Posts filtered by tags: Computer Science[x]


 

AI Software Creates “New” Nirvana, Jimi Hendrix, Doors & Amy Winehouse Songs: Hear Tracks from the “Lost Tapes of the 27 Club”

What would pop music sound like now if the musicians of the 27 club had lived into maturity? Can we know where Amy Winehouse would have gone, musically, if she had taken another path? What if Hendrix’s influence over guitar heroics (and less obvious styles) came not only from his sixties playing but from an unimaginable late-career cosmic blues? Whether questions like these can ever be given real flesh and blood, so to speak, by artificial intelligence may still be very much undecided. O...
Tags: Google, Music, College, Toronto, Atlanta, Amy Winehouse, Computer Science, Rolling Stone, Beatles, Kurt Cobain, Magenta, Nme, Facebook Twitter, Bach, Hendrix, Josh Jones


How to Automate Every Task on Windows or macOS

Time is something that most of us want more of, and one way to reclaim some of the minutes in the day is enlist your computer to automatically take care of repetitive tasks like renaming files, resizing images, and launching apps. With the right software, this is doable, and we’re going to introduce you to some of our…Read more...
Tags: Science, Microsoft, Software, Computer Science, Source Code, Macro, Macros, Computer Programming, Macro Express, Keyboard Maestro, System Software, Technology Internet, Automise, Automate Desktop


The 20 best US schools for computer science and information systems

SeanPavonePhoto/Getty Images QS Quacquarelli Symonds published its World University Rankings by Subject on Wednesday. MIT ranked at the top of the computer science and information systems ranking. These are the top US schools for computer science and information systems. Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories. Global higher education research company QS Quacquarelli Symonds just published its 11th annual rankings of the best global colleges and universities for 51 differen...
Tags: Education, Stanford, New York City, US, Careers, Los Angeles, Trends, Atlanta, Features, Mit, Chicago, Cambridge, Columbia University, University Of Chicago, University of Pennsylvania, Computer Science


SuperAnnotate, a computer vision platform, partners with with open-source to spread visual ML

SuperAnnotate, a NoCode computer vision platform, is partnering with OpenCV, a non-profit organization that has built a large collection of open-source computer vision algorithms. The move means startups and entrepreneurs will be able to build their own AI models and allow cameras to detect objects using machine learning. SuperAnnotate has so far raised $3M to date from investors including Point Nine Capital, Fathom Capital and Berkeley SkyDeck Fund. The AI-powered computer vision platform for d...
Tags: TC, Europe, Raspberry Pi, Articles, Tech, Artificial Intelligence, Computing, Machine Learning, Computer Science, Berkeley, Computer Vision, Point Nine Capital, Opencv, SuperAnnotate, Point Nine Capital Fathom Capital, AI Kit


SuperAnnotate, a computer vision platform, partners with OpenCV to spread visual ML

SuperAnnotate, a NoCode computer vision platform, is partnering with OpenCV, a non-profit organization that has built a large collection of open-source computer vision algorithms. The move means startups and entrepreneurs will be able to build their own AI models and allow cameras to detect objects using machine learning. SuperAnnotate has so far raised $3M to date from investors including Point Nine Capital, Fathom Capital and Berkeley SkyDeck Fund. The AI-powered computer vision platform for d...
Tags: TC, Europe, Raspberry Pi, Articles, Tech, Artificial Intelligence, Computing, Machine Learning, Computer Science, Berkeley, Computer Vision, Point Nine Capital, Opencv, SuperAnnotate, Point Nine Capital Fathom Capital, AI Kit


Classiq raises $10.5M Series A round for its quantum software development platform

Classiq, a Tel Aviv-based startup that aims to make it easier for computer scientists and developers to create quantum algorithms and applications, today announced that it has raised a $10.5 million Series A round led by Team8 Capital and Wing Capital. Entrée Capital, crowdfunding platform OurCrowd and Sumitomo Corporation (through IN Venture) also participated in this round, which follows the company’s recent $4 million seed round led by Entrée Capital. The idea behind Classiq, which currently ...
Tags: Startups, Science, Microsoft, Funding, Tel Aviv, Tech, Ibm, Computer Science, Science and Technology, Quantum, Team8, Ourcrowd, Emerging-technologies, Quantum Computing, Sumitomo Corporation, Entree Capital


MIT’s Introduction to Deep Learning: A Free Online Course

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=njKP3FqW3Sk MIT has posted online its introductory course on deep learning, which covers applications to computer vision, natural language processing, biology, and more. Students “will gain foundational knowledge of deep learning algorithms and get practical experience in building neural networks in TensorFlow.” Prerequisites assume calculus (i.e. taking derivatives) and linear algebra (i.e. matrix multiplication). Experience in Python is helpful but not n...
Tags: Google, Facebook, College, Mit, Online Courses, Computer Science, Facebook Twitter


With $29M in funding, Isovalent launches its cloud-native networking and security platform

Isovalent, a startup that aims to bring networking into the cloud-native era, today announced that it has raised a $29 million Series A round led by Andreesen Horowitz and Google. In addition, the company today officially launched its Cilium platform (which was in stealth until now) to help enterprises connect, observe and secure their applications. The open-source Cilium project is already seeing growing adoption, with Google choosing it for its new GKE dataplane, for example. Other users in...
Tags: Google, Security, Startups, Cloud, Enterprise, Tech, Ceo, Computing, Linux, Computer Science, Kernel, Operating Systems, Vmware, Cto, Andreesen Horowitz, Kubernetes


Should Retraining Programs for Laid-Off Retail Workers Include Computer Programming?

Appearing on ABC, former Chicago Mayor and Obama White House Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel on Friday volunteered some suggestions for an economic recovery plan that America's next president could implement. "One of the things we've got to do to rebuild, mainly on infrastructure," he begins, before switching to additional ideas for also offering a more promising future to laid-off retail workers by trying to train them for better jobs. "There's going to be people like at JCPenney and other retail —...
Tags: Abc, America, Tech, Chicago, Computer Science, Rahm Emanuel, Jcpenney, Emanuel, Chicago Public Schools, Slashdot, Rahm, Obama White House


Discovered: The User Manual for the Oldest Surviving Computer in the World

Image by Clemens Pfeiffer via Wikimedia Commons The first computer I ever sat before, the 1983 Apple IIe, had a manual the size of a textbook, which included a primer on programming languages and a chapter entitled “Getting Down to Business and Pleasure.” By “pleasure,” Apple mostly meant “electronic worksheets,” “word processors,” and “database management.” (They hadn’t fully established themselves as the fun one yet.) Getting these programs running took real effort and patience, especially co...
Tags: Apple, Google, College, Nazis, Munich, Alan Turing, MacBook Air, Computer Science, Bavaria, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, Wikimedia Commons, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology ETH, Durham NC Follow, Konrad Zuse, Zuse


Want to hire and retain high-quality developers? Give them stimulating work

Phil Alves Contributor Share on Twitter Devsquad founder and CEO Phil Alves is an expert entrepreneur with more than 15 years of experience in the tech industry leading product development teams for multiple clients. Software developers are some of the most in-demand workers on the planet. Not only that, they’re complex creatures with unique demands in terms of how they define job fulfillment. With demand for developers on the...
Tags: Google, Startups, TC, Column, Developer, Entrepreneurship, Tech, Recruiting, Larry Page, Information Technology, Sergey Brin, Software Development, Computer Science, Hiring, Programmer, Phil Alves


How to Manage Your Time More Effectively: The Science of Applying Computer Algorithms to Our Everyday Lives

Who among us hasn't wished to be as efficient as a computer? While computers seem to do everything at once, we either flit or plod from task to task, often getting sidetracked or even lost. At this point most have relinquished the dream of true "multitasking," which turns out to lie not only beyond the reach of humans but, technically speaking, beyond the reach of computers as well. "Done right, computers move so fluidly between their various responsibilities, they give the illusion of d...
Tags: Google, Productivity, Facebook, College, United States, Computer Science, Seoul, TED Talks, Facebook Twitter, Colin Marshall, Robert Pirsig, Brian Christian, Tom Griffiths, Franz Kafka Haruki Murakami Stephen King, 21st Century Los Angeles


Amazing interactive globe shows the very different location of your city 750 million years ago

Earth has changed quite a bit in the past 750 million years or so. Due to plate tectonics—the shifting of the Earth's surface—the location of your city is likely far from where it is today. Computer scientist Ian Webster created this stunning interactive "Ancient Earth Globe" that pinpoints your city where it was located at various points in deep history, from 20 million to 750 million years ago. You can also learn about what was happening with the flora and fauna at the time. From CNN: ...
Tags: Post, Maps, Science, News, Earth, Cnn, Geology, Visualizations, Computer Science, Globes, Data Visualizations, Webster, Ian Webster, Christopher Scotese Scotese


Revisit Scenes of Daily Life in Amsterdam in 1922, with Historic Footage Enhanced by Artificial Intelligence

Welkom in Amsterdam… 1922. Neural network artist Denis Shiryaev describes himself as “an artistic machine-learning person with a soul.” For the last six months, he’s been applying himself to re-rendering documentary footage of city life—Belle Epoque Paris, Tokyo at the start of the the Taish? era, and New York City in 1911—the year of the Triangle Shirtwaist Fire. It’s possible you’ve seen the footage before, but never so alive in feel. Shiryaev’s renderings trick modern eyes with artifi...
Tags: Travel, Google, Technology, Film, Indonesia, Youtube, College, New York City, Data, Artificial Intelligence, Netherlands, Amsterdam, Tokyo, Computer Science, Facebook Twitter, Surinam


Jesus, SaaS and digital tithing

Will Robbins Contributor Share on Twitter Will Robbins is an early-stage investor at Contrary. More posts by this contributor Voodoo Games thrives by upending conventional product design Venture investing in elder tech There are more than 300,000 congregations in the U.S., and entrepreneurs are creating billion-dollar companies by building software to service them. Welcome to church tech. The s...
Tags: TC, Column, Florida, Hollywood, Media, Religion, Tech, Software, Netflix, United States, SaaS, Jesus, Payments, Computer Science, Free Software, Leader


What I Learned About Innovation From Learning How to Code

I recently completed Harvard’s CS50: Introduction to Computer Science, offered online though edX. Given my role as a Legal Tech and Innovation Specialist, I work with a lot of technology. Gaining a deeper understanding of computer science seemed like an enjoyable side-project. I was partially correct. (Sample code from one of my projects) While learning about concepts like data structures, memory, and arrays is incredibly helpful, I was not prepared for how challenging it would be to apply the...
Tags: Law, Harvard, Computer Science, Legal Technology, Dunning Kruger, Gary Pisano


Watch a Mesmerizing Stream of Unwatched YouTube Videos: Astronaut.io Lets You Discover the Hidden Dimensions of the World’s Largest Video Platform

When times are hard, it often helps to zoom out for a moment—in search of a wider perspective, historical context, the forest full of trees… Astronaut.io, an algorithmic YouTube-based project by Andrew Wong and James Thompson, offers a big picture that’s as restorative as it is odd: Today, you are an Astronaut. You are floating in inner space 100 miles above the surface of Earth. You peer through your window and this is what you see. If the stars look very different today, it’s because they’re ...
Tags: Travel, Google, Technology, Youtube, College, Life, New York City, Argentina, Computer Science, Montreal, Thompson, Facebook Twitter, Wong, Andrew Wong, James Thompson, Ayun Halliday


All the companies from Y Combinator’s W20 Demo Day, Part II: Consumer Companies

Y Combinator’s Demo Day was a bit different this time around. As concerns grew over the spread of COVID-19, Y Combinator shifted the event format away from the two-day gathering in San Francisco we’ve gotten used to, instead opting to have its entire class debut to invited investors and media via YC’s Demo Day website simultaneously. In a bit of a surprise twist, YC also moved Demo Day forward one week citing accelerated pacing from investors. Alas, this meant switching up its plan for each comp...
Tags: Google, TC, Facebook, UK, Instagram, Indonesia, India, Africa, San Francisco, Tech, Brazil, Medicare, Computer Science, Mumbai, Bollywood, Gucci


Why we like a good robot story

We have been telling stories about machines with minds for almost three thousand years. In the Iliad, written around 800 BCE, Homer describes the oldest known AI: “golden handmaidens” created by Hephaestus, the disabled god of metalworking. They “seemed like living maidens” with “intelligence… voice and vigour”, and “bustled about supporting their master.” In the Odyssey, Homer also gave us the first autonomous vehicles — the self-sailing ships that take Odysseus home to Ithaca, navigating “by t...
Tags: Books, Featured, France, Robots, Computer Science, Sigmund Freud, Sandman, Olimpia, Freud, Ian McEwan, Ithaca, Odysseus, Hoffmann, Kang, Nathanael, Truitt


Larry Tesler, the father of cut, copy, paste, has died

Larry Tesler, the PARC Xerox computer scientist who coined the terms cut, copy, and paste, has died. Born in 1945 in New York, Tesler went on to study computer science at Stanford University, and after graduation he dabbled in artificial intelligence research (long before it became a deeply concerning tool) and became involved in the anti-war and anti-corporate monopoly movements, with companies like IBM as one of his deserving targets. In 1973 Tesler took a job at the Xerox Palo Alto Research C...
Tags: Post, News, Obituaries, Ibm, Computer Science, Gizmodo, Computer History, Stanford University, Xerox PARC, Tesler, Larry Tesler, Jim Leftwich, PARC Xerox, New York Tesler, Xerox Palo Alto Research Center PARC, Tim Mott


The Computer Scientist Responsible For Cut, Copy, and Paste, Has Passed Away

The advent of the personal computer wasn’t just about making these powerful machines available to everyone, it was also about making them accessible and usable, even for those lacking a computer science degree. Larry Tesler, who passed away on Monday, might not be a household name like Steve Jobs or Bill Gates, but…Read more...
Tags: Apple, Science, Steve Jobs, Macintosh, Rip, Computer Science, Newton, Lisa, Xerox PARC, Larry Tesler


"Edge AI": encapsulating machine learning classifiers in lightweight, energy-efficient, airgapped chips

Writing in Wired, Boing Boing contributor Clive Thompson discusses the rise and rise of "Edge AI" startups that sell lightweight machine-learning classifiers that run on low-powered chips and don't talk to the cloud, meaning that they are privacy respecting and energy efficient. Thompson focuses on Picovoice, which makes a speech-recognition system that has a limited vocabulary and whose per-unit hardware costs are "a few bucks apiece" -- cheap enough that you can embed one in a coffee-mak...
Tags: Apple, Amazon, Post, News, Privacy, Nsa, Machine Learning, Ai, Computer Science, Skype, Voice Assistants, Alexa, Thompson, Clive Thompson, Bill Ward, Todd Mozer


The bubbles in VR, cryptocurrency and machine learning are all part of the parallel computing bubble

Yesterday's column by John Naughton in the Observer revisited Nathan Myhrvold's 1997 prediction that when Moore's Law runs out -- that is, when processors stop doubling in speed every 18 months through an unbroken string of fundamental breakthroughs -- that programmers would have to return to the old disciplines of writing incredibly efficient code whose main consideration was the limits of the computer that runs on it. I'd encountered this idea several times over the years, whenever it see...
Tags: Post, Business, News, Law, Bitcoin, Vr, Machine Learning, Ai, Computer Science, Cryptocurrency, Moore, Naughton, John Naughton, Nathan Myhrvold, Moore's Law, ML


Wireheading: when machine learning systems jolt their reward centers by cheating

Machine learning systems are notorious for cheating, and there's a whole menagerie of ways that these systems achieve their notional goals while subverting their own purpose, with names like "model stealing, rewarding hacking and poisoning attacks." AI researcher Stuart Armstrong (author of 2014's Smarter Than Us: The Rise of Machine Intelligence) takes a stab at defining a specific kind of ML cheating, "wireheading" -- a term borrowed from Larry Niven's novels, where it refers to junkies w...
Tags: Post, News, Cheating, Machine Learning, Ai, Computer Science, Larry Niven, Robinson, Stuart Armstrong, Unintended Consequences, Machine Intelligence, ML, Jargon Watch, Goodhart Curse, Reward Hacking, Stuart Armstrong Less Wrong


Trying to land on some runways causes the Boeing 737's control screens to go black

The Boeing 737 Next Generation has a gnarly bug: on instrument approach to seven specific runways, the six cockpit display units used to guide the pilots to their landing go suddenly black and they remain black until the pilots choose a different runway to land on. The FAA has ordered Boeing to fix its software. The seven affected runways are: Pine Bluffs, WY; Wayne County, OH; Chippewa County, MI; Cavern City, NM; Barrow, AK; La Mina, La Guajira, Colombia; and Cheddi Jagan, Georgetown, G...
Tags: Post, News, Iran, Ukraine, Hud, Bp, Computer Science, Faa, Boeing, FMC, Wayne County, Barrow Alaska, Georgetown Guyana, Chippewa County, Gareth Corfield, Boeing Business Jet BBJ


AI, machine learning, and other frothy tech subjects remained overhyped in 2019

Rodney Brooks (previously) is a distinguished computer scientist and roboticist (he's served as as head of MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory and CTO of Irobot); two years ago, he published a list of "dated predictions" intended to cool down some of the hype about self-driving cars, machine learning, and robotics, hype that he viewed as dangerously gaseous. Every year, Brooks revisits those predictions to see how he's doing (to "self certify the seriousness of my ...
Tags: Post, News, Hype, Artificial Intelligence, Robots, Gartner, Ai, Mars, Computer Science, Irobot, Cto, Brooks, Asimov, Rodney Brooks, Dated Predictions


Neuroscientists Discover New Kind of Signal in the Human Brain

Scientists have uncovered a new kind of electrical process in the human brain that could play a key role in the unique way our brains compute.Read more...
Tags: Science, Neuroscience, Computer Science, Neurons


AI is dangerous, but not for the reasons you think.

In 1997, Deep Blue defeated Garry Kasparov, the reigning world chess champion. In 2011, Watson defeated Ken Jennings and Brad Rutter, the world’s best Jeopardy players. In 2016, AlphaGo defeated Ke Jie, the world’s best Go player. In 2017, DeepMind unleashed AlphaZero, which trounced the world-champion computer programs at chess, Go, and shogi.If humans are no longer worthy opponents, then perhaps computers have moved so far beyond our intelligence that we should rely on their superior intellige...
Tags: Books, Science, Featured, Stanford, Artificial Intelligence, Hillary Clinton, Watson, Ai, Computer Science, Social Sciences, Gary Smith, Garry Kasparov, Ken Jennings, Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence, Nigel Richards, Oren Etzioni


AI Now's annual report: stop doing "emotion detection"; stop "socially sensitive" facial recognition; make AI research diverse and representative -- and more

Every year, the AI Now Institute (previously) publishes a deep, thoughtful, important overview of where AI research is and the ethical gaps in AI's use, and makes a list of a dozen urgent recommendations for the industry, the research community, and regulators and governments. This year's report is especially important, as algorithmic discrimination, junk science, bad labor practices, and inappropriate deployments have gained salience and urgency. The Institute's top recommendations are: ...
Tags: Health, Post, News, Privacy, Machine Learning, Ai, Computer Science, Illinois, Facial Recognition, Biometrics, Ring, Institute, Algorithmic Bias, Belt and Road, Ai Now, AI Now Institute


CS Education Week

This week is CS Education Week. There are CS Education week events all around the world, mostly in schools where students will do an hour of coding. In NYC, where I do most of my CS Education work, there are CS Education week events in many/most of the public school buildings this week. As I could not be in NYC this week, I went onto Twitter this morning to see what is going on and saw this: Hopscotch Coding at PS 306 @techstrodinaire #CSForAllNYC, #CSEdWeek, @CSForAllNYC pic.twit...
Tags: NYC, Uncategorized, Trends, CS, Computer Science, Brooklyn Nets, Lucy, Williamsburg, CS Education, Spencer Dinwiddie, Little Neck Queens, Cs Education Week, Hopscotch Coding Young, Elizabeth Kyrou