Posts filtered by tags: Ecology[x]


 

Californias Monarch butterfly population hits 'potentially catastrophic' low in 2018

California’s Monarch butterfly population hit a record low in 2018 after dropping a whopping 86 percent from the previous year. According to the Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation, the total population has declined 97 percent since the 1980s, but this latest one year drop is “potentially catastrophic.” In the western part of the United States, monarchs migrate to California for the winter, traveling from Idaho and Utah. In 2017, the traditional California coastal sites like Pismo Beac...
Tags: Utah, Weather, Design, News, California, Animals, Climate, United States, Conservation, Migration, Wildfires, Idaho, Ecology, Urban Development, Vancouver, Flowers


Iguanas Reintroduced to the Largest Galapagos Island After Nearly 200 Year Absence

In 1835, Charles Darwin documented the presence of iguanas on Santiago island, the largest in the Galapagos archipelago. It probably never dawned on the pioneering naturalist that he would be the last scientist to do so. Invasive species wiped the island clean of iguanas—an ecological void that’s now been filled…Read more...
Tags: Science, Biology, Conservation, Santiago, Charles Darwin, Ecology, Galapagos Islands, Galapagos, Galapagos Island, Iguanas, Remedial Ecology


Industrial Waste From Ants Emits Potent Greenhouse Gas

New research shows that garbage piles produced by leaf-cutter ants emit significant amounts of nitrous oxide—a potent greenhouse gas.Read more...
Tags: Science, Biology, Ecology, Ants, Greenhouse Gases, Nitrous Oxide, Rainforests, Leaf Cutter Ants


The Scientists Who Brave Angry Hawk Parents, Wasps and 80-Foot-Falls to Save Endangered Chicks

Life is hard for Ridgway’s hawks, a species found only in a small sliver of habitat on the Caribbean island of Hispaniola. Once found all over the island, the hawks have steadily declined due to local humans killing them and clearing their forest habitat. If that weren’t enough, their chicks are threatened by…Read more...
Tags: Science, Biology, Wildlife, Endangered Species, Ecology, Caribbean, Ridgway, Ridgeways Hawks, Foot Falls to Save Endangered Chicks


Tropical Lizard With Built-in Scuba Gear Can Stay Submerged for 16 Minutes

Unprecedented footage from Costa Rica shows tiny tropical lizards “breathing” from an air sac suspended atop their snouts—an apparent scuba tank that helps them stay submerged for extended periods.Read more...
Tags: Science, Evolution, Ecology, Animal Behavior, Lizards, Costa Rica, Scuba Lizards, Water Anole


The Northern Cardinal Is Actually Multiple Species, Evidence Suggests

New scientific results have strengthened the case that the ubiquitous northern cardinal could be two species of bird or more.Read more...
Tags: Science, Birds, Evolution, Ecology, Birdmodo


Sustainable Travel in the Jungles of Ecuador

Most of the jungle lodges in Central America and South America claim to be running a sustainable travel operation, but how you define that word can make a huge difference in how valid those claims are. Have they eliminated plastic? Are they powered in a way that doesn't use any fossil fuels? Do they compost waste? Do they grow some of their own food? Are the employees locals who are getting training? Although each of these elements is admirable on its own, there are a lot of individual parts t...
Tags: Travel, Environment, Sustainability, Ecology, South America, Ecuador, Costa Rica, Central America, Green travel, Travel Industry, Yasuni National Park, Awesome View, Travel Life, Jungle Lodge, Ecuador Travel, Don


Earth’s “Deep Biosphere” Thrives Beneath Our Feet

The Deep Carbon Observatory (DCO), composed of 1,000 scientists from 52 countries, studies the underground ecosystems between Earth’s surface and its core. In a recent statement, this has been referred to as “Deep Biosphere” as a “subterranean Galapagos” potentially filled with millions of undiscovered species. Despite darkness and harsh conditions, life has been found as far as three miles below the continental subsurface and six-and-a-half miles below the ocean’s surface. The …
Tags: Science, Design, Environment, Tech, Earth, Nature, Ecology, Galapagos, Linkaboutit, Organisms, Deep Carbon Observatory DCO, Deep Biosphere


The scientific reason you want to squeeze cute things

Researchers appear to have found a neural basis for "cute aggression."Cute aggression is what happens when you say something like, 'It's so cute I want to crush it!'But it's also a complex response that likely serves to regulate strong emotions and allow caretaking of the young to occur. None If you've ever seen someone approach a puppy or small child, lean in and say, "Oh, I just want to squeeze that" while using a tone that suggests that said 'squeeze' might not be as harmless an action as it...
Tags: Psychology, Facebook, Animals, Neuroscience, Compassion, Yale, Innovation, Ecology, UC Riverside, Katherine Stavropoulos, Stavropoulous


We Belong to Each Other

“What if rather than saying, “The garden belongs to me,” you said, “I belong to the garden.” – from my book, Grow Curious I’ve been thinking about this a lot over the years and have picked away at it in big and small ways [see No More War in the Garden]. As a young university …
Tags: Garden, Gardening, Ecology, Deep Thoughts


Inside the Quest to Discover Super-Corals at the Bottom of the Sea

In the inky depths of the Gulf of Mexico, pearly white corals crisscross the seafloor, their translucent tentacles swaying to the current like flower petals on a midnight breeze. Lophelia pertusa brings life to what is often considered a cold, dead wasteland—and now, scientists are now bringing it back to the surface…Read more...
Tags: Science, Climate Change, Oceans, Ecology, Gulf of Mexico, Ocean Acidification, Super Coral, Lophelia Pertusa


Heatwaves significantly impact male fertility, says huge study

New research on beetles shows that successive exposure to heatwaves reduces male fertility, sometimes to the point of sterility.The research has implications both for how the insect population will sustain itself as well as how human fertility may work on an increasingly hotter Earth.With this and other evidence, it is becoming clear that more common and more extreme heatwaves may be the most dangerous aspect of climate change. None When we hear that climate change causes "extreme weather events...
Tags: Weather, Climate Change, Germany, Environment, Genetics, Innovation, Men, Ecology, Insects, Gage, Matthew Gage


Russian reporters discover 101 'tortured' whales jammed in offshore pens

Russian news network discovers 101 black-market whales. Orcas and belugas are seen crammed into tiny pens. Marine parks continue to create a high-price demand for illegal captures. It's like a scene from a Hollywood thriller: Armed guards hired by some shady organization keeping watch dockside over ill-gotten goods. Except, in this case, the goods are alive. About 100 orca and beluga whales jammed into pens of offshore netting for sale to far-off zoos. It's far from clear that this is legal, an...
Tags: Hollywood, China, Compassion, Conservation, Oceans, Innovation, Seaworld, Noaa, Ecology, Greenpeace, Wildlife Service, World Wildlife Federation, Global Issues, Nakhodka, coast of Nakhodka, Srednyaya Bay Some


We are heading for a New Cretaceous, not for a new normal

A lazy buzz phrase – 'Is this the new normal?' – has been doing the rounds as extreme climate events have been piling up over the past year. To which the riposte should be: it's worse than that – we're on the road to even more frequent, more extreme events than we saw this year.We have known since the 1980s what's in store for us. Action taken then to reduce emissions by 20 per cent by 2005 might have restricted the global temperature rise to less than 1.5 degrees Celsius. But nothing was done, ...
Tags: Asia, Europe, Sweden, Climate Change, India, Africa, Environment, Sustainability, Earth, Britain, Geology, Innovation, Arctic, Bonn, Anthropocene, Un


Transportation company switches 600+ trucks to renewable diesel

In California, transportation and logistics company, Ecology, switched its fleet of more than 600 trucks to run on Neste MY Renewable Diesel and is reporting cleaner fuel filters, fewer maintenance problems and reductions in tailpipe emissions. Neste MY Renewable Diesel is a low-carbon, drop-in fuel fuel produced from 100% renewable and sustainable raw materials, primarily wastes and residues that requires no blending, no engine modification and is compatible with all current infrastructure. Eco...
Tags: California, Los Angeles, Ecology, Producer News, Biodiesel, Western United States, Neste MY Renewable Diesel, Long Beach Ecology


How an Earthquake in Japan Triggered an Algae Invasion in the Pacific Northwest

In 2011, a colossal tsunami set off by a magnitude 9.0 earthquake slammed into the eastern shores of Japan. Not long afterwards, some of the 1.5 million tons of floating debris created by the waves, from buoys and boats to entire fishing docks, began washing up along America’s northwest Pacific coast.Read more...
Tags: Japan, Science, America, Ecology, Algae, Tsunamis, Pacific, Pacific Northwest, Algae Blooms, 2011 Japan Earthquake, Here Comes The Slime


Dead penguin sex: The reason you should't anthropomorphize animals

Humans have been giving animals human characteristics since the 4th century, A.D. when a highly popular book changed how we viewed nature. You might not want to march with the penguins. Male Adelie penguins, in particular, have particularly disturbing mating habits that might have never made it past the editing room. Anthropomorphizing animals will only lead to ignorance about them. So how do should we present them in the future? With total and brutal honesty. ...
Tags: Video, Sex, Animals, Nature, Conservation, Innovation, Ecology, Morality, Deextinction, Male Adelie penguins


Barley shortage could threaten global beer supply

A new study in Nature Plants suggests that changes in the climate will dramatically reduce barley harvests. Barley is vital to making beer and feeding livestock, but the researchers argue that livestock will come first in a crisis. The findings show us the impact that climate change will have on even the most mundane parts of our lives.Just when you thought climate change couldn't get any worse, a new study in Nature Plants tells us that you can say goodbye to low-cost beer. Say it ain't so! Th...
Tags: Weather, Science, Climate Change, China, Environment, Nature, United States, Ireland, Innovation, Davis, Ecology, Co, Don, Nature Plants, Dabo Guan, Stephen J Davis


Of gutters and ecosystems: the 50th anniversary of the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act

“Rivers are the gutters down which flow the ruins of continents.” – Luna B. LeopoldLuna Leopold understood that rivers are far more than gutters. In a 1964 textbook, he wrote figuratively of the role of river channels in transporting sediment to lower elevations. In other writings, however, Leopold’s understanding of rivers was closer to that of his father, Aldo, author of A Sand County Almanac, who understood rivers as ecosystems. Straight and uniform in shape, gutters and canals are designed t...
Tags: Books, Featured, Climate Change, Colorado, India, US, United States, Alaska, New Zealand, Ecology, Rivers, Ecosystems, Environmental Science, Aldo, CLEVELAND Ohio, Cuyahoga River


Make Sure Your Ship is a Green One in the Galapagos

No, you won't find a ship painted green plying the Galapagos (that we know of), but in this fragile environment, you want a Galapagos Islands cruise that employs green environmental practices. Everything we humans do can have an impact on the flora and fauna of the area, so you want to choose a company that lessens that impact as much as possible during your vacation. Luxury Cruising That Is Eco-Friendly In this part of the world, you don't have to choose between luxury and going green. In f...
Tags: Travel, Environment, Wildlife, Ecology, Ecuador, Galapagos Islands, Green travel, Galapagos, Unesco World Heritage, Luxury Cruises, Travel Life, Ecuador Travel, Eco-Tourism, Klein Tours, Go Galapagos, Go Galapagos Kleintours


New Story, Same Big Old Bird

Madagascar’s history contains some truly enormous animals, from giant lemurs to giant tortoises. The island was also home to 10-foot-tall flightless birds, which sadly disappeared hundreds of years ago. But how we humans classified those birds was, well, a mess.Read more...
Tags: Science, Biology, Oops, Birds, Modeling, Ecology, Madagascar, Extinction, Elephant Birds


Yellowstone grizzly bear hunt cancelled thanks to court ruling

In the midst of yet another shitty news cycle, it's nice to hear that great things can still happen. Earlier this year, the state of Wyoming said "yeah" to allowing a maximum of 22 grizzly bears, once sheltered as a protected species, to be hunted. Yesterday, U.S. District Court Judge Dana Christensen said "nah" to hunters gearing up to shoot at grizzly bears that call the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem home. From Earther: In his order, Christensen made clear that the case “is not about the eth...
Tags: Post, News, Montana, United States, Wyoming, Ecology, Bears, Yellowstone, Christensen, Grizzly Bears, FWS, Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, Western Great Lakes, Dana Christensen, Yesterday U S District Court, Montana Wyoming Washington Idaho


A CRISPR-based hack could eradicate malaria-carrying mosquitoes

A research team from Imperial College London have published promising results of an experiment in which Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes -- responsible for the spread of malaria -- were genetically modified with a stable, gene-drive-based CRISPR modification that caused them to go extinct in the lab. Importantly, the experiment showed that the modified snip of the mosquitoes' genome was kept stable by the gene drive, neither reverting to a neutralized version that would allow the mosquitoes' po...
Tags: Post, Happy Mutants, Science, News, Biology, Genetics, Public Health, Ethics, Disease, Ecology, Crispr, Imperial College London, Zika, Crisanti, Rob Stein NPR


Thanks to a Chinese and Korean fad, California's wild succulents are being poached and smuggled to Asia

Succulents are key to stabilizing the fragile coastal ecosystems of California; they're also extremely popular in China and South Korea, thanks to a fad that's sweeping Asia. (more…)
Tags: Asia, South Korea, Post, News, California, China, Ecology, Smuggling, Poaching, Succulents, Calexit, Drought-tolerant Tulip-bulb Mania


Diseased Ocean Microbes Could Be Messing With the Weather

Our oceans are brimming with microscopic phytoplankton—plant-like organisms that contribute significantly to marine diversity. Tiny though they are, these sea critters, when infected with a particular virus, may influence atmospheric processes such as cloud formation, according to new research.Read more...
Tags: Weather, Science, Climate, Microbiology, Earth Science, Ecology, Algae, Marine Biology, Atmospheric Science, Phytoplankton, Cloud Formation


After (Post)colonial Tragedy – The Aesthetics of Eco-Planetary Futurity

Below is the abstract of a paper I will be giving at the ‘Crossroads in Cultural Studies 2018’ conference in Shanghai next week. I’ve been interested in ecological and environmental issues for a long time. In the 1980s I thought … Continue reading →
Tags: Religion, Uncategorized, Visual Arts, Capitalism, Shanghai, Ecology, Conference, Aesthetics, Cultural Studies, Postcolonial


Here's How an Absurd Primate Ended Up With Squirrel Teeth

The aye-aye is about as ridiculous looking as a primate can get: beady yellow eyes, bat-like ears, and hands like horrible spiders. But perhaps its most interesting feature is its teeth.Read more...
Tags: Science, Biology, Squirrels, Evolution, Ecology, Primates, Madagascar, Lemurs, Aye Aye


These Australian Birds Learn About Danger by Listening to Their Friends

If you heard a bear roar for the first time but didn’t see the snarling beast, what would you think? Would you be scared? Maybe, but maybe not—the forest is full of strange noises. But what if, at the same time, one of your friends said, “Holy shit, I know all about that clawed monster and we need to get in the car”?Read more...
Tags: Twitter, Science, Biology, Australia, Birds, Ecology, Birbs, Birdmodo, Fairy Wrens


The tiny fern that could take a big bite out of greenhouse gases

The little pink-edged ferns above are Azolla filiculoides, and they're smaller than a fingernail. Scientists just made it the first fern to get its genome sequenced because of its potential for fertilizing and even cooling the planet. Fifty million years ago, it was so abundant as ocean blooms that it helped cool the earth's atmosphere. Via Quartz: This great Azolla boom was so successful that it lasted for 800,000 years, and is now known to paleobotanists as the “Azolla event.” Green plants ...
Tags: Post, Science, News, Environment, Nature, Yale, Ecology, Greenhouse Gases, Cornell University, Fern, Azolla, Fay Wei Li


Scientist Loses Distinguished Award After Acceptance Presentation Full of Racy Photos

The Herpetologists’ League rescinded its annual Distinguished Herpetologist award after winner Dick Vogt showed racy photos during his acceptance address.Read more...
Tags: Science, Biology, Ecology, Sexual Harassment, Herpetology, Sexual Misconduct In Science, MeToo, Dick Vogt