Posts filtered by tags: Genetics[x]


 

Jewish identity is so much more than a person’s biology

Recently I made a self-deprecating joke among friends, when one of them said, “that’s so Jewish,” to which another quipped, “What do you expect? It’s in the genes.” The idea of a Jewish gene is not necessarily new, but it has become more popular and more concerning in recent years.  For example, today, direct-to-consumer genetic […] Find jobs at Careers by KevinMD.com. Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now. Learn more.
Tags: Health, Genetics, Physician, PA NP, CRNA


Mystery virus found with mostly unknown DNA

A virus has been found whose DNA is 90% absolutely unfamiliar.Scientists have no real idea what it developed from, or how.Viruses used to be thought of as simple, jumbles of things — not so much any more. In Lake Pampulha in the Brazilian city of Belo Horizonte, scientists found an amoeba virus unlike anything seen before. Named after Yara, the mother of waters in Brazilian mythology, 90 percent of the Yaravirus's genome is comprised of genes never before described. Sifting through the publicly...
Tags: Science, France, Water, Virus, Discovery, Genetics, Microbiology, Innovation, Brazil, Microbes, Belo Horizonte, Aix Marseille University, Yara, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Lake Pampulha, Bernard La Scola


Could genomics solve the climate change crisis?

Genomics is the study of genes and their functions. The branch of molecular biology presents the idea that the genome can be manipulated for added resilience against harm.Yale professor and editor Daniel C. Esty argues that genetic modification in nature as a way to improve sustainability should be seriously considered.In the book A Better Planet: Forty Big Ideas for a Sustainable Future, Esty and several authors offer actionable solutions for dealing with greenhouse gases, including genomic in...
Tags: Technology, Biology, Climate Change, Animals, Environment, Sustainability, Genetics, Yale, Innovation, Plants, Genomics, Global Issues, Daniel C Esty, Sustainable Future Esty


California Senator proposes tighter regulations on direct-to-consumer genetics testing companies

A state senator in California is introducing legislation designed to provide more direct oversight over direct-to-consumer genetic testing companies. The new regulations, introduced by Santa Ana’s Democratic Senator Thomas Umberg, builds on attempts in the California Consumer Privacy Act to regulate the ways data collected from genetic testing can be used by companies. “The fact that the Pentagon just warned all of the country’s military personnel to avoid home DNA tests should raise brigh...
Tags: TC, New York, Maryland, Medicine, California, Senate, Dna, Tech, Genetics, Pentagon, Illinois, Orange County, Genetic Testing, 23andMe, U S Army, Santa Ana


Dad bod & dad brain: how a man's brain changes when he becomes a father

In the first days and weeks of fatherhood, a man's testosterone and cortisol levels decrease and oxytocin, estrogen, and prolactin levels surge, promoting an important bonding experience between a father and his newborn child.One of the most significant changes in a new father's brain is the new neurons that are formed that have been proved to be directly linked to the time spent with their newborn child.This neurogenesis (forming of new neurons in the brain) happens in the areas that are linked...
Tags: Psychology, Science, Learning, Parenting, Biology, Children, Love, Memory, Neuroscience, Empathy, Brain, Genetics, Innovation, Men, Evolution, Emotions


Genetically Engineered Moths a Success in Cornell Crop Protection Study

A recent article in phys.org reports on a newly-published study on the use of genetically engineered moths to increase crop protection. The Cornell study documents the successful application and release of self-limiting, genetically engineered diamondback moths to fields of brassica crops.  “The diamondback moth, also known as Plutella xylostella, is highly damaging to brassica crops such as cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower and canola. This new strain of diamondback moth, developed by Oxit...
Tags: Future, Genetics, Cornell, Revive & Restore, Oxitec Ltd


One of the Last Mammoths on Earth Was So Mutated, It Lost the Ability to Smell Flowers

The vast majority of woolly mammoths went extinct at the end of the last ice age, but small, isolated populations managed to hold out for a little while longer. New research uncovers the extent to which at least one of these final mammoths suffered due to its many mutations.Read more...
Tags: Science, Genetics, Mutations, Extinction, Paleontology, Wrangel Island, Mammoths, Woolly Mammoths, Inbreeding


Ancestry lays off 6% of staff as consumer genetic testing market continues to decline

Excitement in the consumer genetic testing market continues to show signs of slowing down. In the past two weeks layoffs have hit two of the biggest consumer genetic testing services — 23andme and Ancestry — with the latter announcing that it would slash its staff by 6% earlier today, in a blog post. CNBC first reported the news. In her blogpost announcing the layoffs, Ancestry chief executive Margo Georgiadis wrote: … over the last 18 months, we have seen a slowdown in consumer demand across...
Tags: TC, Biology, Law, Dna, US, Color, Tech, Genetics, United States, Genetic Testing, Director, Cnbc, 23andMe, Illumina, Ancestry, T.rowe Price


Signs of cancer can appear long before diagnosis, study shows

Research into genetic mutations suggests possibility of tests that would detect cancer earlierEarly signs of cancer can appear years or even decades before diagnosis, according to the most comprehensive investigation to date of the genetic mutations that cause healthy cells to turn malignant.The findings, based on samples from more than 2,500 tumours and 38 cancer types, reveal a longer-than-expected window of opportunity in which patients could potentially be tested and treated at the earliest ...
Tags: Science, UK News, Genetics, Medical Research, Cancer Research


Ancestry.com rejected a police warrant to access user DNA records on a technicality

DNA profiling company Ancestry.com has narrowly avoided complying with a search warrant in Pennsylvania after a search warrant was rejected on technical grounds, a move that is likely to help law enforcement refine their efforts to obtain user information despite the company’s efforts to keep the data private. Little is known about the demands of the search warrant, only that a court in Pennsylvania approved law enforcement to “seek access” to Utah-based Ancestry.com’s database of more than 15 m...
Tags: Health, Security, Apps, Utah, Microsoft, Privacy, California, Government, Tech, Law Enforcement, Genetics, Pennsylvania, United States, Aclu, University Of California Berkeley, Biotech


Meet the ancestry test that can help you live a healthier life

Vitagene offers ancestry details and a full DNA analysis of your health and dietary needs.Vitagene findings offer food choices, supplement recommendations and workout routines tailored specifically to you.The Vitagene DNA Premium Test Kit is now $40 off, just $99.99.Last year, MIT estimated that more than 26 million people had taken an at-home ancestry test. At the trend's current wildly popular pace, the genetic makeup of more than 100 million people could be on file by the end of 2020.While it...
Tags: Health, Food, Science, Fitness, Dna, Mit, Genetics, Innovation, Illness, Personal Growth, Vitagene, Human body


Top geneticist ‘should resign’ over his team’s laboratory fraud

Professor responsible for ‘reckless’ failure to properly oversee researchersA row over scientific fraud at the highest level of British academia has led to calls for one of the country’s leading geneticists and highest-paid university chiefs to leave his posts.David Latchman, professor of genetics at University College London and master of Birkbeck, University of London – a post that earns him £380,000 a year – has angered senior academics by presiding over a laboratory that published fraudulent...
Tags: Research, UK News, Genetics, University College London, University of London, Birkbeck University of London, Birkbeck, David Latchman, UCL (University College London


Could 23andMe’s new pharmaceutical friends finally find a fix for psoriasis?

23andMe has spent years collecting genetic samples. Here’s how they’re put to use
Tags: Trends, Features, Genetics, Emerging Tech, Tech For Change, Collaborators-series


The secret to regeneration? Scientists say it lies in the axolotl genome.

All salamanders are gifted at regeneration, but the axolotl takes this capability to the extreme.In addition to growing back its limbs, axolotl can grow back organs like their eyes and even their brains.Research on how they do this has been slow due to the creature's massive genome, but scientists recently uncovered two genes that play an important role. Few creatures have captured the attention of both the general public and scientists as thoroughly as a peculiar-looking salamander known as ...
Tags: Biology, Dna, Genetics, Yale, Mexico City, Innovation, Researchers, Human body, Lake Xochimilco, Parker Flowers


All Humans Are a Little Bit Neanderthal, According to New Research

We’re all a little Neanderthal. That’s the conclusion of a study that used a new statistical technique to revise estimates of the degree to which modern humans have retained Neanderthal DNA. The research suggests that even people of African descent have Neanderthal heritage, something that was previously in doubt.Read more...
Tags: Science, Africa, Genetics, Neanderthals, New Research, Human Evolution, Human Origins, Interbreeding, Archaeogenetics


Neanderthal genes found for first time in African populations

Findings suggest humans bred with Neaderthals before mass migration 60,000 years agoAfrican populations have been revealed to share Neanderthal ancestry for the first time, in findings that add a new twist to the tale of ancient humans and our closest known relatives.Previously it was believed that only non-African populations carried Neanderthal genes due to interbreeding that took place after a major human migration out of Africa and across the globe about 60,000 years ago. Continue reading...
Tags: Science, Biology, Africa, Genetics, Anthropology, Evolution, Neanderthals


Newly discovered sharks that walk are the "youngest" shark species on Earth

Some species of sharks have evolved to literally walk along the ocean floor (no, not on land) using their fins as feet. New research Conservation International’s Mark Erdmann and colleagues determined that walking sharks only evolved their unique capability 9 million years ago, "making them the 'youngest' sharks on our planet." Of course, a distinct species usually forms when some members of a species are physically separated from others. So how did that speciation occur in the case of the walk...
Tags: Post, Video, News, Biology, Animals, Genetics, Marine, Oceans, Evolution, Sharks, Papua New Guinea, Marine Biology, Erdmann, Conservation International, Milne Bay, Mark Erdmann


Could heart disease actually be contagious?

A newly published hypothesis suggests that some noncommunicable diseases can actually be transmitted between people via their microbiomes.A new analysis even found that your microbiome can convey more information than your genes about your chance of developing various health conditions. By being exposed to an unhealthy cluster of microbes, healthy people could put themselves at risk of "catching" noncommunicable diseases. Thanks to the wonders of modern medicine, dying from communicable disea...
Tags: Health, Bacteria, Genetics, Microbiology, Innovation, Disease, World Health Organization, Vancouver, Illness, Fiji, Microbes, University of British Columbia, Finlay, Brett Finlay


Researchers Find 102 Genes Linked to Autism in One of the Largest Studies of its Kind to Date

Autism spectrum disorder is a complex neurodevelopmental condition that is likely caused by both genetic and environmental factors. As the name suggests, it also represents a range of symptoms and behaviors, all of which makes teasing apart the genes involved quite challenging. In a study published Jan. 23 in Cell, researchers led by Joseph Buxbaum, director of the Seaver Autism Center for Research and Treatment at Mount Sinai, took advantage of better genetic sequencing technologies and on...
Tags: News, Uncategorized, Brain, Genetics, Autism, Mount Sinai, Duke University, Dawson, Buxbaum, Center for Autism, Dean Hartley, Seaver Autism Center for Research and Treatment, Joseph Buxbaum, Geraldine Dawson


Newly Sequenced Giant Squid Genome Raises as Many Questions as It Answers

One the most intriguing and mysterious creatures on the planet—the giant squid—has finally had its genome fully sequenced. But while the genome is helping to explain many of its distinguishing features, including its large size and big brain, we still have much to learn about this near-mythical beast.Read more...
Tags: Science, Genetics, Evolution, Marine Biology, Genomes, Giant Squids


Medical News Today: Aicardi syndrome: Everything you need to know

Aicardi syndrome is a rare genetic condition that causes seizures, vision problems, and other symptoms. Here, learn about treatments and more.
Tags: Genetics, Aicardi


23andMe co-founder’s new startup, Precise.ly, brings genomics to India through Narayana partnership

Precise.ly, the new genomics startup launched by 23andMe co-founder Linda Avey and Aneil Mallavarapu, is taking its spin on direct to consumer personalized genomics to India through a partnership with Naryana Health, one of India’s leading specialty hospital networks. Narayana, a company that operates a network of 24 hospitals serving 2.5 million patients, is one of the most fascinating stories in healthcare. By emphasizing efficiencies and cost savings, the hospital network has managed to bring...
Tags: TC, Asia, Biology, Cancer, India, Africa, Chief executive officer, Tech, Bloomberg, Genetics, Healthcare, Healthcare Industry, Disease, Genomics, Fda, Genetic Testing


23andMe co-founder’s new startup, Precise.ly, brings genomics to India through Narayana partnerhsip

Precise.ly, the new genomics startup launched by 23andMe co-founder Linda Avey and Aneil Mallavarapu, is taking its spin on direct to consumer personalized genomics to India through a partnership with Naryana Health, one of India’s leading specialty hospital networks. Narayana, a company that operates a network of 24 hospitals serving 2.5 million patients, is one of the most fascinating stories in healthcare. By emphasizing efficiencies and cost savings, the hospital network has managed to bring...
Tags: TC, Asia, Biology, Cancer, India, Africa, Chief executive officer, Tech, Bloomberg, Genetics, Healthcare, Healthcare Industry, Disease, Genomics, Fda, Genetic Testing


A Genetic Mutation Is Responsible for Mysterious Deaths in the Amish Community, Researchers Say

In a new paper this week, doctors at the Mayo Clinic say they’ve uncovered the cause of a mysterious heart condition that had suddenly killed over a dozen young, healthy members of a tight-knit Amish community. The culprit? A previously undiscovered genetic mutation that runs in families.Read more...
Tags: Science, Genetics, Heart, Mayo Clinic, Amish


Chinese scientist gets jail for rogue gene editing

In November 2018, a Chinese scientist claimed he'd flouted ethics and the law to edit genes in human embryos. Other Chinese scientists call He Jiankui's research "crazy." Three gene-modified babies are now living in China, future uncertain. None The scientific community has been proceeding with caution as it explores the potential of gene editing. The high risk of unintended consequences, both immediate and long-term, has prompted reticence regarding experimentation with humans. And then ther...
Tags: Health, Hong Kong, Law, China, Hiv, Genetics, Innovation, The Guardian, University of Pennsylvania, Lulu, University of Oxford, University Of California Berkeley, Crispr, Shenzhen, Justice System, Bioethics


Pentagon Warns Military Members Against At-Home DNA Tests

There’s a lot of reasons why you should probably chuck that DNA kit you got for Christmas in the trash. That’s doubly true for military personnel, the Pentagon warned in an internal memo. Read more...
Tags: Science, Genetics, Military, Pentagon, DNA testing, 23andMe, Genetic Privacy, Pentagon Warns Military


Armed robber who face-planted into Pizza Hut door left DNA, cops say

In Las Cruces, New Mexico, police say they collected DNA from the spot where a suspect face-planted into a door while trying to escape. Police swabbed the door for possible DNA evidence, collected it, sent it to the New Mexico forensic laboratory in Santa Fe, where DNA was confirmed. That DNA profile was entered into CODIS (Combined DNA Index System) where it matched a known sample belonging to one Markell Deshaun Barnes, 19. The young man is now identified as the suspect responsible for t...
Tags: Post, Crime, News, Dna, Fbi, Genetics, Pizza Hut, New Mexico, Santa Fe, Forensics, LAS CRUCES New Mexico, Markell Deshaun Barnes, Deshaun Barnes, Ash Avenue, Missouri Ave Barnes


Your Genes Suck at Predicting Your Health, Study Finds

A new study this month is the latest to suggest that our genes really don’t do much to predict our health, at least most of the time.Read more...
Tags: Science, Genetics, DNA testing


An ancient piece of chewing gum offers surprising insights into the human genome

Researchers recently uncovered a piece of chewed-on birch pitch in an archaeological dig in Denmark.Conducting a genetic analysis of the material left in the birch pitch offered a plethora of insights into the individual who last chewed it.The gum-chewer has been dubbed Lola. She lived 5,700 years ago; and she had dark skin, dark hair, and blue eyes. None Five thousand and seven hundred years ago, "Lola" — a blue-eyed woman with dark skin and hair — was chewing on a piece of pitch derived from...
Tags: Europe, Dna, Genetics, Innovation, Evolution, Denmark, Scandinavia, Lola, Epstein Barr, Birch, Lolland, Human body, Hannes Schroeder, Theis Jensen


Sequencing an anciet girl's genome from a 5,700-year-old piece of chewing gum

Almost 6,000 years ago on the island of Lolland, Denmark, a young girl disposed of her chewing gum. Now, University of Copenhagen researchers have used that gum, made from birch pitch, to sequence the girl's full genome. From Science: The child had black hair, blue eyes, and dark skin, and was more closely related to hunter-gatherers from Western Europe than to farmers who had more recently settled in the region. She left traces of her most recent meal in the gum—she had been chewing hazel...
Tags: Post, Science, News, Biology, Genetics, Gum, Chewing Gum, Western Europe, Epstein Barr, University of Copenhagen, Lolland Denmark