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5 books published in 2021 that MIT says to read if you in order to better understand the world

The list includes essays on investment, remote working, artificial intelligence, and vaccines.Getty Images/Margarita Shchipkova The books cover topics like investing, artificial intelligence, vaccines, and new ways of working. They've been written by experts in their field, like economist Daron Acemoglu. They provide an insight into what has changed in recent years and what the future may hold. MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) has compiled a small list of the top books publishe...
Tags: UK, Finance, International, Careers, Trends, Strategy, Investing, Mit, Healthcare, Nordic, MIT Media Lab, MIT Massachusetts Institute of Technology, BI International, Daron Acemoglu, Kate Darling, Tech Insider


5 books published in 2021 that MIT says you must read if you want to understand the world better

The list includes essays on investment, remote working, artificial intelligence, and vaccines.Getty Images/Margarita Shchipkova The books cover topics like investing, artificial intelligence, vaccines, and new ways of working. They've been written by experts in their field, like economist Daron Acemoglu. They provide an insight into what has changed in recent years and what the future may hold. MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) has compiled a small list of the top books publishe...
Tags: UK, Finance, International, Careers, Trends, Strategy, Investing, Mit, Healthcare, Nordic, MIT Media Lab, MIT Massachusetts Institute of Technology, BI International, Daron Acemoglu, Kate Darling, Tech Insider


Will a Pandemic Wave of Automation Be Bad News for Workers? (slashdot)

The New York Times reports: When Kroger customers in Cincinnati shop online these days, their groceries may be picked out not by a worker in their local supermarket but by a robot in a nearby warehouse... And in the drive-through lane at Checkers near Atlanta, requests for Big Buford burgers and Mother Cruncher chicken sandwiches may be fielded not by a cashier in a headset, but by a voice-recognition algorithm. An increase in automation, especially in service industries, may prove to be an econ...
Tags: News, Atlanta, United States, New York Times, International Monetary Fund, Nova Scotia, Times, Cincinnati, Kroger, World Economic Forum, Massachusetts Institute Of Technology, GONZALES, Dalhousie University, United Food and Commercial Workers, Daron Acemoglu, Acemoğlu


Will a Pandemic Wave of Automation Be Bad News for Workers?

The New York Times reports: When Kroger customers in Cincinnati shop online these days, their groceries may be picked out not by a worker in their local supermarket but by a robot in a nearby warehouse... And in the drive-through lane at Checkers near Atlanta, requests for Big Buford burgers and Mother Cruncher chicken sandwiches may be fielded not by a cashier in a headset, but by a voice-recognition algorithm. An increase in automation, especially in service industries, may prove to be an econ...
Tags: Tech, Atlanta, United States, New York Times, International Monetary Fund, Nova Scotia, Times, Cincinnati, Kroger, World Economic Forum, Massachusetts Institute Of Technology, GONZALES, Dalhousie University, United Food and Commercial Workers, Daron Acemoglu, Acemoğlu


Automation helped kill up to 70% of the US's middle-class jobs since 1980, study says

The inside of an Amazon fulfillment center in Robbinsville, New Jersey on December 2, 2019. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson/File Photo Automation powered up to 70% of US middle class erosion in recent decades, according to a new study. Automation exacerbated wage inequality while yielding small productivity gains, the researchers said. Work has been allocated away from middle-income jobs since the 1980s, and middle-class real wages have tumbled. See more stories on Insider's business page. Wage ...
Tags: Amazon, US, Trends, Mit, Smith, Boston University, Noah Smith, Daron Acemoglu, Pascual Restrepo, Robbinsville New Jersey, Ben Winck, REUTERS Lucas Jackson File Photo Automation, National Bureau of Economic Research Between


Should we be worried about robots taking our jobs? The answer depends on labor market institutions

Do new technologies, such as robots, destroy jobs and cause mass unemployment? Many current and past commentators have forcefully made this point in the public debate, but new research published in the Journal of the European Economic Association suggests that “technological mass unemployment” is indeed not something we should worry about.Instead, our research documents the subtle shifts in the German labor market brought about by industrial robots, and highlights the crucial importance of funct...
Tags: Books, Technology, Featured, Germany, US, Artificial Intelligence, United States, Robots, Journals, Manufacturing, Ai, Social Sciences, Fraunhofer, Business & Economics, Daron Acemoglu, Digital Technologies


Is Automation Improving the Employee Experience?

Figures alone are incapable of telling the full story of automation. It’s made up of nuances and exceptions, like what type of jobs will need replacement, and how soon. Industry demands, employee skill level, job training, and resource redeployment can vary the outcome. Is it possible for automation to go too far—to render employees obsolete? Automation has no universal effect, but it does have a measurable one. This is evidenced by MIT Researcher Daron Acemoglu and Pascual Restrepo of Boston Un...
Tags: Business, Technology, Labor, Management, Ap, Mit, Automation, Goldman Sachs, Right Now, Boston University, Daron Acemoglu, Pascual Restrepo, Lauren Ruef, Nvoicepay, Hyland Software Accounts Payable, Equipping AP


Robots help some firms, even while workers across industries struggle

A new study co-authored by an MIT professor reveals an important pattern: Firms that move quickly to use robots tend to add workers to their payroll, while industry job losses are more concentrated in firms that make this change more slowly. The study, by MIT economist Daron Acemoglu, examines the introduction of robots to French manufacturing in recent decades, illuminating the business dynamics and labor implications in granular detail.
Tags: Science, Mit, Daron Acemoglu


How many jobs do robots really replace?

MIT economist Daron Acemoglu's new research puts a number on the job costs of automation.
Tags: Science, Mit, Daron Acemoglu


Democratic socialist Bernie Sanders is too far left for Sweden's ruling Social Democrats, official says

Johan Hassel, the international secretary for Sweden's ruling Social Democrats, visited Iowa before the caucuses, and he wasn't impressed with America's standard bearer for democratic socialism, Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.). "We were at a Sanders event, and it was like being at a Left Party meeting," he told Sweden's Svenska Dagbladet newspaper, according to one translation. "It was a mixture of very young people and old Marxists, who think they were right all along. There were no...
Tags: News, Sweden, America, Mit, Harvard, Iowa, Warren, Denmark, Cia, Vox, John Brennan, Bernie Sanders, Trump, Communist Party, Sanders, Matthew Yglesias


Political Economist Daran Acemoglu: 'Trump Poses a Great Risk to U.S. Democracy'

American economist Daron Acemoglu is deeply concerned about the future of democracy under Donald Trump. In a DER SPIEGEL interview, he speaks about the link between economic dissatisfaction and the rise of political extremism.
Tags: Donald Trump, Der Spiegel, Daron Acemoglu, Daran Acemoglu


Is Andrew Yang Wrong About Robots Taking Our Jobs?

U.S. presidential candidate Andrew Yang "is full of it," argues Slate's senior business and economics correspondent, challenging Yang's contention (in a debate Tuesday) that American jobs were being lost to automation: Following the debate, a "fact check" by the AP claimed that Yang was right and Warren wrong. "Economists mostly blame [manufacturing] job losses on automation and robots, not trade deals," it stated. But this was incorrect. No such consensus exists, and if anything, the evidence ...
Tags: China, America, Tech, Ap, Mit, Yale, Boston University, Yang, Federal Reserve Board, Daron Acemoglu, Pascual Restrepo, Andrew Yang, Justin Pierce, Peter Schott, Susan Houseman, Upjohn Institute for Employment Research


The Danger of Creative Destruction

I’m currently reading by Daron Acemoglu and James A. Robinson. The book is about how nations throughout history reached prosperity or poverty. In essence, nations reach prosperity through innovations that bring them to new economic heights. The Industrial Revolution in the eighteenth century is a prime example. Such innovations have a “negative” effect, though: they cause creative destruction. The new replaces the old. As a result, many people lose their jobs if they can’t keep up with the n...
Tags: Apple, Amazon, Microsoft, Innovation, Lifehacks, Daron Acemoglu, James A Robinson


Board Question #92164: I've been thinking about the rise and fall of civilizations. ...

Q: Dear 100 Hour Board,I've been thinking about the rise and fall of civilizations. Rome, Greece, and the like. The pattern seems to be that a fall comes because of complacency and decadence; if you see something different, I'd like to hear another angle. I worry that America may be on the same path. 243 years we've stood, now possibly at the invisible precipice of our end.My question here is: has any major civilization been able to avert its end? Broken the cycle, or at least forestalled its do...
Tags: America, Rome, United States, Roman, Roman Empire, Daron Acemoglu, James A Robinson, Western Empire, Rome Greece, Patrick Wyman Wyman


Robot news.

1. "Evidence That Robots Are Winning the Race for American Jobs." (NYT)For every robot per thousand workers, up to six workers lost their jobs and wages fell by as much as three-fourths of a percent, according to a new paper by the economists, Daron Acemoglu of M.I.T. and Pascual Restrepo of Boston University. It appears to be the first study to quantify large, direct, negative effects of robots....2. "Humans and robots are companion species on this planet. We need each other." (Slate)3. Tiny gi...
Tags: Law, Robots, Viral Video, Trump, Boston University, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Ann Althouse, Things Are Not What They Seem, Daron Acemoglu, President Trump, Pascual Restrepo, David Zarrouk


Evidence That Robots Are Winning the Race for American Jobs

Who is winning the race for jobs between robots and humans? Last year, two leading economists described a future in which humans come out ahead. But now they've declared a different winner: the robots. From a report on the New York Times: The industry most affected by automation is manufacturing. For every robot per thousand workers, up to six workers lost their jobs and wages fell by as much as three-fourths of a percent, according to a new paper by the economists, Daron Acemoglu of M.I.T. and ...
Tags: Tech, New York Times, Boston University, Daron Acemoglu, Pascual Restrepo


Innovation Network

Analysis and mapping of 1.8 million US patents and their citation properties shows that a stable innovation network acts as a conduit for a cumulative process of technological and scientific progress. Research by Daron Acemoglu, Ufuk Akcigit, and William Kerr. [Author: Daron Acemoglu, Ufuk Akcigit, and William Kerr]
Tags: College, Daron Acemoglu


Scholars' letter of support for Ricardo Hausmann

Here is a letter that I have prepared and signed with some colleagues in response to Venezuelan president Nicolás Maduro’s ugly attacks on Ricardo Hausmann. “We the undersigned write to express our dismay at Venezuelan president Nicolás Maduro’s repeated targeting of our colleague Ricardo Hausmann and to express our support for Professor Hausmann. Two years ago, President Maduro ordered Venezuela’s Attorney General to proceed against Professor Hausmann following an article in which Hausmann arg...
Tags: Sales, International Monetary Fund, Venezuela, Nicolás Maduro, Maduro, Hausmann, Ricardo Hausmann, Daron Acemoglu


Want more startups? Build a better safety net

Back in 2012, Daron Acemoglu — an economist I follow and greatly respect — wrote a paper along with James Robinson and Thierry Verdier claiming to explain why Scandinavian countries are (supposedly) less innovative than the U.S. They theorized that Scandinavia embraces “cuddly capitalism” — a strong safety net that prevents failure — while the […]
Tags: News, Opinion, Scandinavia, James Robinson, Daron Acemoglu


James Robinson, expert in global conflicts, named faculty director of The Pearson Institute

Prof. James A. Robinson, a prominent political scientist and economist who has done influential research in the field of global conflicts and political and economic development, has been named to the newly created position of faculty director of The Pearson Institute for the Study and Resolution of Global Conflicts at the University of Chicago. The announcement was made by Daniel Diermeier, dean of the Harris School of Public Policy and incoming provost of the University of Chicago, who said th...
Tags: Isis, Mit, Colombia, University Of Chicago, Pearson, Bogota, James, Elizabeth, Andes, Robinson, James Robinson, Robert J Zimmer, Chicago Harris, Harris School of Public Policy, Daniel Diermeier, Daron Acemoglu


South Africa: Why Malema's Party Doesn't Offer a Way Out of Poverty

[The Conversation Africa] In "Why Nations Fail: The Origins of Power, Prosperity, and Poverty", economist Daron Acemoglu and political scientist James A Robinson argue compellingly that the key to economic growth and prosperity lies in strong and inclusive institutions.
Tags: Africa, South Africa, Daron Acemoglu, James A Robinson


Why state capture is a regressive step for any society

Ongama Mtimka, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University The state is a very important institution, determining "who gets what, when, and how", in Harold Lasswell's definition of politics. As such, various interests will always attempt to influence the state to achieve their desired outcomes. Lobbying political actors to achieve certain socioeconomic outcomes is an acceptable practice in a democracy or any other form of government. Chief executives of state entities, representatives of organised...
Tags: Africa, US, South Africa, Jacob Zuma, Kenya, Huffington Post, The Conversation Africa, ANC, Eskom, James Robinson, Gupta, Robert Cox, Economic Freedom Fighters, Francis Fukuyama, Fukuyama, Andile Mngxitama


Inclusive Institutions Key for Economic Growth

The key to a nation's prosperity or failure is institutions, rather than culture, education or geography. But institutions come in different flavours, argues economist Daron Acemoğlu in an interview at the last St. Gallen Symposium. By Julia Kramer Why are some countries wealthier than others? This question attracted Daron Acemoğlu, Elizabeth & James Killian Professor of Economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, to the field of economics. During the course of his studies, Acemoğlu...
Tags: South Korea, North Korea, China, European Union, Harvard University, Huffington Post, Caribbean, Western Europe, Communist Party, Massachusetts Institute Of Technology, Saharan Africa, North Korea South Korea, St. Gallen Symposium, Daron Acemoglu, Julia Kramer, Daron Acemoğlu Elizabeth James Killian


Study: How more R&D funding can hasten green revolution

In a newly published paper, MIT Prof. Daron Acemoglu and three colleagues present a uniquely detailed model of the dynamics of innovation in the energy industry. In so doing, they indicate how supporting clean energy R&D, not just a carbon tax, might be the best way to help clean energy technologies compete with traditional forms of energy.
Tags: Mit, Daron Acemoglu


23 books Mark Zuckerberg thinks everyone should read

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg has a single mission: to connect people around the world. It's one reason why he decided to launch a Facebook-based book club last year, with a reading list that focused on "different cultures, beliefs, histories, and technologies." Although the birth of his daughter, Max, kept him from hitting his goal of a book every two weeks, he ended the year with 23 selections in his A Year of Books reading group. We've put together a list of his picks and why he thinks everyo...
Tags: Facebook, Mark Zuckerberg, Mit, Harvard, Zappos, James, Zuckerberg, Max, Ohio State University, James Robinson, Tony Hsieh, Ibn Khaldun, New Jim Crow, Khaldun, Michelle Alexander Alexander, Daron Acemoglu


23 books Mark Zuckerberg thinks everyone should read

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg has a single mission: to connect people around the world. It's one reason why he decided to launch a Facebook-based book club last year, with a reading list that focused on "different cultures, beliefs, histories, and technologies." Although the birth of his daughter, Max, kept him from hitting his goal of a book every two weeks, he ended the year with 23 selections in his A Year of Books reading group. We've put together a list of his picks and why he thinks everyo...
Tags: Facebook, Mark Zuckerberg, Mit, Harvard, Zappos, James, Zuckerberg, Max, Ohio State University, James Robinson, Tony Hsieh, Ibn Khaldun, New Jim Crow, Khaldun, Michelle Alexander Alexander, Daron Acemoglu


New book examines why liberty blossoms in some states but wilts in others

Nearly three decades after the fall of the Berlin Wall, University of Chicago scholar James A. Robinson has co-authored a new book exploring why liberty thrives in certain states but falls to authoritarianism or anarchy in others. In The Narrow Corridor: States, Societies and the Fate of Liberty, Robinson and co-author Daron Acemoglu of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology argue for the existence of a narrow corridor to liberty—one which stays open only through a fundamental and incessant s...
Tags: China, Berlin Wall, Russia, Africa, Syria, United States, Chile, Italy, Assad, Latin America, Trump, Massachusetts Institute Of Technology, Robinson, Pinochet, Francis Fukuyama, Fukuyama