Posts filtered by tags: Dick Cavett[x]


 

Jazz Virtuoso Oscar Peterson Gives Dick Cavett a Dazzling Piano Lesson (1979)

Duke Ellington once called Oscar Peterson the “Maharaja of the Keyboard” for his virtuosity and ability to play any style with seeming ease, a skill he first began to learn as a classically trained child prodigy. Peterson was introduced to Bach and Beethoven by his musician father and older sister Daisy, then drilled in rigorous finger exercises and given six hours a day of practice by his teacher, Hungarian pianist Paul de Marky. “I only first really heard jazz somewhere between the age...
Tags: Facebook, Music, Television, College, Beethoven, Jazz, John Coltrane, Dick Cavett, Louis Armstrong, Fred, Bach, Peterson, Duke Ellington, Cavett, Daisy, Charlie Parker


Isaac Asimov Predicts the Future on The David Letterman Show (1980)

In 1980, Newsweek published a cantankerous and sadly on-the-nose diagnosis of the United States’ “cult of ignorance” — written by one Isaac Asimov, “professor of biochemistry at Boston University School of Medicine” and “author of 212 books, most of them on various scientific subjects for the general public.” Given this intimidating biography, and the fact that Asimov believed that “hardly anyone can read” in the U.S., we might expect the science fiction legend wanted nothing to do with ...
Tags: Facebook, Science, Television, College, David Letterman, America, Dave, Brooklyn, United States, Sci Fi, Jeff Bezos, Dick Cavett, Letterman, Newsweek, Josh Jones, Isaac Asimov


Arthur Forrest, Director on ‘Whose Line Is It Anyway?’ and ‘The Dick Cavett Show,’ Dies at 95

Arthur Forrest, a television legend with a 75-year career that covered long-running hits such as “Whose Line Is It Anyway?” and “That’s Incredible!,” died on Oct. 25. He was 95. Marcy Forrest, Arthur’s wife, confirmed the death to Variety. Born in 1926 in Brooklyn and raised in the Bronx as a first-generation American, Forrest completed […]
Tags: News, Brooklyn, Bronx, Dick Cavett, Forrest, Arthur Forrest, Marcy Forrest Arthur


"It was after Kennedy’s victory in the 1960 election that Mr. Sahl’s career first veered off track. He wrote barbed political one-liners for Kennedy the candidate, but..."

"... when he turned his wit on the president-elect, tweaking him for his youth and for his family’s money and power, liberals who had loved his criticism of conservatism became notably cool.... Whether Mr. Sahl was the victim of Kennedy family wrath or a blackball from liberal Hollywood, as he sometimes claimed, or whether his own thorniness was to blame... gigs were fewer and farther between in the 1960s... 'My so-called liberal supporters have all moved in with the establishment,' he said from...
Tags: Comedy, Hollywood, Law, New Orleans, Cia, Vietnam, Jfk, Dick Cavett, Assassination, Kennedy, Trump, Garrison, Goldwater, Dulles, Jack Kennedy, Lee Harvey Oswald


Barbara Hershey on Beaches, Woody Allen and breastfeeding on TV: ‘I was an innocent’

Now 73, the star of Hannah and Her Sisters shines in Jason Blum’s new horror. She talks about why audiences are hungry for mature movies, and her unhappiness at becoming an accidental poster girl for cosmetic surgeryIn 1973, Barbara Hershey – then known as Barbara Seagull, for reasons we’ll get into shortly – went on the popular US talkshow The Dick Cavett Show and torpedoed her career. She was on alongside her then partner, the actor David Carradine, but when Hershey/Seagull walked out on stage...
Tags: Free, Film, Women, US, Life and style, Breastfeeding, Culture, Woody Allen, Bette Midler, Dick Cavett, Jason Blum, Amazon Prime Video, Horror Films, David Carradine, Cavett, Hershey


Opinion: Trump-fueled falsehoods have deep roots

In January 1980, Mary McCarthy appeared on Dick Cavett's talk show to promote her latest novel. When the conversation drifted to "overpraised" writers, McCarthy trained her fire on playwright Lillian Hellman, whom she had disliked for at least three decades.
Tags: News, Stories, Dick Cavett, Mccarthy, Trump, Lillian Hellman, Mary McCarthy


‘The Capote Tapes’ Trailer: The Prayer of That Acclaimed Truman Capote Documentary Is Finally Answered

Truman Capote lived a life less ordinary. The author of Breakfast at Tiffany‘s and In Cold Blood is now the subject of a documentary, The Capote Tapes. It’s a film about the novelist’s unfinished roman-à-clef, Answered Prayers, and it debuted at the Toronto International Film Festival back in 2019. The Capote Tapes currently sits at 95% on the Tomatometer and it’s been a long road to its theatrical release. But it’s finally coming on September 10, 2021, and now you can see the first trailer for...
Tags: Google, Movies, News, Alabama, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Gore Vidal, Dick Cavett, Audrey Hepburn, Truman Capote, Bennett Miller, Variety, Tiffany, Truman, Capote, Mickey Rooney, Yunioshi


757 Episodes of the Classic TV Game Show What’s My Line?: Watch Eleanor Roosevelt, Louis Armstrong, Salvador Dali & More

What would the host and panelists of the classic primetime television game show What’s My Line? have made of The Masked Singer, a more recent offering in which panelists attempt to identify celebrity contestants who are concealed by elaborate head-to-toe costumes and electronically altered voiceovers. One expects such shenanigans might have struck them as a bit uncouth. Host John Charles Daly was willing to keep the ball up in the air by answering the panel’s initial questions for a Myst...
Tags: Facebook, Games, Music, Politics, New York, Science, Television, Youtube, College, America, Broadway, Salvador Dalí, Francis, Dick Cavett, Louis Armstrong, Steve


"Most of the words in movies aren't worth hearing anyway, and you forget them — they're like words on television — dramatic shows. It's no great loss if you don't get all the dialogue...."

Says Pauline Kael in 1971, here:  She's fighting for a particular movie — Robert Altman's "McCabe and Mrs. Miller" — that got trashed by some critics for it's hard-to-hear soundtrack. But watch as the camera pulls back and reveals that sitting next to her is Rod Serling, whose "Twilight Zone" was a television dramatic show and it absolutely did expect you to get every word. There was no random chitchat that you could let drift by and be satisfied to think of a component of the general ambiance....
Tags: Movies, Law, Dick Cavett, Rod Serling, Robert Altman, McCabe, Altman, Pauline Kael, Mrs Miller, Ann Althouse, Kael


Gillmor Gang: Déjà Vu

The Gang or a subset did a Clubhouse, longer than a regular show by a good third. The audio only structure lacked the visual cues that distinguish between irony and bad manners, but otherwise it felt familiar if not comfortable. I can’t remember what we talked about, only that I seemed a little more emphatic about my opinions than usual. We recorded the meeting, which is close to what it was. Not really a show, more a rally of a political platform with no policies. A few friends joined in, se...
Tags: Apple, Amazon, TC, Facebook, Video, Tech, Ohio, Gillmor Gang, Bob, Joni Mitchell, Dick Cavett, Steve Gillmor, Keith Teare, Frank Radice, Mitchell, Woodstock


Muhammad Ali Explains Why He Refused to Fight in Vietnam: “My Conscience Won’t Let Me Go Shoot My Brother… for Big Powerful America” (1970)

In April of 1967, Muhammad Ali arrived at the U.S. Armed Forces Examining and Entrance Station in Houston, Texas. “Standing beside twenty-five other nerve-racked young men called to the draft,” writes David Remnick at The New Yorker, Ali “refused to respond to the call of ‘Cassius Clay!’” Offered the choice of going to Vietnam or to jail, he chose the latter “and was sentenced to five years in prison and released on bail.” Ali lost his title, his boxing license, his passport, and — as fa...
Tags: Facebook, Television, Supreme Court, Abc, College, Sports, America, History, Rome, Canada, United States, Army, Sports Illustrated, Vietnam, Muhammad Ali, Dick Cavett


Stewart Brand and Brian Eno on “We Are As Gods”

In March 02021, We Are As Gods, the documentary about Long Now co-founder Stewart Brand, premiered at SXSW. As part of the premiere, the documentary’s directors, David Alvarado and Jason Sussberg, hosted a conversation between Brand and fellow Long Now co-founder Brian Eno. (Eno scored the film, contributing 24 original tracks to the soundtrack.) The full conversation can be watched above. A transcript follows below.   David Alvarado: Hi. My name is David Alvarado. I’m one of the directors fo...
Tags: Art, Video, Hollywood, Stanford, Singapore, India, Future, Mit, David, Army, Siberia, Brian, Volkswagen, West Coast, North America, Brian Eno


"This talk show was so elegant and respectful, that even the comment section of a video like this isn't infested by angry people shouting from both extremes of the issue."

A comment written one month ago on a video put up on YouTube a year ago:   The show aired in 1970. Watch the whole thing. The person at the extreme left of the talk-show couch — who eventually pipes up — is Grace Slick. The host Dick Cavett engineers the mood — which is serious and comical, tense and relaxed. It's quite something. The 70s vibe is mesmerizing. Somehow the colors brown and orange dominated. And who remembers that there was once a feminist notion that women should travel in pairs ...
Tags: Smoking, Law, Youtube, Feminism, Abortion, Hugh Hefner, Dick Cavett, Cavett, Grace Slick, Ann Althouse, Susan Brownmiller


Watch 12 Seasons of the Dick Cavett Show, 18 Seasons of Johnny Carson & Many Other Classic Shows on Shout! Factory

Dick Cavett was sometimes called the “thinking man’s Johnny Carson,” and he came up in a similar fashion—a stand-up, a joke writer for hire— until he was given a chance to host a late night show. But compare a Cavett episode to any late night host today, and it feels like a very different time. Sure, stars were booked to talk about their upcoming movie or album or television show, but Cavett was so laid back, so chatty and conversant, that it often felt like you were eavesdropping. It’s ...
Tags: Google, Hollywood, Television, College, America, Tokyo, Akira Kurosawa, James Earl Jones, Terry Gilliam, Dick Cavett, Carl Sagan, Facebook Twitter, Carson, Cavett, KCRW, Jim Henson


The Last Interview Book Series Features the Final Words of Cultural Icons: Borges to Bowie, Philip K. Dick to Frida Kahlo

Where were you when you heard that Hunter S. Thompson had died? The uniquely addled, uniquely incisive taker of the strange trip that was 20th-century America checked out sixteen years ago last month, a span of time in which we’ve also lost a great many other influential figures cultural and countercultural. The departed include many of Thompson’s colleagues in letters: societal diagnosticians like David Foster Wallace and Christopher Hitchens; conjurers of the fantastical and the familiar like...
Tags: Google, Amazon, Music, Hollywood, Washington Post, College, Neil Gaiman, Orson Welles, America, David Bowie, Marilyn Monroe, Literature, Npr, Hunter S Thompson, Ursula K Le Guin, Nora Ephron


Paul Simon Deconstructs “Mrs. Robinson” (1970)

There’s nothing like having a deadline. When Simon and Garfunkel were called on by director Mike Nichols to provide music for his 1967 comedy The Graduate, the film was already being edited, and the duo were working on the movie studio clock. To hear Simon tell it in this interview with Dick Cavett (from the same interview we featured earlier this week), it was that crunch time that produced one of their best songs, and their biggest hit, “Mrs. Robinson.” In fact, the song stitched toget...
Tags: Google, Music, College, Paul Simon, Joe Dimaggio, Jesus, Dustin Hoffman, Mike Nichols, Mrs Robinson, Dick Cavett, Simon, Robinson, Facebook Twitter, Garfunkel, Anne Bancroft, Cavett


Paul Simon Tells the Story of How He Wrote “Bridge Over Troubled Water” (1970)

It takes a certain amount of hubris to write a song like “Bridge Over Troubled Water”—to write, that is, a secular hymn, a non-religious gospel hit for burned-out sixties’ folkies. Maybe only a tragic flaw could inspire a composer “coming off the back of four hit albums and two number one singles in four years” to soothe the disaffection of down-and-out Americans who could see the bottom from where they stood in 1969, a year notorious for its cultural disaffection and political gloom. Pa...
Tags: Google, Music, Nbc, College, Paul Simon, America, Bbc, Bob Dylan, Paul Mccartney, New Orleans, Cbs, Upper East Side, Martin Luther King, Dick Cavett, Central Park, Simon


Akira Kurosawa Appears in a Rare Television & Tells Dick Cavett about His Love of Old Tokyo & His Samurai Lineage (1981)

There was a time in America when you could sit down in the evening, turn on a television talk show, and hear a conversation with Akira Kurosawa. That time was the early 1980s, and that talk show came hosted, of course, by Dick Cavett, to whom no cultural current — and indeed no culture — was too foreign for broadcast. With pictures like Rashomon, Ikiru, Seven Samurai, and Throne of Blood, Kurosawa established himself in the 1950s as the most acclaimed Japanese auteur alive, with prominen...
Tags: Google, Japan, Television, Film, College, America, West, Tokyo, Akira Kurosawa, John Wayne, Dick Cavett, Seoul, George Lucas, Hayao Miyazaki, Hiroshima, Suntory


listening to joni: #17 and final: shine

Shine, 2007 Shine is Joni's most recent, and likely final, studio album. She came out of retirement in 2007 to release the album, nine years after her previous Taming the Tiger. Shine, which was also re-issued on vinyl in 2020, is a themed collection: the lyrics focus on environmental destruction and endless war. Joni composed some of the tracks for The Fiddle and the Drum, a collaboration with the Alberta Ballet Company, for which Joni served as artistic director.   At the time of the album...
Tags: Travel, Music, Iraq, US, Pink Floyd, Starbucks, Catholic, Joni Mitchell, Dick Cavett, Joni, Les Irvin, Laura K, Listening To Joni, WarnerMedia, Warner Group, Alberta Ballet Company


PBS American Masters Archive Releases 1,000+ Hours of Uncut, Never-Before-Seen Interviews: Patti Smith, David Bowie, Neil Young & More

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P4kUmYoc1rE When we think of American masters, we don’t think of David Bowie, who despite being a master was also the most English rock star ever to live. But an interview with Bowie, never before seen in full, nonetheless appears in the newly opened American Masters archive, having been shot for the long-running PBS series’ 1997 documentary on Lou Reed — if not the most American rock star ever to live, then surely the most New York one. “For me, New Yor...
Tags: Google, New York, Television, College, History, Neil Young, David Bowie, South London, Patti Smith, Smith, Archives, Lou Reed, Dick Cavett, Seoul, Jeff Bridges, Mel Brooks


Jimi Hendrix Revisits His Searing Performance of “The Star-Spangled Banner”: The Dick Cavett Show (September 9, 1969)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VGf9PTYyJ4A On the final August morning of Woodstock, after a previous day’s downpour had turned most of the field near the stage into mud, after an evening of blues and rock and the comedown of whatever drugs had peaked everybody earlier, as the sunlight crept over what was left of the 500,000 music lovers, now less than half in number, wrapped in blankets and still vibing, Jimi Hendrix took the stage. Now, the Star-Spangled Banner wasn’t his final song, ...
Tags: Google, Music, College, America, Chicago, Jimi Hendrix, Tigers, Detroit, Dick Cavett, National Anthem, Maui, Woodstock, Facebook Twitter, 101st Airborne Division, Cavett, Hendrix


How these ‘One Night in Miami’ stars came together to play Black American icons

On February 25th, 1964, Cassius Clay beat Sonny Liston to become the heavyweight champion of the world. He spent the rest of the night with friends Malcolm X, NFL legend Jim Brown and soul singer Sam Cooke. Within weeks, Clay would become Muhammad Ali; he would also soon split with Malcolm X, who like Cooke would be dead within a year. All that is pretty fertile ground for a story, and Kemp Powers (co-writer and co-director of Pixar’s “Soul”) imagined that fateful day first as a play and then as...
Tags: Movies, NFL, Barack Obama, Sport, Netflix, Things To Do, Soccer, Miami, Lincoln, Spike Lee, Muhammad Ali, Pixar, Orange County, Dick Cavett, Cassius Clay, Ali


Official Trailer for 'The Capote Tapes' Doc About 'Answered Prayers'

"'How could your friend do this to you?'" Altitude Films in the UK has released an official UK trailer for the documentary The Capote Tapes, the feature directorial debut of filmmaker Ebs Burnough. This originally premiered at last year's Toronto Film Festival, and also played at the Hamptons and Rio de Janeiro Film Festivals. Using the tapes, animation, and new on-camera interviews with people who knew him, the film explores the impact of Truman Capote's explosive unfinished novel "Answered...
Tags: UK, Movies, Trailer, Documentaries, Dick Cavett, Truman Capote, Hamptons, Baldwin, Jay McInerney, Rio de, Plimpton, To Watch


Salvador Dalí Gets Surreal with 1950s America: Watch His Appearances on What’s My Line? (1952) and The Mike Wallace Interview (1958)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iXT2E9Ccc8A When was the last time you saw a Surrealist (or even just a surrealist) painter appear on national television? If such a figure did appear on national television today, for that matter, who would know? Perhaps surrealist painting does not, in our time, make the impact it once did, but nor does national television. So imagine what a spectacle it must have been in 1950s America, cradle of the “mass media” as we once knew them, when Salvador Dalí ...
Tags: Google, Art, Facebook, Television, College, America, Cbs, Salvador Dalí, Dick Cavett, Seoul, Frank Lloyd Wright, Eleanor Roosevelt, Facebook Twitter, Wallace, Mike Wallace, Dali


Leta Powell Drake, Interviewer Extraordinaire

This clip of Leta Powell Drake interviewing 80s TV & movie stars like Tom Hanks, Telly Savalas, and Gene Hackman is incredible. She was obviously not intimidated by celebrity — leaning in closely to Hackman, she says: “You’ve done some brilliant pictures and you’ve done some stinkers.” And that’s not even her worst burn. The clips were compiled from interviews that she did for the TV station KOLN/KGIN in Lincoln, NE when celebs would come through town to promote their latest thing. History ...
Tags: Nebraska, Drake, Dick Cavett, Gene Hackman, Jason Kottke, Lincoln NE, Hackman, Leta Powell Drake, Tom Hanks Telly Savalas, KOLN KGIN, Nebraska Broadcasters Association Hall of Fame, Johnny Carson Tom Brokaw, Kalamity Kate


Netflix's 'The Queen's Gambit' is the best sports show on TV right now

Anya Taylor-Joy plays chess prodigy Beth Harmon. Netflix Netflix's "The Queen's Gambit," a limited series about a female chess prodigy in the 1950s and 1960s, has taken the streaming and chess worlds by storm As Beth Harmon, Anya Taylor-Joy's performance is threatening to set off a serious chess boom, the likes of which we haven't seen since Bobby Fischer defeated Boris Spassky in 1972 to win the World Championship. Chess became recognized as a sport, more than just a game, in the 1970s, a...
Tags: New York, London, Kentucky, White House, Russia, US, Sports, Trends, Netflix, Hungary, Jeff Daniels, Nba, Moscow, Manhattan, Jane Austen, Mlb


Janis Joplin & Tom Jones Bring the House Down in an Unlikely Duet of “Raise Your Hand” (1969)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mZmiefQ5y4U If you’re a fan of Tom Jones and you don’t care who knows it, then no one needs to justify the jovial Welsh superstar’s lounge-soul covers of pop, R&B, and rock songs to you . Certain purists have been a tougher sell on Jones’ act, including, in 1969, Neil Young, who joined Jones onstage once, and only once, on the This is Tom Jones show and immediately regretted it. But who cares about Neil Young’s cranky dislike of commercial television...
Tags: Google, Music, Television, College, Neil Young, Frankfurt, Jesus, Janis Joplin, Dick Cavett, Tom Jones, Young, Jones, Woodstock, Tom, Facebook Twitter, Joplin


50 years ago, this evening, Janis Joplin died.

My son John has posted a tribute on his blog. He's put up some music videos. I just want to put this up — something I saw at the time and have always remembered — Janis Joplin talking to Dick Cavett about attending her high school reunion. It's heartbreaking: [Author: [email protected] (Ann Althouse)]
Tags: Law, John, Janis Joplin, Dick Cavett, Ann Althouse


Watch Bob Dylan Perform “Only A Pawn In Their Game,” His Damning Song About the Murder of Medgar Evers, at the 1963 March on Washington

Trauma is repetition, and the United States seems to inflict and suffer from the same deep wounds, repeatedly, unable to stop, like one of the ancient Biblical curses of which Bob Dylan was so fond. The Dylan of the early 1960s adopted the voice of a prophet, in various registers, to tell stories of judgment and generational curses, symbolic and historical, that have beset the country from its beginnings. The verses of “Blowin’ in the Wind,” from 1963’s The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan, enact ...
Tags: Google, Music, Politics, John Lewis, College, Washington, History, United States, Bob Dylan, Dick Cavett, Sherman, Martin Luther King Jr, Jim Crow, South, Jesus Christ, Midwest


James Baldwin Talks About Racism in America & Civil Rights Activism on The Dick Cavett Show (1969)

There are many reasons, some quite literal, that it can be painful to talk about racism in the U.S. For one thing, it often seems that writers like W.E.B. Du Bois, Ida B. Wells, Angela Davis, Audre Lorde, or James Baldwin, have already confronted questions of racial violence without hedging or equivocation. Yet each time racist violence happens, there seems to be a decorous need in politics and media to pretend to be surprised by what's right in front of us, to pretend to have discovered...
Tags: Google, Politics, Television, College, New Orleans Saints, Drew Brees, America, History, Britain, Ronald Reagan, Npr, Dick Cavett, Gucci, Martin Luther King Jr, Cvs, Henry