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Don’t Miss: Our weekly round-up of virtual and in-person events

From art exhibitions to film festivals, we’ve got your entertainment covered this weekend to the next The post Don’t Miss: Our weekly round-up of virtual and in-person events appeared first on The Mail & Guardian.
Tags: Art, Music, Film, Events, Friday, Film Festivals, Goodman Gallery, Gender-based Violence, Moffie, African Cypher, Aluta Amada, Basha Uhuru Creative Uprising, Cassi Namoda, Creative Uprising, Don’t Miss, Inkaba Yami


Bite-Sized Terror: Horror Anthologies Are Thriving at the Telluride Horror Show

American Horror Story . Black Mirror . Room 104 . Channel Zero . The Mortuary Collection . Monsterland . Creepshow . Scare Me . Nightmare Cinema . Scare Package . Books of Blood . Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark . 50 States of Fright . Into the Dark . Welcome to the Blumhouse . The Twilight Zone . Horror anthologies are all the rage across various media right now, and the Shelter-In-Place Edition of Telluride Horror Show is no exception.  A collection of selected short storie...
Tags: Featured Stories Sidebar, Features, Film Festivals, Horror


‘Boys From County Hell’ Review: A Fresh Take on Vampire Lore That Blends Horror and Comedy [Nightstream]

“ Some things are older than science, older than God; the earth has its own secrets, ”  whispers a local Irishman named William. As two Canadian travelers carefully approach an ancient gravesite, William ’ s friend jumps out from around the tombstones scaring the hell out of the tourists who wanted to get a glimpse at a real piece of historic horror. That is one of the great things about folklore. Stories are passed down through generations that cause people to travel all over the world t...
Tags: Movies, Horror, Features, Movie Reviews, William, Eugene, Dracula, Film Festivals, Baugh, Featured Stories Sidebar, Chris Baugh, Boys From County Hell, William As, Eugene Moffat Jack Rowan, Francie Nigel O'Neill


‘Honeydew’ Review: An Unforgettable Horror Movie Score Helps Serve Up One Uniquely Sinister Experience [Nightstream]

Science and religion unite in an unconditional manner with writer/director Devereux Milburn ’ s Honeydew . Making its world premiere at Nightstream Festival, Honeydew is as auditorily savory as it is visually sadistic. A blend of horror sub-genres, Milburn proves that he has a talent (and an appetite) for serving audiences a disturbing new take at an exploration in the countryside gone wrong. Rylie ( Malin Barr ) is a PhD student who is doing her thesis on a specific parasite t...
Tags: Featured Stories Sidebar, Features, Film Festivals, Movie Reviews, Honeydew


‘Black Bear’ Review: Aubrey Plaza is Stunning in This Nightmarish Domestic Thriller [Nightstream]

Don’t be alarmed if you find yourself wondering halfway through Lawrence Michael Levine’s Black Bear just what the hell is going on. Levine intends for his characters to be off-kilter. At least, at first. Influenced by filmmakers like Hong Sang-soo, Levine’s sophomore feature is less about following a straight narrative and more about the longtime screenwriter giving himself permission to explore the unconventional. To bask in the beautiful loneliness that inevitably comes with the curse of ...
Tags: Movies, Features, Movie Reviews, Aubrey Plaza, Virginia Woolf, Abbott, Blair, Levine, Allison, Adirondack Mountains, Film Festivals, Denis Villeneuve, Black Bear, Sophia Takal, Takal, Gadon


‘French Exit’ Review: The Discreet Smarm of the Bourgeoisie [NYFF]

Azazel Jacobs’ previous film, The Lovers, establishes its overarching and consistent tone from the time the opening studio logo appears. A self-consciously melodramatic piece of score cues the audience to recognize Jacobs’ perspective. He humorously heightens the stakes for an otherwise mundane story of aging lovers and their affairs. His follow-up feature, an adaptation of Patrick DeWitt’s novel French Exit, contains no less vibrant an expression of Jacobs’ directorial stamp. Yet there’s somet...
Tags: New York, Movies, Features, Movie Reviews, Paris, Jacobs, Frances, Malcolm, Tracy Letts, Film Festivals, Pfeiffer, Patrick deWitt, Michelle-Pfeiffer, NYFF, Lucas Hedges, Featured Stories Sidebar


‘The Doorman’ Review: Ruby Rose Puts a New Spin on Familiar Action Movie Tropes [Nightstream]

Stop me if you’ve heard this one. A decorated military veteran suffers a traumatizing event in the line of duty and heads to the city to recuperate, only to find more trouble lying in wait. Sudden Death . Speed . Skyscraper . Under Siege . The Rock . Passenger 57 . White House Down . Con Air . Die Hard . Whether it be wreaking havoc on a bus, calculated action within the confines of a small ship or ravaging the top floors of the Nakatomi Plaza, the notion of a highly skilled assassin ...
Tags: Movies, New York City, Features, Movie Reviews, Romania, Palm Springs, Max, Pat, Ruby Rose, Jean Reno, Rose, Carrington, BUCHAREST Romania, Film Festivals, Dubois, American Embassy


‘Soul’ Review Round-Up: Pixar Gets Existential in One of the Studio’s Best Films

Pixar has set a high bar for itself ever since it launched with its all-time cinematic classic Toy Story. And the animation studio has continued to raise the bar ever since, releasing its share of masterworks, and its share of films that are…less so. But thankfully, it seems like Pixar’s latest highly anticipated release, Soul, falls in the former category. Making its worldwide premiere at the BFI London Film Festival ahead of its December release on Disney+, Soul is being called one of Pixar’s...
Tags: Hollywood, Movies, Disney, Soul, Animation, Jamie Foxx, Pixar, Cannes film festival, Deadline, Indiewire, Pete Docter, Film Festivals, Kemp Powers, Whitlock, Capra, BFI London Film Festival


‘Bloodthirsty’ Review: A Savory Tale of Artistic and Primal Hunger and Also Werewolves [Fantastic Fest 2020]

The notion of hunger is vast and can be applied to an array of different desires. For the stereotypical starving artist, hunger usually comes in the form of fame, success, and basic needs. Writer/director Amelia Moses creatively a p plies the concept of hunger and desire to the werewolf sub-genre with her latest film, Bloodthirsty. Grey ( Lauren Beatty) is a successful indie pop star who is currently working on her second album. The pressure of putting out a sophomore album even mo...
Tags: Movies, Features, Movie Reviews, Beatty, Cgi, Grey, Lowell, Charlie, Film Festivals, Vaughn, Bloodthirsty, Fantastic Fest, Wendy Hill, Featured Stories Sidebar, Amelia Moses, Vaughn Daniels Greg Bryk


‘How to Deter a Robber’ Review: Mirth and Mischief Join Forces in This Holiday Home Invasion Thriller [Fantastic Fest 2020]

Boredom and stress are a dangerous combination during the holidays. Dealing with an overbearing family, a lingering assignment for college applications, and trying to entertain an aloof partner can make anyone search for an escape. Writer/director Maria Bissell alleviates holiday doldrums and the stress of growing up by crafting a uniquely comical home invasion movie with her feature debut, How to Deter a Robber .  Madison Williams ( Vanessa Marano ) has led a pretty sheltered and luck...
Tags: Movies, Features, Movie Reviews, Wisconsin, Madison, Jimmy, Film Festivals, Marv, Bissell, Chris Columbus, Marano, Vanessa Marano, Fantastic Fest, Featured Stories Sidebar, Sonny Valicenti, Maria Bissell


‘Spring Blossom’ Review: A Controversial Subject is Tackled With Grace, Humor, and Wisdom [TIFF 2020]

The most striking thing about Spring Blossom , in which a 16-year-old girl falls in love with a man in his mid-thirties, is that it stars 20-year-old director Suzanne Lindon in the leading role. The 2020 Cannes and TIFF selection is a tender and amusing portrait of teen-hood, in which the character of Suzanne experiences a generational disconnect. Bored with her school-aged peers, she seeks out a magnetic stranger — Raphaël (Arnaud Valois), an actor rehearsing at a theatre en route to Suzan...
Tags: Movies, France, Toronto, Features, Movie Reviews, Raphael, Cannes, Suzanne, Lindon, Film Festivals, Featured Stories Sidebar, Florence Viala, Suzanne Lindon, Spring Blossom, Raphaël Arnaud Valois, Frédéric Pierrot


‘The Stylist’ Review: A Delicately Deranged Portrait of Loneliness and Yearning [Fantastic Fest 2020]

It ’ s difficult to open up to people, isn ’ t it? We all have our secrets and if they ’ re disclosed, the person listening can either tell others, judge you for it, or use it against you. And yet, as humans, we yearn for a personal connection with someone that we can trust with our innermost thoughts, desires, and secret personal lives. Writer/director Jill Gevargizian fervidly addresses this need for connection through the lonely life of a hairdresser in The Stylist .  The ...
Tags: Movies, Features, Movie Reviews, Kansas City, Grant, Olivia, Townsend, Claire, Film Festivals, Fantastic Fest, Featured Stories Sidebar, Lucky McKee, William Lustig, Jill Gevargizian, The Stylist, Claire Najarra Townsend


‘Fireball: Visitors From Darker Worlds’ Review: Werner Herzog Explores How Meteors Have Changed the World [TIFF]

There are few things more soothing and sardonic than hearing Werner Herzog opine about an impending apocalypse. Along with collaborator and co-director Clive Oppenheimer, the filmmakers provide a science-rich documentary freed from the didacticism of the genre, reveling instead in the true wonder and weirdness of our existence. Their previous film, Into the Inferno , gazed into the maw of active volcanoes, while their latest, Fireball: Visitors From Darker Worlds , looks at the impact that...
Tags: Movies, Mexico, Toronto, Features, Movie Reviews, Antarctica, Vatican, Werner Herzog, Oppenheimer, Herzog, Film Festivals, Black Stone, Featured Stories Sidebar, Clive Oppenheimer, Fireball: Visitors From Darker Worlds, Mecca 's Kaaba


‘Teddy’ Review: An Emotional Werewolf Story Audiences Can Sink Their Teeth Into [Fantastic Fest 2020]

The only constant thing in life is change. A simple statement but profoundly complex given the effects time has on our emotions, physical bodies, and maturation. Werewolf stories utilize physical transformation on a thematic level in various ways, but at the heart of their stories is an aspect of the uncontrollable loss of self through physical alterations. This sub-genre of horror gives glimpses into our resistance to change and is one reason why it resonates with audiences multiple times over...
Tags: London, Movies, Drama, Horror, France, Movie Reviews, Teddy, Jekyll, Hyde, Ludovic, Film Festivals, Doc Martens, John Landis, Fantastic Fest, American Werewolf, Anthony Bajon


‘Inconvenient Indian’ Review: An Illuminating Documentary About Cultures Often Ignored [TIFF]

In 2012 Thomas King published The Inconvenient Indian: A Curious Account of Native People in North America , a compendium of his writings about what it means to be Native, and the types of stories both ascribed to, and told by, the various individuals broadly contained within the aboriginal rubric. Michelle Latimer’s documentary, simply titled Inconvenient Indian, takes the themes of King’s work, narrated in part by his own words, and showcases a kaleidoscopic vision beyond the stereotype, ...
Tags: Movies, Toronto, Features, Movie Reviews, North America, King, Horn, Film Festivals, Latimer, Flaherty, Thomas King, Kent Monkman, Featured Stories Sidebar, Alethea Arnaquq Baril, Michelle Latimer, Inconvenient Indian


‘Get the Hell Out’ Review: A Wild and Bloody Slice of Mayhem That Desperately Needs a Live Audience [TIFF]

During these times of social-distancing, it’s impossible to know how Get The Hell Out , part of the 2020 Toronto International Film Festival’s Midnight Madness slate, would have played to a boisterous and welcoming crowd. It’s fair to say it would have been a lot more fun with the rote dialogue being overpowered by hoots and screams, and the wrestling maneuvers cheered like at some mad luchador match. Instead, at home, the experience of sitting through the film is middling at best. That’...
Tags: Movies, Toronto, Features, Movie Reviews, Wang, Film Festivals, Scott Pilgrim, Featured Stories Sidebar, Get the Hell Out, Hsiung Megan Lai, Wang Bruce Ho


‘Enemies of the State’ Review: A Conspiracy Theory Becomes a Family Affair [TIFF]

We live in a time that fetishizes a post-truth. In our post-fact world, suspicion of institutions is at an all time high, and citizens on both left and right find ways to pretzel themselves into believing in grand conspiracies as the mundane facts of incompetence and hubris feel too constrained for the magnitude of our society’s problems. Sonia Kennebeck’s documentary Enemies of the State, about a hacker kid, his crusading parents, and a tenacious legal system, brilliantly undermines these imp...
Tags: Movies, Mexico, Toronto, Features, Movie Reviews, Canada, James Bond, Cia, Enemies Of The State, Wikileaks, Chelsea Manning, State, PAUL, Matt, Errol Morris, DeHart


‘The Truffle Hunters’ Review: A Wonderful Story of Driven Men, Rich Ingredients, and Very Good Dogs [TIFF]

Michael Dweck and Gregory Kershaw have crafted a near fairy tale look at the life of some irate Italians as they clamber through the forest seeking a delicacy that by weight is more valuable than gold. The Truffle Hunters is a beautiful, experiential documentary, taking you into a world that feels completely from another time. Shot over the period of several years with seemingly endless patience, Dweck and Kershaw’s film unfolds with scenes that appear as living paintings. Sharp stabs o...
Tags: Movies, Toronto, Features, Movie Reviews, Kershaw, Film Festivals, Dweck, Featured Stories Sidebar, Michael Dweck, Gregory Kershaw, The Truffle Hunters, Truffle Hunters


‘I Care a Lot’ Review: A Star-Studded Thriller That Fails on Every Possible Level [TIFF]

I did not care for I Care A Lot . J Blakeson’s tonally deft and awkward thriller begins by introducing us to Marla (Rosamund Pike), a taut, chilly figure tasked by the court to provide care to those who have fallen through the cracks. Ostensibly a legal guardian, Marla’s true motivation is to exploit the vulnerable, shack them up in assisted living homes while living off the proceeds. When one unstable son (Macon Blair) is unable to visit his mother, their violent and awkward confrontation ...
Tags: Movies, Toronto, Features, Movie Reviews, Northwest, Jennifer, Gonzalez, Pike, Film Festivals, Peter Dinklage, Dinklage, J Blakeson, Marla, Macon Blair, Wiest, Featured Stories Sidebar


‘Limbo’ Review: A Funny and Touching Tale of Immigration and Global Culture [TIFF]

Frank Zappa famously said “there is no Hell, there is only France.” If that’s true, there’s a strong case to be made that a bleak island off the Scottish coast may well be the perfect place to host purgatory. In Limbo , Ben Sharrokck’s dramedy about life as an asylum seeker, we get to spend time in this state between the horror of what’s been left behind and the interminable wait for what’s yet to come. This touching and provocative film (meant to play at Cannes 2020, and shifted to a TI...
Tags: London, Movies, France, Toronto, Turkey, Syria, Features, Movie Reviews, Frank Zappa, Cannes, Omar, Rachel, Chandler, Film Festivals, Limbo, Featured Stories Sidebar


‘The Father’ Review: Anthony Hopkins Gives One of His Greatest Performances in One of the Best Films of 2020 [TIFF]

One of the main joys of film festivals is to go into a film knowing as little as possible, guided by the hopes that the programmers have selected something worthy of your time. I’d missed Florian Zeller’s film The Father at its Sundance premiere, conflating it with another film about an ailing old-man as one of several dramas I skipped in order to focus on that fest’s remarkable doc slate. At TIFF I was allowed to finally dig into this movie, and it’s immediately become one of my favouri...
Tags: Movies, Toronto, Features, Movie Reviews, Williams, Olivia Colman, Anthony Hopkins, Film Festivals, Hopkin, Zeller, Florian Zeller, Rufus Sewell, Featured Stories Sidebar, The Father, Mark Gatiss Imogen Poots


Nightstream Online Horror Film Festival Announces Films and Special Events

Nightstream, the online horror festival that brings together Boston Underground, Brooklyn Horror, North Bend, Overlook, and Popcorn Frights, has announced its film lineup as well as its special events. The fest will serve as the world premiere of Run, starring Sarah Paulson. The four-day festival includes a line-up of feature films selected by all five festival programming teams, alongside eighteen distinct short blocks and an impressive slate of events, panels, and masterclasses, including con...
Tags: Film Festivals, Horror, Nightstream


The Inside Story of How NYFF 2020 Became America’s First Big Pandemic-Era Film Festival

For many, the fall conjures up images of pumpkin spice lattes, flannel shirts, or the return of football. For me, the one constant of the season in recent memory has been the New York Film Festival, which I’ve attended in some form since my final year of college in 2014. As the leaves change and the seasonal weather turns, the best of world cinema has beckoned film lovers indoors to the cinemas at Lincoln Center to stare in wonder at a screen inside a dark room. Despite fears that the pandemic ...
Tags: Amazon, New York, Movies, New York City, Toronto, America, Features, United States, New Zealand, Manhattan, Steven Soderbergh, Steve-McQueen, Lincoln Center, Andrew Cuomo, Upper West Side, Cannes


SXSW 2021 Planning Online Festival, Does Not Specify Status of Traditional Fest

While it’s too soon to decide (officially) to cancel a physical, in-person version of SXSW 2021, the fest doesn’t want to be caught off-guard again. In 2020, the decision was made at almost the last possible minute to cancel SXSW – a wise choice that still cost the City of Austin a large amount of money. As the never-ending nightmare that is 2020 draws to a close, organizers are hedging their bets and planning for an online event for 2021. There are still hopes for a traditional in-person event...
Tags: Movies, Austin, Sxsw, Film Festivals, Roland Swenson, SXSW EDU, SXSW Online


‘Night of the Kings’ Review: Neon’s Latest Acquisition Title is a Thrilling Ode to Storytelling’s Power [TIFF 2020]

Champions of art love to pontificate about its importance, especially during times like a pandemic. But that rhetoric might ring a little hollow right now. However, it’s not an exaggeration to say that humans as a species are hardwired for storytelling. There’s science to back up the capability to narrativize our experience as necessity, not merely a luxury. As innate as our impulses for violence and destruction is our drive to create and narrate. This becomes all too apparent for the young man...
Tags: Movies, Toronto, Features, Movie Reviews, Kings, Ivory Coast, Maca, Roman, Blackbeard, Film Festivals, Featured Stories Sidebar, Philippe Lacôte, Koné Bakary, Night of the Kings, Phillipe Lacôte, Steve Tientcheu


‘The Water Man’ Review: David Oyelowo Makes His Directorial Debut With a Wholesome Adventure [TIFF 2020]

“Anything that basically is overtly celebrating darkness and to be perfectly honest, sanctioning it,” David Oyelowo told NPR in 2015, “that’s something I can’t personally do […] I know that films affect and shape culture, and I want to put stuff in the world that I feel is edifying as opposed to stuff that is detrimental.” As Oyelowo steps behind the camera for his feature directorial debut, it’s helpful to keep the star’s words in mind. The Water Man is nothing if not a brand extension for his...
Tags: Movies, Toronto, Features, Movie Reviews, Npr, Spielberg, David Oyelowo, Amos, Jo, Oyelowo, Film Festivals, Spielbergs, Gunner, Rosario-Dawson, Featured Stories Sidebar, Lonnie Chavis


Beyond Fest 2020 Schedule: ‘Freaky’, ‘Possessor’, ‘Saint Maud’, a David Lynch Triple Feature, and More

Beyond Fest, the annual L.A.-based genre film festival, has announced its full line-up for this year’s event. Comprised of double and triple features and taking place at the Mission Tiki Drive-In theater in Los Angeles, the festival will feature the world premieres of Christopher Landon‘s body-swapping Blumhouse horror film Freaky as well as the Robert Forster-led werewolf film The Wolf of Snow Hollow, plus the West Coast premieres of Rose Glass‘s Saint Maud, Justin Simien‘s Bad Hair, and many ...
Tags: Usa, UK, Movies, France, US, Los Angeles, Canada, West Coast, David Lynch, Eventbrite, Film Festivals, Rob Reiner, Jim Cummings, Robert Forster, John Frankenheimer, Justin Simien


‘Falling’ Review: Viggo Mortensen’s Directorial Debut is a Total Disaster [TIFF 2020]

“Sorry to bring you into this world just to die.” So begins Falling, Viggo Mortensen’s frustrating and flawed father/son drama that demands rather than earns empathy from its deeply unlikeable central character and his near saintly son. Told over two timelines, Mortensen’s script (and directorial debut) shows Willis as a young father (Sverrir Gudnason) and an elderly, sundowning parent (Lance Henriksen). Whether being an obnoxious, abusive prick decades ago or an aggressively homophobic sh...
Tags: Movies, Toronto, Features, Movie Reviews, David Cronenberg, John, Viggo Mortensen, Falling, Willard, Willis, Mortensen, Film Festivals, Henriksen, Linney, Lance Henriksen, Featured Stories Sidebar


‘Summer of 85’ Review: Young Love Burns Brighter Than Dark Noir [TIFF 2020]

As far as ‘80s-set, sun-soaked European summer romances where a young gay man comes to understand his sexuality, Call Me By Your Name still reigns supreme. (A high bar, to be clear!) But if this extremely specific subgenre is to become a thing, François Ozon’s Summer of 85 is a worthy entry. While the film does struggle a bit with some jumbled tonality, the latest work from the famously prolific French filmmaker strikes a new and surprisingly stirring combination of steamy and sweet thanks to t...
Tags: Movies, Toronto, Features, David, Movie Reviews, Alex, Francois Ozon, Ozon, Film Festivals, Lefebvre, David Gorman, Featured Stories Sidebar, Jérémie Renier, Summer of 85, TIFF 2020, Félix Lefebvre


’76 Days’ Review: This Documentary About the Early Days of COVID-19 is the Most Frightening Movie of the Year [TIFF 2020]

Forget anything in the genre-centric Midnight Madness slate: the documentary  76 Days is the horror film of TIFF 2020. Tracing the COVID-19 outbreak in a Wuhan medical facility for the duration of that city’s lockdown, it manages in a concise and remarkable way to illustrate not only the ravages of this new virus but how its effects continue to resonate no matter the political forces looking to downplay its risks. This is not only one of the most unvarnished, most unsentimental looks at ...
Tags: Movies, Toronto, Features, Movie Reviews, Wuhan, Film Festivals, Featured Stories Sidebar, Weixi Chen, 76 Days, Hao Wu Esquire