Posts filtered by tags: Extended Techniques[x]


 

Beyond the 88: More no-fear piano preparations

In the last post I talked about some easy surface preparations for piano, but I didn’t mention that there’s a long history of these. Some early piano makers experimented with creating “stops” for their instrument that would change the timbre of the piano. Many of these were essentially mechanisms for surface preparations. The bassoon stop, for instance, lowered a parchment roll (or a parchment roll covered in silk) onto the strings, producing a gentle buzzy sound against the strings when notes w...
Tags: Religion, Articles, Piano, Columns, John Cage, Jolley, Experimentation, Anna Thorvaldsdottir, Stephen Hartke, Hartke, NewMusicBox, Extended Techniques, Jennifer Jolley, Richard Bunger, Piano Preparation, Toy Piano


Beyond the 88: A No-Fear Beginner’s Guide to Preparing the Piano

In my university music department, I run a weekly composition colloquium, bringing in guest composers and new music performers, as well as faculty speakers, with the latter often coming to talk about things like idiomatic writing and extended techniques for a particular instrument, or setting up a composer website, or digital publishing. A couple of years ago, some of my composition students asked me if I could spend one of those meetings on extended techniques for piano. I dug through my scores...
Tags: Google, Religion, Articles, Tesla, Piano, Columns, Baldwin, Cowell, Curtis Smith, Crumb, Ashley Fure, Experimentation, Annea Lockwood, NewMusicBox, George Crumb, Extended Techniques


A Holistic Approach to Sound

Depending on who you talk to, “extended techniques” can be a loaded term. To one person, the presence of extended techniques makes a piece of music weird and unlistenable, while to another, their absence would indicate music that is regressive and uninteresting. In either case, ears are closed, and a blanket judgment is being made about the quality of the art using a term that should really only be a quantifier. So, first of all, I’d like to clear away some of the subjective baggage that has bui...
Tags: Religion, Articles, Beethoven, Columns, Recording, Sam, Debussy, Sam Pluta, Anthony Braxton, Mozart Beethoven Brahms, Tuning, Kate Soper, Genre, Lachenmann, Eric Wubbels, NewMusicBox


Collaboration as Performance Practice

There’s a moment in Kate Soper’s duo for soprano and violin, Cipher, that tends to stick in people’s minds. The soprano, delivering spoken text, moves toward the violinist and places a mute on the instrument, filtering the tone color. As the violinist continues to play, the soprano moves closer still and places several fingers on the strings, activating specific pitches along the fingerboard. With intricately choreographed movements, the two musicians play the instrument together, creating harmo...
Tags: Religion, Kate, Columns, Ross, Rachmaninoff, Eric, New Music USA, Robert Pirsig, Kate Soper, Eric Wubbels, NewMusicBox, Josh Modney, Extended Techniques, Composer-performer Collaborations, Contemporary Music Techniques, Violin Performance


Exploring Timbre in Choral Music

Full Disclosure: many of the samples I share in this article are from the See-A-Dot Music Catalog, a company for which I am the director. Unlike many aspects of the experimental music world, choral music in the western classical realm has historically avoided employing a variety of vocal timbres in any given piece, usually defaulting to the inherited English choral cathedral tradition. By contrast, string players are readily prepared to perform a variety of sounds on their instruments from sul t...
Tags: India, Religion, United States, Columns, Choral music, Meredith Monk, Aethon, Music Publishing, NewMusicBox, Extended Techniques, West Africa Sardinia, Toby Twining, Twining