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EPFL researchers make a key discovery on how alpine streams work

An EPFL study has showed that until now, scientists have been substantially underestimating how quickly gases are exchanged between mountain streams and the atmosphere. Based on research in the Swiss cantons of Vaud and Valais, an EPFL laboratory has shed new light on the role of mountain streams to emit greenhouse gases.
Tags: EPFL, Valais, Vaud


Researchers Found a Way to Extract Detailed Slo-Mo Videos From a Single Blurry Photo

The Phantom high-speed cameras used by YouTube channels like The Slow Mo Guys to capture mesmerizing slow-motion footage are obscenely expensive. But soon, thanks to a new technique that can extract slo-mo videos from a single photo, the smartphone in your pocket could outperform even a high-speed camera that costs…Read more...
Tags: Photography, Science, Research, Smartphones, Harvard, Slow Motion, High Speed Photography, EPFL, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Slo Mo, Virtual Frame Technique


Virtual time-lapse photos can capture ultrafast phenomena

EPFL scientists have developed a new image-processing method that can capture extremely rapid phenomena using any type of camera. Their method, called Virtual Frame Technique, delivers better performance than any commercial high-speed camera and is affordable and accessible to anyone.
Tags: EPFL


EPFL researchers simulate the process of adhesive wear

Using high-performance computer simulations, EPFL researchers were able to observe how surface roughness changes when two materials rub together. Their findings, which provide insight into friction and wear mechanisms, have implications for areas ranging from engineering to the study of tectonic faults.
Tags: Science, EPFL


Vitamin B3 analogue boosts production of blood cells

Scientists from EPFL and the UNIL/Ludwig Cancer Research have found that supplementing diet with nicotinamide riboside, an analogue of vitamin B3, boosts the production of blood cells by improving the function of their stem cells. This can help overcome problems in stem cell-based therapies that treat leukemia and aggressive lymphomas.
Tags: Science, EPFL, UNIL Ludwig Cancer Research


CRISPR reveals the secret life of antimicrobial peptides

In France, scientists from the lab of Bruno Lemaitre at EPFL’s Global Health Institute have used CRISPR, the gene-editing technique, to delete no less than 14 AMPs from the fruit fly Drosophila. By deleting single AMP genes, various combinations of genes, or even all 14 genes, the scientists were able to remove their corresponding AMPs and observe how their absence affected the fly’s resistance to different bacterial and fungal pathogens. The results showed that, at least in Drosophila, AMPs act...
Tags: France, Research, EPFL, Hanson, Global Health Institute, Bruno Lemaitre, Mark Austin Hanson


A water-splitting catalyst unlike any other

EPFL chemists have developed a new iron-nickel oxide catalyst for water splitting, the reaction that produces hydrogen fuel. The patent-pending catalyst shows significantly higher activity in the oxygen-evolution part of reaction than conventional nickel iron oxide catalysts. The work is now published in ACS Central Science.
Tags: EPFL


Directed evolution builds nanoparticles

Directed evolution is a powerful technique for engineering proteins. EPFL scientists now show that it can also be used to engineer synthetic nanoparticles as optical biosensors, which are used widely in biology, drug development, and even medical diagnostics such as real-time monitoring of glucose.
Tags: EPFL


Prototype prosthesis proffers proper proprioceptive properties

Researchers have created a prosthetic hand that offers its users the ability to feel where it is and how the fingers are positioned — a sense known as proprioception. The headline may be in jest, but the advance is real and may help amputees more effectively and naturally use their prostheses. Prosthesis rejection is a real problem for amputees, and many choose to simply live without these devices, electronic or mechanical, since they can complicate as much as they simplify. Part of that is the ...
Tags: Health, TC, Gadgets, Science, Hardware, Microsoft, Tech, Robotics, Prosthetics, Medtech, Lausanne, EPFL, Amputees, Prosthesis, Artificial Limbs, Silvestro Micera


CRISPR reveals the secret life of antimicrobial peptides

Using CRISPR, scientists at EPFL have carried out extensive work on a little-known yet effective weapon of the innate immune system, antimicrobial peptides.
Tags: Science, EPFL


Bacteria walk (a bit) like we do

EPFL biophysicists have been able to directly study the way bacteria move on surfaces, revealing a molecular machinery reminiscent of motor reflexes.
Tags: EPFL


Why a blow to the chest can kill or save you

It is still a mystery why a blow to the chest can kill people by inducing cardiac arrest yet save others that are in cardiac arrest. We may be one step closer to an answer, however, thanks to a device developed by researchers of the University of Bern and the EPFL that can replicate the experience in the laboratory.
Tags: Science, EPFL, University of Bern


Why a blow to the chest can kill or save you

It is still a mystery why a blow to the chest can kill some people yet save others. We may be one step closer to an answer, however, thanks to a device developed by researchers at EPFL and the University of Bern that can replicate the experience in the laboratory.
Tags: Science, EPFL, University of Bern


The holy grail of nanowire production

EPFL researchers have found a way to control and standardize the production of nanowires on silicon surfaces. This discovery could make it possible to grow nanowires on electronic platforms, with potential applications including the integration of nanolasers into electronic chips and improved energy conversion in solar panels.
Tags: Science, EPFL


These hyper-efficient solar panels could actually live on your roof soon

The clean energy boffins in their labs are always upping the theoretical limit on how much power you can get out of sunshine, but us plebes actually installing solar cells are stuck with years-old tech that’s not half as good as what they’re seeing. This new design from Insolight could be the one that changes all that. Insolight is a spinoff from the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, where they’ve been working on this new approach for a few years — and it’s almost ready to hit your roof....
Tags: Gadgets, Science, Hardware, Tech, Solar Power, GreenTech, Cto, EPFL, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Solar Cells, Ackermann, Insolight, Mathiu Ackermann


Light-based production of drug-discovery molecules

EPFL chemists have developed a light-based chemical method for cheap and simple production of chemical molecules used in drug discovery, such as muscle relaxants and antimicrobials.
Tags: Science, EPFL


Next-generation optics in just two minutes of cooking time

One of the key building blocks of flexible photonic circuits and ultra-thin optics are metasurfaces. And EPFL engineers have now discovered a simple way of making these surfaces in just a few minutes -- without needing a clean room -- using a method already employed in manufacturing. Their findings have just been published in Nature Nanotechnology.
Tags: EPFL


Scientists build the smallest optical frequency comb to-date

Scientists from EPFL and the Russian Quantum Center have built a photonic integrated, compact, and portable soliton microcomb source. The device is less than 1 cm3 in size, and is driven by an on-chip indium phosphide laser consuming less than 1 Watt of electrical power. It can be used in LIDAR, data center interconnects, and even satellites. The study is published in Nature Communications.
Tags: EPFL


New device simplifies measurement of fluoride contamination in water

Seeking to address fluoride contamination in drinking water, chemical engineers at EPFL have developed a portable and user-friendly device that can measure fluoride concentration accurately and reliably.
Tags: Science, EPFL


Gummy-like robots that could help prevent disease

EPFL scientists have developed microscopic, hydrogel-based muscles that can manipulate and mechanically stimulate biological tissue. These soft, biocompatible robots could be used for targeted therapy and to help diagnose and prevent disease.
Tags: Science, EPFL


Let’s save the bees with machine learning

Machine learning and all its related forms of “AI” are being used to work on just about every problem under the sun, but even so, stemming the alarming decline of the bee population still seems out of left field. In fact it’s a great application for the technology and may help both bees and beekeepers keep hives healthy. The latest threat to our precious honeybees is the varroa mite, a parasite that infests hives and sucks the blood from both bees and their young. While it rarely kills a bee out...
Tags: TC, Gadgets, Science, Tech, Artificial Intelligence, Bees, Conservation, Switzerland, GreenTech, EPFL, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Varroa, Beekeeping, Colony Collapse, Alain Bugnon, Bugnon


How transcription factors explore the genome

EPFL scientists have discovered how proteins that regulate gene transcription can scan and bind the genome efficiently.
Tags: Science, EPFL


Cancer: A mutation that breaks gene interplay in 3D

EPFL scientists have discovered how a mutated gene can affect the three-dimensional interactions of genes in the cell, leading to various forms of cancer.
Tags: EPFL


An integrative approach to studying lipid biology

The proteins that manage lipids in the cell are notoriously hard to study. Combining structural, biochemical, and computational studies, scientists at EPFL and the University of Wisconsin-Madison have now discovered how a lipid-binding protein can access, select, and move a lipid ''cargo'' during the biosynthesis of the important coenzyme Q.
Tags: University of Wisconsin Madison, EPFL


Shapeshifting microrobots to travel through your bloodstream

Continuing the quest to design robots that could travel through our bodies to deliver drugs and cure disease, researchers at EPFL and ETH Zurich demonstrated tiny shape-shifting microrobots that swim through blood vessels. Made from hydrogel nanocomposites, the microbots can fold into various shapes for easy travel through tight spaces and flowing with dense, viscous, or fast-moving liquids. The microbots are peppered with magnetic nanoparticles so that they can be "steered" with an external ma...
Tags: Video, News, Medicine, Robots, Robotics, Eth Zurich, EPFL, Microrobots, Selman Sakar


Smart microrobots that can adapt to their surroundings

Scientists at EPFL and ETH Zurich have developed tiny elastic robots that can change shape depending on their surroundings. Modeled after bacteria and fully biocompatible, these robots optimize their movements so as to get to hard-to-reach areas of the human body. They stand to revolutionize targeted drug delivery.
Tags: Science, Eth Zurich, EPFL


Chirality in 'real-time'

Distinguishing between left-handed and right-handed ('chiral') molecules is crucial in chemistry and the life sciences, and is commonly done using a method called circular dichroism. However, during biochemical reactions the chiral character of molecules may change. EPFL scientists have for the first time developed a method that uses ultrashort deep-ultraviolet pulses to accurately probe such changes in real-time in (bio)molecular systems.
Tags: Science, EPFL


Targeting an RNA-binding protein to fight aging

Researchers at EPFL found that the RNA-binding protein PUM2 contributes to the accumulation of defective mitochondria, a key feature of the aging process. Targeting PUM2 in old animals protects against age-related mitochondrial dysfunction.
Tags: Science, EPFL


Machine learning and quantum mechanics team up to understand water at the atomic level

Why is water densest at around 4 degrees Celsius? Why does ice float? Why heavy water has a different melting point compared to normal water? Why do snowflakes have a six-fold symmetry? A collaborative study, led by researchers in EPFL and just published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, provides physical insights into these questions by marrying data-driven machine learning techniques and quantum mechanics.
Tags: National Academy of Sciences, EPFL


Excitons pave the way to more efficient electronics

After developing a method to control exciton flows at room temperature, EPFL scientists have discovered new properties of these quasiparticles that can lead to more energy-efficient electronic devices.
Tags: EPFL