Posts filtered by tags: ― Carl Sagan[x]


 

The 15 most influential universities in the world

Columbia University was among the most influential colleges on the list. The start of the school year means that for many high school juniors, and some seniors, it's time to decide which colleges to apply to.  Academics and data scientists at school ranking website AcademicInfluence.com identified the most influential colleges and universities using a proprietary algorithm that looks at each institution's alumni and professors. Cornell University, Stanford University, and Harvard Univers...
Tags: Google, Spacex, Elon Musk, UK, Microsoft, Wikipedia, US, Trends, Harvard University, New Jersey, Sergey Brin, Peter Thiel, Alan Turing, Angelina Jolie, Charles Darwin, Warren Buffett


How Fiat Chrysler CMO Olivier Francois finally got Carl Sagan’s words into a Jeep ad

It took four years, but the deal-making marketer got his eco-friendly “Pale Blue Dot” spot made at last, as the brand pursues its electrification strategy.
Tags: Advertising, Carl Sagan, Fiat Chrysler, Olivier Francois


Astronomers found a gas in Venus' clouds that could signal alien life

An image of Venus. NASA Goddard Spaceflight Center Venus' carbon-dioxide-rich atmosphere and high temperatures make the planet's surface inhospitable to life. But new research suggests the clouds surrounding Venus could harbor microbial life. A new study found traces of phosphine — a gas typically produced by anaerobic microbes on Earth — in the upper reaches of Venus' clouds. The researchers suggest the phosphine's origin "could be unknown photochemistry or geochemistry, or possibly life....
Tags: Europe, Space, Japan, Science, News, Beck, Trends, Nasa, Earth, Chile, Hawaii, Yale, New Zealand, European Space Agency, Mars, Saturn


The Case for Life on Venus

CNET describes Venus as "a toxic, overheated, crushing hellscape where nothing can survive." But they reported Friday that one astronomy team's hypothesis published last month "could prompt a reevaluation of how and where we look for life in the universe." Carl Sagan speculated about life in the clouds of Venus back in 1967, and just a few years ago, researchers suggested that strange, anomalous patterns seen when looking at the planet in ultraviolet could be explained by something like an alg...
Tags: Tech, Nasa, Mit, Venus, Carl Sagan, Cnet, Veritas, Sara Seager, Seager, TESS Seager


Trending: Jeep drives climate change message with Carl Sagan ad, and Bloomingdale’s masks up with voter plea

The week’s biggest moves, hits and misses.
Tags: Advertising, Carl Sagan, Bloomingdale


100 years after Ray Bradbury’s birth, Neil Gaiman, William Shatner and more are staging a read-a-thon

Author Ray Bradbury was born Aug. 22, 1920. To celebrate that day, libraries, writers, actors and more will host the First Annual Ray Bradbury Read-a-Thon on Saturday, the 100th anniversary of his birth. While Bradbury is known for such books as “The Martian Chronicles” and “Something Wicked This Way Comes,” there probably wasn’t much debate over which novel to choose for this special event, the 1953 dystopian tale “Fahrenheit 451.” More: Here’s how you can enjoy Independent Bookstore Day 2020 i...
Tags: Books, Congress, Neil Gaiman, Ray Bradbury, Los Angeles, Sport, Nasa, Star Trek, Things To Do, Soccer, Joan Didion, Pbs, William Shatner, Pacific, Carl Sagan, Marlon James


sense before stories

Beware the storytellers and praise the sensemakers. In story skepticism (2016) I suggested that while storytelling skills may be important, a critical network era skill will be the ability to deconstruct stories. When it comes to this pandemic, there is no shortage of stories. The emotional, shocking, or fantastic stories get all the attention. The hard scrabble of sensemaking does not. For example, I came across Michael Mina, Epidemiologist, Immunologist & Physician at Harvard School of Public ...
Tags: Carl Sagan, eLearning, Mina, MICHAEL MINA, Jonathan Gottschall, NetworkedLearning, PKMastery


16 plutonium-powered space missions shaping our understanding of space — including the NASA rover that will search for alien life on Mars

NASA last week launched its Mars 2020 Perseverance rover to hunt for signs of ancient alien life. Once on Mars, Perseverance will be powered by a radioisotope thermoelectric generator. The nuclear "battery" is fueled by a rare human-made material called plutonium-238. Perseverance is just the latest in a long line of groundbreaking, plutonium-powered spacecraft that have changed our understanding of the solar system. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. NASA's latest car-size ...
Tags: Navy, California, US, Trends, Nasa, Earth, Mars, Saturn, Jupiter, Europa, DOE, New Horizons, Pluto, US Navy, Titan, Venus


A Physicist Examines the Scientific Accuracy of Physics Shown in Major Movies: Batman, Gravity, Contact, Interstellar, Star Trek & More

Ever had a friend who cannot bring themselves suspend disbelief? It’s not a moral failing, but it can be a tedious quality in situations like, say, the movies, or the cinema, or whatever you call it when you’ve paid your day’s wages for a giant tub of carcinogenic popcorn and a three-hour distraction. (These days, maybe, an overpriced streaming new release and Grubhub.) Who doesn’t love a big-screen science fiction epic—science be damned? Who wants to listen to the seatmate who mutters "...
Tags: Google, Science, Film, College, Harvard, Jurassic Park, Clarke, Kubrick, Batman, Ron Howard, Carl Sagan, Facebook Twitter, Jeff Goldblum, Josh Jones, Durham NC Follow, Dominic Walliman


What Does the United States’ Coronavirus Response Look Like Abroad?: Watch the Rest of the World Stare Aghast at Our Handling of COVID-19

"Even in third world countries, like Senegal, it isn't like this..." Related Content: Carl Sagan Predicts the Decline of America: Unable to Know “What’s True,” We Will Slide, “Without Noticing, Back into Superstition & Darkness” (1995) The Splendid Book Design of the 1946 Edition of Gibbon’s Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire  Orson Welles Narrates an Animated Parable About How Xenophobia & Greed Will Put America Into Decline (1971) What Does the United States’ Coronavirus Response ...
Tags: Google, College, Senegal, United States, Current Affairs, Carl Sagan, Facebook Twitter, Gibbon, Decline of America, Roman Empire Orson Welles


Carl Sagan Saw It Coming

“I have a foreboding of an America in my children's or grandchildren's time -- when the United States is a service and information economy; when nearly all the manufacturing industries have slipped away to other countries; when awesome technological powers are in the hands of a very few, and no one representing the public interest can even grasp the issues; when the people have lost the ability to set their own agendas or knowledgeably question those in authority; when, clutching our cry...
Tags: Pets, America, United States, Carl Sagan, PBurns


Talking to Aliens.

Daniel Oberhaus writes for Wired about the (so far hypothetical) problem of contacting aliens that begins by describing Sónar Calling GJ273b, “an interstellar messaging project by the nonprofit METI International that began in 2017” which “was notable for rehabilitating an extraterrestrial language developed by the physicists Yvan Dutil and Stephane Dumas in the late 1990s”: This custom symbolic system begins by introducing ET to numerals, and then progresses to more complex topics like human bi...
Tags: Uncategorized, Earth, Linguistics, Carl Sagan, Frank Drake, Arecibo, Stephane Dumas, Daniel Oberhaus, METI International, Yvan Dutil, Lincos, Hans Freudenthal


When Astronomer Johannes Kepler Wrote the First Work of Science Fiction, The Dream (1609)

The point at which we date the birth of any genre is apt to shift depending on how we define it. When did science fiction begin? Many cite early masters of the form like Jules Verne and H.G. Wells as its progenitors. Others reach back to Mary Shelley’s 1818 Frankenstein as the genesis of the form. Some few know The Blazing World, a 1666 work of fiction by Margaret Cavendish, Duchess of Newcastle, who called her book a “hermaphroditic text.” According to the judgment of such experts as Is...
Tags: Google, Astronomy, Science, College, Religion, Literature, Sci Fi, William Gibson, Kepler, Carl Sagan, Facebook Twitter, Galileo, Frankenstein, Wells, Copernicus, Jules Verne


Six Ways to Think Long-term: A Cognitive Toolkit for Good Ancestors

Illustration: Tom Lee at Rocket Visual Human beings have an astonishing evolutionary gift: agile imaginations that can shift in an instant from thinking on a scale of seconds to a scale of years or even centuries. Our minds constantly dance across multiple time horizons. One moment we can be making a quickfire response to a text and the next thinking about saving for our pensions or planting an acorn in the ground for posterity. We are experts at the temporal pirouette. Whether we are full...
Tags: Japan, London, North Korea, Future, US, Earth, Groucho Marx, South Dakota, Manchester, Long-term Thinking, Kenya, Goldman Sachs, Mars, Margaret Atwood, Hitler, Black Lives Matter


Tomorrow (Thursday): Sasha Sagan and Ann Druyan in conversation with David Pescovitz

Tomorrow, Thursday (5/14), I'm honored to be moderating a free online conversation with two brilliant women whose work is a light in the darkness during these uncertain times. My friend Ann Druyan is the executive producer, writer, and director of Cosmos, the iconic TV show she co-created with her late husband and collaborator, astronomer and science communicator Carl Sagan. From her work as creative director of the Voyager Golden Record to her numerous books, most recently Cosmos: Possible Wo...
Tags: Post, Space, Science, Hope, News, Optimism, ANN, Authors, Rituals, Carl Sagan, Meaning, Wonder, Sasha, Carl, Ann Druyan, David Pescovitz


How we met: 'I think gay men are often able to negotiate an open marriage'

Dan Butler, 29, a radio journalist, and his husband, Hugh O’Connor, 31, a theatre production designer, are also in a relationship with Charles Davis, 28, another theatre production designer Dan remembers one evening, sitting on the sofa and talking to his husband, Hugh, about Charles. “It was the most amazing experience because we were really falling in love with this person,” he says. “And we could talk about it with each other, like: ‘Isn’t it amazing about him that he does this thing?’ I reme...
Tags: Relationships, Life and style, Sydney, Charles, Charles Davis, Carl Sagan, Dan, Hugh, Dan Butler, Hugh O'Connor


Q&A: ‘Cosmos’ author Ann Druyan muses about possible worlds — and what Carl Sagan would do

How many dimensions does the cosmos have? If we're talking about string theory, it could be 10, or 11, or 26 dimensions. But if we're talking about "Cosmos," the TV series made famous by the late astronomer Carl Sagan 40 years ago, there are now three dimensions. It all started with the original "Cosmos: A Personal Voyage," which brought cosmic topics such as stellar evolution and extraterrestrial life to prime-time TV in 1980. Eighteen years after Sagan's death in Seattle, the show ...
Tags: Science, Seattle, Carl Sagan, Sagan, Ann Druyan, Cosmos


‘Cosmos: Possible Worlds’ finds hope for humanity in a hopeless era

In a time where it's easy to feel a bit concerned about the fate of civilization -- take your pick of calamities, really -- National Geographic's Cosmos is like a hope-filled salve. Developed by Ann Druyan, the co-creator of the original show together with her husband Carl Sagan, and hosted by Neil deGrasse Tyson, Cosmos: Possible Worlds is an exploration of humanity, our past, present and our potential future. The 1980 series redefined how complex topics could be communicated on TV. And...
Tags: Science, Star Trek, Neil Degrasse Tyson, Carl Sagan, Ann Druyan, Brannon Braga, Druyan, National Geographic s Cosmos


FX on Hulu’s First Streaming Series, Devs, Is a Tech Thriller With Cosmic Ambitions

Alex Garland keeps his mind trained on the near future, perpetually imagining that the dire consequences of millennia of human folly are waiting just around the corner to mug us. Published in 1996, his first novel The Beach envisioned the fallout of sending a generation raised on screens into a state of nature. His scripts for Sunshine, Never Let Me Go and 28 Days Later (which I wouldn’t advise revisiting amid the coronavirus pandemic) delved into dystopia and apocalypse. In his first two f...
Tags: Television, News, Uncategorized, San Francisco, Oxford, Nick Offerman, Westworld, Hulu, Black Mirror, Terrence Malick, Carl Sagan, Amaya, Kenton, Lily, Ex Machina, Alex Garland


'Pale Blue Dot' Revisited

cusco shares a report: For the 30th anniversary of one of the most iconic views from the Voyager mission, NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, is publishing a new version of the image known as the "Pale Blue Dot." The updated image uses modern image-processing software and techniques while respecting the intent of those who planned the image. Like the original, the new color view shows Planet Earth as a single, bright blue pixel in the vastness of space. Rays of sunlight sca...
Tags: Tech, Nasa, Neil Degrasse Tyson, Carl Sagan, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena California, Planet Earth, Carolyn Porco


Carl Sagan's Pale Blue Dot image is 30 years old today

Thirty years ago today, the Voyager 1 spaceprobe had completed its ncounters with the outer planets and was careening out of our solar system. The time came to shut off the probes' cameras to preserve power and memory for the other onboard scientific instruments. But before engineers flipped the switch, one last photo opportunity was not to be missed. From my liner notes to the Voyager Golden Record vinyl box set: Astronomer and educator Carl Sagan, a member of the Voyager Imaging Team,...
Tags: Post, Space, Science, News, Nasa, Earth, Mars, Carl Sagan, Sagan, Voyager, Voyager Imaging Team


NASA Releases Remixed Version of Iconic ‘Pale Blue Dot’ Photo

A humbling photo of Earth taken by the Voyager 1 probe from a distance of 3.7 billion miles has been reprocessed by NASA to commemorate the 30th anniversary of the image. Read more...
Tags: Science, Nasa, Space Exploration, Carl Sagan, Space Photography, Pale Blue Dot, Hey I Can See My House From Here


Wry Rules for Navigating a Flawed Universe

When we think about the principles which govern the universe, we typically think of laws which concern the realms of science and mathematics. Yet we also intuitively feel that there are equally universal laws unrelated to physics or calculus that explain the dynamics of social interactions, work, and the ordinary vicissitudes of daily life. Writer Paul Dickson has been compiling such principles for forty years. Inspired by Murphy’s Law (“If anything can go wrong, it will”), Dickson decided ...
Tags: Life, America, Warren Buffett, Rochester, Mike Nichols, Carl Sagan, Kurt Vonnegut, Murphy, Bennett, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Jefferson, Bertolt Brecht, Alfred North Whitehead, Rickey, Machiavelli, U S Department of Labor


Vintage NASA images reveal the agency's earliest feats, from launching the first astronauts to building a '70s space station

The US has been launching spacecraft since 1950, but NASA formed in 1958. Vintage photos show the space agency's earliest missions — from training the first astronauts to creating the golden record it sent beyond our solar system. These 24 vintage photos give a peek into NASA's early years and missions. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. NASA is preparing to launch its astronauts in the first commercial spacecraft ever built.  But it took decades of experimenting, tinkering, ...
Tags: Florida, US, America, Trends, Nasa, Earth, International Space Station, Mars, Naca, Carl Sagan, Cornell, Neil Armstrong, Cape Canaveral, Koch, Glenn, Michael Collins


How's Your Internship Going? This Teen Found a Planet

The summer before senior year of high school can be a stressful time for a teenager. Childhood is winding down. College applications loom large. Many students are looking for an edge that will help them get into the right school. Last year, Wolf Cukier, 17, spent his summer vacation as few other rising seniors have: He helped discover a planet.Meet TOI 1338 b, the newly identified world orbiting two stars more than 1,300 light years away.Last July, just after he finished his junior year at Scars...
Tags: Science, Nasa, Earth, New York Times, University Of Chicago, Kepler, Carl Sagan, Wolf, Honolulu, SETI Institute, Scarsdale, Tess, American Astronomical Society, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt Maryland, Adina Feinstein


best finds of 2019

Every fortnight I curate some of the observations and insights that were shared on social media. I call these Friday’s Finds. Here are some of the best for 2019. Word of the Year @PhilosophyMttrs — “Word of the Year” — Ultracrepidarian — adjective noting or pertaining to a person who criticizes, judges, or gives advice outside the area of his or her expertise. Media “For years, a small hand lettered sign hung on the West wall of McLuhan’s Centre for Culture and Technology at the University o...
Tags: Pete Seeger, America, United States, Stephen Hawking, University of Toronto, Carl Sagan, eLearning, John Maynard Keynes, Forster, Wharton School of Business, Thomas Paine, McLuhan, Schumpeter, Stephen Downes, Friday's Finds, Karl Kraus


How the Sagan standard can help you make better decisions

Carl Sagan famously shared the aphorism "Extraordinary Claims Require Extraordinary Evidence."This approach can help us fight off fake information.Scientific thinkers in centuries before Carl Sagan also expressed similar sentiment. None Is there an omnipotent all-knowing entity, otherwise known as "God", ruling our daily affairs and caring enough to judge our behaviors on an individual basis? Or is our life ruled by an invisible supercomputer that pre-ordains most of our actions, ensuring an i...
Tags: Astronomy, Science, History, Artificial Intelligence, Physics, Innovation, Philosophy, Carl Sagan, Personal Growth, Don, Flournoy, Sagan, Cosmos, David Hume, Decision-making, David Deming


Neil deDrasse Tyson Teaches Scientific Thinking and Communication in a New Online Course

One doesn't normally get into astrophysics for the fame. But sometimes one gets famous anyway, as has astrophysicist Neil DeGrasse Tyson, Director of the Hayden Planetarium at the Rose Center for Earth and Space. But that title doesn't even hint at the scope of his public-facing ventures, from the columns he's written in magazines like Natural History and StarDate to his hosting of television shows like NOVA and the sequel to Carl Sagan's Cosmos to his podcast StarTalk and his high-profi...
Tags: Google, Science, Stephen Colbert, College, Neil Gaiman, Nasa, Online Courses, Stephen Hawking, Neil Degrasse Tyson, Isaac Newton, Seoul, Pluto, Carl Sagan, David Byrne, Werner Herzog, Facebook Twitter


‘Dr. Stone’ is a Hilarious and Oddly Educational Anime About the Power of Science

(Welcome to Ani-time Ani-where, a regular column dedicated to helping the uninitiated understand and appreciate the world of anime.) After exploring the dark and complex existentialism of a ‘90s anime last time, this week we’re jumping right back to the present for maybe the most anticipated anime of the summer season, which somehow still managed to be its biggest surprise. I’m talking about Dr. Stone .  Yes, Dr. Stone is the highly anticipated adaptation of one of the most popular mang...
Tags: Movies, Features, Anime, Coca Cola, Bill Nye, Carl Sagan, Dexter, Stone, Ani, Featured Stories Sidebar, Dr. Stone, Senku, Dr Stone Yes Dr Stone, Senku Ishigami


Experiencing Deep Time Through Visual Storytelling

Geological Time Spiral Deep time is a notoriously hard concept to grasp. Our lived human experience is grounded in a timeframe that is at odds with the geological time frame of millions or billions of years. Since geologists began figuring out the true scale of geologic time, they have tried to communicate this scale through a series of metaphors, maps, and visualizations. Famous examples of this include Carl Sagan’s Cosmic Calendar, and for children, Montessori’s Clock of Eras. Advances i...
Tags: Technology, Future, Earth, Smithsonian, PANGEA, Carl Sagan, The Big Here, Ian Webster, Scotese, Meilan Solly, Marcia Bjornerud, Peter Oswald, Time Walk Deep Time Walk, Stephan Harding Deep Time Walk, Deep Time Walk