Posts filtered by tags: Evolution[x]


 

"You probably want to know how much weight you’re going to lose when we remove the cyst; women always want to know."

Said the surgeon to Pagan Kennedy, who had "an ovarian cyst the size of a grapefruit that, doctors warned me, could at any time rupture and fill my abdomen with blood and pus." He also said — about the value of a complete hysterectomy — "You don’t have to get the procedure right away... You could wait. That would give you time to complete your family." She didn't like that either. The doctor quotes appear in "Why You Want to Eat This Baby Up: It’s Science/Researchers are beginning to ask why som...
Tags: Babies, Birth Control, Children, Evolution, Love, Pagan Kennedy, Population, Pregnancy, Psychology, Surgery


A pleasure to burn: Why do people like spicy foods?

Humans are the only animals known to willingly eat foods that cause irritation, discomfort, and even pain.Theories for why range from thrill-seeking behavior to an evolutionary adaptation for seeking foods that reduce pathogens.Taste results from an interplay of genes, culture, memory, and personality, a complex design that scientists are only now beginning to understand. None If a Martian anthropologist found its way to a Clifton Chili Club Chili Eating Contest, it would discover one the univer...
Tags: Psychology, Food, Europe, Earth, Bacteria, Nature, Birds, Innovation, Evolution, University of Pennsylvania, Sherman, University Of Southern California, Evolutionary Psychology, Microbes, Biomechanics, Padron


Why do homo sapiens include so much variety?

The past is a mess. To pick a path through the mire, historians have appealed to providence, progress, environmental determinism, class struggle, biology and fate.  No explanation has worked – so far. But try shifting perspective: look for the broadest possible context, the most suggestive comparisons. Climb the cosmic crow’s nest. Imagine what history might look like from an immense distance of time and space, with objectivity we cannot attain. The Galactic Observer  – I suggest – would notice ...
Tags: Books, Featured, History, World, Culture, Evolution, Primatology, Historians, Homo Sapiens, Imo, Arts & Humanities, Pixabay, Oxford Illustrated History, A Global World, Felipe Fernández-Armesto, The Galatic Observer


‘Micro snails’ we scraped from sidewalk cracks help unlock details of ancient Earth’s biological evolution

Every step you take, you're likely walking on a world of unseen and undescribed microbial diversity. And you don't need to head out into nature to find these usually unnoticed microscopic organisms. As biologists, we know this firsthand. A meetup for coffee several years ago ended with our using makeshift sampling tools – actually a coffee stirrer and a coffee cup lid – to collect some of the black gunk from between the sidewalk's concrete slabs. In this mundane space on the Mississippi Stat...
Tags: Dna, Environment, History, Earth, Bacteria, Nature, Geology, Innovation, Brazil, Evolution, Ecology, Grand Canyon, Microbes, Lahr, Mississippi State University, Denisovan


'A big jump': People might have lived in Australia twice as long as we thought | Paul Daley

The result of 11 years of research suggests that human habitation could stretch to 120,000 yearsExtensive archaeological research in southern Victoria has again raised the prospect that people have lived in Australia for 120,000 years – twice as long as the broadly accepted period of human continental habitation.The research, with its contentious potential implications for Indigenous habitation of the continent that came to be Australia, has been presented to the Royal Society of Victoria by a g...
Tags: Science, Biology, Australia, Anthropology, Archaeology, Evolution, Indigenous Australians, Victoria, Paul Daley, Royal Society of Victoria, Jim Bowler, Mungo Lady


How the World Might End, According to 'Stuff You Should Know''s Josh Clark  

We talked to Josh Clark about his new podcast, The End of The World with Josh Clark, and asked him all about existential risks, and why we should care.Read more...
Tags: Podcast, Artificial Intelligence, Physics, Evolution, Lifehacks, Existential Risks, Fermi Paradox, Josh Clark, How Stuff Works, The End Of The World, Lifehacker Asks, Micro Organisms


How six elements came together to form life on Earth

How did life begin? We will never know with certainty what the Earth was like four billion years ago, or the kinds of reactions that led to the emergence of life at that time, but there is another way to pose the question. If we ask “how can life begin?” instead of “how did life begin,” that simple change of verbs offers hope. It does seem possible we can demonstrate a series of obvious steps toward the origin of life, perhaps leading to a synthetic version of life in the laboratory. We will the...
Tags: Books, Astronomy, Featured, History, Earth, World, Evolution, Wikimedia, Cosmology, Biochemistry, Hoyle, Molecular Biology, Science & Medicine, Earth & Life Sciences, Fred Hoyle, Natural History


7 of the most popular science books of all time

Chaos theory, evolution and the cosmos make for an eye-opening read. Carl Sagan paints a sagacious picture of humanity's place in the universe.Great scientists give us a glimpse into their minds and their theories.Scientists have been sleuthing through the mysteries and secrets of the universe since humankind first started asking questions. Just what is going on in this grand amphitheater of reality? The courageous and curious sometimes leave their ivory towers to translate their arcane works ...
Tags: Books, Science, Scotland, Time, Earth, Physics, Innovation, Literature, Stephen Hawking, Evolution, Charles Darwin, Dyson, Richard Dawkins, Einstein, Carl Sagan, Darwin


Why the zebra got its stripes: to deter flies from landing on it

Pattern seems to confuse flies, researchers who dressed horses up as zebras findThe mystery of how the zebra got its stripes might have been solved: researchers say the pattern appears to confuse flies, discouraging them from touching down for a quick bite.The study, published in the journal Plos One, involved horses, zebras, and horses dressed as zebras. The team said the research not only supported previous work suggesting stripes might act as an insect deterrent, but helped unpick why, reveal...
Tags: Science, Biology, Animals, Africa, Environment, UK News, World news, Wildlife, Conservation, Evolution, Zoology


What makes someone gay? Science is trying to get it straight.

Heterosexual people have been less interesting to scientists than gay people, in terms of where they come from, because, evolutionarily speaking, being gay doesn't lead to a higher "higher reproductive fitness" — meaning, it doesn't lead to more babies. Across cultures, gay boys tend to be more interested in spending time with their mothers. We still don't really know why gay people are attracted to each other.
Tags: Gender, Biology, Sex, Lgbt, Gay, Innovation, Evolution, Alice Dreger


Newly Discovered African Titanosaur Had a Distinctly Heart-Shaped Tailbone

Titanosaurs were the giants of the giants—four-legged behemoths that stomped around Cretaceous South America and Africa 100 million years ago. The discovery of a previously unknown titanosaur in Tanzania with a unique heart-shaped tailbone is adding to our knowledge of these enigmatic beasts, and how they lived and…Read more...
Tags: Science, Africa, Dinosaurs, Evolution, Tanzania, Paleontology, Titanosaurs, Sauropods, African Dinosaurs, Cretaceous South America


2-Billion-Year-Old Squiggles Could Be the Earliest Evidence of a Mobile Life Form

The reported discovery of 2.1-billion-year-old fossilized track marks etched in sedimentary rock is pushing back the earliest evidence of self-propelled movement by an organism on Earth by a whopping 1.5 billion years.Read more...
Tags: Science, Biology, Evolution, Paleontology, Ancient Life


Ancient rock wiggles could be earliest trace of moving organism

Scientists say 2.1bn-year-old fossils may show evidence of self-propelled motionA collection of short wiggly structures discovered in ancient rocks could be the earliest fossilised traces of organisms able to move themselves, scientists say.If scientists are correct, the 2.1bn-year-old structures point to an earlier origin than generally thought for eukaryotes – cells with a membrane-bound nucleus and which make up plants, animals and fungi – previouslybelieved to have first emerged about 1.8bn ...
Tags: Science, Biology, Africa, Evolution, Fossils, Gabon


Cartoonishly Well-Preserved Fossil Is the Earliest Bird of Its Kind

A 52-million-year-old fossil found in Wyoming is now the earliest known seed-eating perching bird in the scientific record, a discovery that’s shedding new light on the history and early eating habits of these now-ubiquitous birds. Read more...
Tags: Science, Biology, Birds, Wyoming, Evolution, Fossils, Early Birds, Bird Fossils


Newly Discovered Spiked Dinosaurs From South America Look Like Creatures From 'No Man's Sky'

Paleontologists in Argentina have uncovered a dinosaur unlike anything ever seen before. Alive some 140 million years ago, these majestic herbivores featured long, forward-pointing spikes running along their necks and backs. These spikes may have served a defensive role, but their exact purpose now presents a…Read more...
Tags: Science, Biology, Argentina, Dinosaurs, Evolution, South America, Paleontology, Sauropods, Animal Defenses, Dinosaur Defenses


Extras for an Hour, Voyagers for a Lifetime: 'Live Long and Evolve'

None Those were the days. Father and son huddled around a glowing TV screen, eagerly awaiting the next Star Trek episode. It was our ritual. The two of us would gather at a set time, sprawling on a tattered sofa with an armful of snacks: pastries, popcorn, maybe even ice cream. For an hour our lives were suspended; we were no longer citizens of planet Earth—neither pubescent grade schooler nor certified civil engineer. For an hour, we were extras aboard Captain Jean-Luc Picard's USS Enterprise...
Tags: Science Fiction, Music, Science, Biology, Review, Book Review, Earth, Star Trek, Spock, Pop Culture, Evolution, Princeton University Press, Mom, Gene Roddenberry, McCoy, Noor


Rare Fossil of Triassic Reptile Discovered in Antarctica

The fossilized remains of an early reptile dating back some 250 million years have been uncovered in the unlikeliest of places: Antarctica. The discovery shows how wildlife recovered after the worst mass extinction in our planet’s history, and how Antarctica once hosted an ecosystem unlike any other. Read more...
Tags: Science, Biology, Antarctica, Evolution, Paleontology, Ancient Reptiles, Ancient Antarctica


Oldest animal ever discovered by scientists

Researchers in China find fossils of a creature that lived 600 million years ago.This creature resembles a modern-day comb jelly.If confirmed, these would be the oldest animal fossils discovered. None When we think of prehistoric animals, giant creatures like dinosaurs tend to come to mind. But what was the oldest animal that ever existed? Chinese scientists say it was a lowly blob that lived about 600 million years ago. In fact, as reported by Graham Lawton in New Scientist, the creature that w...
Tags: London, Biology, China, Animals, Nature, Oceans, Geology, Innovation, Dinosaurs, Evolution, Paleontology, Geological Society of London, Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology, Graham Lawton, China University of Geosciences Wuhan He, Maoyan Zhu


See What Trees Look Like to a Bird's Ultraviolet-Sensitive Eyes

A bird’s-eye view can completely change your perspective on things. And I mean that literally.Read more...
Tags: Science, Biology, Evolution, Vision, Sight, Ultraviolet Light, Birdmodo


Ancient Shark With Spaceship-Shaped Teeth Named After Vintage Video Game

A newly described freshwater shark from the Cretaceous Period had teeth that resembled the iconic Galaga video game spacefighter. Remarkably, the remains of this shark were found in the same pile of debris that contained Sue the T. rex—the largest and most complete fossil of the species ever found.Read more...
Tags: Science, Biology, Evolution, Sharks, Paleontology, Ancient Sharks


'Like finding a sneeze': fossil identified as 100m-year-old hagfish

Discovery of slimy sea creature could help settle row over early evolution of vertebratesThe fossilised remains of a foot-long slimy sea creature dating from 100m years ago suggest that the last common ancestor of all vertebrates looked less like a squishy eel and more typically “fish-like”, researchers claim.They say the fossil, unearthed around eight years ago in Lebanon, is an early hagfish, a peculiar creature that has no jaws, eyes or true vertebrae but that boasts the ability, when threate...
Tags: Science, Evolution, Lebanon, Palaeontology


Ever wondered why violin’s have f-shaped holes?

Instruments have gone through hundreds and sometimes thousands of years of refining to the form we recognise them in today. So why do guitars have a big circular hole in the centre whilst violins have fanciful f-shapes on either side of their strings? The earliest known depiction of a lira. Carving found in a Byzantine ivory casket (900 – 1100 AD) Over 1000 years ago the fiddle, or ‘fithele’, was spreading across Europe as string instruments became more complex and sought after. The in...
Tags: Europe, Music, Featured, Study, Fun, Mit, Italy, Evolution, Western Europe, Acoustics, Fiddle, Chu, Massachusetts Institute of Technology MIT, Lira, Makris, Jennifer Chu


Ever wondered why violins have f-shaped holes?

Instruments have gone through hundreds and sometimes thousands of years of refining to the form we recognise them in today. So why do guitars have a big circular hole in the centre whilst violins have fanciful f-shapes on either side of their strings? The earliest known depiction of a lira. Carving found in a Byzantine ivory casket (900 – 1100 AD) Over 1000 years ago the fiddle, or ‘fithele’, was spreading across Europe as string instruments became more complex and sought after. The i...
Tags: Europe, Music, Featured, Study, Fun, Mit, Italy, Evolution, Western Europe, Acoustics, Fiddle, Chu, Massachusetts Institute of Technology MIT, Lira, Makris, Jennifer Chu


Why 'upgrading' humanity is a transhumanist myth

Though computer engineers claim to know what human consciousness is, many neuroscientists say that we're nowhere close to understanding what it is, or its source. Scientists are currently trying to upload human minds to silicon chips, or re-create consciousness with algorithms, but this may be hubristic because we still know so little about what it means to be human. Is transhumanism a journey forward or an escape from reality? Team Human...
Tags: Technology, Identity, Future, Neuroscience, Computers, Brain, Innovation, Consciousness, Evolution, Ai, Mind, Humanity, Cyborg


Your body’s full of stuff you no longer need. Here's a list.

An evolutionary biologist got people swapping ideas about our lingering vestigia.Basically, this is the stuff that served some evolutionary purpose at some point, but now is kind of, well, extra.Here are the six traits that inaugurated the fun. Evolutionary anthropologist and Boston College post-doc, Dorsa Amir, started the whole thing with a series of eight tweets, and boy did she start something fun. Amir laid out a list of weird, once-useful details of the human anatomy that we continue to c...
Tags: Science, History, Nature, Innovation, Evolution, Darwin, Physiology, Boston College, Amir, Ancient World, Bann, Human body, Dorsa Amir, Sabre Tooth, Stephen Roughley


Flowers Are Eavesdropping

According to a new study, plants can “hear” when a bee passes and they subsequently create more sweet nectar to attract them. A recent study by scientists at three Tel-Aviv University schools has found that a plant picks up sounds (signaled by the vibration of its petals) and responds (signaled by the excretion of additional nectar). With proof that the flowers responded to all of the …
Tags: Science, Design, Nature, Bees, Culture, Plants, Evolution, Hearing, Flowers, Linkaboutit, Tel Aviv University


Fascinating Experiment Uses a Robot to Recreate the Walking Style of an Early Land Dweller

Using computer simulations and a robot, researchers have recreated the likely gait of a 300-million-year-old animal considered to be among the planet’s earliest terrestrial walkers.Read more...
Tags: Science, Biology, Evolution, Robotics, Simulations, Paleontology, Evolution Of Locomotion, Amniotes


The 20-Year Quest to Track Down Every Bird-of-Paradise Species Before They Vanish

Edwin Scholes has taken dozens of bush plane flights, helicopters and boat trips, and spent countless hours hauling gear up muddy mountains in New Guinea, for nothing more than a song and dance. Sometimes, he only manages to capture a few seconds of footage of the rainforest performances he seeks before his subjects…Read more...
Tags: Science, Birds, Conservation, Evolution, New Guinea, Bird Of Paradise, Edwin Scholes


Researchers have identified an area of the dog brain dedicated to processing human faces

If you want to know about the special relationship between human and canine you need only watch a dog owner slavishly feed, cuddle and clean up after her furry companion, day after day after day. But is this unique cross-species relationship also reflected at a deeper level, in the workings of the canine brain? A recent study in Learning and Behavior suggests so, finding that highly trained dogs have a dedicated neural area for processing human faces, separate from the area involved in processin...
Tags: Psychology, Dogs, Animals, Intelligence, Brain, Nature, Innovation, Evolution, Emotions, BPS Research Digest, Auburn University, Andie Thompkins


Asteroid that wiped out the dinosaurs caused a mile-high tsunami

The asteroid that crashed into the Yucatan caused a mile-high tsunami. The wave was 52 times higher and 2,600 times more energetic than the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami that killed over 227,000 people. Sediment was disturbed 3,700 miles from the site of the crash. None Becoming a fossil is no easy matter. There are a number of conditions that have to be met, according to Paige Williams, author of The Dinosaur Artist. You can't be eaten by scavengers; the weather must not scatter your remains; your...
Tags: Mexico, Environment, Nasa, Oceans, Innovation, Dinosaurs, Evolution, South America, North, Asteroid, North Atlantic, Indian Ocean, Derek, American Geophysical Union, Cosmos, Chicxulub