Posts filtered by tags: Evolution[x]


 

Ancient Shark With Spaceship-Shaped Teeth Named After Vintage Video Game

A newly described freshwater shark from the Cretaceous Period had teeth that resembled the iconic Galaga video game spacefighter. Remarkably, the remains of this shark were found in the same pile of debris that contained Sue the T. rex—the largest and most complete fossil of the species ever found.Read more...
Tags: Science, Biology, Evolution, Sharks, Paleontology, Ancient Sharks


'Like finding a sneeze': fossil identified as 100m-year-old hagfish

Discovery of slimy sea creature could help settle row over early evolution of vertebratesThe fossilised remains of a foot-long slimy sea creature dating from 100m years ago suggest that the last common ancestor of all vertebrates looked less like a squishy eel and more typically “fish-like”, researchers claim.They say the fossil, unearthed around eight years ago in Lebanon, is an early hagfish, a peculiar creature that has no jaws, eyes or true vertebrae but that boasts the ability, when threate...
Tags: Science, Evolution, Lebanon, Palaeontology


Ever wondered why violin’s have f-shaped holes?

Instruments have gone through hundreds and sometimes thousands of years of refining to the form we recognise them in today. So why do guitars have a big circular hole in the centre whilst violins have fanciful f-shapes on either side of their strings? The earliest known depiction of a lira. Carving found in a Byzantine ivory casket (900 – 1100 AD) Over 1000 years ago the fiddle, or ‘fithele’, was spreading across Europe as string instruments became more complex and sought after. The in...
Tags: Europe, Music, Featured, Study, Fun, Mit, Italy, Evolution, Western Europe, Acoustics, Fiddle, Chu, Massachusetts Institute of Technology MIT, Lira, Makris, Jennifer Chu


Ever wondered why violins have f-shaped holes?

Instruments have gone through hundreds and sometimes thousands of years of refining to the form we recognise them in today. So why do guitars have a big circular hole in the centre whilst violins have fanciful f-shapes on either side of their strings? The earliest known depiction of a lira. Carving found in a Byzantine ivory casket (900 – 1100 AD) Over 1000 years ago the fiddle, or ‘fithele’, was spreading across Europe as string instruments became more complex and sought after. The i...
Tags: Europe, Music, Featured, Study, Fun, Mit, Italy, Evolution, Western Europe, Acoustics, Fiddle, Chu, Massachusetts Institute of Technology MIT, Lira, Makris, Jennifer Chu


Why 'upgrading' humanity is a transhumanist myth

Though computer engineers claim to know what human consciousness is, many neuroscientists say that we're nowhere close to understanding what it is, or its source. Scientists are currently trying to upload human minds to silicon chips, or re-create consciousness with algorithms, but this may be hubristic because we still know so little about what it means to be human. Is transhumanism a journey forward or an escape from reality? Team Human...
Tags: Technology, Identity, Future, Neuroscience, Computers, Brain, Innovation, Consciousness, Evolution, Ai, Mind, Humanity, Cyborg


Your body’s full of stuff you no longer need. Here's a list.

An evolutionary biologist got people swapping ideas about our lingering vestigia.Basically, this is the stuff that served some evolutionary purpose at some point, but now is kind of, well, extra.Here are the six traits that inaugurated the fun. Evolutionary anthropologist and Boston College post-doc, Dorsa Amir, started the whole thing with a series of eight tweets, and boy did she start something fun. Amir laid out a list of weird, once-useful details of the human anatomy that we continue to c...
Tags: Science, History, Nature, Innovation, Evolution, Darwin, Physiology, Boston College, Amir, Ancient World, Bann, Human body, Dorsa Amir, Sabre Tooth, Stephen Roughley


Flowers Are Eavesdropping

According to a new study, plants can “hear” when a bee passes and they subsequently create more sweet nectar to attract them. A recent study by scientists at three Tel-Aviv University schools has found that a plant picks up sounds (signaled by the vibration of its petals) and responds (signaled by the excretion of additional nectar). With proof that the flowers responded to all of the …
Tags: Science, Design, Nature, Bees, Culture, Plants, Evolution, Hearing, Flowers, Linkaboutit, Tel Aviv University


Fascinating Experiment Uses a Robot to Recreate the Walking Style of an Early Land Dweller

Using computer simulations and a robot, researchers have recreated the likely gait of a 300-million-year-old animal considered to be among the planet’s earliest terrestrial walkers.Read more...
Tags: Science, Biology, Evolution, Robotics, Simulations, Paleontology, Evolution Of Locomotion, Amniotes


The 20-Year Quest to Track Down Every Bird-of-Paradise Species Before They Vanish

Edwin Scholes has taken dozens of bush plane flights, helicopters and boat trips, and spent countless hours hauling gear up muddy mountains in New Guinea, for nothing more than a song and dance. Sometimes, he only manages to capture a few seconds of footage of the rainforest performances he seeks before his subjects…Read more...
Tags: Science, Birds, Conservation, Evolution, New Guinea, Bird Of Paradise, Edwin Scholes


Researchers have identified an area of the dog brain dedicated to processing human faces

If you want to know about the special relationship between human and canine you need only watch a dog owner slavishly feed, cuddle and clean up after her furry companion, day after day after day. But is this unique cross-species relationship also reflected at a deeper level, in the workings of the canine brain? A recent study in Learning and Behavior suggests so, finding that highly trained dogs have a dedicated neural area for processing human faces, separate from the area involved in processin...
Tags: Psychology, Dogs, Animals, Intelligence, Brain, Nature, Innovation, Evolution, Emotions, BPS Research Digest, Auburn University, Andie Thompkins


Asteroid that wiped out the dinosaurs caused a mile-high tsunami

The asteroid that crashed into the Yucatan caused a mile-high tsunami. The wave was 52 times higher and 2,600 times more energetic than the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami that killed over 227,000 people. Sediment was disturbed 3,700 miles from the site of the crash. None Becoming a fossil is no easy matter. There are a number of conditions that have to be met, according to Paige Williams, author of The Dinosaur Artist. You can't be eaten by scavengers; the weather must not scatter your remains; your...
Tags: Mexico, Environment, Nasa, Oceans, Innovation, Dinosaurs, Evolution, South America, North, Asteroid, North Atlantic, Indian Ocean, Derek, American Geophysical Union, Cosmos, Chicxulub


"Now, nearly 150 years later, a new generation of biologists is reviving Darwin’s neglected brainchild."

"Beauty, they say, does not have to be a proxy for health or advantageous genes. Sometimes beauty is the glorious but meaningless flowering of arbitrary preference. Animals simply find certain features — a blush of red, a feathered flourish — to be appealing. And that innate sense of beauty itself can become an engine of evolution, pushing animals toward aesthetic extremes. In other cases, certain environmental or physiological constraints steer an animal toward an aesthetic preference that has ...
Tags: Law, Birds, Evolution, Darwin, Darwinism, Aesthetics, Ann Althouse, Masculine Beauty


Base paired up: study suggests genetic formula to monogamy

Scientists compared DNA of 10 species and found 24 genes which marked out males that stayed with their matesIt could be a handy riposte for the stalwart commitment-phobe. When challenged on their reluctance to be tied down, half-hearted partners could shrug and claim their neural gene expression profiles made them that way.That is, at least, if research on smaller animals holds true in humans. Researchers who compared the DNA of 10 different species found a common genetic formula which marked ou...
Tags: Science, Biology, Animals, Environment, World news, Genetics, Wildlife, Evolution, Mammals


Let's Make Tomatoes Spicy With Genetic Engineering, Scientists Proclaim

Surely, someone out there has cooked up a shrimp fra diavolo and thought, “mamma mia, this would be much easier if someone genetically modified the tomatoes to be spicy,” right? Right? Read more...
Tags: Food, Science, Biology, Evolution, Food Science, Crispr, Spicy, Peppers, Gene Editing, Crispr Cas9, Nonnas Tomato Sauce, Spicy Meatball


Tholins: The red goo critical to life in the universe

Tholins are a broad group of organic compounds formed when simpler molecules are irradiated.They are extremely common in our solar system, and studies have shown that their properties are incredibly useful to emerging life.By tracking and understanding tholins, we might be able to find extraterrestrial life and even explain how life began on Earth. None It was no easy feat for life to get started on Earth. There was a long way to go from jumbles of dead molecules to the complicated machinery of ...
Tags: Science, Dna, Earth, Innovation, Universe, Evolution, Planets, Pluto, Carl Sagan, Astrobiology, Johns Hopkins University, Sagan, Sarah Hörst, Bishun Khare, Titan Europa Rhea Triton Pluto Ceres Makemake


Last Hawaiian yellow-tipped tree snail dies.

 Achatinella apexfulva. Credit: DLNR The tree snails of O`ahu were both common and famous. So common that kids would walk into the hills above Honolulu and collect them to make leis. So famous that songs and legends referred to them. Today, habitat change, predatory snails, rats, chameleons and other threats have made all of the many species rare. And now, another one, Achatinella apexfulva, has become extinct. The last of his species, this guy was in captivity, ...
Tags: Travel, Government, Conservation, Evolution, Zoology, Botany, Genetic Engineering, Lonesome George, George, Honolulu, KFVE, Achatinella, Galapagos Island of Pinta Tortoise George, Snail Extinction Prevention Program Researchers


An ant colony has memories that its individual members don’t have

Like a brain, an ant colony operates without central control. Each is a set of interacting individuals, either neurons or ants, using simple chemical interactions that in the aggregate generate their behaviour. People use their brains to remember. Can ant colonies do that? This question leads to another question: what is memory? None For people, memory is the capacity to recall something that happened in the past. We also ask computers to reproduce past actions – the blending of the idea of the...
Tags: Europe, Biology, Memory, Neuroscience, Brain, Innovation, Evolution, Sahara Desert, Cognitive Science, Rainer Rosengren, Deborah M GordonThis


Some Hummingbird Beaks Are Better Suited for Combat Than Nectar Feeding

With their elongated bills and specially adapted tongues, hummingbirds are built to extract nectar from flowers. As new research shows, however, some hummingbirds from South America have evolved beaks designed to poke, prod, and pinch—at the expense of feeding proficiency.Read more...
Tags: Science, Birds, Evolution, South America, Animal Behavior, Hummingbirds, Better Suited for Combat Than Nectar Feeding


Short men are indirectly aggressive toward taller men, study finds

A recent study examined the Napoleon complex through economic games.The results showed that shorter men are more likely than taller men to keep a disproportionate amount of resources for themselves, but only when the other player can't retaliate.The study suggests that the Napoleon complex is most likely to manifest in situations where the shorter man has all the power. None In the early 19th century, Napoléon Bonaparte was perhaps best known for leading successful military campaigns and serving...
Tags: Psychology, Gender, Competition, Innovation, Men, Evolution, Napoleon Bonaparte, Napoleon, Evolutionary Psychology, Iredale Van Vugt Dunbar, Jill E P Knapen Nancy M Blaker


Pablo Escobar’s hippos: Why drug lords shouldn’t play God

Lucy Cooke—an acclaimed zoologist, author, and TV presenter—tells the story of Colombian drug lord Pablo Escobar's exotic animal menagerie, which included four hippos illegally imported from Africa. Four hippos became eight, and eight became sixteen, and now this non-native creature is running wild in South America. Cooke explains why this is a moment in evolution — these hippos will evolve into a creature quite different to African hippos. She refers to them as Hippopotamus Escobarus. What will...
Tags: Animals, Africa, Nature, Innovation, Evolution, South America, Narcotics, Pablo Escobar, Cooke, Lucy Cooke


Alexa Snooping, Robot Takeovers, and FBI Surveillance: Best Gizmodo Stories of the Week

The holidays are nigh, and this year’s naughty list is long indeed—and from revelations of reckless privacy violations over at Facebook headquarters and continued labor abuses at Amazon to the generally terrible way humanity has treated our homeworld, your erstwhile chroniclers at Gizmodo have been adding names to it…Read more...
Tags: Amazon, Facebook, Echo, Science, London, Movies, Biology, Labor, Internet, Climate Change, Animals, Doctor Who, Christmas, Economics, Global Warming, Surveillance


Tropical Lizard With Built-in Scuba Gear Can Stay Submerged for 16 Minutes

Unprecedented footage from Costa Rica shows tiny tropical lizards “breathing” from an air sac suspended atop their snouts—an apparent scuba tank that helps them stay submerged for extended periods.Read more...
Tags: Science, Evolution, Ecology, Animal Behavior, Lizards, Costa Rica, Scuba Lizards, Water Anole


Dinosaurs are alive! Here’s how we know, and why it matters

For most of the 20th century, figuring out the origin of birds was a great challenge of evolutionary biology — they didn't seem to fit anywhere. Then, in the late 20th century, a group of scientists discovered that birds evolved from theropod dinosaurs, which were large, bipedal meat-eaters like the Velociraptor or the T-Rex. The bird-from-dinosaur theory was considered to be a crackpot idea but after three decades of research, the evidence became irrefutable. Finally, the discovery of feather...
Tags: Science, Biology, Animals, Nature, Birds, Innovation, Dinosaurs, Evolution, Darwin, Paleontology, Richard Prum


The Northern Cardinal Is Actually Multiple Species, Evidence Suggests

New scientific results have strengthened the case that the ubiquitous northern cardinal could be two species of bird or more.Read more...
Tags: Science, Birds, Evolution, Ecology, Birdmodo


Fossils show ancient flying reptiles called pterosaurs likely had feathers

The specimens are of two small, flying reptiles discovered recently in China.In recent decades, multiple discoveries have led scientists to believe virtually all dinosaurs were covered in feathers.This recent discovery suggests that feathers were an adaptation that evolved before the dinosaurs, from a common ancestor. None During the 1990s and 2000s, paleontologists in China discovered a set of exceptionally well-preserved fossils that suggested theropods, a suborder of dinosaurs to which the ve...
Tags: UK, Science, China, Animals, Brown University, Innovation, Evolution, Siberia, Gizmodo, University of Edinburgh, Paleontology, Steve Brusatte, Manafzadeh


Ancient Flying Reptiles Featured Distinctly Dino-Like Feathers

Feathers were common among dinosaurs, but scientists aren’t certain if the fur-like coverings of pterosaurs—a group of flying reptiles—were of the same sort seen on dinos and birds or something completely different. The discovery of two exquisite fossils in China now suggests pterosaurs were very much covered in…Read more...
Tags: Science, Biology, China, Dinosaurs, Evolution, Feathers, Paleontology, Pterosaurs, Origin Of Feathers


What's the Newest Animal?

Bears. Donkeys. Fat, friendly dogs. These animals—animals, generally—have been around for an extremely long time, long enough to feel like a fixed part of the landscape. It’s easy to forget that these creatures weren’t always there, and didn’t always look like they do now. On human—as opposed to geologic—time, forms…Read more...
Tags: Science, Biology, Animals, Evolution, Evolutionary Biology


Great Gift Ideas # 5 – Non-Fiction That Takes You Places

So you want to give something meaningful and useful and entertaining this Christmas. Well, have a look at these incredible Non-Fiction kids’ books that not only take you places but also inform, comfort, enlighten and above all keep the kids occupied while you sort out the eggnog! Enjoy. Welcome: A Mo Willems Guide For New … Continue reading Great Gift Ideas # 5 – Non-Fiction That Takes You Places The post Great Gift Ideas # 5 – Non-Fiction That Takes You Places appeared first on The Boomerang ...
Tags: Books, Families, Australia, Babies, History, Teenagers, Self-help, Nature, Evolution, Humanity, Self Esteem, Middle Grade, Book Reviews - Childrens and Young Adult, New Book Releases, Romi Sharp, Children's Picture Books


Organisms living inside the Earth far outnumber all the humans, reveals study

Scientists found a rich ecosystem deep inside the planet.The "deep biosphere" contains mostly bacteria and microbes.The amount of life below the surface is hundreds of times greater than the combined weight of all the humans. None Much more life exists below the Earth than above it, concluded an international team of researchers from the Deep Carbon Observatory (DCO). In fact, about 16.5 to 25 billion tons of microorganisms dwell under the planet's surface. That's hundreds of times more than the...
Tags: Amazon, Biology, Earth, Bacteria, Chemistry, Microbiology, Geology, Innovation, Evolution, Biodiversity, Galapagos Islands, Microbes, Knoxville, University of Tennessee, American Society for Microbiology, Karen Lloyd


Why humans have so little hair compared to other apes

Why do humans have so little hair, at least compared to all other primates? At Smithsonian, Jason Daley shares the latest genetic research on the biological factors that result in humans' minimal body hair and its unusual distribution. Daley also surveys the fascinating current theories about why we evolved into the only naked apes. From Smithsonian: One popular idea that has gone in and out of favor since it was proposed is called the aquatic ape theory. The hypothesis suggests that human an...
Tags: Post, News, Biology, Washington, Africa, Evolution, Humans, Hair, Apes, Daley, University of Reading, Smithsonian Museum of Natural History, Pagel, Tim Evanson, Mark Pagel, Hirsute