Posts filtered by tags: Ecology[x]


 

Report Finds Nearly Two-Third of America's Birds Vulnerable to Extinction From Climate Change

A new report has found that nearly two-thirds of America’s breeding bird species were moderately to highly vulnerable to the effects of climate change.Read more...
Tags: Science, America, Birds, Conservation, Ecology, Audubon Society, Birdmodo


The Winning Photos From The CIWEM Environmental Photographer Of The Year 2019, An International Showcase For The Very Best In Environmental Photography

The CIWEM Environmental Photographer of the Year showcases the very best in environmental photography. Highlighting the terrible impacts being wrought on our planet by its most dominant species the competition also celebrates humanity’s innate ability to survive and innovate, lending hope to us all that we can overcome challenges to live sustainably. The competition supports the urgent calls to... Source
Tags: Photography, Design, Environment, Climate, Change, Pollution, Ecology, Contest, Winners, 2019


How the history of Hawaii may predict the future of the world

The analogy is obvious: Eight principal Hawaiian islands are adrift in a universe of ocean, just as our eight planets (sorry Pluto) are isolated in a universe of space. The first Polynesians, from the Marquesas, arrived perhaps as early as 200 A.D. Back-and-forth migrations from a second wave of Polynesians from Tahiti took place until around 1300 A.D., at which point newcomers stopped arriving and the Hawaiians were alone in their world until the late 1700s. That's when Western Civilization...
Tags: Travel, Cook, Global Warming, Sustainability, West, Hawaii, Ecology, Pluto, Big Island, Kauai, Maui, Oahu, James Cook, Tahiti, Pacific Islands, Western World


Man Takes First-Ever Photo of Living Colombian Weasel After Finding It Standing on His Toilet

A man rediscovered the rarest South American carnivore after uploading a picture of it climbing on his toilet to a citizen science database.Read more...
Tags: Science, Biology, Colombia, Ecology, Toilets, Citizen Science, Weasels, Inaturalist


Confronted by Drones, Monkeys Warn Comrades of Incoming 'Eagle'

Researchers in Senegal recently flew drones in the vicinity of green monkeys to see how the primates might respond. Incredibly, the monkeys produced an instinctual alarm call consistent with an eagle sighting. Kinda makes sense—except for the fact that green monkeys aren’t threatened by eagles.Read more...
Tags: Science, Senegal, Monkeys, Drones, Ecology, Animal Behavior, Primates, Primate Intelligence, Drones Monkeys Warn Comrades of Incoming Eagle


Camera Trap Snaps Photo of First Known Albino Giant Panda

Using a motion-activated camera, scientists at Wolong National Nature Reserve in southwest China have snapped a blurry but unprecedented photograph of the world’s first known albino giant panda.Read more...
Tags: Science, Biology, China, Conservation, Ecology, Zoology, Pandas, Albinos, Albinism, Wolong National Nature Reserve


How Are Doves and Sparrows Ending Up Inside Baby Sharks?

Back in 2010, scientists were monitoring a shark population on the Mississippi-Alabama border. They had hauled up a small tiger shark to tag when something strange happened: It puked up feathers. A DNA analysis revealed that the shark had eaten a brown thrasher, a speckled migratory songbird related to the…Read more...
Tags: Science, Biology, Birds, Ecology, Sharks, Mississippi Alabama, Birdmodo, Food Webs


Plastic bag and other human trash found at the bottom of Earth's deepest ocean trench

During the deepest human sea dive ever, 35,853 feet/10,928 meters down to the bottom of the western Pacific's Mariana Trench in a one-person submarine, underwater adventurer found what may be newly discovered species of marine life along with candy wrappers and a plastic bag. This is the third plastic bag that divers have found in the Mariana Trench, considered the deepest natural trench on Earth. From National Geographic: A study released in October 2018 documented what is still the deep...
Tags: Video, News, China, Environment, Earth, Oceans, Ecology, Pacific, Mariana Trench


How Can We Stop the Collapse of Nature?

Scientists warned last week that a million species could go extinct, and it’s all our fault. Well, not “our” as in you and I, but “our” as in humanity.Read more...
Tags: Science, Biology, Conservation, Ecology, Solutions, Sixth Mass Extinction, Ipbes Report


New study shows human development is destroying the planet at an unprecedented rate

“We are eroding the very foundations of our economies, livelihoods, food security, health and quality of life worldwide.” That’s the word from Sir Robert Watson, the chair of a massive multinational research effort to survey the impact of human development on the natural world. In the most comprehensive effort undertaken to date, some 145 expert authors from 50 countries working with another 310 contributing authors spent the last three years compiling and assessing changes in global biodiversit...
Tags: Food, TC, Usa, Germany, Tech, Earth, Nature, United States, Agriculture, Brazil, Argentina, Ecology, Watson, Chair, Eduardo, Robert Watson


Everything Is Fucked, Major New Extinction Report Finds

There has never been a period like this in the history of humanity. In a sweeping report delivered on Monday, the world’s top scientists warned that up to a million species could go extinct in the next few decades. But crucially, the report also shows the world has a choice about whether to let go of nearly 13 percent…Read more...
Tags: Science, Climate Change, Nature, Ecology, Biodiversity, IPBES, Big Problems


Climate change may bring acidic oceans full of jellyfish

Since the beginning of the industrial era, humanity has been pumping out unprecedented levels of CO2 into the atmosphere.A significant portion of this CO2 is sucked back into the ocean, where it reacts with water to produce carbonic acid.Most species fair poorly in the newly acidic ocean. Jellyfish, however, seem to resist ocean acidification more than others. None Human beings don't do well when they try to understand things past a certain scale. When you consider the 7.5 billion people on the ...
Tags: Climate Change, Environment, Earth, Fish, Innovation, Ecology, Biodiversity, Marine Biology, Mediterranean, Northeast US


World's Oldest Rainforest Is Being Cooked to Death by Climate Change, Authorities Warn

Australia can’t seem to catch a break. The Great Barrier reef is still limping along after being ravaged by heat waves two to three years ago, while the people of Australia just sweated through their hottest summer on record. Now, authorities are warning that the endless heat has placed a world-class rainforest in…Read more...
Tags: Science, Australia, Climate, Conservation, Ecology, Tropical Rainforests, Climate Change Authorities Warn


We Have to Do Something About Outdoor Cats

I hate outdoor cats with a burning passion. I set out to write a blog calling for an Isle of Dogs-style roundup of feral cats, a mass adoption drive and cat cull, and outlawing outdoor and community cats. But I’ve realized that things aren’t that simple.Read more...
Tags: Science, Biology, Ecology, Feral Cats, Saturday Riff


Taichung Discovery Pavilion champions biodiversity in new "Half Earth" multimedia art installation

In Taichung, Taiwan, the recently completed Discovery Pavilion at the Taichung World Flower Expo explores what life could be like if humans returned half of the Earth’s habitable surfaces to nature — a concept known as “Half Earth” proposed by the “Father of Biodiversity” Edward Wilson in 2016. Taipei-based Cogitoimage International Co., Ltd designed the pavilion to advocate such preservation with a large-scale exhibition that covers the ecology of the Taichung Dajia River as it flows from high...
Tags: Design, Earth, Taiwan, Architecture, Gallery, Ecology, Taipei, Carousel Showcase, Pavilion, Recycled Materials, Taichung, Native Plants, Edward Wilson, Taichung Taiwan, Natural Materials, Environmental Stewardship


Atlantic Shipwreck Graveyard May Be Key Habitat for Imperiled Sharks

Photographs taken by citizen scientist scuba divers show that female sand tiger sharks develop an affinity to certain shipwrecks off the coast of North Carolina—a finding that could prove useful to conservation efforts. Read more...
Tags: Science, Ecology, North Carolina, Sharks, Shipwrecks, Marine Biology, Shipwreck Sharks Doo Doo Doo Doo Doo Doo, Sand Tiger Sharks, Marine Habitats


What’s the Impact of Galapagos Land Tours vs. Ship Tours?

If you are visiting the Galapagos Islands in Ecuador because you love nature and care about the environment, then one choice you make will support that stance with actions, not just words. Pass up the land-based tour options and book a trip with a responsible ship operator instead. You'll have a better experience and you'll see a lot more too. After taking a dip during the financial crisis a decade ago, Galapagos tourism has come roaring back. Visitor numbers are up 50% per year since then, wh...
Tags: Travel, Environment, New York Times, Ecology, Cruising, Ecuador, Galapagos Islands, Adventure Travel, Travel Industry, Galapagos, Luxury Cruises, Small Ship Cruises, Ecuador Travel, Conde Nast Traveler, Cancun, Isabela Island


What Would Really Happen if Thanos Erased Half of All Life on Earth?

Unless you’ve been hiding under a rock for the past year, you’ll know that the end of Avengers: Infinity War was a rather bleak affair. Read more...
Tags: Science, Ecology, Avengers, Extinction, Avengers Endgame


Asian Supermarkets Go Back To Using Leaves Instead Of Plastic

It should be one of the main goals in today’s society to reduce plastic consumption and to educate people on the environmental and global changes and problems that we are currently facing. Even though many of us believe that recycling will solve the problem, and continue using plastic, it is actually the complete opposite. In 2013, 254 million tonnes of trash was produced in the U.S. alone... Source
Tags: Asia, Design, Safety, Environment, Supermarkets, Plastic, Ecology, Packages


Unsettling Video Shows What Happens to a Dead Alligator at the Bottom of the Sea

For the first time ever, scientists placed alligator carcasses at the bottom of the Gulf of Mexico to see which bottom feeders might make a meal of the dead reptiles. The results came as a surprise even to the researchers.Read more...
Tags: Science, Ecology, Gulf of Mexico, Alligators, Marine Biology, Scavengers, Giant Isopods, Food Falls, Food Webs


Before-And-After Pics Illustrate How Products Turn Into Waste That Pollutes The Environment

At the beginning there are ads that display beautiful products, so people buy them. But there is also a dark side. Trash that is left behind it. Members of the eco-project Ekoista (based in Slovakia) decided to clean their forest from that trash and here is what they’ve found. More: Ekoista, Instagram, Facebook h/t: Source
Tags: Design, Brands, Nature, Ecology, Slovakia, Trash, Inspirations, Ekoista, Ekoista Instagram Facebook


Why the ocean you know and love won’t exist in 50 years

Coral reefs may not be able to survive another human decade because of the environmental stress we have placed on them, says author David Wallace-Wells. He posits that without meaningful changes to policies, the trend of them dying out, even in light of recent advances, will continue.The World Wildlife Fund says that 60 percent of all vertebrate mammals have died since just 1970. On top of this, recent studies suggest that insect populations may have fallen by as much as 75 percent over the last...
Tags: Climate Change, Animals, Environment, Future, Water, Earth, Fish, Nature, Oceans, Innovation, Natural Disaster, Ecology, Insects, World Wildlife Fund, David Wallace


Exploding Whales, Poisoned Porpoises: The Gruesome World of Cetacean Autopsies

A dolphin post-mortem may not be everyone’s cup of tea. Many people have a soft spot for the highly intelligent cetaceans, so watching a recently deceased one get comprehensively dissected by tools including a pair of rudimentary garden shears can be tough. Read more...
Tags: Science, Conservation, Ecology, Behavior, Whales, Marine Biology, Whale Strandings, Csip


Horseshoe crabs are captured for their blue blood. That practice will soon be over.

Horseshoe crabs' blue blood is so valuable that a quart of it can be sold for $15,000.This is because it contains a molecule that is crucial to the medical research community.Today, however, new innovations have resulted in a synthetic substitute that may end the practice of farming horseshoe crabs for their blood. None One of humanity's strangest and most macabre activities is slowly coming to an end, a trend that every horseshoe crab should celebrate. For the time being, however, hundreds of t...
Tags: Medicine, US, Chemistry, Medical Research, Atlantic, Innovation, Ecology, Fda, The Food and Drug Administration, Lonza Group Pharmaceutical, Hyglos GmbH, rFC


Horseshoe crabs are drained for their blue blood. That practice will soon be over.

Horseshoe crabs' blue blood is so valuable that a quart of it can be sold for $15,000.This is because it contains a molecule that is crucial to the medical research community.Today, however, new innovations have resulted in a synthetic substitute that may end the practice of farming horseshoe crabs for their blood. None One of humanity's strangest and most macabre activities is slowly coming to an end, a trend that every horseshoe crab should celebrate. For the time being, however, hundreds of t...
Tags: Medicine, US, Chemistry, Medical Research, Atlantic, Innovation, Ecology, Fda, The Food and Drug Administration, Lonza Group Pharmaceutical, Hyglos GmbH, rFC


Designer Conceived A Bottle That Indicates For Each Town Where To Find A Drinking Water

Despite the historical presence of public water fountains in most of the large cities of the world, city inhabitants still hesitate to drink that “street water” and prefer to buy a plastic bottle, which is pollutive. However, these fountains are tested and their quality very high because of health norms. In Paris, Wallace fountains are icons of the urban landscape. Source
Tags: Travel, Design, World, Cities, Ecology, Bottle, Paris Wallace, Emanuele Pizzolorusso


‘Micro snails’ we scraped from sidewalk cracks help unlock details of ancient Earth’s biological evolution

Every step you take, you're likely walking on a world of unseen and undescribed microbial diversity. And you don't need to head out into nature to find these usually unnoticed microscopic organisms. As biologists, we know this firsthand. A meetup for coffee several years ago ended with our using makeshift sampling tools – actually a coffee stirrer and a coffee cup lid – to collect some of the black gunk from between the sidewalk's concrete slabs. In this mundane space on the Mississippi Stat...
Tags: Dna, Environment, History, Earth, Bacteria, Nature, Geology, Innovation, Brazil, Evolution, Ecology, Grand Canyon, Microbes, Lahr, Mississippi State University, Denisovan


Humans Are Taking Up a Deceptively Large Swath of Antarctica

Antarctica is huge, stretching nearly 3,500 miles at its widest extent. Despite its enormous size, however, the frozen continent features a paltry amount of habitable space—a limited resource that humans have claimed as their own to the potential detriment of the local wildlife, as new research points out. Read more...
Tags: Science, Sustainability, Antarctica, Anthropocene, Ecology, Human Impacts


Humans Are Taking Up a Surprisingly Large Swath of Antarctica

Antarctica is huge, stretching nearly 3,500 miles at its widest extent. Despite its enormous size, however, the frozen continent features a paltry amount of habitable space—a limited resource that humans have claimed as their own to the potential detriment of the local wildlife, as new research points out. Read more...
Tags: Science, Sustainability, Antarctica, Anthropocene, Ecology, Human Impacts


Disney builds massive solar facility to cut emissions in half by 2020

Disney is taking the lead in reducing greenhouse emissions at its facilities.The company built a giant solar panel installation to power its Florida resort.Disney plans to cut emissions by 50% by the year 2020. None You know who's one of the world's leaders in tackling greenhouse gas emissions? You might be surprised to know that the venerable corporation that brought us Mickey Mouse is staying ahead of the pack by following through on its pledge to cut emissions by 50%. Disney's goal is to reac...
Tags: Energy, Florida, Climate Change, Environment, Disney, Engineering, Innovation, Global development, Solar Energy, Ecology, Electricity, Orlando, Disneyland Paris, Alternative Energy, Mickey Mouse, Walt Disney World Resort