Posts filtered by tags: Durham NC Follow[x]


 

John Lennon Finally Meets & Jams with His Hero, Chuck Berry (1972)

“If you had tried to give rock and roll another name, you would call it Chuck Berry,” says John Lennon by way of introduction to his hero in the clip above from The Mike Douglas Show. The two perform Berry’s “Memphis, Tennessee” and “Johnny B. Goode” (with Lennon’s backing band, Elephant’s Memory, and unwelcome discordant backing vocals from Yoko). The moment was a major highlight of Lennon’s post-Beatles’ career. The year was 1972, and Lennon and Yoko Ono had taken over Douglas’ show fo...
Tags: Facebook, Music, California, College, John Lennon, Yoko Ono, Ronald Reagan, Paul Mccartney, Elvis Presley, John, Keith Richards, Beatles, Mccartney, Lennon, Douglas, PAUL


The Bombing of Pompeii During World War II

In 79 AD, 17-year-old Gaius Plinius Caecilius Secundus, known as Pliny the Younger, gazed across the Bay of Naples from his vacation home in Misenum and watched Mount Vesuvius erupt. “Darkness fell, not the dark of a moonless or cloudy night,” Pliny wrote in his eyewitness account — the only surviving such document — “but as if the lamp had been put out in a dark room.” Unbeknownst to Pliny and his famous uncle, Pliny the Elder, admiral of the Roman navy and revered naturalist, hundreds ...
Tags: Facebook, College, History, Getty, Pliny the Elder, National Geographic, Pliny, Pompeii, Bay Of Naples, Josh Jones, Goethe, Getty Museum, Mount Vesuvius, Durham NC Follow, Mount Vesuvius Re Created, Edward Bulwer Lytton


Archaeologists Discover 1300-Year-Old Pair of Skis, the Best-Preserved Ancient Skis in Existence

Surfing is generally believed to have originated in Hawaii and will be forever associated with the Polynesian islands. Yet anthropologists have found evidence of something like surfing wherever humans have encountered a beach — on the coasts of West Africa, in the Caribbean, India, Syria, and Japan. Surfing historian Matt Warshaw sums up the problem with locating the origins of this human activity: “Riding waves simply for pleasure most likely developed in one form or another among any c...
Tags: Facebook, Europe, Japan, College, China, Russia, Sports, History, Hawaii, New York Times, Smithsonian, West Africa, Norway, Josh Jones, Larsen, Kottke


136 Paintings by Gustav Klimt Now Online (Including 63 Paintings in an Immersive Augmented Reality Gallery)

At the end of World War II the Nazis burned an Austrian castle full of masterpieces, including three paintings by Gustav Klimt entitled Philosophy, Medicine, and Jurisprudence. Called the “Faculty Paintings,” these were commissioned by the University of Vienna for the ceiling of its Great Hall in 1900, then, upon completion seven years later, were deemed pornographic and never exhibited. Until now, they were preserved for posterity only in black and white photographs. Thanks to cutting edge art...
Tags: Google, Art, Facebook, College, Vienna, Venice, University of Vienna, Franz Josef, Josh Jones, Great Hall, Gustav Klimt, Ernst, Klimt, Ravenna, University of Munich, University of Applied Arts


Dave Grohl Falls Offstage & Breaks His Leg, Then Continues the Show as The Foo Fighters Play Queen’s “Under Pressure” (2015)

How do you make the show go on after a broken leg? The blessing we give performers before they go onstage isn’t something we actually want to see happen. Nonetheless, stage injuries occur frequently, and in some cases, severely, as when Patti Smith fell 15 feet into a concrete orchestra pit in 1977 and broke several vertebrae in her back. “I felt like an asshole,” she told Circus magazine, “but my doctor told me not to worry, it happens to everybody.” Maybe not everybody, but when th...
Tags: Facebook, Music, College, Washington Dc, Dave Grohl, Patti Smith, Ac Dc, Entertainment Weekly, Kurt Cobain, Bowie, Grohl, Gothenburg Sweden, Josh Jones, Brian Johnson, Durham NC Follow, First Foo Fighters Demo Recordings


Watch Jaco Pastorius: The Lost Tapes Documentary, the Fan-Made Film on the Most Innovative Bass Player of All Time

People do not understand how hard a jazz musician works for a living. I’m not putting nobody down, but I’m telling you nobody understands how hard jazz musicians work. Jazz is not big in the US, because the States are too worried about Pac-Man and The Police. — Jaco When Jaco Pastorius uttered the quote above in a typically entertaining and insightful interview with Guitar World from 1983, I’m sure he meant no disrespect to the members of The Police. It may be safe to say that Jaco signi...
Tags: Facebook, Europe, Music, Japan, College, France, US, Jazz, States, Warner Bros, Montreal, Joni Mitchell, Jaco Pastorius, Jacó, Hendrix, Josh Jones


When J.R.R. Tolkien Worked for the Oxford English Dictionary and “Learned More … Than Any Other Equal Period of My Life” (1919-1920)

When J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings appeared in the mid-1950s, its first critical readers held some diverging views on the books’ quality. On the one hand, there was praise for the revival of fantasy for grown-ups, and comparisons to great epics of the past. On the other hand, Tolkien’s prose was excoriated for its wordiness, length, and seemingly inexhaustible obsession with obscurities. Both perspectives seemed to miss something important. Yes, Tolkien drew liberally from epics of the...
Tags: Facebook, Books, College, Literature, Middle Earth, Tolkien, James Joyce, Bradley, Anglo Saxon, J R R Tolkien, Kelly Grovier, Durham NC Follow, Robert Burchfield, Burchfield, Peter Gilliver, Henry Bradley


Watch “The Impossible Map,” a Short Animated Film That Uses a Grapefruit to Show Why Maps of the Earth Are Misleading (1947)

There are any number of ways one might try to turn a globe into a two-dimensional surface. You could start by cutting it down the middle, as in this Vox video on world maps. You could choose volunteers and have them come up to the head of the class and peel oranges in one piece, flattening out the strips onto an overhead projector, as in this National Geographic lesson on world maps. Or, you might attack an already halved grapefruit peel with a rolling pin, as in the National Film Board ...
Tags: Facebook, Europe, Maps, College, Earth, Vox, National Geographic, Robinson, Josh Jones, National Film Board of Canada, Durham NC Follow, Mercator, Gerardus Mercator, Evelyn Lambart, Arthur Robinson, Arthur H Robinson Map Library


An Animated History of the Ottoman Empire (1299 – 1922)

History is selective. Or, rather, it’s selected by those in power for their own uses. Nowhere do we see this more than in nationalist re-imaginings of an imperial past, whether it be British, Roman, or, in the case of modern Turkey, Ottoman. “Much has been written,” notes Time magazine’s Alan Mikhail, “about [Turkish president Recep Tayyip] Erdogan’s attempts to ‘resurrect’ the Ottoman Empire or to style himself a sultan.” Erdogan’s turn to hardline Islam has been inspired by one particu...
Tags: Facebook, Europe, College, Turkey, History, Rome, United States, Middle East, Islam, Erdogan, Time Magazine, San Antonio, Andrew Jackson, Anatolia, Constantinople, Josh Jones


A Brilliant Demonstration of Magnets & the Promise of Levitating Trains (1975)

For a brief time in the 1980s, it seemed like trains powered by maglev — magnetic levitation — might just solve transportation problems everywhere, maybe even replacing air travel, thereby eliminating one of the most vexing sources of carbon emissions. Maglev trains don’t use fuel; they don’t require very much power by comparison with other sources of high speed travel; they don’t produce emissions; they’re quiet, require less maintenance than other trains, and can travel at speeds of 30...
Tags: Facebook, UK, New York, Science, Technology, College, China, Germany, Beijing, Washington Dc, Shanghai, Imperial College London, Birmingham Airport, Josh Jones, Germany Japan, Dave Hall


A Guitarist Rocks Out on Guitars Made from Shovels, Cigar Boxes, Oil Cans & Whisky Barrels

When Keith Richards felt he’d gone as far as he could go with the six-string guitar, he took one string off and played five, a trick he learned from Ry Cooder. These days, the trend is to go in the opposite direction, up to seven or eight strings for highly technical progressive metal compositions and downtuned “djent.” Traditionalists may balk at this. A five-string, after all, is a modification easily accomplished with a pair of wire-cutters. But oddly shaped eight-string guitars seem ...
Tags: Facebook, Music, Design, College, George Harrison, Creativity, Johnson, Keith Richards, Ray Charles, Keith, Robert Johnson, Keef, Josh Jones, Justin Johnson, Durham NC Follow, Diddley Bow


Albert Camus on the Responsibility of the Artist: To “Create Dangerously” (1957)

Literary statements about the nature and purpose of art constitute a genre unto themselves, the ars poetica, an antique form going back at least as far as Roman poet Horace. The 19th century poles of the debate are sometimes represented by the dueling notions of Percy Shelley — who claimed that poets are the “unacknowledged legislators of the world” — and Oscar Wilde, who famously proclaimed, “all art is quite useless.” These two statements conveniently describe a conflict between art that invo...
Tags: Art, Facebook, Sweden, Writing, College, Literature, Albert Camus, Oscar Wilde, Ursula Le Guin, SANDRA SMITH, Josh Jones, SHELLEY, University of Uppsala, Horace, Camus, Durham NC Follow


Footage of the Last Known Tasmanian Tiger Restored in Color (1933)

Last month, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced that nearly two dozen wildlife species would be removed from the endangered species list, as CNN reported, including the ivory-billed woodpecker, “the Bachman’s warbler, two species of freshwater fishes, eight species of Southeastern freshwater mussels and 11 species from Hawaii and the Pacific Islands.” This is not good news. The animals have been delisted because they’ve been added to a list of extinct creatures, one that grows l...
Tags: Facebook, Science, London, Australia, College, Earth, Cnn, Nature, Atlantic, Hawaii, Paris, Tasmania, Hobart, Benjamin, Wildlife Service, Bachman


The Medieval Ban Against the “Devil’s Tritone”: Debunking a Great Myth in Music Theory

Music lives deep within us, in the marrow of our evolutionary bones, tapping into “this very primitive system,” says British musicologist John Deathridge, “which identifies emotion on the basis of a violation of expectancy.” In other words, our brains are predisposed to hear certain combinations of sounds as soothing and others as disturbing. When we plot those sounds on a staff, we find one of the most dissonant, yet intriguing, combinations, what can be called an augmented 4th or dimin...
Tags: Facebook, Music, College, Ornette Coleman, Lucifer, Pearl Jam, Trinity College, Hartford Conn, James Bennett, WQXR, Camille Saint Saens, Durham NC Follow, Adam Neely, John Deathridge, Jerry Tachoir, Aristoxenus


Jim Henson’s Farewell: Revisit the “Nice, Friendly” Memorial Service at St. John the Divine (1990)

Please watch out for each other and love and forgive everybody. It’s a good life, enjoy it. — Jim Henson Born in Greenville, Mississippi, Jim Henson spent his youth practicing the tenets of Christian Science, a faith he would officially renounce in 1975. But the power of positive thinking his early religion years instilled would persist, romanticized by his alter-ego, Kermit the Frog, and tempered by foils like the earthy, irascible Ms. Piggy. For every foul-mouthed Oscar the Grouch, the...
Tags: Facebook, New York, London, Television, College, Washington, New York City, Big Bird, Brian, Sam, Kermit, Blondie, St Paul, Jim, Josh Jones, Jim Henson


Nirvana Refuses to Mime Along to “Smells Like Teen Spirit” on Top of the Pops (1991)

This month marks the 30th anniversary of Nirvana’s Nevermind, first released on September 24, 1991, “the day,” writes Michael Tedder at Stereogum, “that college radio-nurtured types and arty hard rock officially became rebranded as Alternative Rock, and, according to legend, everything changed forever.” You might believe that legend even if you remember the reality. Yes, “Smells Like Teen Spirit” was just as huge as everybody says — and, yes, you likely recall where you were when y...
Tags: Facebook, Music, College, Dave Grohl, Sinead O'connor, Morrissey, Kurt Cobain, Nme, Pearl Jam, Ukulele Orchestra of Great Britain, Kurt, Olympia Washington, Josh Jones, Soundgarden, Jim Morrison, Mark Beaumont


Why Scientists Can’t Recreate the Sound of Stradivarius Violins: The Mystery of Their Inimitable Sound

In his influential 1936 essay, “The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction,” critic Walter Benjamin used the word “aura” to describe an artwork’s “presence in time and space” — an explanation of the thrill, or chill, we get from standing before a Jackson Pollock, say, or a Michelangelo, rather than a photograph of the same. Writing in the age of radio, photography, and newspapers, Benjamin believed that aura could not be transmitted or copied: “Even the most perfect reproducti...
Tags: Art, Facebook, Europe, Music, Texas, College, Green, Italy, Jackson Pollock, Benjamin, Josh Jones, Francesco, Texas A M University, Walter Benjamin, Cremona Italy, Amati


How New Yorkers Dodged Pre-Prohibition Drinking Laws by Inventing the World’s Worst Sandwich

Three men feast on free lunch in a drawing by Charles Dana Gibson In one of my favorite episodes of The Simpsons, beer-swilling Homer falls in love with a sandwich. He spends his days nibbling away at the “sickening, festering remains of a 10-foot hoagie,” Nathan Rabin writes, “long after decency, self-respect, and survival would all seem to dictate throwing it out.” The sandwich may be yet another instance of the show pulling some obscure detail from American history for comic effect — or mayb...
Tags: Facebook, New York, College, History, Food & Drink, Albany, New York State, Roosevelt, Lower East Side, Theodore Roosevelt, Eugene O'Neill, Josh Jones, Hartman, Homer, Raines, Nathan Rabin


A Rare, Early Version of the King Arthur Legend Found & Translated

The stories of King Arthur and his court took shape over a period of a few hundred years; like most ancient legends, they evolved through many iterations — not a little like the stories in modern-day comic books. “The medieval Arthurian legends were a bit like the Marvel Universe,” explains Laura Campbell, a medieval language scholar at Durham University. “They constituted a coherent fictional world that had certain rules and a set of well-known characters who appeared and interacted with each ...
Tags: Facebook, College, History, Britain, Literature, Bristol, University of Bristol, Merlin, Christ, Durham University, Campbell, Arthur, Josh Jones, Monmouth, Geoffrey, Laura Campbell


Hear the Brazilian Metal Band Singing in–and Trying to Save–Their Native Language of Tupi-Guarani

The indigenous languages spoken in Brazil number around 170, a testament to the survival of tribal communities nearly wiped out by colonialism and commerce. Yet 40 of those languages have fewer than 100 speakers, and many more are declining rapidly. For linguists, “it’s a fight against time,” Luisi Destri writes at Pesquisa. Researchers estimate most, if not all, of these languages could disappear within 50 to 100 years, and some believe 30 percent might fade in the next 15 years. “Knowl...
Tags: Facebook, Music, College, Language, Metallica, Brazil, Black Sabbath, BRASILIA, Josh Jones, Pagan, Aquino, Guarani, University of São Paulo, Durham NC Follow, Tocantins, Mongolia Plays Heavy Metal


Hobbes, Locke & Rousseau: An Animated Introduction to Their Political Theories

The phrase “state of nature” doesn’t get much use in philosophy these days, but every political philosopher must grapple with the history of the idea — a foundational conceit of modern Euro-American thought in the work of Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, and Jean-Jacques Rousseau. These three “contractualist” philosophers, often grouped together in syllabi and selected introductory texts, relied on the notion that humans once existed in an anarchic state predating civil society, and that this ...
Tags: Facebook, Politics, College, France, Philosophy, Leviathan, Yale University, Locke, Charles II, Josh Jones, John Locke, Hobbes, Jean Jacques Rousseau, Rousseau, Durham NC Follow, Lockean


When the Nobel Prize Committee Rejected The Lord of the Rings: Tolkien “Has Not Measured Up to Storytelling of the Highest Quality” (1961)

When J.R.R. Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings books appeared in the mid-1950s, they were met with very mixed reviews, an unsurprising reception given that nothing like them had been written for adult readers since Edmund Spencer’s epic 16th century English poem The Faerie Queene, perhaps. At least, this was the contention of reviewer Richard Hughes, who went on to write that “for width of imagination,” The Lord of the Rings “almost beggars parallel.” Scottish writer Naomi Mitchison did find a compa...
Tags: Facebook, Books, College, New York Times, Oxford, Literature, Richard Hughes, Tolkien, Wilson, Lewis, J R R Tolkien, Edmund Wilson, W H Auden, Auden, Ekstrom, Durham NC Follow


The Recording Secrets of Nirvana’s Nevermind Revealed by Producer Butch Vig

People figured out that I’d tapped into something in making that record; a lot of labels came calling because they wanted to see if I could bring that magic to whatever artists they had. But I found it sorta annoying in some ways, because people thought I had a formula, that I could take a folk artist or a blues guitarist and make them sound like Nirvana. The pop cultural phenomenon of Nirvana’s Nevermind caught everyone involved by surprise — from the band, to the label, to Butch Vig, j...
Tags: Facebook, Music, College, Dave, Dave Grohl, Kurt Cobain, Kurt, Josh Jones, Butch, Cobain, Geffen, Billie Eilish, VIG, Krist Novoselic, Durham NC Follow, Butch Vig


How Italian Physicist Laura Bassi Became the First Woman to Have an Academic Career in the 18th Century

The practice and privilege of academic science has been slow in trickling down from its origins as a pursuit of leisured gentleman. While many a leisured lady may have taken an interest in science, math, or philosophy, most women were denied participation in academic institutions and scholarly societies during the scientific revolution of the 1700s. Only a handful of women — seven known in total — were granted doctoral degrees before the year 1800. It wasn’t until 1678 that a female scholar was...
Tags: Facebook, Europe, Gender, Science, College, America, History, Physics, Italy, Benjamin Franklin, Marie Curie, Newton, Stanford University, Bologna, Laura, Josh Jones


Elvis Presley Gets the Polio Vaccine on The Ed Sullivan Show, Persuading Millions to Get Vaccinated (1956)

No one living has experienced a viral event the size and scope of COVID-19. Maybe the unprecedented nature of the pandemic explains some of the vaccine resistance. Diseases of such virulence became rare in places with ready access to vaccines, and thus, ironically, over time, have come to seem less dangerous. But there are still many people in wealthy nations who remember polio, an epidemic that dragged on through the first half of the 20th century before Jonas Salk perfected his vaccine...
Tags: Health, Facebook, Television, College, History, Smithsonian, Elvis Presley, Elvis, Ed Sullivan, Yo Yo Ma, Sullivan, Josh Jones, Walter Winchell, Brody, Jonas Salk, Durham NC Follow


The Roman Colosseum Has a Twin in Tunisia: Discover the Amphitheater of El Jem, One of the Best-Preserved Roman Ruins in the World

Image via Wikimedia Commons When Rome conquered Carthage in the Third Punic War (149-146 BC), the Republic renamed the region Africa, for Afri, a word the Berbers used for local people in present-day Tunisia. (The Arabic word for the region was Ifriqiya.) Thereafter would the Roman Empire have a stronghold in North Africa: Carthage, the capital of the African Province under Julius and Augustus Caesar and their successors. The province thrived. Second only to the city of Carthage in the region, ...
Tags: Facebook, College, Africa, History, Rome, Architecture, Unesco, Algeria, Republic, Tunisia, Pompeii, Tunis, North Africa, Atlas Obscura, Jem, Carthage


What Makes Basquiat’s Untitled Great Art: One Painting Says Everything Basquiat Wanted to Say About America, Art & Being Black in Both Worlds

They wouldn’t have let Jean-Michel into a Tiffany’s if he wanted to use the bathroom or if he went to buy an engagement ring and pulled a wad of cash out of his pocket.  — Stephen Torton, Jean-Michel Basquiat’s studio assistant When Jean-Michel Basquiat’s Untitled (Skull) sold for $110.5 million in 2017 to Japanese billionaire Yusaku Maesawa, the artist joined the ranks of Da Vinci, De Kooning, and Picasso as one of the top selling painters in the world, surpassing a previous record set ...
Tags: Art, Facebook, New York, College, America, Brooklyn, Andy Warhol, Picasso, Christie, Tiffany, Tiffany Co, Jean Michel Basquiat, Josh Jones, Ben Davis, Artnet, Basquiat


Sci-Fi Pioneer Hugo Gernsback Predicts Telemedicine in 1925

If you’ve ever wondered why one of science fiction’s greatest honors is called the “Hugo,” meet Hugo Gernsback, one of the genre’s most important figures, a man whose work has been variously described as “dreadful,” “tawdry,” “incompetent,” “graceless,” and “a sort of animated catalogue of gadgets.” But Gernsback isn’t remembered as a writer, but as an editor, publisher (of Amazing Stories magazine), and pioneer of science fact, for it was Gernsback who first introduced the earth-shaking techno...
Tags: Health, Facebook, Technology, College, Germany, Earth, Cambridge, Smithsonian, Sci Fi, Arthur C Clarke, Hugo Gernsback, Josh Jones, Gernsback, Matt Novak, Durham NC Follow, J G Ballard


William Blake’s 102 Illustrations of The Divine Comedy Collected in a Beautiful Book from Taschen

In his book on the Tarot, Alejandro Jodorowsky describes the Hermit card as representing mid-life, a “positive crisis,” a middle point in time; “between life and death, in a continual crisis, I hold up my lit lamp — my consciousness,” says the Hermit, while confronting the unknown. The figure recalls the image of Dante in the opening lines of the Divine Comedy. In Mandelbaum’s translation at Columbia’s Digital Dante, we see evident similarities: When I had journeyed half of our life’s way, I fo...
Tags: Art, Facebook, Europe, Books, College, Literature, William Blake, Florence, Columbia, Dante, Alejandro Jodorowsky, Blake, Virgil, Josh Jones, Taschen, Mandelbaum


Why Do We Dream?: An Animated Lesson

Why do we dream? It’s a question science still can’t answer, says the TED-Ed lesson above by Amy Adkins. Many neuroscientists currently make sense of dreaming as a way for the brain to consolidate memory at night. “This may include reorganizing and recoding memories in relation to emotional drives,” writes computational neuroscientist Paul King, “as well as transferring memories between brain regions.” You might imagine a defragging hard drive, the sorting and filing process happening wh...
Tags: Psychology, Facebook, College, Neuroscience, Toni Morrison, Freud, Vladimir Nabokov, Amy Adkins, Paul King, Durham NC Follow, Museum of Dreams