Posts filtered by tags: Emotions[x]


 

Bruce Lee: How to live successfully in a world with no rules

Bruce Lee would have turned 80 years old on November 27, 2020. The legendary actor and martial artist's daughter, Shannon Lee, shares some of his wisdom and his philosophy on self help in a new book titled "Be Water, My Friend: The Teachings of Bruce Lee."In this video, Shannon shares a story of the fight that led to her father beginning a deeper philosophical journey, and how that informed his unique expression of martial arts called Jeet Kune Do.One lesson passed down from Bruce Lee was his us...
Tags: Life, Personality, Innovation, Extreme Sports, Philosophy, Emotions, Bruce Lee, Personal Growth, Shannon, Shannon Lee


Lonely? Hungry? The same part of the brain worries about both

A new study demonstrates that our brains crave social interaction with the same areas used to crave food. Hungry test subjects also reported a lack of desire to socialize, proving the existence of "hanger." Other studies have suggested that failure to socialize can lead to stress eating in rodents. Even before the COVID-19 pandemic started, an epidemic of loneliness existed. This is not only unpleasant for those involved but has measurably adverse effects on their mental and physical health. Th...
Tags: Food, Neuroscience, Mit, Brain, Hunger, Innovation, Emotions, Loneliness, Sulk Institute


Hope and Heartache During the Holidays

On a fall morning over a decade ago, I sat in a circle of women whose ages and stories varied. We clutched coffee cups and held in our emotions, no one wanting to be the first to share. What did we all have in common? Being part of a class at my church called “Interrupted Expectations.” I, as a counseling intern and co-facilitator, felt the pressure to say something brilliant but instead stared at the carpet. Our leader, Jan Stockdale, pulled out a box of twenty-four crayons which she said repre...
Tags: Hope, Holidays, Inspiration, Disappointment, Loss, Emotions, Jan, Brandt, David Brandt, HOLLEY, Encouragement, NLT, Jan Stockdale


Receiving Big Love

In yesterday’s post I wrote about expressing and exploring Big Love. Now let’s consider the receiving side. Be receptive to other people’s expression of love, even when it’s not individually directed to you. Allow yourself to feel gratitude and appreciation for the gifts that other people share with the world, as if those gifts were meant for you personally. Can you allow yourself to receive the love expressed in these expressions? An actor’s performanceA song that moves youProducts you...
Tags: Careers, Values, Emotions, Steve, Don, Abundance


Big Love

Loving another person is one form of love, but you can also love a grand purpose or vision that doesn’t directly involve loving a specific person. By expressing love at the individual level, you may make another person happier. But by channeling love into an expression of purpose, you may delight or inspire a great many people, even well beyond your lifetime. Consider the creation of Star Wars, a grand labor of love for George Lucas. Or consider the love energy that Walt Disney poured into Disne...
Tags: Careers, Values, Emotions, George Lucas, Walt Disney, Steve, Don


NaNoWriMo Days 16-17

The morning I hit a nice milestone for my novel-in-progress, getting it just beyond 30K words, so I’m still ahead of schedule for reaching 50K words by November 30th. The daily target of 1667 words continues to work well. Yesterday I added 2050 words, which I think is the first time I’ve gone over 2K words in a day. I got into the flow of an emotionally juicy scene and didn’t want to stop till I got to the end of it. I got caught up in the characters’ feelings as I channeled their dialogue, a...
Tags: Lifestyle, Careers, Emotions, Steve


Psilocybin rapidly promotes neuroplasticity in the brains of rats

Psilocybin and psilocin are chemical compounds found in "magic mushrooms." A recent study published in the Journal of Psychopharmacology found very interesting results when psilocybin was administered to rats to research the potential impact the chemical could have on the human brain.Several studies have suggested that psilocybin could be a treatment for depression.A recent study published in the Journal of Psychopharmacology found very interesting results when psilocybin was administered to rat...
Tags: Health, Biology, Drugs, Mexico, Animals, Dna, Neuroscience, Mindfulness, Brain, Depression, Innovation, Addiction, Emotions, South America, Johns Hopkins University, Matthew Johnson


10 Songs That Make People Happy

Inc. Magazine shared a recent article about 10 songs that make people happy, based on some findings by a neuroscientist several years ago. I don’t normally find Inc’s articles worthwhile because they publish so many fluffy clickbait pieces (often padding out one minor quote from Steve Jobs, Bill Gates, Warren Buffet, or Jeff Bezos into a whole article). But I can say that Rachelle and I listened to several of the songs on this list last night while making dinner, and we did feel happier. Here...
Tags: Stephen King, Careers, Emotions, Jeff Bezos, Steve, Inc Magazine, Rachelle, Billie JoelEye, Cyndi LauperLivin, Jon Bon, Gloria GaynorWalking


Some sleep is worse than no sleep for keeping fear in check

A new study finds that people without sleep fare better in learning what to fear and not fear than those getting only some sleep.Test subjects learned to associate colors with electric shocks, but only some unlearned it. The findings could be used to help create new treatments for those at risk of PTSD or anxiety. A good night's sleep is essential for your overall good health. Memories are cemented during sleep, and students are often reminded that they need to have good sleep habits to maximi...
Tags: Sleep, Medical Research, Innovation, Fear, Emotions, University of Pittsburgh, Harvard Medical School, Rapid Eye Movement REM


Remote education is decreasing anxiety, increasing wellbeing for some students

With coronavirus resurging in Europe and the United States, parents are worried about their children's well-being and mental health.A report from the U.K.'s NIHR extends some hope; it found that students' mental health is improving while remote learning. Parents will continue play an important role in supporting their children's mental health. As coronavirus cases resurge, European states have begun the second round of shutdowns and business closures. Across the Atlantic, 10 million people have...
Tags: Health, Europe, Learning, Parenting, Children, Happiness, Depression, Atlantic, United States, United Kingdom, Innovation, Fear, Emotions, Rahman, National Institute for Health Research, Johns Hopkins Children s Center


Podcast #660: How Ancient Greek Tragedies Can Heal the Soul

When you think about ancient Greek tragedies, you probably think about people in togas spouting stilted, archaic language — stories written by stuffy playwrights to be watched by snooty audiences. My guest today argues that this common conception of Greek tragedies misses the power of plays that were in fact created by warriors for warriors, and which represent a technology of healing that’s just as relevant today as it was two millennia ago. His name is Bryan Doerries and he’s the author of ...
Tags: Podcast, Life, Ajax, Athens, Emotions, Walter Reed, Bryan, Bryan Doerries


Sensitivity to Lying

Some people have a high tolerance for lying and falsehood. They can hang out around others who frequently share false information, deliberately or from ignorance, and it doesn’t seem to bother them. Either they don’t notice the falsehoods, or they aren’t much affected when they do notice. I’m not one of those people. I used to be though. When I was younger I could hang around people who spewed nonsense left and right and be okay with it. That’s basically how I grew up, being taught lots of fa...
Tags: Health, Facebook, Usa, Relationships, Careers, Emotions, Donald Trump, Steve, Erin, Trump, Angela Stokes, Rachelle, Ron Lewison


Should parents de-emphasize gender norms?

The idea that blue is for boys and pink is for girls plays out in gender reveals and in the toy aisle, but where does it come from and what limits is it potentially placing on children?Lisa Selin Davis traces the gendering of toys and other objects back to the 1920s and explains how, over time, these marketing strategies were falsely conflated with biological traits. The "pink-blue divide" affects boys and girls on a psychological level. For example, psychologists discovered that when girls exit...
Tags: Psychology, Family, Gender, Parenting, Children, Identity, Women, Society, Innovation, Men, Emotions, Self, Potential, Selin Davis


How we braved danger to honour Fikile Ntshangase

Reporter Khaya Koko reflects on what it took — logistically and emotionally — to travel to KwaZulu-Natal and speak to the slain activist’s family and neighbours The post How we braved danger to honour Fikile Ntshangase appeared first on The Mail & Guardian.
Tags: Activism, Journalism, Fear, Violence, Emotions, National, Reporting, Logistics, Kwazulu Natal, Top Six, South Africa (country, Fikile Ntshangase, Somkhele, MCEJO, Tendele Coal Mining, Armed Guards


3 ways to get your point across while wearing a mask – tips from an award-winning speech coach

You wear your mask, keep six feet between yourself and others and are committed to safety. But the measures that help minimize your risk of COVID-19 can also have an impact on your interactions with others. As you stroll the aisle of a supermarket, you approach someone who looks familiar. To avoid an awkward exchange, you flash them a friendly smile. It's not until you pass you remember: Your smile was hidden behind a mask. Unloading your groceries at home, you see your neighbor. You excitedly a...
Tags: Communication, Innovation, Emotions, Body Language, Speech, Sense, Don, Coronavirus, MSU Speech Debate Team Mississippi State, Cheryl Chambers Instructor of Communication


Autistic people's nerve cells differ before birth, new study finds

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental condition that can cause significant social, communication, and behavioral challenges. Although a diagnosis of autism can typically be made around the age of 2, the average age for diagnosis in the United States is after 4 years old.A new study shows that the atypical development of autism in human brain cells starts at the very earliest stages of brain organization, which can happen as early as the third week of pregnancy.Autism spectrum di...
Tags: Children, Cdc, Pregnancy, Neuroscience, Brain, Genetics, Disability, Autism, United States, Innovation, Cambridge, Emotions, Mind, Cambridge University, Autism Spectrum Disorder, King s College London


Psychogenic shivers: Why we get the chills when we aren’t cold

A few years ago, I proposed that the feeling of cold in one's spine, while for example watching a film or listening to music, corresponds to an event when our vital need for cognition is satisfied. Similarly, I have shown that chills are not solely related to music or film but also to the practice of science (mainly physics and mathematics) and to the social logic of religious rituals. I believe that chills and aesthetic emotions in general can teach us something that we do not know yet. They ca...
Tags: Psychology, Brain, Sociology, Innovation, Emotions, Ibm, Mind, Lyon, Leon Festinger, Human body, Rolf Landauer, Perlovsky


Colors evoke similar emotions around the world, survey finds

Color psychology is often used in marketing to alter your perception of products and services.Various studies and experiments across multiple years have given us more insight into the link between personality and color.The results of a new study spanning 6 continents (30 nations) shows universal correlations between colors and emotions around the globe.People associate colors with emotions (green for envy, blue for sadness, etc). We see this portrayed in the media, in marketing, even in the clot...
Tags: Psychology, Greece, China, Color, Mindfulness, Brain, Innovation, Emotions, Ibm, Dell, Senses, Mainz, Brown, Johannes Gutenberg University, Greek Orthodox Church, Amazon Green


How to Overcome Your Feelings of Neediness

Why do you feel needy sometimes? You feel needy because your own brain doesn’t believe you. Your brain sees what you want. It also sees what you don’t want. And it genuinely expects that you’re going to keep getting what you don’t want. It doesn’t believe that you’re going to get what you want. Your brain believes that your efforts to get what you want will ultimately provide inadequate. It believes that you’re going to fail. So you feel needy when this happens. That’s actually a goo...
Tags: Lifestyle, Careers, Emotions, Costco, Steve, Don, Abundance, Creating Reality


How do lie detectors work?

In a 2002 study, 60 percent of people were found to lie at least once during a 10-minute conversation, with most people telling an average of two or three lies. The polygraph, invented in the early 1920s, detects physiological responses to lying (such as elevated heart and respiratory rates as well as spikes in blood pressure.Three main areas of the brain are stimulated during deception: the frontal lobe, the limbic system, and the temporal lobe.According to the American Polygraph Association, ...
Tags: Psychology, England, California, Communication, Neuroscience, Mindfulness, Testing, Innovation, Emotions, Dan Ariely, Duke, Forensics, Personal Growth, Jessica Stillman, American Polygraph Association, Cognitive Science


Liberal and conservative brains react to charged words differently

A new study shows brain activity differs between liberals and conservatives when they watch political videos. Brain activity differed between partisans when words tied to emotions, morality, or threats were used. The findings could help us understand how partisans process information, perhaps leading to new ways to bridge the divide. People are somewhat politically polarized these days. While the United States' polarization gets most of the press, increasing polarization is also causing problem...
Tags: Politics, US, Conservative, Brain, United States, Language, Innovation, Emotions, UC Berkeley, Liberals, National Academy of Sciences, Leong, Brain Scans, United Kingdom Turkey Poland Brazil India, Yuan Chang Leong


How music therapy benefits the autistic brain

Music is used in many different therapies. Used in conjunction with traditional therapies, music therapy benefits us in a variety of different ways.According to a 2004 study, music intervention used with children and teens with ASD (autism spectrum disorder) can improve their social behaviors, increase focus and attention, and reduce their anxiety and improve body awareness.Various music therapy activities and tools can be used to help improve the quality of life of children with autism. Music ...
Tags: Psychology, Health, Music, Parenting, Children, Youth, Communication, Neuroscience, Play, Teaching, Mental Health, Brain, Creativity, Disability, Language, Innovation


Wiring your website with the correct colours

Has a website ever elicited a specific emotion from you? Sometimes it doesn’t even have to do with the words or imagery you’re looking at — you just feel a certain way looking at the site. Emotions are powerful. Effective marketing often relies on tapping into an emotional response. And there are many different factors involved in creating the response you’re looking for from your website, including the colours you use. The connection between colours and emotions in websites and design is fascin...
Tags: Marketing, Target Audience, Website, Digital Media, Emotions, Websites, Communications, Branding, Digital Marketing, Digital Marketing Strategy, Communicatto, Digital Media Strategy, Website Optimization, Colour Palette


How does your brain make split second decisions?

Two studies done several years apart uncover more about the split-decision-making process. While it was previously thought that the cerebellum was in charge of these decisions, it's been uncovered that it is more like a "complex web of connections" through the brain that goes into how you make a choices.If the decision to change is made within 100 milliseconds (of being presented with the choice), the change of mind will succeed in altering the original course of action. You are driving down the...
Tags: Psychology, Decision Making, Biology, Neuroscience, Intelligence, Choice, Mindfulness, Brain, Medical Research, Hawaii, Innovation, Emotions, Personal Growth, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Courtney, Restrepo


How to Get Along With Your Ex After a Breakup

Learning to get along with an ex can be necessary if you have mutual friends, children, or for professional reasons. Aside from accommodating others outside the relationship, though, maintaining a positive relationship with an ex could be beneficial to you both, and a mature way to acknowledge that while that person…Read more...
Tags: Psychology, Networking, Relationships, Communication, Dating, Emotions, Lifehacks, Breakup


Raising Your Baseline

In practicing the slow, shallow breathing approach from The Oxygen Advantage that I shared about during the past two days, I’m grasping that the key to this approach is to define a new baseline for my breathing and then keep synching back to that new baseline whenever I catch myself drifting from it. The initial temptation is to sync back to my old way of breathing, which can happen automatically when I lose awareness of my breath. Then I might catch myself and practice consciously reducing m...
Tags: Health, Productivity, Careers, Emotions, Steve


Study: 75 percent of women executives have experienced imposter syndrome

A new survey found that three-fourths of women executives have experienced imposter syndrome and believe they put more pressure on themselves to succeed than men.Imposter syndrome was first identified in highly successful women in 1978.Imposter syndrome is a widespread phenomenon, but there are ways to ease the agony. Have you ever felt like a fraud? Like, everyone at the office treats you with respect and admires your hard work, but inside you feel artificial. It's as though you have no idea w...
Tags: Psychology, Time, Women, Neil Gaiman, America, Success, Mental Health, Anxiety, Personality, Innovation, Fear, Emotions, Kpmg, Women In Business, Short, Young


A Positive Development

When I heard that Trump had contracted the coronavirus, my first thought was the word good. This feels like a much-needed positive development for humanity and the world. It likely means fewer deaths, less suffering, and less time in pandemic mode – and perhaps less stupidity from him and his minions. So I see it as good news. While some people wish Trump and his wife a speedy recovery, I honestly don’t. I’m sending healing vibes and positive intentions to the virus inside him, not to h...
Tags: Careers, Values, Emotions, Steve, Trump


Tone Down Your Anxiety By Recognizing When You Feel OK

Anxiety is hard-wired into our brain—and that’s not always a bad thing. This gnawing, persistent uneasy feeling is part of our fight-or-flight response and prompts us to take action in situations where we may not be safe. In situations where you haven’t already identified a source of imminent danger, your brain is…Read more...
Tags: Mental Health, Anxiety, Emotions, Lifehacks


Study: 33% of people fantasize about being in a sexually open relationship

The study involved 822 Americans who were in monogamous relationships at the time.Participants answered questions about their personalities, sexual fantasies, and intentions to act on those fantasies.Research suggests practicing consent, comfort, and communication makes open relationships more likely to succeed. New research suggests one-third of Americans in monogamous relationships fantasize about being in a sexually open relationship. Of that one-third, most want to act out their desire. Som...
Tags: Psychology, Google, Marriage, Sex, Relationships, Innovation, Emotions, University of Rochester, Justin J Lehmiller