Posts filtered by tags: Disease[x]


 

A 'vampire' fungus has killed millions of bats since 2006. Here's why it matters.

White-nose syndrome has killed at least 6.7 million bats, though this estimate was made in 2012, and the current figure is almost certainly much higher.Bats serve a crucial role in our ecosystem and economy, and white-nose syndrome is already pushing many species to the brink of extinction.Researchers and scientists are working hard to develop novel methods to cure white-nose syndrome; a few methods have shown promise, but none have yet been deployed in the field. None The fungus Pseudogymnoascu...
Tags: New York, Environment, Indiana, Conservation, Innovation, Disease, Ecology, Illness, Biodiversity, North America, White, Jonathan Palmer Kevin Drees Jeffrey Foster, Daniel Lindner, Washington Post Lindner


These new keto diet tortillas are made of 100% cheese

To help keto dieters stay the course, Lotito Foods has developed the Folios cheese wrap, a tortilla made entirely of cheese.These cheese wraps can be part of a healthy diet, but only if eaten in extreme moderation and alongside low-fat, low-salt foods. Research shows that replacing grains and fiber with fat and salts in the long term can be dangerous. None Now they've gone and done it. Keto diet enthusiasts have concocted all manner of unsettling dishes to kick the carbs: coffee with butter inst...
Tags: Health, Cancer, Happiness, Choice, Public Health, Medical Research, Innovation, Agriculture, Disease, Keto, European Society of Cardiology, Bonnie Taub Dix, Taub Dix, Jaha, Human body, Keto Diet


Sparkling water: Healthy alternative or millennial fad?

Sparkling waters are en vogue as a healthy, refreshing alternative to soft drinks and alcohol.Some claim sparkling water has injurious effects, such as reducing bone mineral density, but research shows such claims are overstated or outright myths.Not all sparkling waters are created equal, though. While some are just as hydrating as plain water, others can be unhealthy if not consumed in moderation. None Sparkling waters are the latest in health chic, providing all the fizzy refreshment of a sof...
Tags: Health, Food, Water, Chemistry, Medical Research, Atlantic, Innovation, Food And Drug Administration, Disease, Starbucks, Illness, Pepsi, Heart Association, Birmingham Alabama, American Dental Association, American Journal of Clinical Nutrition


Up to $818 million deal between J&J and Locus Biosciences points to a new path for CRISPR therapies

The up to $818 million deal between Locus Biosciences and Janssen Pharmaceuticals (a division of Johnson & Johnson) that was announced yesterday points toward a new path for CRISPR gene editing technologies and (potentially) the whole field of microbiome-targeted therapies. Based in Research Triangle Park, N.C., Locus is commercializing research initially developed by scientists at North Carolina State University that focused on Cas3 proteins, which devour DNA Pac-Man-style, rather than edit it ...
Tags: TC, Science, Biology, Los Angeles, Tech, Genetics, Tencent, Food And Drug Administration, Disease, North Carolina, Infection, Genetic Engineering, Crispr, Executive, Biotechnology, University Of Southern California


CBD makes glaucoma worse, researchers find

For decades, marijuana has been touted as providing glaucoma relief. A study out of Indiana University shows that while THC reduces eye pressure, CBD does the opposite. Of the 18 mice tested, females were less responsive to marijuana than males. None While glaucoma has been the butt of many well-intentioned, wink-wink weed jokes for decades, the disease is quit serious. In fact, glaucoma is the leading cause of blindness in people above sixty. Glaucoma is insidious as well. Abnormally high pres...
Tags: Biology, Aging, Innovation, Disease, Physiology, Derek, Indiana University, Blindness, Human body, Alex Straiker, Straiker


Sock sniffer suffers from fungal infection in lungs

A man only identified as Peng, 37, from Zhangzhou, China, was admitted to the hospital with chest pains and coughing bouts. He eventually confessed to being a dirty sock sniffer. He reportedly jonesed for the stink of his own hosiery and the daily practice led to a fungal infection in his lungs. From Science Alert: ...While it's difficult to prove his strange habit was the definite source of his chest infection, doctors concluded it was the most reasonable explanation – exacerbated by a lack o...
Tags: Post, News, Disease, Socks, Vanderbilt University, Peng, William Schaffner, Stink, Smelly, Zhangzhou, Zhangzhou China, Mai Zhuanying


Invasive longhorned tick could spread disease across the U.S.

The Asian longhorned tick used to be a species only found in China, Japan, Korea and southeastern Russia, plus parts of Australia, New Zealand and the Pacific Islands. But last year, an established population was found in New Jersey, and since then, the ticks have been found in eight other states. Because the tick is parthenogenetic — which means the females can reproduce without needing male DNA — it is possible that it will soon occupy large parts of the Pacific Northwest and the eastern U.S....
Tags: Japan, Science, Design, News, Cdc, Russia, Lyme Disease, Public Health, New Jersey, Disease, North America, Pacific Northwest, New England, Pacific Islands, Australia New Zealand, China South Korea


Companies tracking mutations in cancer cells can provide a key to unlocking better therapies

Investors and entrepreneurs are beginning to bring new diagnostic tools to market that promise better results for cancer patients through the identification of mutations in cancer cells that can create more targeted therapies. Earlier this month, research using technology developed by the startup Mission Bio helped identify cellular mutations in acute myeloid leukemia cancer cells that could be indicators of potential relapse or recurrence of the cancer after therapy. In the study, which was pre...
Tags: TC, Y Combinator, Texas, Biology, Medicine, Breast Cancer, California, Cancer, Tech, Ceo, Genetics, Pennsylvania, Disease, Machine Learning, University of Pennsylvania, Cancer Treatment


Is wasp venom the next healthcare revolution?

Researchers are looking at the venom of wasps, bees, and arachnids to develop life-saving medical therapies.Researchers at MIT created synthetic variants of a peptide found in wasp venom that proved an effective antibiotic.With the "post-antibiotic era" looming, synthetic peptides could provide a way to maintain global health initiatives.Two of the most common phobias are the fear of insects and fear of needles, so it's little wonder that people with apiphobia and spheksophobia aren't keen for ...
Tags: Health, Animals, Mit, Bacteria, Public Health, Medical Research, Innovation, Disease, World Health Organization, Illness, Insects, AMP, AMR, Molecular Biology, Pseudomonas, Timothy Lu


Scientists create 10-minute test that can detect cancer anywhere in the body

Australian researchers find 3D nanostructures that are unique to cancer cells.These markers can be identified using technology that may be available on cell phones.Human clinical trials are next for the team. None Australian researchers claim in a new study that they developed a 10-minute test that's capable of finding cancer cells at any location in the body. If further testing achieves the same results, this accomplishment could be a real breakthrough in fighting cancer.The potential for quick...
Tags: Health, Medicine, Dna, Chemistry, Medical Research, Innovation, Disease, Illness, University Of Queensland, Nature Communications, Sina, Johns Hopkins University, Tau, Human body, Trau, Matt Trau


McDonald's touchscreens test positive for feces, dangerous bacteria

The Metro newspaper conducted a semi-scientific test of touchscreen kiosks in eight McDonald's restaurants in the U.K.All of them tested positive for various kinds of bacteria that can cause infection.Public touchscreens are known to harbor high amounts of bacteria, though tests also suggest the average smartphone isn't much cleaner. None A new test suggests you should strive to avoid public touchscreens — unless you don't mind getting poop and other infection-causing bacteria on your fingers.Th...
Tags: Health, Business, Innovation, Disease, University Of Arizona, Metro, London Metropolitan University, McDonald, University of California at Davis, Human body, Paul Matewele, Metro These, Matewele, David Coil


How Google plans to eradicate dangerous mosquitoes: Breed more.

The method involves breeding thousands of male mosquitoes, infecting them with a particular kind of bacterium that renders female eggs unviable, and releasing them into the wild.It's proven to be very effective in a test area in Southern California.The method could be used to combat mosquito populations in areas where the insects carry deadly diseases.In 2017, Verily, a research organization run by Alphabet, Google's parent company, began a counterintuitive project designed to kill off mosquitoe...
Tags: Health, Google, Africa, Bloomberg, Innovation, Disease, South America, Insects, Southern California, Zika, Alphabet Google, Center for Disease Control, Fresno California, Wolbachia, Jacob Crawford


CDC: Do Not Eat Any Romaine Lettuce Until We Can Figure Out What the Hell Is Going On

The Centers for Disease Control has an ominous warning for the nation this week: Please, for the love of god, do not consume romaine lettuce of any kind.Read more...
Tags: Health, Science, Medicine, Cdc, Epidemics, Food And Drug Administration, Disease, Fda, E Coli, Salad, Epidemiology, Centers for Disease Control, Outbreaks, Foodborne Illness, Romaine Lettuce


Increased air travel may decrease the chances of a global pandemic

The more exposed we are to each other, the less surprising a pathogen will be to our bodies.Terrorism, high blood pressure, and staffing issues threaten to derail progress. Pursuing global health has to be an active choice. None Part of the anxiety in watching the 2011 film Contagion hinges on members of the CDC watching the map of the world itself: the world is so large and filled with so much detail — nooks, corners, and endless blind alleys — that it felt difficult to get a handle on where th...
Tags: Travel, Health, Hong Kong, Chris Christie, Abc, Cdc, Chicago, New Jersey, Innovation, Oxford, Disease, Human body, Surprising science, Disease propagation


New study reveals what time we burn the most calories

Seven individuals were locked inside a windowless, internetless room for 37 days.While at rest, they burned 130 more calories at 5 p.m. than at 5 a.m. Morning time again shown not to be the best time to eat. None Dualism has left a marked imprint on modern consciousness. Mind-body is an industry, including a host of philosophical protocols, physical practices, breathing exercises, juice cleanses, crystals, nootropics, and other assorted tchotchkes guaranteed to bridge the divide between brain a...
Tags: Health, Sleep, Obesity, Innovation, Disease, Physiology, Derek, Duffy, Human body, Jeanne Duffy


Why Cancer Is Replacing Heart Disease as the Leading Cause of Death in the U.S.

Heart disease has long been the number one killer in the United States. But a new study out this week is the latest to suggest that it’s only a matter of time before the second leading cause of death—cancer—becomes more commonly fatal for the average person. On the bright side, though, that’s largely because we’ve…Read more...
Tags: Death, Science, Cancer, Heart Disease, Public Health, United States, Disease


How the appendix may kick-start Parkinson’s

As far back as Darwin, scientists have thought the appendix was a vestigial organ, but opinions have changed in recent years.A new study found that the appendix houses Lewy bodies, abnormal protein deposits that contribute to Parkinson's disease.Researchers suggest an appendectomy may lower one's risk of Parkinson's, while other research suggests the appendix has important roles to play in our immune system.If the appendix has a jam, it's definitely the Clash's Should I Stay or Should I Go. The ...
Tags: Health, Aging, Noah, Mental Health, Brain, Medical Research, Innovation, Disease, Charles Darwin, Darwin, Parkinson, Lewy, Science News, Midwestern University, Cognitive Science, Human body


Promoting digital technologies for disease prevention among Latinos

Half of Americans live with at least one chronic disease, such as diabetes, hypertension, or heart disease. Chronic diseases take an economic toll and account for a large proportion of health care costs.  A moderate amount of weight loss and an increase in physical activity can prevent or reduce the burden of chronic disease.  Therefore, we need to find a low-cost platform that is effective for chronic illness prevention. The use of digital technology, such as smartphones and mobile apps, has gr...
Tags: Health, Books, Featured, United States, Disease, Journals, Latinos, Healthy Lifestyle, Health & Medicine, Chronic Disease, Digital Technologies, Bay Area of California, Disease Prevention, Translational Behavioral Medicine, Tbmedi, Yoshimi Fukuoka


4 keto diet variations: Do they work?

The traditional ketogenic diet requires only 5% carbohydrate intake per day.Alternatives considered "less restrictive" are gaining in popularity. What you get out of each diet depends on what you're trying to accomplish. None Twenty years ago, while I was working as a reporter in Princeton, I met a vegetarian butcher. She was a hearty Russian grandmother, very reminiscent of my own. Day after day she sliced meat in her deli but refrained from indulging—except, she told me, around Thanksgiving. T...
Tags: Health, Motivation, Obesity, Innovation, Disease, Illness, Princeton, Derek, Keto, Ketogenic Diet, Human body, Kate Save, Franziska Spritzler, Low Carb Dietitian, Steph Lodge


Eating organic food lowers cancer risk by 25%, study reveals

A French study of nearly 70,000 people states that organic foods reduce the risk that you'll develop non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and postmenopausal breast cancer. Agricultural pesticides have been shown to have a toxic effect on the human endocrine system. The high cost of organic food remains a barrier to entry for those wishing to eat a healthier diet. None In 1998, while working as a reporter at a Princeton newspaper, I wrote a story on organic foods, at the time a $3.5 billion business. The feat...
Tags: Health, Food, Cancer, Environment, Public Health, New York Times, Innovation, Disease, Princeton, Derek, Microbes, Ny Times, Bucks County, Rutgers University, JAMA, Hodgkin


Why You Keep Hearing About a Polio-Like 'Mystery Illness' Among Children

The CDC confirmed this week that 62 people, mainly children, have come down with acute flaccid myelitis (AFM), an illness that weakens their arms and legs. But even though the symptoms are scary (they’ve been described as “polio-like,”) it’s a very rare disease and I promise you there’s no need to freak out. Doctors…Read more...
Tags: Health, Children, Cdc, AFM, Disease, Polio, Infectious Disease, Lifehacks, Explainers, Paralysis, Polio Like Illness, Childrens Health


CDC Says It's Concerned About Polio-Like 'Mystery Illness' That's Paralyzing Kids

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention this week issued a warning about a disease known as acute flaccid myelitis (AFM), an illness it says it knows very little about but can cause arm or leg weakness and paralysis, particularly in children. According to a Tuesday press briefing, there have been 62 confirmed…Read more...
Tags: Health, Science, Public Health, Disease, Centers For Disease Control And Prevention, Diseases, Acute Flaccid Myelitis


How LA County plans to tackle the typhus outbreak

Los Angeles County mobile health teams will hand out flea collars, insect repellent and maps to restrooms as part of an emergency plan approved Tuesday to ward off disease-carrying fleas that are spreading typhus at alarming rates in pockets of downtown Los Angeles and throughout Long Beach, Pasadena and the San Gabriel Valley. The Board of Supervisors, by unanimous vote, also approved a broader pilot program aimed at ridding typhus and hepatitis from a concentrated homeless population in Skid R...
Tags: Health, News, Virginia, Los Angeles, Sport, Soccer, Long Beach, Disease, Homeless, Pasadena, Orange County, San Marino, Tom Sachs, Board, Los Angeles County, Department of Public Health


Typhus symptoms look like the flu, which is why it took weeks for this San Marino man to be diagnosed correctly

Tom Sachs could barely move from his bed. He lay lifeless — delirious with 103-degree fever, riddled with aches, chills and extreme weakness. “I had the chills where my body would shake from my waist to my head,” he said during an interview Monday, Oct. 15. Doctors told him he had the flu. After nearly three weeks without any recovery, his wife, Carolyn, called a priest. Although she said she was thinking more about healing than death, Sachs seemed so ill that the priest gave him communion and l...
Tags: Health, News, Los Angeles, Sport, Soccer, Glendale, Long Beach, Disease, Blue Shield, Pasadena, San Marino, Tom Sachs, Sachs, Carolyn, HealthCare Partners Medical Group, USC Verdugo Hills Hospital


Typhus fever’s wild threat? The rat-faced opossum, named in health advisories as culprits in spreading the disease

When you think of animals carrying fleas, what comes to mind are dogs and cats, a problem that most responsible pet owners know all about. But an equal, yet lesser known threat is lurking in the wild and unbeknownst to homeowners, living under the floorboards or in the attic. We are talking about opossums. Grumpy baby opossums are cared for by volunteers at the Wetlands and Wildlife Care Center in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 5, 2018. (Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG) ...
Tags: News, Environment, Los Angeles, Sport, Soccer, Glendale, Wildlife, Long Beach, Disease, Johnson, Pasadena, Local News, Huntington Beach, Los Angeles County, Michael Johnson, Angeles National Forest


80,000 People Died of the Flu Last Winter, CDC Says

In recent years, flu-related deaths have ranged from about 12,000 to 56,000
Tags: News, Uncategorized, Disease, Onetime


There’s a Promising New Way to Treat Appendicitis That Doesn’t Involve Surgery

Almost two thirds of the patients using the treatment didn't have another attack
Tags: News, Uncategorized, Disease, Onetime, Healthytime


A CRISPR-based hack could eradicate malaria-carrying mosquitoes

A research team from Imperial College London have published promising results of an experiment in which Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes -- responsible for the spread of malaria -- were genetically modified with a stable, gene-drive-based CRISPR modification that caused them to go extinct in the lab. Importantly, the experiment showed that the modified snip of the mosquitoes' genome was kept stable by the gene drive, neither reverting to a neutralized version that would allow the mosquitoes' po...
Tags: Post, Happy Mutants, Science, News, Biology, Genetics, Public Health, Ethics, Disease, Ecology, Crispr, Imperial College London, Zika, Crisanti, Rob Stein NPR


Finding God in the Dark

I stand beside my son’s bed at two in the morning. A breeze sneaks through the window and lifts the curtains. I watch for his chest to rise and fall. I watch and wait. He lies on his back, one arm flung over a huge stuffed penguin, the blankets balled at his feet. My eyes trace the small tube snaking out from his back to the pouch attached around his waist. The tube that means life or death. He sleeps, and I do not. I pull out his blood glucose meter and shove in a test strip. I wait for the bee...
Tags: Inspiration, Jerusalem, Diabetes, David, Mother, Disease, Jesus, John, Son, Christ, James, Suffering, Jericho, Nazareth, Bartimaeus, Jayden


'No one should be sleeping well tonight': WHO encourages fear of Ebola

The Democratic Republic of Congo continues to fight off the worst Ebola outbreak in years. Butembo, a major regional hub of 1 million people, has now had a confirmed death. The World Health Organization is worried, and recommends you worry too. Via HuffPo: The Democratic Republic of Congo has confirmed its first Ebola death in the eastern city of Butembo, a trade hub with Uganda that is home to almost a million people. This first urban death, combined with ongoing violence in the northeast...
Tags: Post, Ebola, News, Uganda, Population, Disease, World Health Organization, Democratic Republic Of Congo, HuffPost, Drc, Ministry of Health, Salama, Butembo, Peter Salama, East Africa Reuters