Posts filtered by tags: Evolution[x]


 

The Story of Real-Life Dire Wolves Is Finally Emerging

Dire wolves menaced Pleistocene landscapes for tens of thousands of years, eventually going extinct at the end of the last ice age. Despite the long success of this species, very little is known about them, including their origins and reasons for their demise. New research is helping to fill these gaps.Read more...
Tags: Science, Genetics, Evolution, Wolves, Paleontology, Dire Wolves, Paleogenetics


Tasmanian Tigers and Wolves Evolved Uncannily Similar Skulls

The extinct thylacine had the stripes of a tiger, the body of a canid, and the pouch of a kangaroo. These ill-fated, predatory marsupials are a classic example of convergent evolution, in which species independently evolve the same traits, and a new study breaks down just how remarkably similar Tasmanian tigers’…Read more...
Tags: Science, Evolution, Marsupials, Wolves, Extinction, Skulls, Evolutionary Biology, Tasmanian Tiger, Tasmanian Tigers, Thylacines


Baby shark! Newborn megalodons larger than humans, scientists say

Creatures that patrolled the oceans 3m years ago were about two metres long at birth, researchers findEnormous megatooth sharks, or megalodons, which patrolled the world’s oceans more than three million years ago, gave birth to babies larger than most adult humans, scientists say.Researchers made the unsettling discovery when they X-rayed the vertebra of a fossilised megalodon and found that it must have been about two metres (6.5 ft) long when it was born. Continue reading...
Tags: Science, Marine Life, Evolution, Sharks, Fossils, Palaeontology


Chemists discover the mix that likely originated life on Earth

New study shows that RNA and DNA likely originated together.The mixture of the acids produced Earth's first life forms.The molecules were created with the help of a compound available in planet's early days. How did life on Earth originate? Chemists claim to have found the exact ingredients of the primordial soup that resulted in the plethora of creatures we see in the world today. A new study shows that the compound diamidophosphate (DAP) possibly mixed together the strands of the original...
Tags: Biology, Animals, Dna, Earth, Chemistry, Innovation, Evolution, Krishnamurthy, Scripps Research, Human body, Ramanarayanan Krishnamurthy, Coronavirus


Siberia permafrost yields well-preserved ice age woolly rhino

Calf carcass from thawing ground in north-east region of Yakutia found with many internal organs intactA well-preserved ice age woolly rhino with many of its internal organs still intact has been recovered from the permafrost in Russia’s extreme northern region.Russian media reported Wednesday that the carcass was revealed by thawing permafrost in Yakutia in August. Scientists are waiting for ice roads in the Arctic region to become passable to deliver the animal to a laboratory for studies in J...
Tags: Europe, Science, Biology, Climate Change, Russia, World news, Geology, Arctic, Evolution, Siberia, Zoology, Fossils, North East, Yakutia, Extinct wildlife


Newly-discovered flower is so rare, there is only one plant of its species

Botanists discover a new species of flower on a remote slope in Hawaii.The new plant is called Cyanea heluensis and features white, curved flowers.The plant is so rare, there is only one of its kind found so far. A flower was found in Hawaii that is one of a kind – in fact, it's the only known example of its species. It's name is Cyanea heluensis, and the only place you can see it in the world is in a remote location in West Maui. It was discovered above the town of Lahaina by botanists Hank...
Tags: Biology, Environment, Discovery, Hawaii, Innovation, Evolution, Botany, Steve Perlman, Maui, Perlman, Lahaina, West Maui, Hank Oppenheimer, Jennifer Higashino, Olinda Rare Plant Facility


Analyzing the evolutionary biology of STAR WARS megafauna

"Why Is the Star Wars Universe Full of Megafauna?" This is the question that has plagued James Davis Nicoll for years. But it ultimately hit its peak after watching the recent season of The Mandalorian, which continues the tradition of giant apex predators in a galaxy far, far away. — Read the rest
Tags: Star Wars, Post, News, Animals, Conservation, Evolution, Creatures, Megafauna, Majestic creatures, The Mandalorian, Animal Oddities, Creatures Of Unusual Size, Star Wars Universe Full of Megafauna, James Davis Nicoll


Podcast: The Future of Breathing | James Nestor

The Long Now Foundation · James Nestor – The Future of Breathing Drawing on thousands of years of medical texts and recent cutting-edge studies in pulmonology, psychology, biochemistry, and human physiology, journalist James Nestor questions the conventional wisdom of what we thought we knew about our most basic biological function, breathing. Nestor tracks down men and women exploring the science behind ancient breathing practices like Pranayama, Sudarshan Kriya, and Tummo and teams up w...
Tags: Future, Genetics, Culture, Evolution, Nestor, Long Now Foundation, Long Now Seminars, James Nestor, Pranayama Sudarshan Kriya


Early humans may have survived the harsh winters by hibernating

Seasonal damage in bone fossils in Spain suggests Neanderthals and their predecessors followed the same strategy as cave bearsBears do it. Bats do it. Even European hedgehogs do it. And now it turns out that early human beings may also have been at it. They hibernated, according to fossil experts.Evidence from bones found at one of the world’s most important fossil sites suggests that our hominid predecessors may have dealt with extreme cold hundreds of thousands of years ago by sleeping through...
Tags: Europe, Science, Spain, Anthropology, Evolution, Neanderthals


Why moral people tolerate immoral behavior

The problem with having a compass as the symbolic representation of morality is that due north is not a fixed point. Liane Young, Boston College associate professor and director of the Morality Lab, explains how context, bias, and tribal affiliation influence us enormously when we pass moral judgments.Moral instinct is tainted by cognitive bias. Humans evolved to be more lenient to their in-groups—for example excusing a beloved politician who lines their pockets while lambasting a colleague for ...
Tags: Psychology, Corruption, Science, Identity, Relationships, Society, Sociology, Innovation, Community, Philosophy, Evolution, Morality, Self, Evolutionary Psychology, Liane Young Boston College


By the age of 3, children appreciate nature's fractal patterns

A new study from the University of Oregon found that, by the age of three, children understand and prefer nature's fractal patterns.A "fractal" is a pattern that the laws of nature repeat at different scales. Exact fractals are ordered in such a way that the same basic pattern repeats exactly at every scale, like the growth spiral of a plant, for example.Separate studies have proven that exposure to fractal patterns in nature can reduce your stress levels significantly.A new study from the Unive...
Tags: Psychology, Garden, Science, Biology, Environment, Trees, Happiness, Mindfulness, Creativity, Nature, Innovation, Evolution, Exploration, Mind, Senses, Self


Digital technology reveals secrets of UK's earliest dinosaur

Thecodontosaurus antiquus a nimble omnivore that ran on two legs, CT scans and 3D modelling suggest Britain’s earliest dinosaur was a nimble omnivore that ran around on two legs, unlike its later relatives brontosaurus and diplodocus, research suggests.Standing at about the height of a 10-year-old child, and 1.5 metres in length with a long thin tail, Thecodontosaurus antiquus roamed the Earth during the Triassic period, more than 205m years ago, when Britain consisted of many islands surrounded...
Tags: UK, Science, Biology, UK News, Earth, Britain, Dinosaurs, Evolution, Zoology, Bristol, University of Bristol, Fossils


Scientists Uncover the Mysterious Origin of Pterosaurs

Pterosaurs are among the most recognizable creatures from the dinosaur age, yet scientists know very little about their origins. New research finally pinpoints a possible precursor to these flying reptiles. Read more...
Tags: Science, Dinosaurs, Evolution, Evolution Of Flight, Pterosaurs, Flying Reptiles, Largerpetids


How showing remorse can save your relationships

Forgiveness as a cultural act linked to religion and philosophy dates back centuries, but studies focused on the science of apologies, morality, and relationships are fairly new. As Amrisha Vaish explains, causing harm, showing remorse, and feeling concern for others are things children pay attention to, even in their first year of life.In a series of experiments, adults ripped children's artworks and either showed remorse or showed neutrality. They found that remorse really mattered. "Here we s...
Tags: Psychology, Science, Children, Life, Relationships, Love, Communication, Society, Innovation, Evolution, Emotions, Friendships, Personal Growth, Evolutionary Psychology, Vaish, Amrisha Vaish


Human sexual desire: Is monogamy natural?

Depending on who you ask, monogamy is either essential to a successful marriage or it is unrealistic and sets couples up for failure. In this video, biological anthropologist Helen Fisher, psychologist Chris Ryan, former Ashley Madison CEO Noel Biderman, and psychotherapist Esther Perel discuss the science and culture of monogamy, the role it plays in making or breaking relationships, and whether or not humans evolved to have one partner at a time. "The bottom line is, for millions of yea...
Tags: Psychology, Science, Marriage, Sex, Relationships, Love, Women, Society, Innovation, Reproduction, Men, Evolution, Ashley Madison, Evolutionary Psychology, Noel Biderman, Fisher


Ancient 40ft-long whale skeleton discovered in Thailand

Scientists hope remains will deepen understanding of Bryde’s whale evolutionA whale skeleton thought to be up to 5,000 years old has been discovered, almost perfectly preserved, by researchers in Thailand.The skeleton, believed to be a Bryde’s whale, was found in Samut Sakhon, west of Bangkok. Researchers have excavated 80% of the remains and have so far identified 19 complete vertebrae, five ribs, a shoulder blade and fins. The skeleton measures 12 metres (39ft), with a three-metre-long skull. ...
Tags: Science, Biology, Environment, World news, Thailand, Asia Pacific, Wildlife, Marine Life, Evolution, Whales, Cetaceans, Bangkok, Samut Sakhon, Bryde


Top 5 theories on the enigmatic monolith found in Utah desert

A monolithic object found in a remote part of Utah caused worldwide speculation about its origins.The object is very similar to the famous monolith from Stanley Kubrick's "2001: Space Odyssey".The object could be work of an artist or even have extraterrestrial origins. An enigmatic "monolith" found in a Utah desert on November 18th has become the source of worldwide attention and speculation, with Internet denizens looking for something more light-hearted to talk about as the tumultuous 2020 dr...
Tags: Art, Utah, Space, Movies, Innovation, Evolution, Arthur C Clarke, Stanley Kubrick, New Mexico, Mars, Kubrick, Alien, Extraterrestrial Life, Art History, Utah Department of Public Safety, DPS


A Chinese plant has evolved to hide from humans

A plant coveted in China for its medicinal properties has developed camouflage that makes it less likely to be spotted and pulled up from the ground.In areas where the plant isn't often picked, it's bright green. In harvested areas, it's now a gray that blends into its rocky surroundings.Herbalists in China have been picking the Fritillaria dealvayi plant for 2,000 years. There are a growing number of examples of animals' evolutionary path diverting around humans and human encroachment. From th...
Tags: England, China, Nature, Innovation, Agriculture, Plants, Anthropocene, Evolution, Biodiversity, University of Exeter, Liu, Stevens, Martin Stevens, Fritillaria, NIU, Biosphere


Niche: Two Examples From Deep Time

The term 'niche' can very simply mean an ecologic space which a particular type of organism exploits. Scientists are a pedantic lot though. They need more rigorous definitions to work with. This has spawned many different ideas about what a niche means and how it can best be described and measured. There is the environmental niche concept which focuses on the physical and chemical attributes of an available space that may or may not be filled by organisms. In this idea, there may be vacant niche...
Tags: Australia, Seo, Niche, Evolution, Ecology, Fossils, Paleoecology, Permian, Elisabeth, Sydney Basin, Palaeontology, Mass Extinction, Suvrat Kher, Research Gate, Cretaceous, Evelyn Fox Keller


Meave Leakey: 'Definitely, Africa is where it all began'

The renowned fossil hunter on the anti-African prejudice in palaeontology, her dream discovery, and bathing her daughter beside a baby hippoFor over 50 years, British-born palaeoanthropologist Meave Leakey has been unearthing fossils of our early ancestors in Kenya’s Turkana Basin. Her discoveries have changed how we think about our origins. Instead of a tidy ape-to-human progression, her work suggests different pre-human species living simultaneously. Leakey’s new memoir, The Sediments of Time:...
Tags: Science, Biology, Africa, Anthropology, Kenya, Evolution, Fossils, Mary, Louis, Samira, Leakey, Turkana Basin, Richard Leakey, Meave Leakey


Chinese flower has evolved to be less visible to pickers

Fritillaria delavayi, used in traditional medicine, turning grey to blend into rocksFor thousands of years, the dainty Fritillaria delavayi has grown slowly on the rocky slopes of the Hengduan mountains in China, producing a bright green flower after its fifth year.But the conspicuous small plant has one deadly enemy: people, who harvest the flower for traditional Chinese medicine. Continue reading...
Tags: Science, Biology, China, Environment, World news, Asia Pacific, Conservation, Plants, Evolution, Hengduan


Are humans cruel by nature?

How have humans managed to accomplish significantly more than any other species on the planet? Historian Rutger Bregman believes the quality that makes us special is that we "evolved to work together and to cooperate on a scale that no other species in the whole animal kingdom has been able to do."Pushing back against the millennia-old idea that humans are inherently evil beneath their civilized surface, which is known as 'veneer theory', Bregman says that it's humanity's cooperative spirit and ...
Tags: Psychology, Animals, Friendship, Society, War, Sociology, Innovation, Collaboration, Philosophy, Evolution, Morality, Humanity, Bregman, Rutger Bregman


'Muscular bonding': The strange psychological effects of moving together

Muscular bonding, a term coined by the veteran and historian William McNeill, describes how individuals engaged in synchronous movement often experience feelings of euphoria and connection to the group.Psychologists have proposed that muscular bonding, or interpersonal entrainment, is a group-level adaptation that helped early human groups outcompete other groups.Muscular bonding can help people form cohesive groups, but it could come at cost. Humans have a penchant for moving together in uniso...
Tags: Psychology, Sociology, Innovation, Evolution, Morality, Humanity, McNeill, Jonathan Haidt, Haidt, IPE, William McNeill


"For some reason, animals keep evolving into things that look like crabs, independently, over and over again."

"What is it about the crab's form that makes it so evolutionarily successful that non-crabs are apparently jealous of it?" (Metafilter). [Author: [email protected] (Ann Althouse)]
Tags: Law, Evolution, Arthropods, Ann Althouse


Remains of new flying reptile species spotted in UK museum drawer

Student finds mislabelled fragment of pterosaur, which flew over eastern England up to 66m years agoA fossil that been had languishing in a museum drawer in Brighton, wrongly labelled as a shark fin skeleton, has now been identified as a completely new species of prehistoric flying reptile that soared majestically over what are now the Cambridgeshire fens.Roy Smith, a University of Portsmouth PhD student, identified the creature after realising was much more unusual and interesting than its labe...
Tags: UK, England, Science, Biology, UK News, Culture, Museums, Brighton, Cambridge, Archaeology, Dinosaurs, Evolution, Zoology, Cambridgeshire, Fossils, Reptiles


Scientists piece together the story of humans and dogs

The earliest dog, not wolf, found so far comes from over 15,000 years ago.A new study tracks the travel and development of dogs since the end of the Ice Age.Insights are derived by comparing ancient canine DNA with ancient human DNA. We know that at some point long ago there were wild wolves who became companions for humans, and eventually evolved into dogs. The oldest verified dog remains, found in Germany, are from 15,000-16,000 years ago. Much of the story remains mysterious, though. Where i...
Tags: Europe, UK, Dogs, Germany, Americas, History, Genetics, Innovation, Evolution, Siberia, University of Oxford, Huskies, Paleontology, Francis Crick, Near East, University of Vienna


Are humans wired for conflict? Lord of the Flies vs. Charles Darwin

The iconic novel "Lord of the Flies" paints a picture of human beings as naturally selfish and prone to conflict, but that is not the most accurate depiction of humanity, argues historian Rutger Bregman.Bregman shares a true story from his research about a group of Tongan students who survived on an island together for 15 months in 1965, not through brutal alliances, but by working together and forming a functional community.Darwin's observation of domestication syndrome is apparent in humans, a...
Tags: Psychology, Science, Biology, Children, Relationships, Sociology, Innovation, Collaboration, Community, Literature, Evolution, Charles Darwin, Humanity, Darwin, Evolutionary Psychology, Bregman


Average human body temperature mysteriously declined, finds study

Average human body temperatures have declined, show several studies.A new paper looked at an indigenous population in the Amazon over 16 years.They found the new body temperature of the observed people to be 97.7°F, not the standard 98.6°F. Temperature checks have become part of the new normal in the world under Covid, but the average body temperature may not be what the thermometers say. A series of studies, including a new paper, propose that the average human body temperature has been droppi...
Tags: Health, Amazon, UK, Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Innovation, Evolution, Bolivia, Indigenous, UC Santa Barbara, Palo Alto California, Tsimane, Bolivian Amazon, Human body, Michael Gurven


First winged reptiles were clumsy flyers, research suggests

Analysis of early Pterosaurs fossils shows they are likely to have been ungainly in flightPterosaurs, such as pterodactyl, are some of the largest animals ever to have taken to the skies, but the first reptile aviators were clumsy flyers, only capable of travelling short distances, a study suggests. The research may also shed new light on the evolution of flight more generally.Pterosaurs evolved around 245m years ago, and dominated the skies for more than 150m years, before dying out at the end ...
Tags: Science, Evolution, Fossils, Reptiles, Palaeontology


Scientists discover why fish evolved limbs and left water

A new study says solar and lunar tide impacts led to the evolution of bony fish and tetrapods.The scientists show that tides created tidal pools, stranding fish and forcing them to get out of the water.The researchers ran computer simulations to get their results. Tides influenced by the sun and the moon were likely the reason why fish developed limbs and early tetrapods evolved, found new research.The groundbreaking study took a look at tides during the Late Silurian—Devonian periods, which ha...
Tags: UK, Biology, Animals, Earth, Fish, Moon, Innovation, Gravity, Evolution, Neil Degrasse Tyson, Planets, University of Oxford, Oxford University, Geography, Bangor University, South China