bioethicist L. Syd M Johnson of SUNY-Upstate Medical University tells Big Think, "Death is not an event — it's a process." It's not as if there's a big on/off switch that gets flipped. It takes a while for a body's systems to wind down and eventually cease...
Tags: Death, Neuroscience, Discovery, Brain, Genetics, Medical Research, Innovation, Zombie, Loeb, UIC, SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syd M Johnson, Jeffrey Loeb, University of Illinois Chicago UIC, John S Garvin, UIC s College of Medicine


Octopuses Dream in 'GIFs,' New Experiment Suggests

Two years ago, a PBS documentary video showed an octopus named Heidi in what appeared to be an active dream state. Her arms twitched as she slumbered, and her skin flipped wildly through all sorts of alien textures. Most dramatically, however, the cephalopod changed colors, flashing in greens and reds like a…Read more...
Tags: Science, Sleep, Biology, Brain, Dream, Octopus, Heidi, Cephalopod, Dan Margoliash, Branches Of Biology, Neurophysiology, Rapid Eye Movement Sleep, Non Rapid Eye Movement Sleep, Cephalopod Intelligence, Sleep In Non Human Animals, Iscience


Some of Our Brain Cells Get More Active Hours After We Die, Study Finds

Even after we die, some of our brain cells can experience one last and large momentary burst of life, new research out Tuesday suggests. The study found evidence that certain “zombie genes” in our brain cells are active more frequently soon after death, which causes some cells to immensely expand for hours. The…Read more...
Tags: Science, Biology, Brain, Glia, Human Brain, Branches Of Biology, Health Medical Pharma, Glial Cells, Cerebral Organoid, Jeffrey Loeb, Brain Anatomy, Neurogenomics


Are geniuses real? The neuroscience and myths of visionaries

Revolutionary ideas and culture-shifting inventions are often credited to specific individuals, but how often do these "geniuses" actually operate in creative silos? Tim Sanders, former chief strategy officer at Yahoo, argues that there are three myths getting in the way of innovative ideas and productive collaborations: the myths of the expert, the eureka moment, and the "lone inventor." More than an innate quality reserved for an elite group, neuroscientist Heather Berlin and neurobiologist Jo...
Tags: Yahoo, Success, Neuroscience, Intelligence, Brain, Creativity, Innovation, Collaboration, Mind, Genius, Tim Sanders, Bach Beethoven, Heather Berlin, Joy Hirsch


Is computer code a language or math? MIT study uses brain scans for answers

Computer coding is a relatively new skill, so our brains can't have specialized areas for it from birth. The question of how we process computer code, as a language or as math, could impact how we teach the subject. A new MIT study suggests our brains treat it as its own special topic. The comparison between computers and the human brain is hard to get away from. It is often a useful analogy, but sometimes conflicts with how our brains actually work. One of the continuing questions about how o...
Tags: Python, Programming, Technology, Learning, Mit, Computers, Brain, Language, Innovation, Tufts University, Piet, Anna Ivanova, Harold Abelson


Is the Earth's "heartbeat" of 7.83 Hz influencing human behavior?

The Schumann Resonances are a set of frequencies produced by electromagnetic waves in Earth's lower ionosphere.The frequencies, created from thunderstorms and lightning, range from 7.83 Hz, called the Earth's "heartbeat," to 33.8 Hz. The Schumann Resonance has been studied for its effect on the planet as well as on humans. Flashes of lightning that strike around the earth about 50 times every second create low frequency electromagnetic waves that encompass the planet. These waves, dubbed Schuma...
Tags: Astronomy, Space, Mexico, Nasa, Earth, Brain, Physics, Canada, Innovation, Universe, Planets, South America, Hertz, Schumann, Asia Africa, Cosmos


Schumann Resonances: Is the Earth's 'heartbeat' influencing human behavior?

The Schumann Resonances are a set of frequencies produced by electromagnetic waves in Earth's lower ionosphere.The frequencies, created from thunderstorms and lightning, range from 7.83 Hz, called the Earth's "heartbeat," to 33.8 Hz. The Schumann Resonance has been studied for its effect on the planet as well as on humans. Flashes of lightning that strike around the earth about 50 times every second, create low frequency electromagnetic waves that encompass the planet. These waves, dubbed Schum...
Tags: Astronomy, Space, Mexico, Nasa, Earth, Brain, Physics, Canada, Innovation, Universe, Planets, South America, Hertz, Schumann, Asia Africa, Cosmos


How your brain bonds with fictional characters

Researchers explored the brain activity that accompanies our often-close association with fictional characters.The same brain region that's active when we think about ourselves seems to be involved.When we like a fictional character, the research suggests, we see ourselves in them. It's really remarkable how seriously we take the fortunes of fictional characters. We care what happens to the people that we know perfectly well are simply words on a page or a screen. That they exist only in a writ...
Tags: Psychology, Hbo, Identity, Robin Williams, Neuroscience, Brain, Innovation, Storytelling, Literature, Grey, Ohio State University, Keating, IRI, Science And Art, Ellen Pompeo, Atticus Finch


Smells connect to memories more than other senses

The right scent can conjure up a memory more powerfully than most anything else.People who lose their sense of smell often develop symptoms of depression.While other senses connect to the brain's memory center indirectly, the olfactory cortex has a direct line. It's called the Proust effect after a story in the author's "Remembrance of Things Past: Swann's Way." When a character dipped a madeleine, a sweet, buttery French cake, into some lime-blossom tea, the scent suddenly transported him back...
Tags: Memory, Neuroscience, Brain, Innovation, Square, Emotions, Senses, Smell, Swann, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, Christina Zelano, Zelano, Zelano Vision, Guangyu Zhou


Mindfulness may cause the human brain to transcend racial biases

Mindfulness practices may lead to the human brain's transcendence of previously established associations that lead to racial biases.A mindfulness-based program, which has a myriad of benefits, may be more effective than a specific racial bias training program and may benefit BIPOC youth and police officers alike.Professionally known as Director X, Julien Christian Lutz of the Toronto-based mindfulness organization Operation Prefrontal Cortex believes that many young people that identify as BIPOC...
Tags: Race, Toronto, America, Meditation, Mindfulness, Brain, Canada, Atlantic, United States, Innovation, South America, Mind, North America, Black, Ben Hecht, Floyd


How to Keep Your Brain Sharp as You Age

Just as our bodies tend to atrophy the older you get, so do our brains. We all know you can keep your body physically fit to stave off an inevitable decline, but can we do the same with our minds?Read more...
Tags: Biology, Brain, Lifehacks, Stanford University, Brain Training, Cognition, Neuroplasticity, Human Brain, Neuropsychology, Douglas Scharre, Branches Of Biology, Neurotrauma, Neurophysiology, Health Medical Pharma, Neural Circuit


As we approach death, our dreams offer comfort and reconciliation

One of the most devastating elements of the coronavirus pandemic has been the inability to personally care for loved ones who have fallen ill. Again and again, grieving relatives have testified to how much more devastating their loved one's death was because they were unable to hold their family member's hand—to provide a familiar and comforting presence in their final days and hours. Some had to say their final goodbyes through smartphone screens held by a medical provider. Others resorted to u...
Tags: Psychology, Death, Brain, Innovation, Health Care, Mind, Kristen, Joan, Robert, Mary, Kerr, Jessica, Lisa, Barbara, Michel de Montaigne, Christopher Kerr


Skepticism: Why critical thinking makes you smarter

It's not always easy to tell the difference between objective truth and what we believe to be true. Separating facts from opinions, according to skeptic Michael Shermer, theoretical physicist Lawrence Krauss, and others, requires research, self-reflection, and time. Recognizing your own biases and those of others, avoiding echo chambers, actively seeking out opposing voices, and asking smart, testable questions are a few of the ways that skepticism can be a useful tool for learning and growth...
Tags: Learning, Critical Thinking, Brain, Innovation, Mind, Personal Growth, Derren Brown, Lawrence Krauss, Michael Shermer, Cognitive Science


Cephalopod aces 'marshmallow test' designed for eager children

Scientists recently ran the Stanford marshmallow experiment on cuttlefish and found they were pretty good at it. The test subjects could wait up to two minutes for a better tasting treat. The study suggests cuttlefish are smarter than you think but isn't the final word on how bright they are. The Stanford marshmallow test, an experiment asking kids to hold off on eating one marshmallow for 15 minutes in exchange for two as a reward, was introduced in 1972 by psychologist Walter Mischel. The st...
Tags: Stanford, Animals, Intelligence, Brain, Innovation, University of Cambridge, Marine Biology, Walter Mischel, Rogelio, Cognitive Science, Alexandra Schnell, Mica Pinto Demi Franklin Jebidiah


Apple Orders Korean Language Series 'Dr. Brain' Starring Parasite's Lee Sun Kyun

Apple today announced that it has signed a series order for "Dr. Brain," a Korean-language show based on the popular Korean webtoon of the same name. "Dr. Brain" will be written and directed by filmmaker Kim Jee-Woon, and it will star Lee Sun-Kyun, best known for "Parasite." The series is in production in South Korea and is expected to debut later this year. The show tells the story of a brain scientist who works to find new technologies to access memory, tools that he uses when his family i...
Tags: Apple, South Korea, Brain, Acapulco, Apple TV Apple, Kim Jee woon, Apple TV shows, Lee Sun Kyun, Apple TV Plus, Apple TV Shows Apple, Dr Brain


How exercise changes your brain biology and protects your mental health

As with many other physicians, recommending physical activity to patients was just a doctor chore for me – until a few years ago. That was because I myself was not very active. Over the years, as I picked up boxing and became more active, I got firsthand experience of positive impacts on my mind. I also started researching the effects of dance and movement therapies on trauma and anxiety in refugee children, and I learned a lot more about the neurobiology of exercise. I am a psychiatrist and neu...
Tags: Health, Sports, Mental Health, Brain, Depression, Innovation, Don, BDNF


Jeff Brain of CloutHub. Jeff Brain of CloutHub. Jeff Brain of CloutHub. Jeff Brain of CloutHub.

It’s the first day of the big Republican conference CPAC and a star has already been born. Read more...
Tags: Facebook, Science, Brain, Ted Cruz, Donald Trump, Mike Isaac, Tom Cotton, CPAC, Marc Andreesen, Ashley Feinberg, Dave Weigel, Fictional Characters, Doom Patrol, Parler, Entertainment Culture, Health Medical Pharma


Lab-grown brain organoids mature like real infant brains

Scientists have found that cultures of embryonic brain cells mature at the same rate as a 20-month-old infant's.Researchers have looked to such cell structures, called "organoids," as potential models for understanding the human body's biological mechanisms.Their study validates the use of lab-dish organoids for research. Scientists have been growing cell cultures that resemble natural human cells in dishes for a while now, but their usefulness for research has been inhibited by concerns that t...
Tags: Biology, Stanford, Neuroscience, Discovery, Brain, Genetics, Medical Research, Innovation, Ucla, Aaron Gordon, Geschwind, Organoids, Daniel Geschwind


Drinking coffee while pregnant alters the fetal brain

Neuroregulating caffeine easily crosses the placental barrier.A study finds that the brains of children born to mothers who consumed coffee during pregnancy are different.The observed differences may be associated with behavioral issues. As one human body gives birth to another, so many things have to, and usually do, go right. It's known that substances a mother ingests can influence the success of fetal development. Modern mothers are careful regarding the consumption of alcohol, associated w...
Tags: Nutrition, Pregnancy, Discovery, Brain, Medical Research, Innovation, Caffeine, Joe, Christensen, University of Rochester, John Foxe, Human body, Foxe, Zachary Christensen, Del Monte Institute for Neuroscience


Could playing video games be linked to lower depression rates in kids?

A new study published by a UCL researcher has demonstrated how different types of screen time can positively (or negatively) influence young people's mental health. Young boys who played video games daily had lower depression scores at age 14 compared to those who played less than once per month or never.The study also noted that more frequent video game use was consistently associated with fewer depressive symptoms in boys with lower physical activity, but not in those with high physical activi...
Tags: Psychology, Gaming, Learning, Microsoft, Youth, Social Media, Mindfulness, Mental Health, Brain, Depression, Innovation, Nintendo, University of Oxford, University Of Arizona, Aaron Kandola


BDSM therapy: Are there therapeutic and relational benefits to being submissive?

BDSM is an acronym encompassing a variety of sexual practices that include: bondage/discipline, dominance/submission, and sadism/masochism. The practice of BDSM usually consists of partners taking on specific roles in which one partner is dominant and the other is submissive.BDSM practitioners (individuals who frequently engage in BDSM play) can experience various mental health benefits from engaging in their scenes. According to the research, subspace is often characterized by the activation o...
Tags: Psychology, Sex, Relationships, Love, Compassion, Mindfulness, Mental Health, Brain, Innovation, Consciousness, Emotions, Bdsm, Senses, Curiosity, Self, ASCS


7 dimensions of depression, explained

According to the World Health Organization, more than 264 million people suffer from depression. It is the leading cause of disability and, at its worst, can lead to suicide. Unfortunately, depression is often misunderstood or ignored until it is too late. Psychologist Daniel Goleman, comedian Pete Holmes, neuroscientist Emeran Mayer, psychiatrist Drew Ramsey, and more outline several of the social, chemical, and neurological factors that may contribute to the complex disorder and explain why...
Tags: Psychology, Health, Science, Nutrition, Neuroscience, Society, Mindfulness, Mental Health, Brain, Depression, Innovation, World Health Organization, Emotions, Illness, Mind, Mediterranean