Posts filtered by tags: Current Biology[x]


 

Scientists found a way to communicate with people while they're asleep and dreaming

Roos Koole/Getty Images In a new study, scientists found they could communicate with people who are lucid dreaming. Lucid dreaming is when a person is aware they are dreaming. The dreamers could answer yes-or-no questions and solve basic math problems while asleep. Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories. Scientists have identified a new phenomenon they describe as "interactive dreaming" - when people experiencing deep sleep and lucid dreams are able to follow instructions,...
Tags: Science, News, Sleep, Biology, US, Trends, REM, Dreams, Lucid, Northwestern University, Eeg, David Nield, Current Biology, France Germany the Netherlands, ScienceAlert, Ken Paller


Modeling study of ancient thumbs traces the history of hominin thumb dexterity

Researchers analyzing the biomechanics and efficiency of the thumb across different fossil human species using virtual muscle modeling, revealed new insight into when these abilities first arose and what they've meant for the development of more complex human culture. The findings, appearing January 28 in the journal Current Biology, suggest that a fundamental aspect of human thumb opposition appeared approximately 2 million years ago and was not found in the earliest proposed stone tool makers.
Tags: Science, Current Biology


Territorial red squirrels live longer when they're friendly with their neighbors

Researchers publishing December 17, 2020 in the journal Current Biology found that red squirrels in the Yukon have a greater chance of survival when living near neighbors. These fitness benefits depended on familiarity, or how long the same squirrels lived next to each other. These benefits were more pronounced in older squirrels, whom the data suggested could sharply offset the effects of aging by maintaining all of their neighbors from one year to the next.
Tags: Science, Yukon, Current Biology


Twinkling, star-shaped brain cells may hold the key to why, how we sleep

A new study published today in the journal Current Biology suggests that star-shaped brain cells known as astrocytes could be as important to the regulation of sleep as neurons. The study builds new momentum toward ultimately solving the mystery of why we sleep and how sleep works in the brain. The discovery may also set the stage for potential future treatment strategies for sleep disorders and neurological diseases and other conditions associated with troubled sleep.
Tags: Science, Current Biology


Fossil reveals 'cute' baby dinosaur's skull features

Researchers have uncovered what the facial features of a baby titanosaurus embryo looked like using cutting-edge imaging technology.This in the first-ever discovery of a 3D embryonic titanosaurian sauropod skull.The embryo reveals that titanosaur babies had binocularly focused vision in the front of the head rather than on each side, retracted openings on their snout, and a single horn in the front of their head. Researchers have uncovered what the facial features of a baby titanosaurus looked...
Tags: Science, Cnn, United States, New York Times, Innovation, Brazil, Argentina, Patagonia, Jurassic Park, Dinosaurs, Slovakia, Fossils, University of Edinburgh, Paleontology, University of Manchester, Stephen Brusatte


Ancient genomes suggest woolly rhinos went extinct due to climate change, not overhunting

Although overhunting led to the demise of some prehistoric megafauna after the last ice age, a study appearing August 13 in the journal Current Biology found that the extinction of the woolly rhinoceros may have been caused by climate change. By sequencing ancient DNA from 14 woolly rhinos, researchers found that their population remained stable and diverse until only a few thousand years before it disappeared from Siberia, when temperatures likely rose too high.
Tags: Science, Siberia, Current Biology


This fruit attracts birds with an unusual way of making itself metallic blue

Instead of relying solely on pigments, the metallic blue fruits of Viburnum tinus use structural color to reflect blue light, a mechanism rarely seen in plants. Researchers reporting August 6 in the journal Current Biology show that the fruits use lipid nanostructures in their cell walls, a previously unknown mechanism of structural color, to get their striking blue--which may also double as a signal to birds that the fruits are full of nutritious fats.
Tags: Science, Current Biology


Special glasses help colorblind people see more hues, even with glasses off

Special glasses constructed with technically advanced "spectral notch filters" enhance color vision for individuals with the most common type of red-green color blindness. The ability for colorblind participants to experience expanded color channels was demonstrated even after they took the glasses off.At least 8 percent of men and .5 percent of women have red-green color vision deficiency (CVD). A new study may be a breakthrough in treating the most common type of red-green color blindness.Res...
Tags: Health, Science, Research, United States, Innovation, UC Davis, Frances, CVD, Current Biology, Blindness, Sight, UC Davis Health, UC Davis Eye Center, Brain Research Institute, John S Werner, Alex Zbylut


Twenty-year study tracks a sparrow song that went "viral" across Canada

With the help of citizen scientists, researchers have tracked how one rare sparrow song went "viral" across Canada, traveling over 3,000 kilometers between 2000 and 2019 and wiping out a historic song ending. The study, publishing July 2 in the journal Current Biology, reports that white-throated sparrows from British Columbia to Ontario have ditched their traditional three-note-ending song in favor of a unique two-note-ending variant--although researchers don't know what made the new song so co...
Tags: Science, Canada, British Columbia, Ontario, Current Biology


Black rhinos eavesdrop on the alarm calls of hitchhiking oxpeckers to avoid humans

In Swahili, red-billed oxpeckers are called Askari wa kifaru, or 'the rhino's guard.' Now, a paper appearing April 9 in the journal Current Biology suggests that this indigenous name rings true: red-billed oxpeckers may behave like sentinels, sounding an alarm to potential danger. By tracking wild black rhinos, researchers found that those carrying oxpeckers were far better at sensing and avoiding humans than those without the hitchhiking bird.
Tags: Science, Current Biology


7 healthy snacking strategies to maintain energy and good nutrition

There’s no doubt that snacking is on the rise and, in fact, may even be replacing traditional meals. The snacking trend is fueled by busy schedules and the need for fast and convenient options on-the-go. While snacks have the potential to provide a nutritious source of energy between meals, snacking often contributes to excess sugar and fat in the diet and often less healthy eating patterns. Eating high-calorie snacks has the potential to disrupt the biological clock, causing overeating. A study...
Tags: Nutrition, Sport, Things To Do, Soccer, Heart Association, Current Biology, Top Stories LADN, Top Stories OCR, Top Stories PE, Top Stories IVDB, Top Stories RDF, Top Stories Sun, Top Stories Breeze, Top Stories LBPT, Top Stories WDN, Top Stories SGVT


Soft robot fingers gently grasp deep-sea jellyfish

Marine biologists have adopted "soft robotic linguine fingers" as tools to conduct their undersea research. In a study appearing February 24 in the journal Current Biology, scientists found that jellyfish held by ultra-soft robotic fingers expressed significantly fewer stress-related genes than when braced by traditional submersible grippers. Shaped like the famous noodles, this new robotic technology allows for the collection of ecological data in a gentler, less invasive manner.
Tags: Science, Current Biology


Working Out Too Much Could Lead To Impulsive Eating, Rash Purchasing Decisions

(CNN) — It turns out that overworking your brain with either physical or mental exercise may lower your ability to delay self-gratification. And that may set you up for poor choices in your eating habits, self-care and finances. A new study published Thursday in the journal Current Biology asked elite endurance athletes to overtrain for three out of nine weeks and compared them to a group who did a normal 9-week training program. Not only did those overworked athletes perform worse on a cycling ...
Tags: Health, News, Cnn, Exercise, Overeating, Joe, University College London, Current Biology, Time Warner Company, Blain, Cable News Network Inc, Bastien Blain, Marc Andre Cornier, Cornier


Influential excrement: How life in Antarctica thrives on penguin poop

For more than half a century, biologists studying Antarctica focused their research on understanding how organisms cope with the continent's severe drought and the coldest conditions on the planet. A new study published Thursday in the journal Current Biology found the influential excrement supported thriving communities of mosses and lichens, which in turn sustained vast numbers of microscopic animals like springtails and mites for more than 1,000 meters (yards) beyond the colony. "What we se...
Tags: Science, Antarctica, Current Biology, Stef Bokhorst, Department of Ecological Sciences


How life on desolate Antarctica thrives on penguin and seal poop

For more than half a century, biologists studying Antarctica focused their research on understanding how organisms cope with the continent's severe drought and the coldest conditions on the planet. A new study published Thursday in the journal Current Biology found the influential excrement supported thriving communities of mosses and lichens, which in turn sustained vast numbers of microscopic animals like springtails and mites for more than one 1,000 meters (yards) beyond the colony. "What w...
Tags: Science, Antarctica, Current Biology, Stef Bokhorst, Department of Ecological Sciences


17 signs we're in the middle of a 6th mass extinction

The planet appears to be undergoing a sixth mass extinction: the sixth time in the history of life on Earth that global fauna has experienced a major collapse in numbers. Historically, mass extinctions have been caused by catastrophic events like asteroid collisions. This time, human activities are to blame. A new report from the United Nations found that up to 1 million species are threatened with extinction. The primary culprits are deforestation, mining, and carbon dioxide-emissions, which ...
Tags: UK, Trends, Earth, United Nations, Un, Atlantic Ocean, Nature Communications, Current Biology, Francisco Sánchez Bayo


Seafood mislabeling rate less than 1 percent for products with MSC ecolabel vs. global average of 30 percent

DNA barcoding of more than 1,400 Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) labelled products has shown that less than 1 percent were mislabeled, compared with a reported average global seafood mislabeling rate of 30 percent. These results published in the journal Current Biology suggests that the MSC's ecolabeling and Chain of Custody program is an effective deterrent for systematic and deliberate species substitution and fraud.
Tags: Current Biology, Marine Stewardship Council MSC


Gently stroking babies before medical procedures may reduce pain processing

Researchers found that gently stroking a baby seems to reduce activity in the infant brain associated with painful experiences. Their results, appearing Dec. 17 in the journal Current Biology, suggest that lightly brushing an infant at a certain speed -- of approximately 3 centimeters per second -- could provide effective pain relief before clinically necessary medical procedures.
Tags: Science, Current Biology


Neandertal genes give clues to human brain evolution

A distinctive feature of modern humans is our round (globular) skulls and brains. On Dec. 13, in the journal Current Biology, researchers report that present-day humans who carry particular Neandertal DNA fragments have heads that are slightly less rounded, revealing genetic clues to the evolution of modern brain shape and function.
Tags: Science, Current Biology


Remote South Atlantic Islands Are Flooded With Plastic

Thirty years ago, the ocean waters surrounding British islands in the South Atlantic were near-pristine. But plastic waste has increased a hundredfold since then, and is ten times greater than it was a decade ago. From a report: The islands of the British Overseas Territories in the South Atlantic, including St. Helena, East Falkland, and Ascension Island, are so tiny and remote that most people don't even realize they exist. For centuries, that kept them relative clean and pristine, but in rece...
Tags: Tech, South Atlantic, Current Biology, Marlene Cimons, James Clark Ross, South Atlantic Islands, St Helena East Falkland, Nexus Media


What Ecstasy Does To Octopuses

Gul Dolen, a neuroscientist at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine who studies how the cells and chemicals in animal brains influence animals' social lives, gave ecstasy to octopuses and recorded her observations. The study, published in the journal Current Biology, suggests that the psychoactive drug that can make people feel extra loving toward others also has the same effect on octopuses. An anonymous reader shares the report from The Atlantic: [Dolen] and her colleague Eric Edsinger put fiv...
Tags: Atlantic, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Current Biology, Dolen, Gul Dolen, Eric Edsinger, Edsinger


Our bond with dogs runs deep — here are some of the reasons why

Known as man’s best friend, the dog has a relationship with humans that dates back tens of thousands of years. Today, research has shown us that that bond is more than a pretty picture; science has proved that being around one another is beneficial to humans and dogs. Your brain on dog In 2000, the Life Sciences Research Institute in South Africa published a study that measured the effects of animal-assisted therapy. Research showed that dogs are incredibly good “therapists.” Studies on the hu...
Tags: News, Colorado, Dogs, Pets, Uncategorized, California News, Infographic, Sport, Soccer, South Africa, Wisconsin, Local News, Centers For Disease Control And Prevention, Sirius, American Kennel Club, ASPCA


Our bond with dogs runs deep — here are some of the reasons why

Cave drawing thought to be from 5,000 BC Known as man’s best friend, the dog has a relationship with humans that dates back tens of thousands of years. Today, research has shown us that that bond is more than a pretty picture; science has proved that being around one another is beneficial to humans and dogs. Your brain on dog In 2000, the Life Sciences Research Institute in South Africa published a study that measured the effects of animal-assisted therapy. Research showed that dogs are incre...
Tags: Health, Colorado, Pets, Uncategorized, Infographic, Sport, Soccer, South Africa, Wisconsin, Centers For Disease Control And Prevention, Sirius, American Kennel Club, Current Biology, Top Stories LADN, Top Stories OCR, Top Stories PE


Large Predators’ Habitat Expanding Into Unexpected Territories Is A Complicated Matter

A paper published Monday in the journal Current Biology sheds light on large predators in various parts of the world moving into habitats they had once occupied, before human activity pushed them into small geographical areas and drove them to near-extinction. But it may be somewhat premature to celebrate this development as a definite conservation success.
Tags: News, Current Biology


Male fruit flies like sex and alcohol

Researchers at Bar-Ilan University in Israel have found that male fruit flies (Drosophilia melanogaster) enjoy ejaculation and sex and are also keen on alcohol consumption. The results of this novel study that shows that sexual gratification is preserved across species was published in the latest issue of the journal Current Biology this week.
Tags: Health, Israel, Bar Ilan University, Current Biology


Humans Cut Orangutan Population By More Than 100,000 So Far This Century

More than 100,000 orangutans on the Asian island of Borneo have already died from human interference in the 21st century, according to new estimates. In a study for the journal Current Biology, researchers point to the extraction of natural resources on the island, such as logging and agriculture, as main culprits behind the orangutan losses, which cut deeply into the animal’s population there between 1999 and 2015.
Tags: News, Borneo, Current Biology


Praying mantises wearing tiny glasses help researchers discover new type of 3D vision

This praying mantis isn’t just wearing minuscule 3D glasses for the cute factor, but to help scientists learn more about 3D vision. A Newcastle University team discovered a novel form of 3D vision, or stereo vision, in the insects – and compared human and insect stereo vision for the very first time. Their findings could have implications for visual processing in robots. Humans aren’t the only creatures with stereo vision, which “helps us work out the distances to the things we see,” according...
Tags: Design, Newcastle University, Current Biology, Vivek Nityananda, Ghaith Tarawneh, Newcastle University Current Biology Images, Newcastle University UK Phys


Pigeons no mere 'bird brains': study

Pigeons may be smarter than you think. A study out Monday in the journal Current Biology found that pigeons are able to judge time and space, much the way humans and apes can. "Indeed, the cognitive prowess of birds is now deemed to be ever closer to that of both human and nonhuman primates," said study author Edward Wasserman, professor of experimental psychology at the University of Iowa.
Tags: Science, Current Biology, Edward Wasserman


In mongoose society, immigrants are a bonus -- when given time to settle in

Researchers studying wild dwarf mongooses have provided insight into what happens when immigrants join a new group. The study in Current Biology shows that, initially, recent immigrants rarely serve as lookout, which means they provide little information to help the rest of the group. Even when they do act cooperatively, their new groupmates tend to ignore what they have to offer. But, within five months, the new arrivals become valued members within mongoose society.
Tags: Current Biology


New Research Shows Electric Brain Stimulation Can Help Memory

Zapping the brain with small bursts of electricity in hopes of improving memory isn’t a brand new concept, however a new study shows that the experimental therapy could be more effective than previous studies indicated. A team of neuroscientist from the University of Pennsylvania are the first to successfully…Read more...
Tags: Science, Technology, Department Of Defense, University of Pennsylvania, Electric, Current Biology, Deep Brain Stimulation