Posts filtered by tags: Global Issues[x]


 

Why the simple life is not just beautiful, it’s necessary

The good life is the simple life. Among philosophical ideas about how we should live, this one is a hardy perennial; from Socrates to Thoreau, from the Buddha to Wendell Berry, thinkers have been peddling it for more than two millennia. And it still has plenty of adherents. Magazines such as Real Simple call out to us from the supermarket checkout; Oprah Winfrey regularly interviews fans of simple living such as Jack Kornfield, a teacher of Buddhist mindfulness; the Slow Movement, which advocate...
Tags: Money, Society, Rome, Beijing, United States, Farming, Pope Francis, Innovation, Community, Oprah Winfrey, Personal Growth, Versailles, Buddha, Buddhist, Socrates, Nero


Is a capitalist-socialist economy inevitable?

What will the economy of the future look like? To answer that we must first consider the current trajectory and the ways in which modern capitalism operates, who it benefits, and if it is sustainable.In this video, historians, economists, and authors discuss income and wealth inequality, how the American economy grew into the machine that it is today, the pillars of capitalism and how the concept has changed over time, and ways in which the status quo can, and maybe even should, change."It's not...
Tags: Politics, Resources, Money, Government, Economics, Society, Poverty, United States, Capitalism, Innovation, Inequality, Humanity, Universal Basic Income, Social Change, Global Issues, Capital Institute


What is environmental racism?

Poisoned tap water in Flint, Michigan. Toxic waste dumps in the Lower Rio Grande Valley. A town in China where 80% of children have been poisoned by old computer parts. What do these things have in common?All are examples of environmental racism, a form of systemic racism whereby communities of colour are disproportionately burdened with health hazards through policies and practices that force them to live in proximity to sources of toxic waste such as sewage works, mines, landfills, power stati...
Tags: Asia, UK, Mexico, China, Environment, Race, US, Sustainability, European Union, Society, Innovation, Community, Bernie Sanders, Flint Michigan, Flint, Michigan Civil Rights Commission


A rush is on to mine the deep seabed, with effects on ocean life that aren’t well understood

Mining the ocean floor for submerged minerals is a little-known, experimental industry. But soon it will take place on the deep seabed, which belongs to everyone, according to international law. Seabed mining for valuable materials like copper, zinc and lithium already takes place within countries' marine territories. As soon as 2025, larger projects could start in international waters – areas more than 200 nautical miles from shore, beyond national jurisdictions. We study ocean policy, ma...
Tags: Senate, China, Environment, Barack Obama, European Union, Mining, United States, Oceans, Geology, Innovation, Korea, Jamaica, Lockheed Martin, Rhode Island, Marine Biology, Miller


You want to stop child abuse? Here's how you can actually help.

The conspiracy theory, QAnon, is doing more harm than good in the battle to end child trafficking. Foster youth expert, Regan Williams, says there are 25-29k missing children every year, not 800k, as marketed by QAnon.Real ways to help abused children include donating to nonprofits, taking educational workshops, and becoming a foster parent. Though Marjorie Taylor Greene is scrubbing her social media conspiracy theory mongering clean after her victory in Georgia's 14th Congressional District's...
Tags: Corruption, Politics, Activism, Youth, Los Angeles, Georgia, Gop, Williams, Innovation, Chrissy Teigen, Donald Trump, Inequality, Black, Derek, Alex Jones, Wayfair


'A world with no ice': Confronting the horrors of climate change

Climate change is often framed as a debate that has split society down the middle and that requires more evidence before we can act. In reality, 97 percent of scientists agree that it is real and only 3 percent are skeptical. A sticking point for some is the estimated timeline, but as Columbia University professor Philip Kitcher points out, a 4-5 Celsius temperature increase that makes the planet uninhabitable is a disaster no matter when it happens.In this video, 9 experts (including professors...
Tags: Politics, Science, Climate Change, Environment, Future, Sustainability, Policy, Oceans, Innovation, Refugees, Fear, Anthropocene, Natural Disaster, Ecology, Columbia University, Marine Biology


This is now the world’s greatest threat – and it’s not coronavirus

A detailed analysis of environmental research has revealed the greatest threat to the world: affluence. Affluence is the biggest threat to our world, according to a new scientific report. True sustainability will only be achieved through drastic lifestyle changes, it argues. The World Economic Forum has called for a great reset of capitalism in the wake of the pandemic. That's one of the main conclusions of a team of scientists from Australia, Switzerland and the United Kingdom, who have...
Tags: Money, Australia, Global, Economics, United Kingdom, Capitalism, Paris, Innovation, United Nations, Un, Inequality, Consumerism, University Of Leeds, Klaus Schwab, World Economic Forum, Antonio Guterres


The sun is setting on unsustainable long-haul, short-stay tourism — regional travel bubbles are the future

Unprecedented border closures and the domestic lockdown have paralysed New Zealand's $40.9 billion a year tourism industry. In the process, the vulnerability of the sector to external shocks and the tenuous nature of tourism employment have been exposed. While New Zealand's handling of the pandemic has been hailed as a global masterclass, and the prospect of travel bubbles promoted as a way to restart the tourism economy and save jobs, it is clear there is no quick fix.The inherent dangers of re...
Tags: Travel, Health, Europe, Australia, European Union, Public Health, Innovation, New Zealand, Pacific, Nz, Don, Kiwis, Pandemic, United Nations World Tourism Organisation UNWTO, Global Issues, Coronavirus


Google to fund 100,000 online certificate scholarships

America is facing a "middle-skills gap" thanks to the rapid digitalization of work. Google announces new online certificate courses and 100,000 need-based scholarships to train people for in-demand skills. The need for middle-skills will grow as the COVID-19 pandemic hastens technological adoption. American has a "middle skills" gap. Good jobs requiring a high school diploma have contracted since the 1990s, while workers wielding a college education continue to excel. But according to a report...
Tags: Google, Education, America, Markets, Economics, Software, Teaching, United States, Innovation, Silicon Valley, Brookings Institution, Coursera, Upwork, Social Change, Personal Growth, Walker


Study details the negative environmental impact of online shopping

A new study shows e-commerce sites like Amazon leave larger greenhouse gas footprints than retail stores. Ordering online from retail stores has an even smaller footprint than going to the store yourself.Greening efforts by major e-commerce sites won't curb wasteful consumer habits. Consolidating online orders can make a difference. Walmart recently announced plans to battle Amazon in the massive online shopping market. At $98/year, Walmart+ offers many of the same perks, including same-day gro...
Tags: Amazon, UK, Climate Change, Walmart, Infrastructure, Netherlands, Innovation, Manufacturing, Consumerism, Derek, Environmental Science Technology, Twitter Facebook, US China, Netherlands Sweden, Global Issues, Sadegh Shahmohammadi


R.P. Eddy wrote about a coming pandemic in 2017. Why didn't we listen?

In their 2017 book, "Warnings," R.P. Eddy and Richard Clarke warned about a coming pandemic. "You never get credit for correctly predicting an outbreak," says science journalist Laurie Garrett in the book. In this interview with Big Think, R.P. Eddy explains why people don't listen to warnings—and how to try to get them to listen.    If only we had a warning.Well, besides this 2007 review from a team at the University of Hong Kong warning about a pandemic coming from a wet market in southern Ch...
Tags: Energy, Politics, Obama, Government, Africa, America, Public Health, Idaho, Edward Snowden, Innovation, Rand Paul, Un, Derek, Twitter Facebook, Garrett, Cassandra


What 11 emerging countries think about increased diversity

Pew Research Center surveyed more than 28,000 people across 11 emerging countries. Their data shows that most people believe different racial, national, and religious groups have improved the lives of people in their country. Young people were more likely to see diversity in a positive light, as well as those with higher levels of education. A glance at news headlines could lead one to believe our world has lost to tribalism and hate. In just the last few years, we've seen white supremacists m...
Tags: Asia, Mexico, Africa, Youth, Society, United States, Philippines, Middle East, Innovation, Refugees, Population, South Sudan, Kenya, Venezuela, Jordan, Somalia


8 powerful speakers that might make you think differently about racism

Black communities have been telling the nation, for more than a century, that they have been targeted, beaten, falsely accused and killed by the police and other institutions meant to protect them. They have not been believed until recently, when the rise in camera phones and social media finally enabled them show and disseminate proof.Even after the video of George Floyd's death on May 25, 2020, there remains defensiveness and denial among white Americans and institutions—a defensiveness that p...
Tags: Politics, Activism, Prison, Government, Race, America, Poverty, History, Policy, United States, Innovation, Protests, Slavery, Inequality, Justice System, Social Change


Why white America's inaction must end in 2020

Black communities have been telling the nation, for more than a century, that they have been targeted, beaten, falsely accused and killed by the police and other institutions meant to protect them. They have not been believed until recently, when the rise in camera phones and social media finally enabled them show and disseminate proof.Even after the video of George Floyd's death on May 25, 2020, there remains defensiveness and denial among white Americans and institutions—a defensiveness that p...
Tags: Politics, Activism, Prison, Government, Race, America, Poverty, History, Policy, United States, Innovation, Protests, Slavery, Inequality, Justice System, Social Change


The school curriculum has stopped breathing. Let’s bring it back to life.

The role of curriculum planners is to ensure that what students are being taught doesn't become stale and rigid. "The minute curriculum stops breathing, it gets really boring fast," says Heidi Hayes Jacobs, president of Curriculum Designers Inc.Jacobs says there are three necessary questions that designers have to ask while moving forward during and after COVID-19: What should be cut that isn't working, what essential components should be kept, and maybe most importantly, what will be created? S...
Tags: Learning, Education, Children, Youth, Future, Teaching, Innovation, Global Issues, Future Of Learning, Coronavirus, Heidi Hayes Jacobs, Curriculum Designers Inc Jacobs


Furloughed due to COVID-19? Become a contact tracer.

Demand for coronavirus contact tracers has made it one of the fastest-growing jobs in the United States.Contact tracers reach out to people who may have been infected with the virus. They answer questions, provide information, and encourage people to stay home.Though contact tracing is not new, states and counties hoping to reopen will need a strong workforce to stave off a COVID-19 resurgence. April saw the U.S. economy in a shambolic nose dive. The unemployment rate rose to a near-historic 14...
Tags: Health, News, Cdc, Linkedin, Society, Public Health, United States, Innovation, Health Care, Centers For Disease Control And Prevention, Tom Friedman, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Global Issues, Sten Vermund, Coronavirus, Emily Gurley


Here’s what traveling could be like after COVID-19

COVID-19 has upended global travel and brought the world to a standstill. For the first time in history, close to 90% of the world's population now lives in countries with travel restrictions. Airlines, travel companies and the tourism sector as a whole are among the most affected businesses. An estimated 25 million aviation jobs and 100 million travel and tourism jobs are at risk. Between five and seven years' worth of industry growth will potentially be lost. Air passenger volume as measured...
Tags: Travel, Apple, Health, Google, Transportation, Innovation, Epidemiology, IATA, International Air Transport Association IATA, Global Issues, Coronavirus, COVID


Here’s what travelling could be like after COVID-19

COVID-19 has upended global travel and brought the world to a standstill. For the first time in history, close to 90% of the world's population now lives in countries with travel restrictions. Airlines, travel companies and the tourism sector as a whole are among the most affected businesses. An estimated 25 million aviation jobs and 100 million travel and tourism jobs are at risk. Between five and seven years' worth of industry growth will potentially be lost. Air passenger volume as measured...
Tags: Travel, Apple, Health, Google, Transportation, Innovation, Epidemiology, IATA, International Air Transport Association IATA, Global Issues, Coronavirus, COVID


How to shut down coronavirus conspiracy theories

During times of high anxiety, not unlike the situation we find ourselves in now, there is a rise in conspiracism. Conspiracy theories provide comfort where there is uncertainty.As author Michael Shermer points out, history has shown that this way of thinking is sometimes warranted, but not in the case of coronavirus. One factor that has helped recent coronavirus conspiracy theories grow, he says, is the shrinking political middle and an increased polarization to the far left and far right."The f...
Tags: Health, Biology, Government, Communication, Society, Intelligence, Virus, Mental Health, Brain, Innovation, Mind, Michael Shermer, Shermer, Pandemic, Global Issues, Coronavirus


A landslide is imminent and so is its tsunami

A remote area visited by tourists and cruises, and home to fishing villages, is about to be visited by a devastating tsunami.A wall of rock exposed by a receding glacier is about crash into the waters below.Glaciers hold such areas together — and when they're gone, bad stuff can be left behind. The Barry Glacier gives its name to Alaska's Barry Arm Fjord, and a new forecasts trouble ahead.Thanks to global warming, the glacier has been retreating, so far removing two-thirds of its support for ...
Tags: Science, Climate Change, Environment, Water, Alaska, Geology, Innovation, Greenland, Barry, Glacier, Prince William Sound, Anchorage, Whittier, Department of Natural Resources, Hoover Dam, Lituya Bay


Plant-based meats bloom as coronavirus spoils meat industry

Crowded conditions and a lack of safety protocols at meat processing facilities have created transmission hot spots for coronavirus. The plant-based meat industry has grown during the pandemic, with stocks growing and new partnerships formed. America's meat obsession won't change soon, but some experts forecast the start of a titanic shift. Americans love meat. We view prosperity as a chicken for every pot and steak as a symbol of the middle-class lifestyle. We choke our steaming services with ...
Tags: News, Cdc, America, Markets, Usda, Sustainability, Society, United States, South Dakota, Innovation, Nielsen, Donald Trump, Consumerism, Pew Research Center, Financial Times, Impossible Foods


Ask a Chemist: How does handwashing kill coronavirus?

A common recommendation from experts to help protect against coronavirus is to wash your hands often, but why? It turns out that each time you do it is an effective two-pronged attack.As Kate the Chemist explains, the virus has a weak outer membrane. By using the proper handwashing technique, you're actually breaking through that membrane and ripping the virus apart.Soap is an important part of the equation because of its two sides: the hydrophobic side (which grabs onto the virus), and the hydr...
Tags: Science, Biology, Medicine, Virus, Bacteria, Public Health, Chemistry, Medical Research, Microbiology, Innovation, Illness, Kate, Microbes, Pandemic, Global Issues, Human body


Whale-watching is now bigger than whaling in Iceland

Since the International Whaling Commission's ban on whaling went into effect in 1986, only three countries are still whaling: Norway, Iceland, and Japan.The whale-watching industry is rapidly eclipsing whaling in Iceland these days.If you visit Iceland, don't eat the whale meat — Icelanders don't. In 1982, 25 member nations of the International Whaling Commission (IWC) voted to ban commercial whaling by 1986. Seven nation voted against the ban: Brazil, Iceland, South Korea, Japan, Norway, Peru...
Tags: Japan, Resources, Animals, Nature, Conservation, Oceans, Innovation, Norway, Whaling, Iceland, National Geographic, Social Change, Afp, Iwc, Norway Iceland, International Whaling Commission IWC


Why are conspiracy theories rampant in the 'wellness' industry? Welcome to conspirituality

The term conspirituality was coined in 2011 to represent a growing disillusionment that leads to belief in conspiracy theories. This particular affliction affects spiritually-minded people suspicious of anything deemed institutional. Conspiritual thinking is the juncture where far-left "wellness" purveyors meet right-wing conspiracy theorists. Coronavirus got you down? No worries. A bit of oregano oil will protect you from this virus that, by the way, was created in a Chinese laboratory. That ...
Tags: Psychology, Facebook, Politics, London, Microsoft, America, Sociology, Bill Gates, Innovation, Consumerism, Trump, Derek, Jules Evans, Ward, Rutgers, Big Pharma


Social distancing measures recommended until 2022

Harvard researchers have recommended that intermittent social distancing measures should be in place until 2022. An observational study in Hong Kong found that social distancing measures have helped the nation avoid stricter lockdowns.America has a severe testing shortage that is delaying our ability to effectively measure the impact of COVID-19. While the media spotlight over the last week has been on fringe groups protesting at state capitals, most of the American population is staying at hom...
Tags: Facebook, South Korea, Hong Kong, Biology, Singapore, US, America, Virus, Public Health, Harvard, Innovation, Vox, Derek, Harvard T H Chan School of Public Health, Cynthia Cox, Global Issues


How pandemics are used to promote racism and xenophobia

Pandemics have historically brought out racist and xenophobic tendencies. COVID-19 has sparked conspiracy theories against Chinese and Jewish populations around the world. Racist tropes spread online have real-world consequences that are harming communities. In the fourth and fifth centuries, Christians were called upon to practice alousia. Known as "the state of being unwashed," the only time these faithful were allowed to bathe was during baptism. Any other instance of putting soap and water...
Tags: Facebook, Hong Kong, France, White House, China, India, Race, America, Public Health, Racism, Bill Gates, Guinea, Innovation, Reddit, Charles Dickens, Mars


Fighting boredom with banjos and Russian grammar: Tips from polar explorers for surviving months of isolation

Due to Antarctica's extreme winter, which includes four months of total darkness, polar explorers endured intense confinement in close quarters for long periods of time. American pioneer Richard Byrd explained, “little things … have the power to drive even the most disciplined … to the edge of insanity. The ones who survive with a measure of happiness are those who can live profoundly off their intellectual resources, as hibernating animals live off their fat." How did the Antarctic explorers of...
Tags: History, Innovation, Antarctica, Community, Exploration, Shackleton, Personal Growth, Antarctic, Ernest Shackleton, Byrd, Roald Amundsen, Robert Falcon Scott, Amundsen, Richard Byrd, Apsley Cherry Garrard, Global Issues


Restoring a healthy economy will require a local focus. Here’s why.

Life is different everywhere—it is determined by the context of a unique culture and a unique geography. The same goes for economies. Local economies are unique to their contexts, says John Fullerton, founder and president of Capital Institute."[I]magine if you thought about human economic development from a place-based perspective," says Fullerton. "You would have, instead of a global corporation like Apple, thought of as a single thing, you would have Apple's manufacturing plant in China as pa...
Tags: Apple, Money, Finance, Government, China, Economics, Society, Poverty, Policy, Capitalism, Innovation, Population, Global development, Behavioral Economics, Fullerton, Global Issues


The Global Hack is calling for help to address COVID-19 with innovative ideas

The Global Hack is a 48-hour online brainstorming marathon beginning on Thursday, April 9. The event is open to anyone with a solution to address the COVID-19 pandemic and socioeconomic problems caused by it. The prize pool is estimated at 120,000 euros, or about $130,000 U.S. dollars. A worldwide event to rapidly combat the coronavirus by linking together brilliant ideas from around the globe begins Thursday, April 9.The Global Hack is calling on the global tech community to develop and sha...
Tags: Health, Spacex, Technology, Internet, Government, Future, Economics, Tesla, Web, Computers, Policy, Public Health, Innovation, Estonia, Start-up, UTC


This chart will tell you how biased your favorite news source is

Polarized, unreliable news can be dangerous during turbulent times, such as the coronavirus pandemic. The Ad Fontes' Media Bias Chart maps out the biases and reliability of legacy and alternative news organizations. Political bias is one of many we must be wary of when judging the quality of the news we consume. The New York Times was a failing newspaper before changing its business model to muckraking on Trump. Fox News had to drop its "Fair and Balanced" motto because that's false advertising...
Tags: Politics, News, Education, Internet, Washington Post, Democracy, Journalism, Cnn, United States, New York Times, Innovation, Associated Press, Npr, National Enquirer, Vox, Fox News Channel