Posts filtered by tags: Ecology[x]


 

What’s the Impact of Galapagos Land Tours vs. Ship Tours?

If you are visiting the Galapagos Islands in Ecuador because you love nature and care about the environment, then one choice you make will support that stance with actions, not just words. Pass up the land-based tour options and book a trip with a responsible ship operator instead. You'll have a better experience and you'll see a lot more too. After taking a dip during the financial crisis a decade ago, Galapagos tourism has come roaring back. Visitor numbers are up 50% per year since then, wh...
Tags: Travel, Environment, New York Times, Ecology, Cruising, Ecuador, Galapagos Islands, Adventure Travel, Travel Industry, Galapagos, Luxury Cruises, Small Ship Cruises, Ecuador Travel, Conde Nast Traveler, Cancun, Isabela Island


What Would Really Happen if Thanos Erased Half of All Life on Earth?

Unless you’ve been hiding under a rock for the past year, you’ll know that the end of Avengers: Infinity War was a rather bleak affair. Read more...
Tags: Science, Ecology, Avengers, Extinction, Avengers Endgame


Asian Supermarkets Go Back To Using Leaves Instead Of Plastic

It should be one of the main goals in today’s society to reduce plastic consumption and to educate people on the environmental and global changes and problems that we are currently facing. Even though many of us believe that recycling will solve the problem, and continue using plastic, it is actually the complete opposite. In 2013, 254 million tonnes of trash was produced in the U.S. alone... Source
Tags: Asia, Design, Safety, Environment, Supermarkets, Plastic, Ecology, Packages


Unsettling Video Shows What Happens to a Dead Alligator at the Bottom of the Sea

For the first time ever, scientists placed alligator carcasses at the bottom of the Gulf of Mexico to see which bottom feeders might make a meal of the dead reptiles. The results came as a surprise even to the researchers.Read more...
Tags: Science, Ecology, Gulf of Mexico, Alligators, Marine Biology, Scavengers, Giant Isopods, Food Falls, Food Webs


Before-And-After Pics Illustrate How Products Turn Into Waste That Pollutes The Environment

At the beginning there are ads that display beautiful products, so people buy them. But there is also a dark side. Trash that is left behind it. Members of the eco-project Ekoista (based in Slovakia) decided to clean their forest from that trash and here is what they’ve found. More: Ekoista, Instagram, Facebook h/t: Source
Tags: Design, Brands, Nature, Ecology, Slovakia, Trash, Inspirations, Ekoista, Ekoista Instagram Facebook


Why the ocean you know and love won’t exist in 50 years

Coral reefs may not be able to survive another human decade because of the environmental stress we have placed on them, says author David Wallace-Wells. He posits that without meaningful changes to policies, the trend of them dying out, even in light of recent advances, will continue.The World Wildlife Fund says that 60 percent of all vertebrate mammals have died since just 1970. On top of this, recent studies suggest that insect populations may have fallen by as much as 75 percent over the last...
Tags: Climate Change, Animals, Environment, Future, Water, Earth, Fish, Nature, Oceans, Innovation, Natural Disaster, Ecology, Insects, World Wildlife Fund, David Wallace


Exploding Whales, Poisoned Porpoises: The Gruesome World of Cetacean Autopsies

A dolphin post-mortem may not be everyone’s cup of tea. Many people have a soft spot for the highly intelligent cetaceans, so watching a recently deceased one get comprehensively dissected by tools including a pair of rudimentary garden shears can be tough. Read more...
Tags: Science, Conservation, Ecology, Behavior, Whales, Marine Biology, Whale Strandings, Csip


Horseshoe crabs are captured for their blue blood. That practice will soon be over.

Horseshoe crabs' blue blood is so valuable that a quart of it can be sold for $15,000.This is because it contains a molecule that is crucial to the medical research community.Today, however, new innovations have resulted in a synthetic substitute that may end the practice of farming horseshoe crabs for their blood. None One of humanity's strangest and most macabre activities is slowly coming to an end, a trend that every horseshoe crab should celebrate. For the time being, however, hundreds of t...
Tags: Medicine, US, Chemistry, Medical Research, Atlantic, Innovation, Ecology, Fda, The Food and Drug Administration, Lonza Group Pharmaceutical, Hyglos GmbH, rFC


Horseshoe crabs are drained for their blue blood. That practice will soon be over.

Horseshoe crabs' blue blood is so valuable that a quart of it can be sold for $15,000.This is because it contains a molecule that is crucial to the medical research community.Today, however, new innovations have resulted in a synthetic substitute that may end the practice of farming horseshoe crabs for their blood. None One of humanity's strangest and most macabre activities is slowly coming to an end, a trend that every horseshoe crab should celebrate. For the time being, however, hundreds of t...
Tags: Medicine, US, Chemistry, Medical Research, Atlantic, Innovation, Ecology, Fda, The Food and Drug Administration, Lonza Group Pharmaceutical, Hyglos GmbH, rFC


Designer Conceived A Bottle That Indicates For Each Town Where To Find A Drinking Water

Despite the historical presence of public water fountains in most of the large cities of the world, city inhabitants still hesitate to drink that “street water” and prefer to buy a plastic bottle, which is pollutive. However, these fountains are tested and their quality very high because of health norms. In Paris, Wallace fountains are icons of the urban landscape. Source
Tags: Travel, Design, World, Cities, Ecology, Bottle, Paris Wallace, Emanuele Pizzolorusso


‘Micro snails’ we scraped from sidewalk cracks help unlock details of ancient Earth’s biological evolution

Every step you take, you're likely walking on a world of unseen and undescribed microbial diversity. And you don't need to head out into nature to find these usually unnoticed microscopic organisms. As biologists, we know this firsthand. A meetup for coffee several years ago ended with our using makeshift sampling tools – actually a coffee stirrer and a coffee cup lid – to collect some of the black gunk from between the sidewalk's concrete slabs. In this mundane space on the Mississippi Stat...
Tags: Dna, Environment, History, Earth, Bacteria, Nature, Geology, Innovation, Brazil, Evolution, Ecology, Grand Canyon, Microbes, Lahr, Mississippi State University, Denisovan


Humans Are Taking Up a Surprisingly Large Swath of Antarctica

Antarctica is huge, stretching nearly 3,500 miles at its widest extent. Despite its enormous size, however, the frozen continent features a paltry amount of habitable space—a limited resource that humans have claimed as their own to the potential detriment of the local wildlife, as new research points out. Read more...
Tags: Science, Sustainability, Antarctica, Anthropocene, Ecology, Human Impacts


Humans Are Taking Up a Deceptively Large Swath of Antarctica

Antarctica is huge, stretching nearly 3,500 miles at its widest extent. Despite its enormous size, however, the frozen continent features a paltry amount of habitable space—a limited resource that humans have claimed as their own to the potential detriment of the local wildlife, as new research points out. Read more...
Tags: Science, Sustainability, Antarctica, Anthropocene, Ecology, Human Impacts


Disney builds massive solar facility to cut emissions in half by 2020

Disney is taking the lead in reducing greenhouse emissions at its facilities.The company built a giant solar panel installation to power its Florida resort.Disney plans to cut emissions by 50% by the year 2020. None You know who's one of the world's leaders in tackling greenhouse gas emissions? You might be surprised to know that the venerable corporation that brought us Mickey Mouse is staying ahead of the pack by following through on its pledge to cut emissions by 50%. Disney's goal is to reac...
Tags: Energy, Florida, Climate Change, Environment, Disney, Engineering, Innovation, Global development, Solar Energy, Ecology, Electricity, Orlando, Disneyland Paris, Alternative Energy, Mickey Mouse, Walt Disney World Resort


Time Now for Some Gnarly Photos of Spiders Eating Other Animals

Spiders are creepy even at the best of times, but new photos taken from the Amazon rainforest put these predatory creatures in an even more fearsome light: as they’re chomping down on animals of unusual sizes. Read more...
Tags: Amazon, Science, Biology, Ecology, Animal Behavior, Arthropods, Spiders, Not So Itsy Bitsy Spiders, Predatory Arthropods, Avert Your Eyes


Scientists Will Once Again Try to Explore Alien Ecosystem Exposed by Giant Antarctic Iceberg

Last year, a team of scientists embarked on a mission to explore the seafloor exposed when a Delaware-sized iceberg popped off the Antarctic Peninsula in 2017. Frustratingly, their ship had to turn around mid-voyage thanks to impenetrable sea ice. This year, amidst near-record low Antarctic sea ice levels, another…Read more...
Tags: Science, Ice, Antarctica, Ecology, Exploration, Glaciers, Delaware, Antarctic sea, Antarctic Peninsula, Ice On Thin Ice, Giant Antarctic Iceberg


A 'vampire' fungus has killed millions of bats since 2006. Here's why it matters.

White-nose syndrome has killed at least 6.7 million bats, though this estimate was made in 2012, and the current figure is almost certainly much higher.Bats serve a crucial role in our ecosystem and economy, and white-nose syndrome is already pushing many species to the brink of extinction.Researchers and scientists are working hard to develop novel methods to cure white-nose syndrome; a few methods have shown promise, but none have yet been deployed in the field. None The fungus Pseudogymnoascu...
Tags: New York, Environment, Indiana, Conservation, Innovation, Disease, Ecology, Illness, Biodiversity, North America, White, Jonathan Palmer Kevin Drees Jeffrey Foster, Daniel Lindner, Washington Post Lindner


Californias Monarch butterfly population hits 'potentially catastrophic' low in 2018

California’s Monarch butterfly population hit a record low in 2018 after dropping a whopping 86 percent from the previous year. According to the Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation, the total population has declined 97 percent since the 1980s, but this latest one year drop is “potentially catastrophic.” In the western part of the United States, monarchs migrate to California for the winter, traveling from Idaho and Utah. In 2017, the traditional California coastal sites like Pismo Beac...
Tags: Utah, Weather, Design, News, California, Animals, Climate, United States, Conservation, Migration, Wildfires, Idaho, Ecology, Urban Development, Vancouver, Flowers


Iguanas Reintroduced to the Largest Galapagos Island After Nearly 200 Year Absence

In 1835, Charles Darwin documented the presence of iguanas on Santiago island, the largest in the Galapagos archipelago. It probably never dawned on the pioneering naturalist that he would be the last scientist to do so. Invasive species wiped the island clean of iguanas—an ecological void that’s now been filled…Read more...
Tags: Science, Biology, Conservation, Santiago, Charles Darwin, Ecology, Galapagos Islands, Galapagos, Galapagos Island, Iguanas, Remedial Ecology


Industrial Waste From Ants Emits Potent Greenhouse Gas

New research shows that garbage piles produced by leaf-cutter ants emit significant amounts of nitrous oxide—a potent greenhouse gas.Read more...
Tags: Science, Biology, Ecology, Ants, Greenhouse Gases, Nitrous Oxide, Rainforests, Leaf Cutter Ants


The Scientists Who Brave Angry Hawk Parents, Wasps and 80-Foot-Falls to Save Endangered Chicks

Life is hard for Ridgway’s hawks, a species found only in a small sliver of habitat on the Caribbean island of Hispaniola. Once found all over the island, the hawks have steadily declined due to local humans killing them and clearing their forest habitat. If that weren’t enough, their chicks are threatened by…Read more...
Tags: Science, Biology, Wildlife, Endangered Species, Ecology, Caribbean, Ridgway, Ridgeways Hawks, Foot Falls to Save Endangered Chicks


Tropical Lizard With Built-in Scuba Gear Can Stay Submerged for 16 Minutes

Unprecedented footage from Costa Rica shows tiny tropical lizards “breathing” from an air sac suspended atop their snouts—an apparent scuba tank that helps them stay submerged for extended periods.Read more...
Tags: Science, Evolution, Ecology, Animal Behavior, Lizards, Costa Rica, Scuba Lizards, Water Anole


The Northern Cardinal Is Actually Multiple Species, Evidence Suggests

New scientific results have strengthened the case that the ubiquitous northern cardinal could be two species of bird or more.Read more...
Tags: Science, Birds, Evolution, Ecology, Birdmodo


Sustainable Travel in the Jungles of Ecuador

Most of the jungle lodges in Central America and South America claim to be running a sustainable travel operation, but how you define that word can make a huge difference in how valid those claims are. Have they eliminated plastic? Are they powered in a way that doesn't use any fossil fuels? Do they compost waste? Do they grow some of their own food? Are the employees locals who are getting training? Although each of these elements is admirable on its own, there are a lot of individual parts t...
Tags: Travel, Environment, Sustainability, Ecology, South America, Ecuador, Costa Rica, Central America, Green travel, Travel Industry, Yasuni National Park, Awesome View, Travel Life, Jungle Lodge, Ecuador Travel, Don


Earth’s “Deep Biosphere” Thrives Beneath Our Feet

The Deep Carbon Observatory (DCO), composed of 1,000 scientists from 52 countries, studies the underground ecosystems between Earth’s surface and its core. In a recent statement, this has been referred to as “Deep Biosphere” as a “subterranean Galapagos” potentially filled with millions of undiscovered species. Despite darkness and harsh conditions, life has been found as far as three miles below the continental subsurface and six-and-a-half miles below the ocean’s surface. The …
Tags: Science, Design, Environment, Tech, Earth, Nature, Ecology, Galapagos, Linkaboutit, Organisms, Deep Carbon Observatory DCO, Deep Biosphere


The scientific reason you want to squeeze cute things

Researchers appear to have found a neural basis for "cute aggression."Cute aggression is what happens when you say something like, 'It's so cute I want to crush it!'But it's also a complex response that likely serves to regulate strong emotions and allow caretaking of the young to occur. None If you've ever seen someone approach a puppy or small child, lean in and say, "Oh, I just want to squeeze that" while using a tone that suggests that said 'squeeze' might not be as harmless an action as it...
Tags: Psychology, Facebook, Animals, Neuroscience, Compassion, Yale, Innovation, Ecology, UC Riverside, Katherine Stavropoulos, Stavropoulous


We Belong to Each Other

“What if rather than saying, “The garden belongs to me,” you said, “I belong to the garden.” – from my book, Grow Curious I’ve been thinking about this a lot over the years and have picked away at it in big and small ways [see No More War in the Garden]. As a young university …
Tags: Garden, Gardening, Ecology, Deep Thoughts


Inside the Quest to Discover Super-Corals at the Bottom of the Sea

In the inky depths of the Gulf of Mexico, pearly white corals crisscross the seafloor, their translucent tentacles swaying to the current like flower petals on a midnight breeze. Lophelia pertusa brings life to what is often considered a cold, dead wasteland—and now, scientists are now bringing it back to the surface…Read more...
Tags: Science, Climate Change, Oceans, Ecology, Gulf of Mexico, Ocean Acidification, Super Coral, Lophelia Pertusa


Heatwaves significantly impact male fertility, says huge study

New research on beetles shows that successive exposure to heatwaves reduces male fertility, sometimes to the point of sterility.The research has implications both for how the insect population will sustain itself as well as how human fertility may work on an increasingly hotter Earth.With this and other evidence, it is becoming clear that more common and more extreme heatwaves may be the most dangerous aspect of climate change. None When we hear that climate change causes "extreme weather events...
Tags: Weather, Climate Change, Germany, Environment, Genetics, Innovation, Men, Ecology, Insects, Gage, Matthew Gage


Russian reporters discover 101 'tortured' whales jammed in offshore pens

Russian news network discovers 101 black-market whales. Orcas and belugas are seen crammed into tiny pens. Marine parks continue to create a high-price demand for illegal captures. It's like a scene from a Hollywood thriller: Armed guards hired by some shady organization keeping watch dockside over ill-gotten goods. Except, in this case, the goods are alive. About 100 orca and beluga whales jammed into pens of offshore netting for sale to far-off zoos. It's far from clear that this is legal, an...
Tags: Hollywood, China, Compassion, Conservation, Oceans, Innovation, Seaworld, Noaa, Ecology, Greenpeace, Wildlife Service, World Wildlife Federation, Global Issues, Nakhodka, coast of Nakhodka, Srednyaya Bay Some