Posts filtered by tags: Erik Kwakkel[x]


 

A 900-Page Pre-Pantone Guide to Color from 1692: A Complete High-Resolution Digital Scan

There’s ahead of its time, then there’s Traité des couleurs servant à la peinture à l’eau — or, in its original Dutch title, Klaer Lightende Spiegel der Verfkonst, a 900-page book of paint colors made before any such things were common tools of the artist’s, scientist’s, and industrial designer’s trade. Author and artist A. Boogert created one, and only one, copy of his extraordinary manual on color mixing in 1692. Appearing on the threshold of modern color theory, and featuring over 700 pages ...
Tags: Google, Art, College, Charles Darwin, Newton, Provence, Aristotle, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, Goethe, Werner, Aix, Durham NC Follow, Erik Kwakkel, Goethe Newton, Opticks


A 900-Page Pre-Pantone Guide to Color from 1692: A Complete Digital Scan

Human beings got along perfectly well for hundreds of millennia without standardized taxonomies of color, but they didn’t do so in a globally connected culture full of logos, brands, and 24/7 screens. It’s arguable whether the world as we now see it would have been possible without monopolistic color systems like Pantone. They may circumscribe the visual world and dictate color from above. But they also enable international design principles and visual languages that translate easily everywhere...
Tags: Google, Art, Books, College, Charles Darwin, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, Goethe, Werner, Provence France, David Hale, Aix, Kandinsky, Durham NC Follow, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Erik Kwakkel


See the Oldest Printed Advertisement in English: An Ad for a Book from 1476

Nobody pays much mind to advertising, at least the haphazard kind of advertising that clutters the space around us. But here in the 21st century, when both that space and the ads that appear throughout it are as likely to be digital as physical, we might take a moment to look back at how the practice of putting up notices to sell things began. In the English language, it goes back to at least to the mid-fifteenth century — specifically, to the year 1476, when Britain’s first printer William Cax...
Tags: Google, Facebook, College, History, Britain, Oxford University, Dick Cavett, Seoul, Facebook Twitter, William Caxton, Caxton, Colin Marshall, Erik Kwakkel, 21st Century Los Angeles, Kwakkel, Oldest Functioning Gutenberg Press


Medieval book opens six ways, revealing six different texts

A XVIth Century book held in the National Library of Sweden's collection features a "sixfold dos-a-dos binding," meaning that the book could be opened in six different ways to reveal six different texts ("devotional texts printed in Germany during the 1550s and 1570s,including Martin Luther, Der kleine Catechismus"), with the hinges doubling as latches. You may remember a blog I posted about dos-à-dos (or “back-to-back”) books. These are very special objects consisting of usually two book...
Tags: Gadgets, Post, Books, Happy Mutants, Publishing, Old school, News, Sweden, Germany, History, Glam, Erik Kwakkel, Interactive Fiction, Martin Luther Der


A Medieval Book That Opens Six Different Ways, Revealing Six Different Books in One

Technology has come so far that we consider it no great achievement when a device the size of a single paper book can contain hundreds, even thousands, of different texts. But 21st-century humanity didn't come up with the idea of putting multiple books in one, nor did we first bring that idea into being — not by a long shot. Medieval book historian Erik Kwakkel points, for example, to the "dos-à-dos" (back to back) binding of the 16th and 17th centuries, which made for books "like Siamese twins...
Tags: Google, Europe, Books, Technology, Sweden, College, Germany, History, Seoul, Napoleon, Facebook Twitter, National Library, Andrew Tarantola, Colin Marshall, Erik Kwakkel, 21st Century Los Angeles


271 Years Before Pantone, An Artist Mixed And Described Every Color Imaginable In An 800-Page Book

In 1692 an artist known only as “A. Boogert” sat down to write a book in Dutch about mixing watercolors. Not only would he begin the book with a bit about the use of color in painting, but would go on to explain how to create certain hues and change the tone by adding one, two, or three parts of water. The premise sounds simple enough, but the final product is almost unfathomable in its detail and scope. Spanning nearly 800 completely handwritten (and painted) pages, Traité des couleurs serva...
Tags: Design, Erik Kwakkel


Medieval Doodler Draws a “Rockstar Lady” in a Manuscript of Boethius’ The Consolation of Philosophy (Circa 1500)

By the early 6th century, the Western Roman Empire had effectively come to an end after the deposition of the final emperor and the installation of Germanic kings. Under the second such ruler, Theodoric the Great, emerged one of the most influential works of literature of the European Middle Ages: The Consolation of Philosophy. Its author, senator and philosopher Boethius, wrote the text while imprisoned and awaiting execution. A conversation the despondent author has with his muse, Lady Philos...
Tags: Google, Europe, College, Life, Germany, History, Philosophy, Don Quixote, Facebook Twitter, Brecht, Josh Jones, John Walton, Berthold Brecht, Hannah Arendt, Durham NC Follow, Erik Kwakkel


Medieval Orphan And Foundling Nametags

'This child is named Bartholomew': Erfgoed Leiden, HGW, Archiefnr. 519, Inv. nr. 3384, slip 1 (15th century) - Photo EK via Here is a poignant story by medieval schlar Erik Kwakkel about a rare collection of 15th century notes and nametags that were pinned to the clothing of babies given up by their parents at an orphanage in Leiden, The Netherlands. Some of the notes were written by the priests or staff who logged kids into the orphanage. But others, which provide glimpses of the kids' famil...
Tags: Adoption, Bartholomew, Erik Kwakkel, Leiden The Netherlands