Posts filtered by tags: Durham NC Follow[x]


 

Miles Davis’ Bitches Brew Turns 50: Celebrate the Funk-Jazz-Psych-Rock Masterpiece

I shouldn’t have to tell you that Miles Davis’ Bitches Brew, released fifty years ago this month, is a groundbreaking record. The funk-jazz-psych-rock masterpiece has been handed that award in “best of” lists for half a century. “Bitches Brew is NOT LIKE OTHER records of its time, or any other time,” Rick Frystak announced emphatically on the Amoeba Records blog last year, on the 50th anniversary of the album’s 1969 “hatching” onstage and in the studio. How could it be otherwise? Davis “...
Tags: Google, Music, College, America, Radiohead, Davis, Jazz, Miles Davis, Herbie Hancock, Npr, Copenhagen, Thom Yorke, Miles, Coltrane, Chick Corea, Facebook Twitter


This is What Richard Feynman’s PhD Thesis Looks Like: A Video Introduction

Richard Feynman wasn’t just an “ordinary genius.” He was, according to mathematician Mark Kac “in his taxonomy of the two types of geniuses,” a “magician” and “a champion of scientific knowledge so effective and so beloved that he has generated an entire canon of personal mythology,” writes Maria Popova at Brain Pickings. Many a Feynman anecdote comes from Feynman himself, who burnished his popular image with two bestselling autobiographies. His stories about his life in science are extr...
Tags: Google, College, Physics, Albert Einstein, Princeton, Einstein, Feynman, Manhattan Project, Richard Feynman, Facebook Twitter, James Gleick, Josh Jones, Toby, Durham NC Follow, Gleick, Maria Popova


Simulating an Epidemic: Using Data to Show How Diseases Like COVID-19 Spread

Disease modeling as a science has come into its own lately, for heartbreakingly obvious reasons. What may not be so obvious to those of us who aren't scientists is just how critical data can be in changing the course of events in an outbreak. Virus outbreaks may be “acts of God” or acts of unregulated black markets and agribusinesses, but in either case, statistical models can show, concretely, how collective human activity can save lives—and show what happens when people don’t act toget...
Tags: Health, Google, Science, College, Data, Current Affairs, The Washington Post, Facebook Twitter, Stevens, Josh Jones, Durham NC Follow, Kevin Simler, Harry Stevens, Nicholas Jewell, Mathematical Sciences Research Institute


Good Medicine: The Band’s Classic Song, “The Weight,” Sung by Robbie Robertson, Ringo Starr & Special Guests from Around the World

Robbie Robertson’s “The Weight,” the Band’s most beloved song, has the quality of Dylan’s impressionistic narratives. Elliptical vignettes that seem to make very little sense at first listen, with a chorus that cuts right to the heart of the human predicament. “Robertson admits in his autobiography,” notes Patrick Doyle at Rolling Stone, “that he struggled to articulate to producer John Simon what the song was even about.” An artist needn’t understand a creation for it to resonate with l...
Tags: Google, Music, Japan, College, Los Angeles, Current Affairs, Rolling Stone, Bahrain, Ringo Starr, Facebook Twitter, Robertson, Dylan, Doyle, Allman Brothers, Josh Jones, Robbie


Download Classic Works of Plague Fiction: From Daniel Defoe & Mary Shelley, to Edgar Allan Poe

The apotheosis of prestige realist plague film, Steven Soderburgh’s 2011 Contagion, has become one of the most popular features on major streaming platforms, at a time when people have also turned increasingly to books of all kinds about plagues, from fantasy, horror, and science fiction to accounts that show the experience as it was in all its ugliness—or at least as those who experienced it remembered the events. Such a work is Daniel Defoe’s semi-fictional history “A Journal of the Plague Ye...
Tags: Google, Europe, Books, London, College, Edgar Allan Poe, History, Britain, Moscow, Literature, Isaac Newton, Algeria, Albert Camus, Catherine, Marseilles, Lisbon


Bob Dylan Releases a Cryptic 17-Minute Song about the JFK Assassination: Hear a “Murder Most Foul”

Like an Old Testament prophet with smartphone, Bob Dylan has appeared the midst of catastrophe to drop a new previously unreleased track, “Murder Most Foul,” on Twitter. Ostensibly a 17-minute song about JFK’s assassination, it’s “the first evidence of original songwriting that we’ve had in eight years from one of the most original songwriters of our era,” writes Kevin Dettmar, Professor of English at Pomona College, for The New Yorker. The move seems like a weird one—“’weird’ with its f...
Tags: Google, Music, College, Bob Dylan, Dallas, Npr, Jfk, Hamlet, Rolling Stone, Jack, Kennedy, Facebook Twitter, Dylan, Lyndon Johnson, Andy Greene, Josh Jones


The Foot-Licking Demons & Other Strange Things in a 1921 Illustrated Manuscript from Iran

Few modern writers so remind me of the famous Virginia Woolf quote about fiction as a "spider's web" more than Argentinian fabulist Jorge Luis Borges. But the life to which Borges attaches his labyrinths is a librarian's life; the strands that anchor his fictions are the obscure scholarly references he weaves throughout his text. Borges brings this tendency to whimsical employ in his nonfiction Book of Imaginary Beings, a heterogenous compendium of creatures from ancient folk tale, myth, and de...
Tags: Google, Books, College, Religion, Iran, Dan Brown, Virginia Woolf, Michael, Bosch, Isfahan, Jorge Luis Borges, Facebook Twitter, Gabriel, Da Vinci, Near East, Persia


Patrick Stewart Is Reading Every Shakespeare Sonnet on Instagram: One a Day “to Keep the Doctor Away”

  View this post on Instagram   It has led me to undertake what follows. When I was a child in the 1940s, my mother would cut up slices of fruit for me (there wasn't much) and as she put it in front of me she would say: "An apple a day keeps the doctor away." How about, “A sonnet a day keeps the doctor away”? So...here we go: Sonnet 1. A post shared by Patrick Stewart (@sirpatstew) on Mar 22, 2020 at 4:28pm PDT After receiving...
Tags: Google, Instagram, College, Current Affairs, Literature, Shakespeare, Patrick Stewart, Ben Kingsley, Helen Mirren, Ian Mckellen, Agincourt, Henry V, John Barton, Stewart, Patrick, Facebook Twitter


Take a Virtual Tour of the Paris Catacombs

The Paris Catacombs is “one of those places,” wrote photographer Félix Nadar, “that everyone wants to see and no one wants to see again.” If anyone would know, Nadar would. He spent three months in and out of the underground city of death, with its macabre piles of skulls and crossbones, taking photographs (see here) that would help turn it into an internationally famous tourist attraction. In these days of quarantine, no one can see it; the site is closed until further notice. But if you’re th...
Tags: Travel, Google, College, Life, History, Paris, Napoleon, Facebook Twitter, Roman, Josh Jones, Nadar, Paris Catacombs, Durham NC Follow, Allison Meier, Felix Nadar, Jean Paul Marat


What Happened to U.S. Cities That Practiced–and Didn’t Practice–Social Distancing During 1918’s “Spanish Flu”

Americans have long been accused of growing socially distant, bowling alone, as Robert Putnam wrote in 2000, or worse becoming radicalized as "lone wolves" and isolated trolls. But we are seeing how much we depend on each other as social distancing becomes the painful normal. Not quite quarantine, social distancing involves a semi-voluntary restriction of our movements. For many people, this is, as they say, a big ask. But no matter what certain world leaders tell us, if at all possible,...
Tags: Health, Google, College, History, Current Affairs, Philadelphia, Vox, St Louis, Facebook Twitter, Lopez, Josh Jones, Harvard T H Chan School of Public Health, Bitton, Durham NC Follow, Isaac Chotiner, Robert Putnam


Meet the World’s First Known Author: Sumerian High Priestess Enheduanna

Watchers of Westworld will have heard a character in the most recent episode utter the line, “for the first time, history has an author.” It’s as loaded a bit of dialogue as the series has dropped on fans, not least for its suggestion that in the absence of a god we should be better off with an all-knowing machine. The line might bend the ear of literary scholars for another reason. The idea of authorship is a complicated one. In one sense, maybe, everyone is an author of history, and in...
Tags: Google, College, Poetry, Literature, Westworld, Facebook Twitter, Abraham, Miguel De Cervantes, Josh Jones, Inanna, Michel, Sargon, Akkad, Durham NC Follow, Enheduanna, Lit Hub


Watch “Coronavirus Outbreak: What You Need to Know,” and the 24-Lecture Course “An Introduction to Infectious Diseases,” Both Free from The Great Courses

COVID-19 is a serious, highly communicable disease. It is not a hoax, and it will continue to spread until it is contained with widespread testing and a vaccine. At present, scientists seem to know little about all the forms of transmission or the possibility of reinfection. Older people and the immunocompromised are certainly more at risk than others, but the virus can kill the healthy and the sick. It doesn’t care where it starts or ends. It doesn’t care if someone is a U.S. Senator or...
Tags: Health, Google, Science, College, Current Affairs, Johns Hopkins, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, Durham NC Follow, Roy Benaroch, Barry Fox, COVID, Benaroch


Digital Archives Give You Free Access Thousands of Historical Children’s Books

It is no arbitrary coincidence that Margery Williams’ classic The Velveteen Rabbit involves a terrifying brush with scarlet fever. Published in 1922, the book was based on her own children. But all of its first readers would have shuddered at the mention, given very recent memories of the global devastation wrought by “Spanish” flu. The story earns its fairy-tale ending by invoking catastrophe, with images of the poor rabbit nearly thrown into the fire and then tossed out with the trash. The Ve...
Tags: Google, Books, England, College, Disney, Williams, Library Of Congress, Princeton, Oscar Wilde, Hayao Miyazaki, Jeanette Winterson, Soviet Union, Facebook Twitter, Wilde, Josh Jones, Poetry Foundation


When Orson Welles Crossed Paths With Hitler (and Churchill): “He Had No Personality…. I Think There Was Nothing There.”

Dick Cavett excelled at turning the late-night talk show format into a showcase for genuinely revealing conversations (and the occasional wrestling match). Of the many riveting guests he had on throughout the 60s and 70s, some appearing multiple times, few could match Orson Welles for sheer storytelling prowess. As if in a contest to outdo himself, Welles appeared on Cavett’s show three times in 1970, and once more in 1973, as an amiable, gruff raconteur who lived a life almost impossibl...
Tags: Google, London, Television, College, Orson Welles, History, Winston Churchill, Time Magazine, Venice, Hitler, Woody Allen, Dick Cavett, Alfred Hitchcock, Pearl Harbor, Churchill, Stalin


Take a Virtual Tour of 30 World-Class Museums & Safely Visit 2 Million Works of Fine Art

Since the first stirrings of the internet, artists and curators have puzzled over what the fluidity of online space would do to the experience of viewing works of art. At a conference on the subject in 2001, Susan Hazan of the Israel Museum wondered whether there is “space for enchantment in a technological world?” She referred to Walter Benjamin’s ruminations on the “potentially liberating phenomenon” of technologically reproduced art, yet also noted that “what was forfeited in this process we...
Tags: Google, Art, College, Smithsonian, Taipei, Archives, New York Public Library, Whitney, British Museum, Stanford University, Metropolitan Museum Of Art, Facebook Twitter, Tate, Rosetta Stone, Cleveland Museum of Art, Vermeer


A Short, Animated Film Shows How a Scientific Article Gets Published: “Excitement, Baby Steps and Reams of Rejections”

When people say things like “the science is settled” or “the science has changed,” researchers tend to grind their teeth. Science can come to a broad consensus, as in the case of the coronavirus or climate change, but it isn’t ever perfectly settled as a bloc on any question. We proceed in scientific knowledge not by attaining perfect knowledge but, as Isaac Asimov once wrote, by being less wrong than those who came before. And scientists advance in scientific publishing, as Aeon writes, no...
Tags: Google, Japan, Science, College, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, Isaac Asimov, Aeon, Durham NC Follow, Charlotte Arene, Frédéric Restagno, Julien Bobroff, University of Paris Saclay, Restagno, Bobroff


Linked Jazz: A Huge Data Visualization Maps the Relationships Between Countless Jazz Musicians & Restores Forgotten Women to Jazz History

Having watched the development of interactive data visualizations as a writer for Open Culture, I’ve seen my share of impressive examples, especially when it comes to mapping music. Perhaps the oldest such resource, the still-updating Ishkur’s Guide to Electronic Music, also happens to be one of the best for its comprehensiveness and witty tone. Another high achiever, The Universe of Miles Davis, released on what would have been Davis’ 90th birthday, is more focused but no less dense a collecti...
Tags: Google, Music, New York, College, Wikipedia, Data, United States, Davis, New Orleans, Jazz, John Coltrane, Miles Davis, Carnegie Hall, Facebook Twitter, Pratt, Dave Brubeck


David Bowie’s Rise as Ziggy Stardust Documented in a New 300-Page Photo Book

Great rock photographers of the seventies often captured their subjects at their moodiest, as in Pennie Smith’s pensive tour photos of the Clash, or Kevin Cummins’ stark, sometimes explosive photos of Joy Division. These were bands best shot in black and white. Punk looked back to the rock of the fifties in its high-contrast simplicity. But the early seventies belonged to glam—or, more accurately, belonged to Ziggy Stardust, a character who demanded to be captured in full-color. Mick Rock was j...
Tags: Google, Photography, Music, College, Rock, David Bowie, Freddie Mercury, Dallas, Richard, Bowie, Ziggy Stardust, Facebook Twitter, Marlene Dietrich, Mick Rock, Josh Jones, Ziggy


While Away the Hours with a Free H.P. Lovecraft Call of Cthulhu Coloring Book

Unlike his devotee Stephen King, whose novels and stories have spawned more Lovecraftian film and television projects than any writer in the genre, H.P. Lovecraft himself has little cinema credit to his name. Given the abject terror evoked by Cthulhu and other terrifying “primal Great Ones"—as the author called his monsters in the story of the octopus-headed god—we might expect it to be otherwise. But Lovecraft was not a cinematic writer, nor a fan of any such modern storytelling devices. He pr...
Tags: Google, College, Stephen King, Cthulhu, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, Lovecraft, Durham NC Follow, Comics/Cartoons, Chaosium Inc, Orient Express Masks of Nyarlathotep, Yuggoth, Andrey Fetisov


Isaac Newton Conceived of His Most Groundbreaking Ideas During the Great Plague of 1665

Whether you’ve volunteered to self-quarantine, or have done so from necessity, health experts worldwide say home is the best place to be right now to reduce the spread of COVID-19. For some this means layoffs, or remote assignments, or an anxious and indefinite staycation. For others it means a loss of safety or resources. No matter how much choice we had in the matter, there are those among us who harbor ambitious fantasies of using the time to finally finish labors of love, whether they be cr...
Tags: Google, Facebook, London, Washington Post, College, History, Netflix, Physics, Atlantic, Cambridge, Isaac Newton, Algeria, Shakespeare, Albert Camus, Cambridge University, The Washington Post


How Patti Smith “Saved” Rock and Roll: A New Video Makes the Case

Rock and roll has always had its huge stars: from its earliest beginnings as a cultural phenomenon of interracial and sexual anxiety, to its turn as the soundtrack of free love, good drugs, and civil unrest. By the early 70s, however, Polyphonic argues above, the music of rebellion had “lost its way,” become the province of superrich superstars in private jets and French chateaus. As the 60s crashed and burned with the deaths of major figures like Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, and Jim Morr...
Tags: Google, Music, New York, College, New York City, Pink Floyd, Bob Dylan, Punk, Patti Smith, Smith, Iggy, Van Morrison, Ramones, Facebook Twitter, Gloria, Jim Morrison


Covering Robert Johnson’s Blues Became a Rite of Rock ‘n’ Roll Passage: Hear Covers by The Rolling Stones, Eric Clapton, Howlin’ Wolf, Lucinda Williams & More

American rock and roll originated from all corners of the country in the 1940s and 50s: from the exuberant gospel of the south, rollicking western swing of Texas, lean electric blues of Chicago, fast-paced Chicano music of L.A…. Truly a cultural melting pot, it represented the U.S to itself, amplifying and intensifying contemporary trends that continued right alongside the upstart new genre. But along with the deaths, arrests, and army stints of the music’s most famous stars at the e...
Tags: Google, Music, Texas, Mississippi, College, Chicago, New York Times, Bob Marley, Johnson, Richard, Keith Richards, Jimmy Page, Wolf, Madison Square Garden, Facebook Twitter, Clapton


The Meaning of Life According to Simone de Beauvoir

When someone presumes to explain the meaning of life, they usually draw, however vaguely, on religion. Many a philosopher has ventured a secular answer, but it’s hard to compete with the ancient stories of the world’s major faiths. The richness of their metaphors surpasses historical truth; humans, it seems, really “cannot bear very much reality,” as T.S. Eliot . Maybe we need stories to keep us going, which is why we love Plato, whose myth of the origins of love in his novella, the Sym...
Tags: Google, College, Philosophy, Albert Camus, Facebook Twitter, Plato, Sartre, Josh Jones, Popper, Jean Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, Karl Popper, Durham NC Follow, De Beauvoir, Iseult Gillespie, Eliot Maybe


Bill Gates Describes His Biggest Fear: “I Rate the Chance of a Widespread Epidemic Far Worse Than Ebola at Well Over 50 Percent” (2015)

What are billionaires afraid of? A wealth tax? Universal healthcare? Immigrants from several specific places in the world? Probably. But if you ask one billionaire, Bill Gates—who has spent the last several years spending money to combat deadly epidemics—he’ll answer with a very detailed description of a global threat to everyone, not just the handful of people in his (un)tax(ed) bracket: Pandemics like the 1918 Spanish flu, as he told Vox’s Ezra Klein in the 2015 video interview above. ...
Tags: Google, Congress, Cdc, College, Current Affairs, Bill Gates, Vox, Ezra Klein, Gates, Johns Hopkins, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, Klein, Durham NC Follow, Robert Redfield


Watch 85,000 Historic Newsreel Films from British Pathé Free Online (1910-2008)

The “pivot-to-video” moment of a few years back devastated writers everywhere with mass layoffs as companies scrambled to attract projected millions of nonexistent viewers. It’s a story about predatory media monopolies and the proliferation of news, documentary, and opinion video content online. While the sheer amount of video can feel overwhelming, we might remember that people have been getting their news from screens for well over a hundred years. First came the newsreels....
Tags: Google, Film, Youtube, College, New York City, History, New York Times, Toulon, Reuters, Facebook Twitter, Wells, Pathe, Josh Jones, National Endowment for the Humanities, Prelinger Archives, Durham NC Follow


Watch Scenes from Czarist Moscow Vividly Restored with Artificial Intelligence (May 1896)

In May of 1896, Charles Moisson and Francis Doublier traveled to Moscow on behalf of the Lumière Brothers company, bearing with them the newly developed Lumière Cinématogaphe camera. Their purpose: to document the coronation of Tsar Nicholas II—the last Emperor of Russia, though no one would have known that at the time. The coronation was an extraordinary event, soon to be overshadowed by even more extraordinary events in the Revolutionary years to come. An enormous celebration followed,...
Tags: Google, Film, College, Russia, New York City, History, FPS, Moscow, Peter Jackson, Facebook Twitter, Alexandra, Khodynka, Nicholas, Josh Jones, Nicholas II, Tverskaya Street


Hear the Sound of the Hagia Sophia Recreated in Authentic Byzantine Chant

Audio technology has made many exciting advances in the past few years, one of which enables recording engineers to capture the sound of a specific space and recreate it elsewhere. Through a process called “convolution reverb,” the sound of a concert hall or club can be portable, so to speak, and a band or group of singers in a studio can be made to sound as if they were performing in Carnegie Hall, or inside a cave or grain silo. Also being recreated are the sounds of gothic cathedrals ...
Tags: Google, Music, College, Stanford, History, Architecture, Npr, David Byrne, Carnegie Hall, Facebook Twitter, Sophia, Scott Simon, Constantinople, Josh Jones, Abel, Durham NC Follow


The Summerhill School, the Radical Educational Experiment That Let Students Learn What, When, and How They Want (1966)

Among the political and social revolutions of the 1960s, the movement to democratize education is of central historical importance. Parents and politicians were entrenched in battles over integrating local schools years after 1954’s Brown v. Board of Education. Sit-ins and protests on college campuses made similar student unrest today seem mild by comparison. Meanwhile, quieter, though no less radical, educational movements proliferated in communes, homeschools, and communities that coul...
Tags: Google, England, Education, College, Canada, K-12, Noam Chomsky, Soviet Union, Brown, Neill, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, Erich Fromm, Rudolf Steiner, John Locke, Maria Montessori


Jeremy Bentham’s Mummified Body Is Still on Display–Much Like Other Aging British Rock Stars

Plato’s ideal of philosopher-kings seems more unlikely by the day, but most modern readers of The Republic don't see his state as an improvement, with its rigid caste system and state control over childbearing and rearing. Plato’s Socrates did not love democracy, though he did argue that men and women (those of the guardian class, at least) should receive an equal education. So too did many prominent European political philosophers of the 18th and 19th centuries, who had at least as much...
Tags: Google, New York, London, College, France, Athens, Philosophy, Salvador Dalí, Leonard Cohen, Random, University College London, Metropolitan Museum Of Art, Atlas Obscura, University College, Facebook Twitter, Plato


How African-American Explorer Matthew Henson Became the First Person to Reach the North Pole, Then Was Forgotten for Almost 30 Years

The history of exploration is replete with famous names everyone knows, like Robert Peary, the man most often credited with first reaching the North Pole. Those who work alongside the legends—doing the heavy lifting, saving lives, making essential calculations—tend to be forgotten or marginalized almost immediately in the telling of the story, especially when they don’t fit the profile for the kinds of people allowed to make history. In Peary’s case, it seems that the most important memb...
Tags: Google, Maryland, Congress, College, History, Washington Dc, Nicaragua, Shakespeare, Inuit, Ku Klux Klan, Yale University, Lewis, U S Customs, Facebook Twitter, Clark, Perry