Posts filtered by tags: Cass Sunstein[x]


 

How to Talk with a Conspiracy Theorist: What the Experts Recommend

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JpInOs1Fyno Why do people pledge allegiance to views that seem fundamentally hostile to reality? Maybe believers in shadowy, evil forces and secret cabals fall prey to motivated reasoning. Truth for them is what they need to believe in order to get what they want. Their certainty in the justness of a cause can feel as comforting as a warm blanket on a winter’s night. But conspiracy theories go farther than private delusions of grandeur. They have spilled i...
Tags: Psychology, Google, Politics, College, Current Affairs, Reddit, University of Pennsylvania, Vox, Bill Nye, Daniel, Facebook Twitter, Pew Research, Josh Jones, University of California Irvine, Cass Sunstein, MIT Technology Review


How to Talk with a Conspiracy Theorist (and Why People Believe Conspiracy Theories in the First Place): What the Experts Recommend

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JpInOs1Fyno Why do people pledge allegiance to views that seem fundamentally hostile to reality? Maybe believers in shadowy, evil forces and secret cabals fall prey to motivated reasoning. Truth for them is what they need to believe in order to get what they want. Their certainty in the justness of a cause can feel as comforting as a warm blanket on a winter’s night. But conspiracy theories go farther than private delusions of grandeur. They have spilled i...
Tags: Psychology, Google, Politics, College, Current Affairs, Reddit, University of Pennsylvania, Vox, Bill Nye, Daniel, Facebook Twitter, Pew Research, Josh Jones, University of California Irvine, Cass Sunstein, MIT Technology Review


The emerging science of content labeling: “Soft” interventions and hard public problems

From the Workshop on  “News and Information Disorder in the 2020 US Presidential Election.”  John P. Wihbey We are all content labelers — and potentially, the labeled — now. Indeed, we might think of 2020 as the dawn of information about information, the moral use of metadata in the market of speech. Given this extraordinary turn toward labeling on social media, I want to focus here on a particular research agenda that explores a set of interrelated questions. They revolve around the tri...
Tags: Facebook, Twitter, Supreme Court, US, Donald Trump, Knight Foundation, Branding, Guest Blogger, Twitter Facebook, Cross, Cass Sunstein, Richard Thaler, Oliver Wendell Holmes, John P Wihbey, Election Integrity Partnership, Northeastern University Ethics Institute


Despite hand wringing from pundits, if Democrats win they should enact a truly transformative agenda and fully prosecute Trump

US President Donald Trump looks on as he departs a rally at Toledo Express Airport in Swanton, Ohio on September 21, 2020. MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty Images Democratic pundits and thought leaders are pushing to curtail a liberal agenda as the party looks set to win big in next week's election. Essays calling for letting Trump go quietly and avoid prosecution and for Democrats to listen to conservatives on domestic policy are popping up at major media outlets now that Biden has a sizable lea...
Tags: Facebook, Obama, Congress, Washington Post, Washington, Politico, US, Trends, Bloomberg, Joe Biden, Democrats, Gop, New York Times, Samantha Power, Biden, Donald Trump


If Democrats win, they need to enact a transformative agenda, fully prosecute Trump — and ignore any hand wringing from pundits

US President Donald Trump looks on as he departs a rally at Toledo Express Airport in Swanton, Ohio on September 21, 2020. MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty Images Democratic pundits and thought leaders are pushing to curtail a liberal agenda as the party looks set to win big in next week's election. Essays calling for letting Trump go quietly and avoid prosecution and for Democrats to listen to conservatives on domestic policy are popping up at major media outlets now that Biden has a sizable lea...
Tags: Facebook, Obama, Congress, Washington Post, Washington, Politico, US, Trends, Bloomberg, Joe Biden, Democrats, Gop, New York Times, Samantha Power, Biden, Donald Trump


Cass Sunstein reviews books describing the mass appeal of ultra-nationalism (Michael Simkovic)

In the NY Review of Books (recently republished online): Nazism was so horrifying and so barbaric that for many people in nations where authoritarianism is... [Author: Michael Simkovic]
Tags: Law, NY Review of Books, Cass Sunstein, Michael Simkovic


"Knowing the date of their death appealed to a little over a quarter of those surveyed, knowing whether their partners were cheating appealed to over half..."

"... knowing if there is life on other planets appealed to nearly three-quarters. There was also great variation in reported willingness to pay for that information, with median bids ranging from $1 for credit card late-fee disclosure to $200 to know if heaven exists."From "Accused of Ruining Popcorn, Cass Sunstein Wants to Repent," a NYT book review, by Clay Shirky, of Sunstein's new book, "TOO MUCH INFORMATION/Understanding What You Don’t Want to Know.""Among government reformers and progressi...
Tags: Books, Death, Law, Adultery, Heaven, Cass Sunstein, Clay Shirky, Sunstein, Ann Althouse


The Implications Of Creating Addictive Products

If you listen to Mark Zuckerberg, he simply created an innovative piece of tech that enabled the world to “connect”. Well, that wasn’t particularly novel in 2005. We had Myspace, Friends Reunited and Bebo for that. Hell, you could message your friends in real time on Instant Messenger, long before Facebook Messenger launched in 2011. But what Facebook did better than those other businesses was create a far more addictive product – one which leveraged behavioral science principles to create so...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Mark Zuckerberg, UK, Facebook Messenger, Silicon Valley, Richard, Sean Parker, Branding, Bebo, BBC Panorama, Cass Sunstein, Harvard Business School, Business Strategy, Shoshana Zuboff, Aza Raskin


Thursday round-up

Amy Howe reports for this blog, in a post that first appeared at Howe on the Court, that “[a]fter just under three years (and three Supreme Court terms) on the job, Noel Francisco announced today that he would step down as the solicitor general of the United States, effective July 3, 2020.” According to Jessica Gresko at AP, “[i]t is common for people in the job to leave in the summer, when the Supreme Court takes a break, before a presidential election.” For The Washington Post (subscription re...
Tags: Supreme Court, Law, Congress, Washington Post, Court, Bloomberg, Ap, United States, Liberty, New York Times, Philadelphia, Donald Trump, Francisco, DOE, Forest Service, Trump


The problematics of impeachment (II): Constitutional interpretation v. constitutional design

Because the Impeachment Clause was badly drafted and is the only mechanism, together with the useless 25th Amendment, for displacing an unfit president, it is, of course, the focus of efforts in "constitutional interpretation," a subject that lawyers profess to have some expertise in.  So we are being treated to the back-and-forth especially as to how to interpret the truly unfortunate phrase "high crimes and misdemeanor." This is a source of almost endless mischief, as seen most clearly in Alan...
Tags: Texas, Congress, Senate, House, Philadelphia, Branding, Marshall, Jeff, Tyler, Larry Tribe, Cass Sunstein, Gerard, John Quincy Adams, John Tyler, Alan Dershowitz, Dershowitz


Drafting Articles of Impeachment

Now that many (though certainly not all) of the relevant facts concerning President Trump’s Ukraine affair are in, House Democrats face crucial choices.   Drafting articles of impeachment is no boilerplate task.   How the Judiciary Committee chooses to define Trump’s transgressions may have far-reaching consequences.   In drafting articles of impeachment Democrats are not merely determining their trial strategy in the Senate.   They are also setting the boundaries of public debate, laying ...
Tags: Senate, Reagan, Joe Biden, Iran, Ukraine, Democrats, House, Biden, Branding, Clinton, Trump, Democratic, Nixon, Cass Sunstein, Andrew Johnson, Judiciary Committee


How Do We Measure Good Progress?

For the symposium on Robert Tsai, Practical Equality: Forging Justice in a Divided Nation (Norton 2019).Robert Tsai             My thanks to Mark Graber and Jack Balkin for hosting this Balkinization symposium on my new book, Practical Equality. My special appreciation for the close read of the book by Mark, George Thomas, Susan Burgess, and Nelson Tebbe. In this post, I’ll respond to their thoughtful critiques and offer a few clarifications.             Practical Equality argues that p...
Tags: Supreme Court, Massachusetts, Delaware, Branding, American University, Guest Blogger, George Thomas, Thomas, Roberts, Cass Sunstein, Graber, VMI, Mark Graber, George Washington Law Review, Jack Balkin, Nelson Tebbe


A Conservative on Credit Cards

Yesterday Professor Charles Fried, the elegant, eridite former Solicitor General of the US and former Supreme Court Massachusetts Supreme Court Justice, sparred with eminent philosopher and law professor Cass Sunstein and Harvard economist Ed Glasser in a faculty forum over “the Nanny State.” The discussion was lively and engaging, but Fried’s remark on credit cards stopped me in my tracks. Fried was aggressive in his defense of unregulated consumer choice. He poo-poo’d the idea of regulating mu...
Tags: Credit Cards, News, US, Harvard, Cafe, Charles Fried, Cass Sunstein, Sunstein, Jackie Wilhelm, Elizabeth Warren archive, Warren Reports, Supreme Court Massachusetts Supreme Court Justice, Ed Glasser


Linda Greenhouse on The Oath and the Office

Linda   Greenhouse  reviews The Oath and The Office in the New York Review of Books, alongside Josh Matz and Lawrence Tribe's To End a Presidency, as well as Cass Sunstein's Impeachment. Here is an excerpt: Maybe, after more than two years of President Trump, what we need more than anything is a collective reminder of what we have a right to expect from the occupant of the White House—how a president should behave and what the presidency should  be. In that vein, I end this essay by...
Tags: White House, Office, Brown University, Branding, Trump, Linda Greenhouse, Lawrence Tribe, Cass Sunstein, Calibri, New York Review of Books, Brettschneider, Corey Brettschneider, Josh Matz


How Conformity Can Be Good and Bad for Society

In the U.S. Federal court system, many important cases go through three-judge panels. The majority opinion of these panels carries the day, meaning that having a majority is crucial for one side or another to get the rulings they want. So, if two out of three of the judges are appointed by Democrats, it’s safe to assume that most cases will go their way. But a study of the judicial behavior of the District of Columbia Circuit came to a surprising conclusion: A panel of three GOP-appointed judge...
Tags: Parenting, California, Senate, Barack Obama, Gop, House, Jane Austen, Donald Trump, Watts, Cass Sunstein, Stanley Milgram, Milgram, Sunstein, Duncan Watts, District of Columbia Circuit


Nanny state roundup

London ban on transit ads depicting “bad” foods winds up nixing images of Wimbledon strawberries and cream, bacon, butter, cheese, jam, honey, and Christmas pudding [Scott Shackford] And more: British medical journal The Lancet wants to do some highly non-consensual poking and jabbing at your midsection, with the aim of making you lose weight; highlights include funding activist campaigns, cutting business out of policy discussions, and routing policy through the least accountable internationa...
Tags: London, Law, Obesity, California, Uncategorized, Public Health, Britain, United Kingdom, Pharmaceuticals, Soft drinks, Nanny State, Cass Sunstein, CALEB BROWN, Snowdon, The Lancet, Randy Barnett


Are Social Media Driving Political Polarization?

Americans are more divided along party lines than ever before. In the past two decades, the percentage of Americans who consistently hold liberal or conservative beliefs—rather than a mix of the two, which is the case for most people—has jumped from 10 percent to over 20. At the same time, beliefs about the other side are becoming more negative. Since 1994, the number of Americans who see the opposing political party as a threat to “the nation’s well-being” has doubled. This deepening polariza...
Tags: Parenting, House Of Representatives, Trump, Duke University, Cass Sunstein, Facebook Reddit, Allport, William Brady, Tali Sharot, Levi Boxell, Boxell, Gordon Allport, Christopher Bail, Presidential Senate


Symposium: Tampering with the structure of administrative law

Adrian Vermeule is the Ralph S. Tyler, Jr., Professor of Constitutional Law at Harvard Law School. In Kisor v. Wilkie, the Supreme Court has agreed to consider whether the doctrine of deference to agency interpretations of their own regulations should be discarded — or more precisely whether Auer v. Robbins and Bowles v. Seminole Rock & Sand Co. should be overruled, the first question in the certiorari petition and the only one the court granted. In one sense, the stakes are lower than the petit...
Tags: Featured, Supreme Court, Law, Time, SEC, Chevron, National Labor Relations Board, Securities And Exchange Commission, Robbins, Antonin Scalia, Scalia, Natural Resources Defense Council, Clarence Thomas, Cass Sunstein, Robert Jackson, Bowles


The Nondelegation Doctrine -- Correcting a Common Error

I just read yet another article asserting that the Supreme Court invoked the nondelegation doctrine to hold a federal statute unconstitutional only twice, in Panama Refining v. Ryan and Schechter Poultry. (Cass Sunstein's formulation, that the doctrine had one -- and only one -- good year, 1935, is a clever version of the assertion.)It's not true. Carter v. Carter Coal Co., decided in 1936, held the Bituminous Coal Conservation Act unconstitutional on several grounds, one of which was the nondel...
Tags: Supreme Court, Branding, Carter, Ryan, Cass Sunstein, Schechter, Mark Tushnet, Carter Coal Co, Panama Refining


Harvard's Cass Sunstein: Algorithms can correct human biases

Algorithms help drive the modern world.Algorithms reflect human biases, but some — as Harvard's Cass Sunstein notes — can be built to help correct our biases.If you build the right algorithm, you might be able to help contribute to a better world. None Algorithms are part of the engine that drives the modern world. When you search for something on Google, you're relying on a search engine defined by a specific algorithm. When you see what you see on your news feed on Facebook, you're not looking...
Tags: Google, Amazon, Facebook, Harvard, United States, Innovation, Machine Learning, Miami, Philadelphia, Algorithm, Ai, National Bureau of Economic Research, Pittsburgh, Cass Sunstein, Harvard Kennedy School, Sunstein


Another effective preview of coming SCOTUS review of SORNA delegation in Gundy

I was so very pleased to publish this post last week the original commentary of Wayne Logan concerning Gundy v. United States, the soon-to-be-heard Supreme Court case about the administration of the federal Sex Offender Registration and Notification Act (SORNA).  I now see that SCOTUSblog here has up its Gundy preview authored by Mila Sohoni and titled "Argument preview: Justices face nondelegation challenge to federal sex-offender registration law." I recommend the piece in full, and here is ho...
Tags: Supreme Court, Law, Congress, United States, Wyoming, Ginsburg, U S Court of Appeals, Clarence Thomas, Cass Sunstein, SORNA, 10th Circuit, Gundy, Douglas A Berman, Neil Gorsuch, Wayne Logan, Mila Sohoni


Argument preview: Justices face nondelegation challenge to federal sex-offender registration law

Over 12 years ago, Congress enacted the Sex Offender Registration and Notification Act. One provision of SORNA created a requirement that a convicted sex offender register with every jurisdiction in which he resides, works or studies, as well as in the jurisdiction in which he was convicted. Another part of SORNA, its criminal enforcement provision, made it a crime for a convicted sex offender subject to the registration requirement to fail to register or to keep his registration information u...
Tags: New York, Featured, Maryland, Supreme Court, Law, Congress, Pennsylvania, United States, Wyoming, Bureau, Antonin Scalia, Ryan, Scalia, Ginsburg, Reynolds, U S Court of Appeals


Sunstein & Pulliam: Universities (And Law Schools) Need To Hire More Republican Professors

Following up on my previous posts (links below): Cass Sunstein (Harvard), The Problem With All Those Liberal Professors: The paucity of Republicans at many top schools hurts everyone. Suppose that you start college with a keen interest in physics, and you quickly discover that almost all members of the physics... [Author: Paul Caron]
Tags: Taxes, Scholarship, Cass Sunstein, Pulliam, Paul Caron, Legal Education, Sunstein


Kavanaugh on administrative law and separation of powers

Christopher J. Walker is a law professor at The Ohio State University Moritz College of Law. Administrative law sets the ground rules for how federal agencies regulate and how courts review and constrain such agency action. Administrative law’s importance in our everyday lives has become even more pronounced in recent decades with the rise of regulation and the decline of legislation. To provide just one imperfect snapshot, in 2015 and 2016 federal agencies promulgated more than 7,000 final rule...
Tags: Featured, Fcc, Supreme Court, Law, Congress, California, Senate, White House, United States, Federal Communications Commission, SEC, Michigan, Epa, Donald Trump, Environmental Protection Agency, Chevron


Kavanaugh on administrative law and separation of powers (Corrected)

Christopher J. Walker is a law professor at The Ohio State University Moritz College of Law. Administrative law sets the ground rules for how federal agencies regulate and how courts review and constrain such agency action. Administrative law’s importance in our everyday lives has become even more pronounced in recent decades with the rise of regulation and the decline of legislation. To provide just one imperfect snapshot, in 2015 and 2016 federal agencies promulgated more than 7,000 final rule...
Tags: Featured, Fcc, Supreme Court, Law, Congress, California, Senate, White House, United States, Federal Communications Commission, Portland, SEC, Michigan, Epa, Donald Trump, Environmental Protection Agency


Symposium: Constitutional dodgeball and the separation of powers

Peter M. Shane is the Jacob E. Davis and Jacob E. Davis II Chair in Law at the Ohio State University Moritz College of Law. He was part of an amicus brief of constitutional and administrative law scholars in support of the SEC in Lucia v. Securities and Exchange Commission. In 2004, Harvard law professor Mark Tushnet wrote an influential article called “Constitutional Hardball.” By that term, he was referring to moves by the political branches of government that are “without much question within...
Tags: Supreme Court, Law, Obama, Congress, Commission, SEC, Social Security Administration, Securities And Exchange Commission, Trump, Antonin Scalia, Scalia, Lucia, Republican Senate, Stephen Breyer, Elena Kagan, Kagan


What made the Nazis possible? Why didn’t anyone stop them?

With an eye on the current political situations in the US, Turkey, Russia, and China, Cass Sunstein reviews three books that shed light on how the Nazis came to power in Germany in the 1930s: They Thought They Were Free: The Germans, 1933-45 by Milton Mayer, Broken Lives: How Ordinary Germans Experienced the Twentieth Century by Konrad Jarausch, and Defying Hitler by Sebastian Haffner. Mayer’s book was published in 1955 and consisted of post-war interviews with normal German people (janitor, ba...
Tags: Isis, China, Germany, Nazis, America, Spain, Man, Norway, Hitler, Hans Rosling, Jason Kottke, Iraq Syria, Mayer, Cass Sunstein, Sunstein, US Turkey Russia


Big Brains podcast welcomes Nobel-winning economist Richard Thaler

Editor’s note: This is the final episode of Big Brains, but stay tuned for several bonus episodes this summer, and a new season come fall with some of the pioneering minds at the University of Chicago. It has been a long journey for economist Richard Thaler, from early days struggling to get his research published to being honored with the Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel in October. Often dubbed as “one of the founding fathers of behavioral economics,” Th...
Tags: Google, Sweden, Selena Gomez, University Of Chicago, Daniel Kahneman, Cass Sunstein, Richard Thaler, University of Chicago Booth School of Business, Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences, Amos Tversky, The University of Chicago, Thaler, Charles R Walgreen, Behavioral Science and Economics, Gene Fama


Facebook and the perils of a personalized choice architecture

Yafit Lev-Aretz Contributor Share on Twitter Yafit Lev-Aretz is a Research Fellow at the Information Law Institute, New York University Law School. More posts by this contributor If it talks like a government and acts like a government, it must be a tech giant The recent Facebook-Cambridge Analytica chaos has ignited a fire of awareness, bringing the risks of today’s data surveillance culture to the fo...
Tags: Google, TC, Facebook, Column, Isis, Australia, Youtube, Opinion, Tech, Federal Trade Commission, Ftc, Trump, Cass Sunstein, Richard Thaler, Cambridge Analytica, Choice Architecture


Simpler service or experience pays

Over the last few weeks I’ve had the pleasure of speaking at a handful of conferences and in-house workshops, where I have been talking about some of the characteristics of leading companies, particularly those that are customer experience leaders. One of the characteristics I have been talking about is Simplicity. Now, it’s common when thinking about growing your business or developing your customer base to consider offering customers greater choice and more options. However, whilst offering mo...
Tags: Business, Marketing, Brand, Business Growth, Customer Experience, Customer Service, Employee Engagement, Product Management, Branding, Cass Sunstein, Richard Thaler, Customer Choice, Brand Management, Customer Journey, Customer Services, Services Marketing