Posts filtered by tags: Charles Darwin[x]


 

Google will give you a ‘Heads Up’ when you’re walking on your phone… and Darwin weeps

Once, just once, I’d like to sit down at my computer on a Monday morning and not want to smash my face repeatedly into the keyboard. Unfortunately, today’s not that day: because Google is rolling out Heads Up, a feature that’ll alert users when they’re walking and using their phones. To put that another way, you’ll get a reminder on your phone to stop looking at your phone while you’re using your phone. On the November 24, 1859, Charles Darwin released On the Origin of Species. In this work, he ...
Tags: Plugged, Google


Google will give you a ‘Heads Up’ when you’re walking on your phone… and Darwin weeps

Once, just once, I’d like to sit down at my computer on a Monday morning and not want to smash my face repeatedly into the keyboard. Unfortunately, today’s not that day: because Google is rolling out Heads Up, a feature that’ll alert users when they’re walking and using their phones. To put that another way, you’ll get a reminder on your phone to stop looking at your phone while you’re using your phone. On the November 24, 1859, Charles Darwin released On the Origin of Species. In this work, he ...
Tags: Plugged, Google


A 900-Page Pre-Pantone Guide to Color from 1692: A Complete High-Resolution Digital Scan

There’s ahead of its time, then there’s Traité des couleurs servant à la peinture à l’eau — or, in its original Dutch title, Klaer Lightende Spiegel der Verfkonst, a 900-page book of paint colors made before any such things were common tools of the artist’s, scientist’s, and industrial designer’s trade. Author and artist A. Boogert created one, and only one, copy of his extraordinary manual on color mixing in 1692. Appearing on the threshold of modern color theory, and featuring over 700 pages ...
Tags: Google, Art, College, Charles Darwin, Newton, Provence, Aristotle, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, Goethe, Werner, Aix, Durham NC Follow, Erik Kwakkel, Goethe Newton, Opticks


BritBox Unveils What’s Coming to the Streamer in April 2021

BritBox unveils what’s coming to the streamer in April 2021 BritBox has unveiled its April streaming slate, including the new BritBox Original thriller series Grace starring John Simm (Life on Mars, Doctor Who) and Richie Campbell (Top Boy, The Frankenstein Chronicles) and written by Russell Lewis (Endeavour), based on the bestselling Roy Grace series by UK author Peter James. The lineup also includes the new comedy series Kate & Koji starring award-winner Brenda Blethyn and Jimmy Akingbola m...
Tags: UK, TV, Movies, Samsung, Bbc, Rome, Britain, Yorkshire, Army, Cambridge, West Africa, TV News, Starz, BAFTA, Streaming, Charles Darwin


The fight for the Galápagos: ecologists seek bigger reserve as fishing fleets circle

Ecuador’s president to decide on proposal to expand islands’ marine reserve, seen as vital to protect world heritage site from fishing industryStrolling along a beach dotted with sea lion pups and their mothers barking at one another, utterly unconcerned by your presence, is a singularly magical experience. On the trail leading to the shore on tiny Seymour Island, noisily courting blue-footed boobies and frigate birds are equally unruffled by the presence of humans.Getting up close to the natura...
Tags: Food, Science, Animals, Environment, Americas, World news, Wildlife, Conservation, Marine Life, Fishing, Charles Darwin, Ecuador, Galapagos Islands, Darwin, Seymour Island


Why I Bought The IWC Aquatimer Bronze Dive Watch

During 2020, my watch rotation was different than a typical year. One of the significant factors was remote working from home, but also other reasons seeped in. Due to the combination of these situations, one watch became my predominant wrist companion and even accompanied me on my limited but worthwhile vacation time over the past […] Visit Why I Bought The IWC Aquatimer Bronze Dive Watch to read the full article.
Tags: Watches, Charles Darwin, Iwc, Watch Talk, Dive Watch, Bronze Dive Watches, Aquatimer, IWC Aquatimer Bronze Dive Watch


Here’s why California celebrates Arbor Day on March 7 and not in April

Arbor Day is observed by most Americans as a day to plant a tree in late April. But in California we celebrate early. California’s Arbor Day is recognized on March 7, which is horticulturalist Luther Burbank’s birthday. Burbank developed more than 800 varieties of fruits, flowers and vegetables over his career in California. After he grew 20,000 little prune trees, or seedlings, in only nine months, Californian farmers began calling him the “Plant Wizard.” Burbank had famous friends in high plac...
Tags: Business, Gardening, News, California, Environment, California News, Infographic, Sport, Things To Do, Soccer, Ireland, Charles Darwin, Local News, New England, Thomas Edison, Russet Burbank


See What Some of History's Most Important Scientists Look Like With the DeepNostalgia Treatment

Deepfakes are getting better and better, but instead of wearing Tom Cruise’s face on a golf course, we decided to commemorate some amazing scientists (and one science fiction writer) by bringing them back to fleeting life using DeepNostaglia, a tool created by MyHeritage that breathes movement into old photos. Read more...
Tags: Science, Biology, Arthur C Clarke, Charles Darwin, Isaac Newton, Scientists, Nikola Tesla, Tom Cruise, Ada Lovelace, Thomas Edison, Gregor Mendel, Ada Lovelace Ada Lovelace, Charles Babbage, Thomas Young, Carolus, MyHeritage


Why Does Music Make Us Feel Things?

Once a day, at least, I’ll tear up listening to music. Just a drop or two, or not even a drop, just a pre-cry convulsion, a sudden seizure of feeling. More often than not, I have no specific memories tied to the song in question—sometimes I’m hearing it for the first or second time. If you asked me why the song was…Read more...
Tags: Psychology, Spotify, Music, Science, Articles, Compassion, Empathy, Charles Darwin, Emotions, Anger, Why, Irving Berlin, Herbert Spencer, Music Psychology, Musicology, Moral Psychology


SEE IT: A Love Story Discovered in the Galápagos Islands

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Tags: Charles Darwin, Only CBS, North America, Galapagos Islands, National Park, Galapagos, Santa Cruz, Marine Reserve, Lindsey Davis, Henley, Española Island, Nazca, Santa Cruz Island, Santiago Island, Bartolome, Simon Schuster


Silversea Cruises: Galápagos Islands

? Silversea Cruises: Galápagos Islands Silversea Cruises is reinventing visiting the Galápagos Islands with its new expedition ship, the Silversea Origin. The Galápagos Islands is a volcanic archipelago in the Pacific Ocean. A province of Ecuador, the islands’ group lies just 975 kilometers (600 miles) off its coast and is considered one of the world’s principal destinations for wildlife viewing. The Galápagos’ isolated terrain shelters a diversity of plant and animal species unique to th...
Tags: Travel, Featured, Blog, Charles Darwin, Ecuador, Pacific Ocean, Galapagos Islands, Carol, Galapagos, Silversea, Santa Cruz, San Cristobal, Silversea Cruises, Baltra, Roaming Boomers Travel Services, Tagus Cove


Darwin’s queer plots in The Descent of Man

This year, LGBT+ History Month coincides with the 150th anniversary of Charles Darwin’s momentous sexological work The Descent of Man, and Selection in Relation to Sex, originally published on 24 February 1871. The occasion prompts reflection on Darwin’s highly equivocal handling of sex variations in the natural world, including intersexualities (“hermaphroditism”), transformations of sex, and non-reproductive sexual behaviours.Descent has long been considered a landmark text in the history of s...
Tags: Books, England, Featured, History, Evolution, Journals, Charles Darwin, Sigmund Freud, Darwin, Magnus Hirschfeld, Science & Medicine, Earth & Life Sciences, Queer Studies, LGBT History Month, The Descent Of Man, Ruth Bernard Yeazell


Darwin’s theory of agency: back to the future in evolutionary science?

Was Darwin a one-trick pony? The scientists who most praise him typically cite just one of his ideas: natural selection. Do any know that his theory of evolution—like his take on psychology—presumed all creatures were agents? This fact has long been eclipsed by the “gene’s-eye view” of adaptation which gained a strangle-hold over biology during the twentieth century—and hence over sociobiology and today’s evolutionary psychology. Are current efforts to revise this view—emphasising “new” topics l...
Tags: Books, Featured, Harvard, Charles Darwin, Galapagos Islands, Darwin, Natural Selection, Mendel, Huxley, Science & Medicine, Psychology & Neuroscience, Earth & Life Sciences, Richard Lewontin, Lewontin, Subtopics, Julian Huxley


Ancient skeletal hand could reveal evolutionary secrets

Evolutionary expert Charles Darwin and others recognized a close evolutionary relationship between humans, chimps and gorillas based on their shared anatomies, raising some big questions: how are humans related to other primates, and exactly how did early humans move around? Research by a Texas A&M University professor may provide some answers.
Tags: Texas, Science, University, Charles Darwin


Study reveals energy sources supporting coral reef predators

Since Charles Darwin's day, the abundance of life on coral reefs has been puzzling, given that most oceanic surface waters in the tropics are low in nutrients and unproductive. But now research, led by Newcastle University and published in in the journal Science Advances, has confirmed that the food web of a coral reef in the Maldives relies heavily on what comes in from the open ocean.
Tags: Science, Charles Darwin, Maldives, Newcastle University, Science Advances


Best Story Wins

Morgan Housel, on the art and power of storytelling: C. R. Hallpike is a respected anthropologist who once wrote a review of a young author's recent book on the history of humans. It states: "It would be fair to say that whenever his facts are broadly correct they are not new, and whenever he tries to strike out on his own he often gets things wrong, sometimes seriously ... [It is not] a contribution to knowledge." Two things are notable here. One is that the book's author doesn't seem to di...
Tags: Washington Post, Tech, New York Times, Charles Darwin, Ken Burns, Bill Bryson, Sapiens, Yuval Noah Harari, Harari, Morgan Housel, Hallpike, John Burr Williams, Benjamin Graham But Graham


How should we address Charles Darwin's complicated legacy?

The Descent of Man, 150 years old this month, is a work of humanist brilliance – yet its errors, particularly on gender, now make for uncomfortable reading“Light will be thrown on the origin of man and his history.” That sentence is the sole reference to human evolution in Charles Darwin’s masterwork On the Origin of Species, which in 1859 set down the theory that explains how life on Earth has evolved. Darwin had entirely excluded humans from his scheme. That tease comes in the final chapter, a...
Tags: Science, Biology, Race, World news, Earth, Genetics, Feminism, Evolution, Charles Darwin, Darwin, Descent of Man


Ten things you didn’t know about Darwin

Charles Darwin’s birthday on the 12th February is widely celebrated in the scientific community and has come to be known as “Darwin day.” In recognition of Darwin’s 212th birthday this year, we have put together a list of ten little-known facts about the father of evolution.1. Darwin didn’t actually invent the phrase “survival of the fittest.”It was invented by Herbert Spencer after reading On the Origin of Species in 1864 and adopted by Darwin in his fifth edition of the book.2. Darwin has over...
Tags: Books, Featured, India, Bank Of England, History, Jane Austen, Charles Darwin, Charles, British, Cambridge University, Darwin, Galapagos, Wallace, Wikimedia Commons, Alfred Russel Wallace, Francis Galton


YInMn Blue, the First Shade of Blue Discovered in 200 Years, Is Now Available for Artists

Photo via Oregon State University “Color is part of a spectrum, so you can’t discover a color,” says Professor Mas Subramanian, a solid-state chemist at Oregon State University. “You can only discover a material that is a particular color”—or, more precisely, a material that reflects light in such a way that we perceive it as a color. Scientific modesty aside, Subramanian actually has been credited with discovering a color—the first inorganic shade of blue in 200 years. Named “YInMn blue” —and ...
Tags: Google, Art, Science, College, US, Chemistry, Smithsonian, Charles Darwin, Npr, Oregon State, Osu, U S Environmental Protection Agency, Facebook Twitter, Oregon State University, Josh Jones, Golden


YInMn Blue, the First Shade of Blue Discovered in 200 Years, Now Available for Artists

Photo via Oregon State University “Color is part of a spectrum, so you can’t discover a color,” says Professor Mas Subramanian, a solid-state chemist at Oregon State University. “You can only discover a material that is a particular color”—or, more precisely, a material that reflects light in such a way that we perceive it as a color. Scientific modesty aside, Subramanian actually has been credited with discovering a color—the first inorganic shade of blue in 200 years. Named “YInMn blue” —and ...
Tags: Google, Art, Science, College, US, Chemistry, Smithsonian, Charles Darwin, Npr, Oregon State, Osu, U S Environmental Protection Agency, Facebook Twitter, Oregon State University, Josh Jones, Golden


New study unravels Darwin's 'abominable mystery' surrounding origin of flowering plants

The origin of flowering plants famously puzzled Charles Darwin, who described their sudden appearance in the fossil record from relatively recent geological times as an 'abominable mystery'.
Tags: Science, Charles Darwin, Darwin


New light shed on Charles Darwin's 'abominable mystery'

Historical documents are uncovered that provide clues to a puzzle that haunted Charles Darwin.
Tags: News, Charles Darwin


Charles Darwin's 165-year-old "wind hypothesis" finally proven true

Charles Darwin speculated that wingless insects thrived on windy islands because they weren't blown off the land.While the reasoning was slightly faulty, researchers have now proved Darwin's 165-year-old "wind hypothesis."This finding is yet another example of how environments shape the animals that inhabit them. All animals adapt to their environment. Even humans, self-isolating animals that we are, are shaped by our surroundings. Every one of us is interdependent with the environment that we...
Tags: Facebook, Biology, Animals, Environment, Morocco, Innovation, Antarctica, Evolution, Charles Darwin, Insects, Darwin, Derek, MADEIRA, Buddhist, Southern Ocean, St Matthew


Charles Darwin's Walking Stick

Whalebone, 1839. Darwin said the skull reminded him of his limited time on earth.  The cane was not affectation; by 1839 Darwin’s gait was suffering, perhaps due to any number of a variety of illnesses. From: Terrierman's Daily Dose To order the book.. [Author: PBurns]
Tags: Pets, Charles Darwin, Darwin, PBurns


You are more closely related to comb jellies than sponges, new study claims

The theory of evolution shows that all life stems from a single root and that we are related, more or less distantly, to every other living thing on Earth. Our closest ancestors, as Charles Darwin recognized, are to be found among the great apes. But beyond this, confusion over the branching pattern of the tree of life means that things become less clear. We know that life evolved from a common universal ancestor that gave rise to bacteria, archaea (other types of single-celled microorganisms), ...
Tags: Startups, Charles Darwin, Syndication


Inside wealthy kids' weird, pricey pandemic purchases, from $1,000 Patagonia fleeces to a $31.8 million T. rex

A wealthy person at the airport wearing Chanel pearls, of course. Matthew Sperzel/Getty Images Wealthy people snatched up bizarre items during the coronavirus pandemic — take, for example, this $31.8 million T. rex, or this $1.9 million pigeon. Many millennials and Gen Zers have also leaned into nostalgia-tinged purchases, stocking up on Patagonia vests that cost up to $1,000 and trading $1 million worth of Pokemon cards. Auction houses and online high-end marketplaces are seeing a recor...
Tags: China, Trends, Investing, Bloomberg, Economy, Paypal, New York Times, Ariana Grande, Millennials, Retail, Pokemon, Patagonia, Charles Darwin, Ed Ruscha, Graham, Francis Bacon


William Dampier’s Firsts.

Luke Fater writes for Atlas Obscura about an unexpected lexical goldmine: British-born William Dampier began a life of piracy in 1679 in Mexico’s Bay of Campeche. Orphaned in his late teens, Dampier set sail for the Caribbean and fell into a twentysomething job scramble. Seeing no future in logging or sugar plantations, he was sucked into the burgeoning realm of New World raiding, beginning what would be the first of his record-breaking three circumnavigations. A prolific diarist, Dampier kept a...
Tags: Indonesia, Mexico, Uncategorized, Spain, Linguistics, Charles Darwin, South America, Caribbean, Commonwealth, Anthony Bourdain, Atlas Obscura, Robinson Crusoe, Defoe, British Royal Navy, South Africa Australia, Bay of Campeche


Carl Sagan on the Importance of Choosing Wisely What You Read (Even If You Read a Book a Week)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VRoWGRyc_3g More than a few of us have a reading goal for 2021: a book a week, say. Some of us may have had the idea planted in our heads long ago by Carl Sagan, in his capacity as creator and host of the PBS series Cosmos: A Personal Voyage. “If I were to read a book a week for my entire adult lifetime,” he says in the clip above, “I would have read maybe a few thousand books. No more.” This is part of a longer monologue set in a library, a background tha...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Books, College, Charles Darwin, Pbs, Seoul, Carl Sagan, Facebook Twitter, Sagan, Aldous Huxley, Colin Marshall, Andre Gide, Plato 's Republic, 21st Century Los Angeles, Charles Darwin Read


Bill Gates Picks 5 Good Books for a Lousy Year

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zxlx8aZJ6mE 2020 has been a terrible year. But that hasn’t stopped Bill Gates (as is his custom) from choosing, he says, “five books that I enjoyed—some because they helped me go deeper on a tough issue, others because they offered a welcome change of pace.” Below, you can read, in his own words, the selections he published here. Range: Why Generalists Triumph in a Specialized World, by David Epstein. I started following Epstein’s work after watching his f...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Books, Microsoft, College, Germany, Bill Gates, Winston Churchill, Roger Federer, Charles Darwin, Alexander, KGB, Facebook Twitter, Larson, Epstein, Erik Larson


Sixteen facial expressions appear in every culture

A new study reviewed YouTube videos in search of commonly used expressions and the conditions that prompted them. The researchers suggest the commonality of our expressions is evidence that some emotional reactions are universal. This study is hardly the first to take on that question. Despite the often extreme differences between individuals, many elements of our existence are shared by almost everyone. We all shiver in the cold, sweat in the heat, and sometimes dream while sleeping. A new stu...
Tags: Earth, Innovation, Machine Learning, Charles Darwin, Emotions, UC Berkeley, Humanity, Faces, New Guinea, Cowen, Google Research, Alan Cowen