Posts filtered by tags: Film History[x]


 






These are the first words ever heard in a feature film

“Wait a minute... Wait a minute... you ain’t heard nothin’ yet.” In 1927, Al Jolson spoke those words in The Jazz Singer, marking the end of the silent film age. (Of course, that film also featured Jolson in blackface which unfortunately was common at the time.) From The Guardian: Just a year before (The Jazz Singer), Warners had made Don Juan, starring Douglas Fairbanks and Mary Astor, which didn’t exactly set the Hudson river on fire, despite sound effects like the clash of swords ...
Tags: Video, New York, Hollywood, Technology, News, Film, Films, Cinema, Film History, Hudson, Al Jolson, Don Juan, Metropolitan Opera, Western Electric, Mary Astor, Warners










England's Postwar Paranoia Creeps in the Shadows of Three Film-Noirs

Kino Lorber has been doing Region 1 a favor by licensing Blu-rays of classic British films from France's StudioCanal, which apparently owns everything in Europe. That's why we've been blessed with a bunch of Ealing Films and a set of early Hitchcocks. Now available are three stray postwar classics made in the four-year period from 1949 to 1953, two of them from London Films and one from Associated British Pictures. All are moody delights indulging noir-ish black and white, keying into the uncert...
Tags: Europe, Music, England, London, Drama, France, US, Thriller, Film History, Kino Lorber, Carol Reed, Film feature, Thorold Dickinson, John Boulting, Film-noir, The queen of spades


















John Badham's 'Dracula', the Rock Star

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Tags: Feature, Music, Romance, Horror, Film History, Dracula, Rock Star, Shout! Factory, John Badham, Film feature








Will the Oscars and Emmys Merge in the Streaming Era?

“[Hollywood has] welcomed change with about the same relish the dinosaurs welcomed the Ice Age.” Stephen Galloway The Hollywood Reporter “I get asked all the time, ‘Where does this stop? When does it stop?’ The truth is that it is only getting started.” Brett Sappington (on the growing number of streaming services) A senior Parks […]
Tags: Hollywood, Movies, Netflix, Filmmaking, New York Times, The Hollywood Reporter, Film History, Brooks Barnes, Oscar Awards, Emmy Award, Brett Sappington, Stephen Galloway




Fantastic film of Paris in the late 1890s

This late 1890s Lumière film of Paris is amazing. The image is clear and the motion is smooth. Sound was added, which makes the film come alive (I wish they would have colorized it, too). No cars in sight - just horse-drawn carriages, pedestrians, and the rare bicycle (why not more bikes?). People are dressed in elaborate outfits - how long did it take them to dress up in the morning? The horse-drawn fire trucks at 3:35 are a highlight.
Tags: Video, News, Paris, Film History, Lumière


Watch a delightful interview with the stars of The Big Lebowski

The Big Lebowski turned 20 years old this year and it is still as much of a joy to watch as it was back in 1998. Recently, NBC's Harry Smith sat down with Jeff Bridges, John Goodman and Steve Buscemi for a long chat about what it was like to make the film and its enduring cult legacy.
Tags: Post, Video, Movies, News, Nbc, John Goodman, Steve Buscemi, Film History, Jeff Bridges, The Big Lebowski, The Dude, Harry Smith, Lebowski, Jeff Bridges John Goodman, That's just like you opinion man


Rare Movie Posters Go Up For Auction, Including the World's First

Rare movie posters are going up for sale later this month in a Sotheby’s auction that includes a very special find: The world’s first movie poster, according to the Guardian, created in 1895.Read more...
Tags: Hollywood, Science, Film History, Movie Posters, Sotheby, Movie History, Classic Hollywood


Jean-Pierre Melville’s 'Le Samouraï' Plays with the Perils of the Lone Detective

I recently spoke to a class full of students about Plato's "Allegory of the Cave". Actually, I mentioned Plato's "Allegory of the Cave" by prefacing that I understood the likelihood that no one had read it. Fortunately, two students had, which brought mild temporary relief. In an effort to close the gap of understanding (perhaps more a canyon or uncanny valley) I made the popular quick comparison between Plato's often cited work and the Wachowski siblings' cinema spectacl...
Tags: Music, Crime, Drama, Cinema, Paris, Mystery, Film History, Criterion Collection, Imdb, David Fincher, Film Review, Jules, Lawrence, Jeff, Plato, Melville


Jean-Pierre Melville’s 'Le Samouraï' Plays with the Perils of the Loner

I recently spoke to a class full of students about Plato's "Allegory of the Cave". Actually, I mentioned Plato's "Allegory of the Cave" by prefacing that I understood the likelihood that no one had read it. Fortunately, two students had, which brought mild temporary relief. In an effort to close the gap of understanding (perhaps more a canyon or uncanny valley) I made the popular quick comparison between Plato's often cited work and the Wachowski siblings' cinema spectacl...
Tags: Music, Crime, Drama, Cinema, Paris, Mystery, Film History, Criterion Collection, Imdb, David Fincher, Film Review, Jules, Lawrence, Jeff, Plato, Melville


What’s going on in the shadows? A visual arts timeline

Although cast shadows lurk almost everywhere in the visual arts, they often slip by audiences unnoticed. That’s unfortunate, since every shadow tells a story. Whether painted, filmed, photographed, or generated in real time, shadows provide vital information that makes a representation engaging to the eye. Shadows speak about the shape, volume, location, and texture of objects, as well as about the source of light, the time of day or season, the quality of the atmosphere, and so on. Reattachin...
Tags: Art, Europe, Books, Photography, Featured, Movies, Media, Film, Painting, Visual Arts, Cinema, Literature, Victoria, Pliny the Elder, Rembrandt, Peter Pan


Erich von Stroheim, the child of his own loins

Even though Erich von Stroheim passed away 60 years ago, it is clear that his persona is still very much alive. His silhouette and his name are enough to evoke an emblematic figure that is at once Teutonic, aristocratic and military. No one has forgotten his timeless characters—among others, Max von Mayerling in Sunset Boulevard, a talented film director who has become the devoted servant of the almost-forgotten silent film star whose movies he used to make, or von Rauffenstein, the prisoner of ...
Tags: Books, Hollywood, Featured, America, Vienna, Cinema, Monaco, Silent Film, Film History, Kane, Kelly, Sunset Boulevard, Griffith, Monte Carlo Casino, Arts & Humanities, Online products