Posts filtered by tags: Geology[x]


 

Diamonds have been created at room temperature in a lab

Diamonds aren't just beautiful, they're also excellent at cutting through most anything.Researchers have worked out how to create the gems without the high temperatures that accompany their natural formation.The researchers were able to create two different types of diamonds that also occur naturally. It may not always be cool to admit you were a fan of Superman as a kid, but one thing about Supe that was inarguably cool was that he could close his hands around coal—chunks of carbon—squeeze, an...
Tags: Superman, Earth, Diamond, Materials, Geology, Innovation, Invention, Melbourne, Natural Resources, McCulloch, RMIT, RMIT University, Australian National University ANU, Bradby, Jodie Bradby, Lonsdaleite


Watch: China Is Launching Its Chang'e-5 Spacecraft to Get Some Moon Rocks of Its Own

The China National Space Administration’s mission to bring chunks of the Moon back to Earth for the first time in decades will kick off this week, with the Chang’e-5 spacecraft slated to launch on today from Wenchang Space Launch Center on Hainan Island.Read more...
Tags: Astronomy, Space, Science, Technology, China, Earth, Moon, Change 5, Geology, Chang, China National Space Administration, Astrogeology, CNSA, Change 4, Lunar Lander, Lunar Landing


The 12-foot-tall Chamberlin Rock — in the news these days as racist — is featured as a climbing destination at Mountain Project.

It's one of the "the classic, most popular, highest rated climbing routes in this area" — "UW Madison Campus Bouldering" (click to enlarge and clarify): The route is marked:   There's "Chamberlin Rock East Arete": Sit start and work your way up the arete using holds on both sides of the corner. Top out. In my opinion this is the best problem on this rock.In the comments there: Found some more routes on this little boulder. Hang below the plaque and climb and top out at top left corner. If...
Tags: Law, Wikipedia, Sports, University, Conversation, Canada, Language, Geology, Wisconsin, Native Americans, Landscapes, WSJ, Cemeteries, University Of Wisconsin, Don, Abraham Lincoln


Newly discovered mineral petrovite could revolutionize batteries

Russian scientists discover a new mineral in the volcanic area of Kamchatka in the country's far east.The mineral dubbed "petrovite" can be utilized to power sodium-ion batteries.Batteries based on salt would be cheaper to produce than lithium-ion batteries. Researchers from St. Petersburg University in Russia found a beautiful new mineral species called "petrovite," created in the volcanos of the remote region of Kamchatka in the country's far east.The research team that found petrovite was he...
Tags: Travel, Energy, Technology, Russia, Discovery, University, Chemistry, Geology, Innovation, St Petersburg, Kamchatka, Peter, Russian Academy of Sciences, St Petersburg University, Filatov, Far Eastern Branch


Zircon in a meteorite opens the door on Mars’ past

A meteorite from Mars unexpectedly contains zircons that reveal the planets history. The rock likely comes from one of the solar system's tallest volcanoes. Analyzing the zirconium required smashing some very expensive rock. Just last week, we wrote about one lab's conclusion that water may be a common byproduct in the formation of rocky planets. This week, the same lab has announced that the very same Martian meteorite that led to that earlier finding has yet another secret to reveal: It co...
Tags: Space, Earth, Discovery, Geology, Innovation, Planets, Mars, Extraterrestrial Life, University of Copenhagen, northwest Africa, Tharsis, Cosmos, Zircon, Bizzarro, Globe Institute, Martin Bizzarro


Housebound? This map lets you travel through time

If you love travelling, a pandemic like this is not the greatest of times.But here's a way to go somewhere else without even leaving the house.This interactive tool lets you travel up to 750 million years back in time. Travels in the fourth dimension Berlin in deep time. Left to right: in the Neocene Period (20 million years ago), Berlin is on a vast plain that includes what would become the Baltic Sea; in the Devonian (400 million years ago), it's on the southern edge of a turtle-shaped cont...
Tags: Maps, Berlin, New York City, Time, Earth, Morocco, Geology, Innovation, Time Travel, Baltic Sea, Long Island, Time Machine, Ian, Southern Africa, Pangaea, H G Wells


UPSC Geo-Scientist Recruitment Examination 2021

UPSC Geo-Scientist Geologist Recruitment Examination 2021 Union Public Service Commission  (UPSC), Shahjahan Road, Dholpur House, New Delhi – 110069 will hold a Combined Geo-Scientist (Preliminary) Examination, 2021 (Computer Based Test) on 21/02/2021 for selection to Combined Geo-Scientist (Main) Examination, 2021 for recruitment to following 40 Govt. Job Sarkari Naukri Vacancy posts of  Geophysicist, Chemist, and Hydrogeologists (Scientist B) in Geological Survey of... Please Click on the Titl...
Tags: Jobs, Chemistry, Physics, Geology, New Delhi, Scientist, PSC, Manisha, Chemist, Geophysicist, UPSC, Recruitment Examination, Hydrogeologists


Earth’s first lifeforms breathed arsenic, not oxygen

We owe the Earth's oxygen to ancient microbes that photosynthesized and released it into the world's oceans.A long-standing question has been: Before oxygen, what did they breathe?The discovery of microbes living in a hostile early-Earth-like environment may provide the answer. One of the most interesting natural organizations studied by scientists are microbial mats, communities of cyanobacteria (AKA, "blue-green algae"). These fascinating self-contained ecosystems are visible to the naked eye...
Tags: California, Earth, Bacteria, Oceans, Chile, Microbiology, Geology, Innovation, Nevada, Mars, Western Australia, Pacific Ocean, Marine Biology, Atacama Desert, Paleontology, Microbes


Rock study may have just revealed cause of Triassic mass extinction

A new study suggests that the mass extinction that gave dinosaurs the evolutionary upper hand was caused by oceanic oxygen deprivation. Using ratios of sulfur isotopes, researchers could estimate changes in ocean oxygen levels in ancient seas. The authors suggest a similar mechanism as that which can cause dead zones in oceans today caused a mass extinction. Living on Earth isn't always easy. The fossil record is littered with enough mass extinction events to have once made theories that they o...
Tags: Climate Change, Environment, Italy, Geology, Innovation, Northern Ireland, Dinosaurs, Gulf of Mexico, Extinction, UK China, Dead Zone, British Columbia Sicily, Panthalassa


The weird, enchanting beauty of geology maps

Science is often blamed for making the world less 'magical,' but geology maps are proof of the opposite. William Smith and William Maclure produced amazing geology maps of Britain and the U.S., respectively.Their pioneering work is still important – and enchanting – today; but one William's legacy outshines the other one's. Weirdly beautiful maps Here's one of the worst raps science gets: it has disenchanted the world. Literally dis-enchanted it, by replacing magic with measurement. And so, ...
Tags: Europe, Maps, England, London, Wales, Mexico, France, Scotland, Virginia, America, Indiana, Britain, United States, Geology, Innovation, Charles Darwin


New Song Category: Gold or Mining Song | Seminole Wind

John Anderson: Seminole Wind (lyrics) Album: Seminole Wind, 1992 I'm claiming a new song category: Gold Songs. And kind of like the Road Song category—songs that have to mention roads, streets, etcetera—gold songs are those that mention gold, gold mining, and possibly just mining in general. As a new category, at least on the blog, the definition has not yet been set in stone, so to speak. Another example of a "gold song" would be Heart of Gold by Neil Young. This particular gold song, Sem...
Tags: Florida, Neil Young, Geology, Nevada, Midwest, Mojave Desert, Silver Fox, John Anderson, Osceola, Seminole Wind


No One Knows What Lurks at the Bottom of This Freakishly Deep Submerged Cave

New research suggests Hranice Abyss—the world’s deepest freshwater cave—is around 0.6 miles (1 kilometer) deep, which is more than twice the depth of previous estimates.Read more...
Tags: Science, Geology, Caves, Deep Caves, Hranice Abyss


Mysterious crater appears in Siberian tundra

Discovered by journalists with Vesti Yamal TV in Russia, a 164-ft crater in Siberia joins the other mysterious holes (previously, previously) thought to be the result of methane explosions. Record temperatures in the region accellerate the thawing of permafrost, releasing the trapped gases. This is the 17th such feature, called a hydrolaccolith, that scientists have found across the thawing Siberian tundra, according to The Siberian Times. Researchers discovered the first one in 2014.
Tags: Post, Video, News, Climate Change, Russia, Geology, Siberia, Holes, Siberian Times Researchers, Vesti Yamal TV


"In collaboration with the Black Student Union at the school, University of Wisconsin-Madison leaders are discussing plans to remove a 70-ton boulder from campus grounds due to it once being called a racist name nearly a century ago."

"The boulder had traveled to the region over 10,000 years ago, deposited by ancient pre-Cambrian bedrock drift from Canada, according to its plaque. In 1925, workers pulled the rock out of the side of a hill on campus and named it 'Chamberlin Rock' after Thomas Chrowder Chamberlin, a 19th century glaciologist and University of Wisconsin president. The rock was adorned with a plaque commemorating Chamberlin and placed at the university’s Washburn Observatory, where it remains today. While Chamber...
Tags: Law, Canada, Geology, Madison, University Of Wisconsin, University of Wisconsin Madison, UW, Becky, Meade, Black Student Union, Rebecca Blank, Ann Althouse, Insults, Chamberlin, The Black Student Union, Nalah McWhorter


The Earth may have been wet from the very start

Enstatite chondrite meteorites are rare today, but they may have been Earth's basic building blocks.A study finds these meteorites contain a surprising amount of hydrogen, nitrogen, and water.The implication of the study is that Earth had all of its water from the beginning. Very few enstatite chondrite ("E chondrite") meteorites have been found on Earth — there are less than 200 specimens, about 2 percent of all the meteorites that have been found.Rare as they are today, though, it may be that...
Tags: Astronomy, Water, Earth, Chemistry, Physics, Geology, Innovation, Universe, Meteorites, Cosmos, Vacher, Nancy France, Laurette Piani, Lionel G Vacher, Washington University in St LouisThe, Piani


Northumberland via old Highway 8A

Before I get very far into this blog post, I have to say that the Blogger interface, with its recent "upgrade," now sucks due to sudden changes in the way the HTML works. First off, the code for each photo is different than it used to be, such that I have to go back to older posts to duplicate spacing at the top, bottom, and left margins. I mean, I guess if I was 100% prolific with HTML, I wouldn't have to do that, but every time they’ve done one of their upgrades, I’ve had to modify the way I...
Tags: Austin, Geology, Nevada, Kingston, Usgs, Northumberland, Pete, Ravenswood, Battle Mountain, USFS, Virga, Silver Fox, Mount Jefferson, Bob Scott, Big Smoky Valley, Reese River


Amazing interactive globe shows the very different location of your city 750 million years ago

Earth has changed quite a bit in the past 750 million years or so. Due to plate tectonics—the shifting of the Earth's surface—the location of your city is likely far from where it is today. Computer scientist Ian Webster created this stunning interactive "Ancient Earth Globe" that pinpoints your city where it was located at various points in deep history, from 20 million to 750 million years ago. You can also learn about what was happening with the flora and fauna at the time. From CNN: ...
Tags: Post, Maps, Science, News, Earth, Cnn, Geology, Visualizations, Computer Science, Globes, Data Visualizations, Webster, Ian Webster, Christopher Scotese Scotese


A rush is on to mine the deep seabed, with effects on ocean life that aren’t well understood

Mining the ocean floor for submerged minerals is a little-known, experimental industry. But soon it will take place on the deep seabed, which belongs to everyone, according to international law. Seabed mining for valuable materials like copper, zinc and lithium already takes place within countries' marine territories. As soon as 2025, larger projects could start in international waters – areas more than 200 nautical miles from shore, beyond national jurisdictions. We study ocean policy, ma...
Tags: Senate, China, Environment, Barack Obama, European Union, Mining, United States, Oceans, Geology, Innovation, Korea, Jamaica, Lockheed Martin, Rhode Island, Marine Biology, Miller


Readings: India Dams, Geology Videos, Parsis in India

 Sharing some readings.1) Neeraj Wagholikar, Parineeta Dandekar and Himanshu Thakkar weigh in on the dam building epidemic that is afflicting India. These three experts cover issues of environmental governance, destruction of fisheries and livelihoods, and a perspective on their irrigation potential and economic logic.The deep political drive to push through permissions to build dams is best highlighted by an example of a malign recommendation in a report of the Parliamentary Standing Committee ...
Tags: India, Environment, Seo, Development, History, Genetics, Geology, Dams, Gujarat, Himachal Pradesh, FRA, Suvrat Kher, Cin Ty Lee, Parliamentary Standing Committee, Science Outreach, Himanshu Thakkar


Scientists see an earthquake boomerang back and forth in the Atlantic

An earthquake ran quickly east before turning west beneath the Atlantic Ocean near the equator in 2016.Such earthquakes are likely to pack significantly more destructive power.Land-based boomerang earthquakes may have been witnessed, but have never been recorded seismographically. It was definitely an odd story Rosario García González told in the summer of 2010.González is an elder of the indigenous Cucapah community in Baja, California/Mexico. He and his wife were in their trailer in Paso Infe...
Tags: Japan, Science, Earthquake, Atlantic, Oceans, Liberia, Geology, Innovation, Natural Disaster, National Geographic, Imperial College London, Boomerang, Atlantic Ocean, University Of Southampton, Imperial College, Gonzalez


No, the Yellowstone supervolcano is not ‘overdue’

The supervolcano under Yellowstone produced three massive eruptions over the past few million years.Each eruption covered much of what is now the western United States in an ash layer several feet deep.The last eruption was 640,000 years ago, but that doesn't mean the next eruption is overdue. The end of the world as we know it Of the many freak ways to shuffle off this mortal coil – lightning strikes, shark bites, falling pianos – here's one you can safely scratch off your worry list: an outbr...
Tags: Maps, Indonesia, California, Mexico, Environment, Canada, United States, North Dakota, Idaho, Geology, Innovation, Nebraska, North America, Washington State, Yellowstone, Mount St Helens


When the Bronx Was a Forest: Stroll Through the Centuries

Yankee Stadium was the site of a salt marsh. Concourse Plaza was a valley. Our critic walks with Eric W. Sanderson, a conservation ecologist.
Tags: News, Architecture, Geology, Bronx, New York Botanical Garden, Sanderson, Yankee Stadium, Bronx (NYC, Forests and Forestry, Yankee Stadium (NYC, Bronx Zoo Wildlife Conservation Park, Eric W, Eric W Sanderson


Well, it's been so long...

It's been a long time—almost a year—since my last real post, the actual last post being a road song with brief blurb. And even though it's been a year, I haven't really started what would be the last in a series of posts reporting on a trip from Winnemucca to northeastern California, with geology and other points of interest along the route. It's been hard getting to that last post and to a few side posts along the route that would be possible if I would just maintain a bit of focus. And the st...
Tags: California, Geology, Nevada, Northumberland, Silver Fox, Winnemucca, Wheeler Peak, NEC Northern Exploration Company, Hoodoo Canyon


Terrawatch: lasting legacy of Taiwan's 2009 typhoon season

Typhoon Morakot left country with more quakes after changing stress pattern in Earth’s crustEleven years ago, Typhoon Morakot slammed into Taiwan, deluging the country with 3,000 litres of rain per square metre in three days. Catastrophic flooding and landslides followed and more than 600 people died.It is considered one of the worst tropical cyclones in Taiwan’s recorded history. But that wasn’t the end of it. New research reveals that the typhoon also left Taiwan with a legacy of extra earthqu...
Tags: Science, World news, Earth, Taiwan, Asia Pacific, Natural disasters and extreme weather, Earthquakes, Geology, Extreme Weather, Typhoon Morakot, Morakot


The Anthropause is here: COVID-19 reduced Earth's vibrations by 50 percent

A team of researchers found that Earth's vibrations were down 50 percent between March and May. This is the quietest period of human-generated seismic noise in recorded history. The researchers believe this helps distinguish between natural vibrations and human-created vibrations. The planet's vibes are down.That's the consensus from a team of researchers at six European institutions; the study was based at the Royal Observatory of Belgium. Their research, published in Science, found that huma...
Tags: Japan, China, Boston, Singapore, New York City, Environment, Earth, Conservation, Geology, Innovation, New Zealand, Belgium, Cornwall, Oklahoma, Brothers Grimm, Seismology


Ancient Mars May Have Been Less Wet Than We Thought

Ice sheets, and not rushing rivers, sculpted many Martian valleys, according to scientists. The new research suggests ancient Mars wasn’t as warm and wet as we thought, but an expert we spoke to remains unconvinced.Read more...
Tags: Science, Geology, Mars, Life on Mars, Habitability, Planetary Science, Water On Mars, Ancient Mars, Ice Sheets On Mars, Habitability On Mars


Scientists solve the origin of Stonehenge’s sarsen stones

Researchers have known Stonehenge's smaller bluestones came from Preseli Hills, Wales, but the source of its sarsens has remained a mystery. Using chemical analysis, scientists found at matching source at West Woods, approximately 25 kilometer north of the World Heritage Site. But mysteries remain, such as why that site was chosen. ​ Many mysteries surround Stonehenge . Who built it and what purpose did it serve? Why that arrangement of megaliths and lentils? How did Neolithic people move and...
Tags: Europe, Wales, History, Bbc, Geology, Innovation, Archeology, Wiltshire, Marlborough, English Heritage, Phillips, Nash, Salisbury Plain, David Nash, Brighton University, Ancient World


Map: The Deep Geological Cycle of Carbon

When I was a kid not so long ago in geologic time, my understanding of how diamonds are created went something like this.In forests and swamps, large trees grew and died. The wood got buried under more wood and layers of sand and mud. The wood in the bottom layers under the influence of great pressure and higher temperatures got converted first to coal. As burial to greater depths continued, this coal turned first to graphite and then finally to diamond. The story of woody material turning event...
Tags: Japan, Maps, Seo, Carbon, Diamonds, Geology, Pacific, Central India, Marianna, Andaman Islands, Carbon Cycle, Bundelkhand, Plate Tectonics, Suvrat Kher, Mineralogy, Terry Plank Craig E Manning


Stonehenge core sample shows monument was largely quarried only 15 miles from site

The mineral origin of Stonehenge is an ancient mystery now solved, thanks to the solving of more contemporary one: who absconded with core samples from a crumbling standing stone, drilled out in 1959 so it could be reinforced with rebar? One of the three cores was recently returned by an 89-year-old worker from the diamond company that performed the work six decades ago, and tests show that it came from a quarry only 15 miles north of the monument. Researchers first carried out x-ray fluorescenc...
Tags: Post, News, History, Geology, Devon, Norfolk, Stonehenge, West Woods, Marlborough Stonehenge


Whence Came Stonehenge’s Stones? Now We Know

Last year archaeologists pinpointed the origin of many of the ancient monument’s massive stones. A new study identifies the source of the rest.
Tags: News, Geology, Archaeology and Anthropology, Monuments and Memorials (Structures, Rock and Stone, Stonehenge (England, Your-feed-science