Posts filtered by tags: Colin Marshall[x]


 

When Edward Gorey Designed Book Covers for Classic Novels: See His Ironic-Gothic Take on Dickens, Conrad, Poe & More

Twenty years after his death, it's cooler than ever to like Edward Gorey. This is evidenced not just by the frequent posting of his intensively crosshatched, Victorian- and Edwardian-period-inflected, grimly comic art on social media, but by the number of artists who now claim him as an influence. Where, one wonders, did they come across Gorey in the first place? Having published more than a hundred books in his lifetime (if often in small runs from obscure presses), he certainly put the work o...
Tags: Google, Art, Facebook, Books, College, House, New York Times, Andy Warhol, Seoul, Doubleday, Herman Melville, Edward Gorey, Facebook Twitter, Gorey, Steven Kurutz, Colin Marshall


How John Woo Makes His Intense Action Scenes: A Video Essay

The world does not lack action movies, but well-made ones have for most of cinema history been few and far between. Despite long understanding that action sells, Hollywood seldom manages to get the most out of the genre's master craftsmen. Hence the excitement in the early 1990s when fans of Hong Kong gangster pictures learned that John Woo, that country's preeminent action auteur, was coming stateside. His streak of Hong Kong hits at that point included A Better Tomorrow, The Killer, Bu...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Hong Kong, Hollywood, Film, College, Bmw, Jackie Chan, Seoul, Facebook Twitter, Evan Puschak, Sergio Leone, Jean Claude Van Damme, John Woo, Colin Marshall, Puschak


Dessert Recipes of Iconic Thinkers: Emily Dickinson’s Coconut Cake, George Orwell’s Christmas Pudding, Alice B. Toklas’ Hashish Fudge & More

Image via Wikimedia Commons Of all the desserts to attain cultural relevance over the past century, can any hope to touch ? Calling for such ingredients as black peppercorns, shelled almonds, dried figs, and most vital of all Cannabis sativa, the recipe first appeared in 1954's The Alice B. Toklas Cook Book. (Toklas would a time when the fudge's key ingredient had become an object of much more intense public interest.) More than a how-to on Toklas' favorite dishes, the book is also a kind of...
Tags: Google, Facebook, College, France, George Orwell, Food & Drink, Literature, Seoul, Emily Dickinson, Gertrude Stein, Hemingway, Ernest Hemingway, Marcel Proust, Thomas Jefferson, Facebook Twitter, Dickinson


The Golden Age of Berlin Comes to Life in the Classic, Avant-Garde Film, Berlin: Symphony of a Metropolis (1927)

The rediscovery of Berlin began thirty years ago this November, with the demolition of the wall that had long divided the city's western and eastern halves. Specifically, the Berlin Wall had stood since 1961, meaning the younger generation of West and East Berliners had no memory of their city's being whole. In another sense, the same could be said of their parents' generation, who saw nearly a third of Berlin destroyed in the Second World War. Only the most venerable Berliners would hav...
Tags: Google, Facebook, New York, Film, College, Germany, Berlin Wall, Berlin, History, West, Seoul, Samuel Beckett, Sao Paulo, Facebook Twitter, Jenkins, Leni Riefenstahl


Divine Decks: A Visual History of Tarot: The First Comprehensive Survey of Tarot Gets Published by Taschen

The cards of the tarot, first created for play around 600 years ago and used in recent centuries for occult divination of truths about life, the universe, and everything, should by all rights be nothing more than a historical curiosity today. Yet something about the tarot still compels, even to many of us in the ever more digital, ever more data-driven 21st century. Taschen, publisher of lavish art and photo books, know this: hence, as we featured last year here on Open Culture, products...
Tags: Google, Art, Facebook, Europe, Books, England, College, History, Brooklyn, Italy, Philip K Dick, Seoul, David Lynch, Crowley, Facebook Twitter, Dali


Roald Dahl Gives a Tour of the Small Backyard Hut Where He Wrote All of His Beloved Children’s Books

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, The BFG, The Witches, Matilda: Roald Dahl wrote these and all his other beloved children's books in a hut. Just fifteen feet long and ten feet wide, it served him for 35 years as an office in which no meetings were held and no calls taken. For four hours a day, broken into two-hour morning and afternoon sessions, it was just Dahl in there — Dahl and his paper, his pencils, his sharpener, his coffee, his cigarettes, his increasingly eccentric collection ...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Books, Writing, College, Roald Dahl, Fox, Wes Anderson, Seoul, Anderson, Buckinghamshire, Rod Serling, Babylon, Facebook Twitter, Charlie, Dahl


Istanbul Captured in Beautiful Color Images from 1890: The Hagia Sophia, Topkaki Palace’s Imperial Gate & More

Even those who know nothing else about Istanbul know that it used to be called Constantinople. The official renaming happened in 1930, meaning that the photographs you see here, all of which date from around 1890, were taken, strictly speaking, not in Istanbul but Constantinople. But under any name, and despite all the other changes that have occurred over the past 130 years, the Turkish metropolis on the Bosphorus remains recognizable as the gateway between East and West it has been throughou...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Photography, Congress, College, History, West, Paris, Venice, Library Of Congress, Seoul, Istanbul, East, Facebook Twitter, Sophia, Bosphorus


Explore the Ruins of Timgad, the “African Pompeii” Excavated from the Sands of Algeria

Image via Wikimedia Commons Fifteen centuries after its fall, the Roman Empire lives on in unexpected places. Take, for instance, the former colonial city of Timgad, located in Algeria 300 miles from the capital. Founded by the Emperor Trajan around 100 AD as Colonia Marciana Ulpia Traiana Thamugadi, it thrived as a piece of Rome in north Africa before turning Christian in the third century and into a center of the Donatist sect in the fourth. The three centuries after that saw a sacking by Van...
Tags: Google, Facebook, College, Africa, History, Rome, Architecture, Unesco, Algeria, Alan, Seoul, Pompeii, Versailles, Facebook Twitter, James Bruce, Sahara


The Map of Quantum Physics: A Colorful Animation Explains the Often Misunderstood Branch of Science

In our time, few branches of science have taken as much public abuse as quantum physics, the study of how things behave at the atomic scale. It's not so much that people dislike the subject as they see fit to draft it in support of any given notion: quantum physics, one hears, proves that we have free will, or that Buddhist wisdom is true, or that there is an afterlife, or that nothing really exists. Those claims may or may not be true, but they do not help us at all to understand what q...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Science, College, Physics, Seoul, Buddhist, Facebook Twitter, Heisenberg, Wallman, Colin Marshall, Hans Bethe, 21st Century Los Angeles, Dominic Wallman


Watch Metropolis’ Cinematically Innovative Dance Scene, Restored as Fritz Lang Intended It to Be Seen (1927)

When it came out in 1927, Fritz Lang's Metropolis showed audiences the kind of wholly invented reality, hitherto beyond imagination, that could be realized in motion pictures. Its vision of a society bisected into colossal skyscrapers and underground warrens, an industrial Art Deco dystopia, continues to influence filmmakers today. This despite — or perhaps because of — the simple story it tells, in which Freder, the scion of the city of Metropolis, rebels against his father after follow...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Film, College, History, New York Times, Metropolis, Seoul, Maria, Thomas, Facebook Twitter, Fritz Lang, LANG, Georges Méliès, Colin Marshall, 21st Century Los Angeles


Tony Hawk & Architectural Historian Iain Borden Tell the Story of How Skateboarding Found a New Use for Cities & Architecture

Wouldn't we enjoy seeing our cities like an architectural historian, in command of deep knowledge about the technology, ideology, and aesthetics of the buildings we pass by every day? For most of us, this would hugely enrich our experience of the urban environment. But then so, less obviously, would seeing our cities like a skateboarder, in command of deep knowledge about how to glide, jump, and bounce along the streets, the buildings, and all the myriad pieces of infrastructure as a sur...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Florida, California, College, Sports, Architecture, United States, Arizona, Tony Hawk, Seoul, Hawk, Facebook Twitter, Borden, LAYTON, Frida Kahlo


Behold 19th-Century Japanese Firemen’s Coats, Richly Decorated with Mythical Heroes & Symbols

Some firemen today may complain about the boredom of all the time spent doing nothing at the station between calls, but when the hour comes to do battle with a serious blaze, no one can say they have it easy. Firefighting has, of course, never been a particularly relaxed gig, especially back in the days before not just water cannon-equipped helicopters, and not just fire engines, but fire hoses as we know them today. Putting out urban conflagrations without much water at hand is one thing, but ...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Fashion, Japan, College, History, Tokyo, Seoul, Facebook Twitter, Philadelphia Museum of Art, Edo, Colin Marshall, Public Domain Review, Hiroshige, Momotarō, 21st Century Los Angeles


Hear the Cristal Baschet, an Enchanting Organ Made of Wood, Metal & Glass, and Played with Wet Hands

Playing a musical instrument with wet hands usually falls somewhere between a bad idea and a very bad idea indeed. The Cristal Baschet, however, requires its players to keep their hands wet at all times, and that's hardly the only sense in which it's an exceptional musical instrument. Have a listen to the performance above, Erik Satie's Gnossienne No. 1 by Marc Antoine Millon and Frédéric Bousquet, and you'll understand at once how exceptional it sounds. Both ideally suited to Satie's co...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Music, College, France, Steven Soderbergh, Brian Eno, Seoul, Facebook Twitter, Bernard, Erik Satie, Moog, Hieronymus Bosch, Cliff Martinez, Soderbergh, Satie


Watch Manhatta, the First American Avant-Garde Film (1921)

Every city needs its ideal observer. Moreover, a city needs an ideal observer for each of its eras, and ideally each of its eras will have an ideal observer in each major medium. Booming with industry in the mid-19th century and daily absorbing more of what must have seemed like the entire world, New York fairly demanded the celebratory poetic capacity of Walt Whitman. In time, Whitman's 1860 poem "Mannahatta" would inspire two visual artists to capture the city in another time, and through a br...
Tags: Google, Facebook, New York, Film, College, Berlin, New York City, History, Manhattan, Museum of Modern Art, Seoul, Brooklyn Bridge, Hudson, Sao Paulo, Babylon, Facebook Twitter


Devo De-Evolves the Rolling Stones’ “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction”: See Their Groundbreaking Music Video and Saturday Night Live Performance (1978)

In 1978, the debut album by a forcefully idiosyncratic new wave band out of Akron, Ohio both asked and answered a question: Q: Are We Not Men? A: We Are Devo! When we look back on the still-active group's career more than 40 years later, we may still ask ourselves who, or what, Devo are. Given that they're a rock band — albeit only just recognizable as one at the time they hit it big — we could define them by their songs. Were Devo made Devo by their their first single, "Mongoloid"? Or w...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Music, Television, College, Neil Young, Mtv, Mick Jagger, Seoul, Jagger, Facebook Twitter, Roberts, Akron Ohio, Devo, Fred Willard, Padgett


Artists Give Advice to the Young: Words of Wisdom from Andrei Tarkovsky, Patti Smith, Laurie Anderson, John Cleese & Many More

When Rainer Maria Rilke began corresponding with a poetically inclined 19-year-old military-academy cadet named Franz Xaver Kappus, he inadvertently founded a genre. After Rilke's death, Kappus published the missives the two had exchanged in the 1900s as the book Letters to a Young Poet, a title to which established older artists giving advice to aspiring younger ones have paid homage ever since. Here in the 21st century, of course, their words of advice don't usually come written in let...
Tags: Google, Art, Facebook, College, Life, John Cleese, Denmark, Ed Ruscha, Jonathan Franzen, Anton Corbijn, Seoul, Ai Weiwei, Don, Facebook Twitter, Wim Wenders, Lydia Davis


How Vladimir Nabokov Wrote Lolita, “My Most Difficult Book”: A 1989 Documentary

How many of us could write a book with the impact of Lolita? The task, as revealed in the BBC Omnibus documentary above, lay almost beyond even the formidable literary powers of Vladimir Nabokov — almost, but obviously not quite. It did push him into new aesthetic, cultural, and compositional realms, as evidenced by his memories of drafting the novel on index cards in roadside motels (and when faced with especially noisy or drafty accommodations, in the backseat of the parked car) while ...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Books, Television, College, America, Bbc, United States, Ferrari, Literature, Stanley Kubrick, Martin Amis, Seoul, Vladimir Nabokov, Facebook Twitter, Byatt


A Beatboxing Buddhist Monk Creates Music for Meditation

Most of us assume Japanese Buddhist monks to be silent types. In their personal lives they may well be, but if they want to go viral, they've got to log onto the internet and make some noise. This is the lesson one draws from some of the Buddhist figures previously featured here on Open Culture: Kossan, he of the Beatles and Ramones covers, or Gy?sen Asakura, the priest who performs psychedelic services soundtracked with electronic dance music. Depending on your taste in music, their per...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Music, Japan, Australia, College, Religion, United States, Tokyo, Fukushima, Asmr, Seoul, Buddhist, Ramones, Facebook Twitter, Bach


You Can Play the New Samurai Video Game Ghost of Tsushima in “Kurosawa Mode:” An Homage to the Japanese Master

Video games are starting to look and feel like movies: even those of us who haven't gamed seriously in decades have taken notice. Nor has the convergence between the art forms — if, unlike the late Roger Ebert, you consider video games an art form in the first place — been lost on game developers themselves. While the most ambitious creators in the industry looked for inspiration from cinema even when they were working with relatively primitive digital tools, they can now pay practically...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Japan, Greece, Video Games, Film, College, History, Roger Ebert, Akira Kurosawa, Seoul, Kurosawa, Facebook Twitter, Kotaku, MacDonald, Keza Macdonald


Michel Gondry Creates a Burger King Ad That Touts New Research on Reducing Cow Flatulence & Climate Change

As every grade schooler knows (and delights in working into conversation), cows have a tendency towards flatulence. At first this just deterred kids from going into animal husbandry, but now those kids have come to associate the phenomenon of farting livestock with a larger issue of interest to them: climate change. From cows' rear ends comes methane, "one of the most harmful greenhouse gases and a major contributor to climate change," as Adam Satariano puts it in a recent New York Times...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Science, Film, College, Germany, Walmart, New York Times, Andy Warhol, Bjork, Seoul, Burger King, Noam Chomsky, McDonald, Facebook Twitter, Ramsey


Explore Flowcharts That Japanese Aquariums Use to Document the Romantic Lives of Penguins

In recent years, viewers the world over have been binge-watching a Japanese reality show called Terrace House. The New Yorker's Troy Patterson describes its format thus: "Three men and three women move into an elegant pad for a spell, while otherwise conducting their lives as usual. The members of the cast are above average in their camera-readiness and their civility, and in no other discernible way." Fueled not by the self-promotional showboating and ginned-up resentment that have become conv...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Japan, Australia, College, Los Angeles, Nature, Congo, Penguins, Seoul, Facebook Twitter, Waldman, Colin Marshall, Tamago, 21st Century Los Angeles, Johnny Waldman


Orson Welles Narrates Animations of Plato’s Cave and Kafka’s “Before the Law,” Two Parables of the Human Condition

You're held captive in an enclosed space, only able faintly to perceive the outside world. Or you're kept outside, unable to cross the threshold of a space you feel a desperate need to enter. If both of these scenarios sound like dreams, they must do so because they tap into the anxieties and suspicions in the depths of our shared subconscious. As such, they've also proven reliable material for storytellers since at least the fourth century B.C., when Plato came up with his allegory of t...
Tags: Google, Facebook, College, Orson Welles, Animation, Literature, Philosophy, Seoul, Kafka, Facebook Twitter, Plato, Wells, Bald Mountain, Franz Kafka, Colin Marshall, John Malkovich Read Plato


An Introduction to Hagia Sophia: After 85 Years as a Museum, It’s Set to Become a Mosque Again

No tour of Istanbul can fail to include Hagia Sophia. The same is true enough of the British Museum in London or the Louvre in Paris, but Hagia Sophia is more than a museum: it's also spent different stretches of its near-millennium-and-a-half of existence as an Eastern Orthodox cathedral, a Roman Catholic cathedral, and a mosque. Stripped of its religious function in the mid-1930s by the administration of President Mustafa Kemal Atatürk, remembered for his creation of a secular Turkish ...
Tags: Travel, Google, Facebook, London, College, Turkey, Syria, Ars Technica, History, Bbc, Architecture, Egypt, Paris, Erdogan, Seoul, Lebanon


Bill Nye Shows How Face Masks Actually Protect You–and Why You Should Wear Them

Like many Americans of my generation, I grew up having things explained to me by Bill Nye. Flight, magnets, simple machines, volcanoes: there seemed to be nothing he and his team of young lieutenants couldn't break down in a clear, humorous, and wholly non-boring manner. He didn't ask us to come to him, but met us where we already were: watching television. The zenith of the popularity of his PBS series Bill Nye the Science Guy passed a quarter-century ago, and the world has changed a bi...
Tags: Health, Google, Facebook, Science, Instagram, College, America, Nye, Seoul, Bill Nye, Facebook Twitter, Colin Marshall, Maria Popova, 21st Century Los Angeles


An Introduction to Jean Baudrillard, Who Predicted the Simulation-Like Reality in Which We Live

Each and every morning, many of us wake up and immediately check on what's happening in the world. Sometimes these events stir emotions within us, and occasionally we act on those emotions, which raise in us a desire to affect the world ourselves. But does this entire ritual involve anything real? While performing it we don't experience the world, but only media; when we respond, we respond not with action in the world, but only with action in media. We have directly interacted, to put i...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Hbo, College, Philosophy, Seoul, Chernobyl, Adam Curtis, Facebook Twitter, Roland Barthes, Geiger, Marshall McLuhan, McLuhan, Kenneth Goldsmith, Colin Marshall, Jean Baudrillard


Salvador Dalí Explains Why He Was a “Bad Painter” and Contributed “Nothing” to Art (1986)

Not so very long ago, Salvador Dalí was the most famous living painter in the world. When the BBC's Arena came to shoot an episode about him in 1986, they asked him what that exalted state felt like. "I don't know if I am the most famous painter in the world," Dalí responds, "because lots of the people who ask for my autograph in the street don't know if I'm a singer, a film star, a madman, a writer — they don't know what I am." He was, in one sense or another, most of those things and o...
Tags: Google, Art, Facebook, Television, College, Bbc, Raphael, Salvador Dalí, Dick Cavett, Seoul, Sigmund Freud, Freud, Mozart, Facebook Twitter, Arena, Velázquez


The Film Music of Ennio Morricone (RIP) Beautifully Performed by the Danish National Symphony Orchestra Play: “The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly” & Much More

What we think of as "film music" today is a creation of only a few inventive and original composers, one fewer of whom walks the Earth as of yesterday. Though Ennio Morricone will be remembered first for his association with spaghetti western master Sergio Leone, his career in film scores spanned half a century and encompassed work for some of the most acclaimed directors of that period: his countrymen like Michelangelo Antonioni, Bernardo Bertolucci, Pier Paolo Pasolini, but also such c...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Music, Hollywood, Film, College, Earth, Quentin Tarantino, Seoul, Ennio Morricone, Tarantino, Facebook Twitter, Leone, Morricone, Sergio Leone, Salo


Watch Vintage Footage of Tokyo, Circa 1910, Get Brought to Life with Artificial Intelligence

For more than 200 years, the rulers of Japan kept the country all but closed to the outside world. In 1854, the "Black Ships" of American commander Matthew Perry arrived to demand an end to Japanese isolation — and a commencement of Japanese world trade. Within decades, many fashion-forward Europeans and even Americans couldn't get enough things Japanese, especially the art, crafts, and clothing that exemplified kinds of beauty they'd never known before. (Vincent van Gogh was a particula...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Japan, Technology, Film, College, New York City, History, Artificial Intelligence, Tokyo, Seoul, Facebook Twitter, Vincent Van Gogh, Matthew Perry, Colin Marshall, Belle Epoque Paris


16th Century Bookwheels, the E-Readers of the Renaissance, Get Brought to Life by 21st Century Designers

Most of us, through our computers or our even our phones, have access to more books than we could ever read in one lifetime. That certainly wouldn't have been the case in, say, the middle ages, when books — assuming you belonged to the elite who could read them in the first place — were rare and precious objects. Both books and literacy became more common during the Renaissance, though acquaintance with both could still be considered the sign of a potentially serious scholar. And for the...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Books, Technology, College, History, Seoul, Dick, RIT, Atlas Obscura, Facebook Twitter, CNC, Rochester Institute of Technology, Joshua Foer, Foer, Colin Marshall


An Animated Introduction to the Pioneering Anthropologist Margaret Mead

Modern Western societies haven't solved the problem of sex, but Samoa has the answer. Or at least it does according to the work of influential anthropologist Margaret Mead, subject of the animated introduction from Alain de Botton's School of Life above. Her mentor Franz Boas, the founder of anthropology in the United States, saw not a world progressing "in a linear fashion from barbarism to savagery to civilization" but "teeming with separate cultures, each with their own unique perspec...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Books, College, History, United States, Las Vegas, Seoul, Facebook Twitter, Hunter Thompson, Samoa, Margaret Mead, Mead, Boas, Colin Marshall, Claude Lévi Strauss