Posts filtered by tags: Harvard T H Chan School of Public Health[x]


 

Here's how long people with COVID-19 may remain contagious, according to the best available data

People clear the virus at different speeds so the length of time infected varies.Ben Hasty/MediaNews Group/Reading Eagle/Getty Images UK health officials estimated the impact of different isolation periods on COVID-19 infectiousness. Five days from symptoms or a positive test, 31% of people with COVID-19 were contagious, they said. Testing negative on rapid tests on days 5 and 6 cut the risk of being infectious to 7%, they said. It's a critical question that has played on the minds of ind...
Tags: Health, Japan, UK, Science, News, US, Trends, Healthcare, Delta, Biden, Anthony Fauci, London Metropolitan University, Exeter University, McLean, University of California San Francisco, Harvard T H Chan School of Public Health


A future mono vaccine may have a shot at defeating multiple sclerosis, a new study suggests

Particles of the mononucleosis virus (dark circles) inside a cell.CDC A study provides the strongest evidence to date suggesting the Epstein-Barr virus may lead to multiple sclerosis.  Scientists disagree about whether EBV definitively causes MS. Experts hope a vaccine may one day prevent some MS cases, but it may take decades. Scientists have found the strongest evidence to date that an infection from the Epstein-Barr virus could significantly increase the risk of developing multiple scleros...
Tags: UK, Science, News, Trends, Multiple Sclerosis, Harvard, News UK, National Institutes of Health, Vaccine, Thompson, University College London, Epidemiology, Epstein Barr, EBV, Harvard T H Chan School of Public Health, Alan Thompson


Multiple sclerosis may be caused by infection with the Epstein-Barr virus

Multiple sclerosis (MS), a progressive disease that affects 2.8 million people worldwide and for which there is no definitive cure, is likely caused by infection with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), according to a study led by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health researchers.
Tags: Health, Epstein Barr, EBV, Harvard T H Chan School of Public Health


COVID-19 is 'everywhere' and tests are in short supply. If you have symptoms, assume you're positive and isolate, health officials say.

Girl takes test after getting COVID-19 symptoms on January 4.Brittany Murray/MediaNews Group/Long Beach Press-Telegram/Getty Images People with symptoms should assume they have COVID-19 and isolate, health officials have said. The CDC recommends people with symptoms stay at home for at least five days. Omicron symptoms include runny nose, cough, headache, fever, and fatigue. Americans with COVID-19 symptoms should isolate — even if they haven't taken a test — health officials have said, a...
Tags: Health, Science, News, Cdc, Trends, Healthcare, Symptoms, Louisiana, Centers For Disease Control And Prevention, MICHAEL MINA, Harvard T H Chan School of Public Health, Kanter, Coronavirus, COVID, Joseph Kanter, Catherine Schuster Bruce


Rapid COVID-19 tests that require only nasal swabbing can miss Omicron in the early days of infection, a small study suggests

Nose swabbing alone for rapid COVID-19 tests might not pick up Omicron infections in their early stages, a small study found.ADRIAN DENNIS/AFP/Getty Images Nose swabs for rapid COVID-19 tests didn't pick up Omicron in the early stage of infection, a small study found. The study, which isn't published, suggests that with Omicron, virus particles peak faster in the throat than in the nose. Experts don't agree on whether you should always swab your throat as well as your nose. Rapid ...
Tags: UK, US, San Francisco, Trends, South Africa, Delta, Fda, Centers For Disease Control And Prevention, Peter, New York Los Angeles, US Food and Drug Administration FDA, Mina, MICHAEL MINA, Department of Computer Science, Harvard T H Chan School of Public Health, Gulick


Rapid COVID-19 tests can miss Omicron if they don't require a throat swab, a small study suggests

Nose swabbing alone for rapid COVID-19 tests might not pick up Omicron infections in their early stages, a small study found.ADRIAN DENNIS/AFP/Getty Images Nose swabs for rapid COVID-19 tests didn't pick up Omicron in the early stage of infection, a small study found. The study, which isn't published, suggests that with Omicron, virus particles peak faster in the throat than in the nose. Experts don't agree on whether you should always swab your throat as well as your nose. Rapid ...
Tags: UK, US, San Francisco, Trends, South Africa, Delta, Fda, Centers For Disease Control And Prevention, Peter, New York Los Angeles, US Food and Drug Administration FDA, Mina, MICHAEL MINA, Department of Computer Science, Harvard T H Chan School of Public Health, Gulick


Breakthrough lifts hopes for biodegradable, shelf-life-extending food packaging

In Singapore, scientists at Nanyang Technological University and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health have jointly developed biodegradable food packaging that also extends the shelf life of fruit. The material is made by electrospinning cellulose, natural antimicrobial compounds, acetic acid and zein—a waste product of converting corn into ethanol.   By releasing tiny amounts of antimicrobials under certain conditions, the packaging can help extend the shelf life of produce by a couple...
Tags: Singapore, Nanyang Technological University, Harvard T H Chan School of Public Health, NTU, Chemicals & Materials, Mary Chan Director


Scientists say we're not yet ready to treat Omicron like it's just a cold. It's still too early to gauge its severity from the data we have right now.

Medical worker in London, UK wears personal protective equipment to protect against COVID-19 when doing tests on December 18.DANIEL LEAL/AFP/Getty Images Experts have warned that we can't tell Omicron's intrinsic severity from the early data we have just yet. Four studies found the share of Omicron cases attending hospital was lower than the share of Delta cases. "We're not at a place to treat this as a cold," Azra Ghani, co-author of the Imperial study, told the NYT. Scientists h...
Tags: Health, Science, News, Scotland, Trends, Joe Biden, South Africa, Healthcare, Delta, Ferguson, The New York Times, Oxford University, Anthony Fauci, Wall Street Journal, Imperial College London, Naismith


Scientists say don't treat Omicron like a cold just yet — it could cause more havoc than Delta, even if symptoms appear 'mild'

Medical worker in London, UK wears personal protective equipment to protect against COVID-19 when doing tests on December 18.DANIEL LEAL/AFP/Getty Images Experts have warned that we can't tell Omicron's severity from the early data we have. Four studies found the share of Omicron cases attending hospital was lower than the share of Delta cases. "We're not at a place to treat this as a cold," Azra Ghani, co-author of the Imperial study, told the NYT. Scientists have urged caution a...
Tags: Health, Science, News, Scotland, Trends, Joe Biden, South Africa, Healthcare, Delta, The New York Times, Oxford University, Anthony Fauci, Wall Street Journal, Imperial College London, Naismith, London UK


A study on NBA players and staff found vaccinated people with breakthrough infections may be less likely to spread COVID-19 to others

Mohammed, 18, receives his first Pfizer vaccine on June 6, 2021 in Stanmore, Greater London.Hollie Adams/Getty Images The study was conducted in partnership with the NBA. It examined nearly 20,000 viral samples from the league's occupational health program. It found vaccinated people cleared their infections an average of two days faster. A new study of NBA players, staff, and household members provides yet more evidence that fully vaccinated people who get a breakthrough case of COVID-19...
Tags: Science, Cdc, Study, US, Trends, Research, Harvard University, Healthcare, Delta, Nba, Vaccinations, Pfizer, National Basketball Association, Anthony Fauci, Charles Davis, Mohammed


Antibody tests can show whether you need a COVID-19 booster shot, some experts say — but the FDA disagrees

A person undergoes a finger prick blood sample as part of a coronavirus antibody rapid serological test on July 26 2020 in San Dimas, California, 30 miles east of Los Angeles.Robyn Beck / AFP Experts can't agree on whether to use COVID-19 antibody tests to check whether people need a booster shot. The FDA said on May 19 that antibody tests shouldn't be used to test for COVID-19 immunity. But experts told Insider that antibody tests to check COVID-19 protection in vulnerable groups wer...
Tags: Health, Science, Los Angeles, Trends, Joe Biden, Healthcare, Fda, Anthony Fauci, Mayo Clinic, London Metropolitan University, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, McLean, Rockefeller University, The Food and Drug Administration, The Hill, Fauci


Lesser sodium and higher potassium intake associated with lower cardiovascular disease risk

Lower sodium consumption and higher potassium intake is linked with lower risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in most people, according to a study led by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health researchers.
Tags: Health, Harvard T H Chan School of Public Health


Director of Marketing and Communications

ABOUT THE OPPORTUNITY Following a year of reduced operations due to the COVID-19 crisis, the American Repertory Theater seeks a Director of Marketing and Communications who will direct and regrow the currently reduced staff in meeting the theater’s revenue and attendance goals. Additionally, the incumbent will play a pivotal role in developing, advancing, and communicating A.R.T.’s policies and culture with regard to diversity, equity, inclusion, accessibility, and anti-racist practice. ...
Tags: Art, Jobs, Finance, Google Analytics, Harvard, Cambridge, Diane Paulus, American Repertory Theater, Greater Boston, Harvard T H Chan School of Public Health, Harvard Square, Oberon, Allston, Digital Communications, Executive Team, Marketing and Communications


Harvard Researcher: About Half of New Gun Owners are Women

Despite what the media tells you, most new gun owners aren’t white men. IMG NRA-ILA U.S.A. -(AmmoLand.com)- In a blow to the tired stereotypes perpetuated by gun control supporters, a recent academic survey found broad diversity among recent first-time gun buyers. The findings bolstered what many observers had anecdotally discovered, the last year-and-a-half’s pandemic and civil unrest-fueled record-breaking gun sales. Provided with the preliminary survey results, the Wall Street Journal repor...
Tags: Guns, Wall Street Journal, Pew Research Center, Miller, Northeastern University, IMG, Matthew Miller, Harvard T H Chan School of Public Health, Azrael, NSSF, Gun Rights News, NRA-ILA, Institute for Legislative Action ILA, National Rifle Association of America ILA, Deborah Azrael, Harvard Researcher


4 leading public-health experts describe what it would take for them to fully return to normal life

A couple take a selfie as Madison Square Garden reopens for a full-capacity concert in New York City on June 20, 2021. Roy Rochlin/Getty Images Insider asked four public-health experts what it would take for them to fully return to their pre-pandemic lifestyles. Some are holding out for specific COVID-19 case rates or vaccination thresholds. Others are waiting to hear about fewer cases among their extended social networks. See more stories on Insider's business page. It's the quest...
Tags: Science, News, New York City, US, Trends, Thailand, South Africa, Delta, New Orleans, University of Florida, Salt Lake City, Birmingham, Louisiana, Anthony Fauci, University Of Alabama, Madison Square Garden


‘Nearly One-Third of Gun Owners Have Used Gun in Self-Defense,’ Says Report

More than 30 percent of American gun owners say they have used a gun in self-defense. U.S.A. –-(AmmoLand.com)- A whopping 31.1 percent of gun owners—estimated to be about 25.3 million American adults—have used a gun in self-defense, according to the 2021 National Firearms Survey, by Prof. William English, PhD., at Georgetown University. The survey was designed by Deborah Azrael of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and Matthew Miller of Northeastern University, according to the Wa...
Tags: Guns, Gun Rights, New York State, WSJ, Nra, U S Supreme Court, National Shooting Sports Foundation, Hill, Northeastern University, Georgetown University, The Hill, Matthew Miller, Gottlieb, JOHN LOTT, Ammoland, Harvard T H Chan School of Public Health


New 'Work Design for Health' framework offers viable directions for improving employee health, well-being

The "Work Design for Health" framework—developed by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and MIT Sloan School of Management researchers—maps how to create work environments that foster worker health and well-being.
Tags: Health, MIT Sloan School of Management, Harvard T H Chan School of Public Health, Work Design for Health


Wildfire smoke linked to almost 20,000 COVID-19 cases last year

The coronavirus pandemic and raging wildfires were two heinous events of 2020. And in one of life’s unfair twists of evil synergy, a new study from Harvard says that smoke from West Coast wildfires increased the cases of COVID illnesses and deaths. The study, published in the journal Science Advances, attributed 19,742 additional COVID cases — and 748 deaths — to last year’s heavy blanket of wildfire smoke in Oregon, California and Washington. Tiny particulate matter, aka PM 2.5, was the culprit...
Tags: Science, Design, Washington, Oregon, Fire, Harvard, Wildfires, Fires, Wildfire, West Coast, Science Advances, San Bernardino California, California Washington, Oregon California, Harvard T H Chan School of Public Health, Whitman County Washington


Biden is trying to appease conservatives - not protecting public health - by keeping a Trump-era immigration policy in place during the pandemic, a Harvard expert argues

Migrants from Central America us mobile phones to try to register to request asylum in the US, at Pan de Vida shelter in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, February 19, 2021. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez The Biden administration has extended a Trump-era policy that effectively closes the border. Title 42, issued by the CDC, limits the right to seek asylum, with exceptions for children. Public health and legal experts have challenged the order. The ACLU is suing. See more stories on Insider's busines...
Tags: Politics, Texas, News, Law, Cdc, Mexico, Asylum, US, Trends, Joe Biden, Harvard, United States, Aclu, Border, Healthcare, Refugees


The Biden administration and Republicans alike are using public health to play politics at the border

Honduran Eric Villanueva, 31, carries his son Eric, 7, onto the shore of the Rio Grande after crossing the US-Mexico border on a raft into the United States in Roma, Texas on July 9, 2021. PAUL RATJE/AFP via Getty Image In March 2020, the Trump administration used the pandemic to justify shutting down the asylum system. Under President Biden, children and some families are now able to apply for refuge. But despite GOP claims, the administration has not embraced a policy of "open borders." ...
Tags: Florida, Politics, Texas, Law, Obama, Cdc, Mexico, White House, Asylum, US, Trends, Joe Biden, Analysis, Gop, United States, Migration


Researchers Struggle to Use Apple Watch in Studies Due to Sudden Algorithm Changes (mac rumors)

Researchers are rethinking plans to use the Apple Watch in studies after finding inconsistencies in the data gathered by the device (via The Verge). Inconsistencies in the Apple Watch's heart rate variability data are reportedly caused by Apple tweaking the device's algorithms, meaning that data from the same time period can change without warning. Associate professor of biostatistics at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and developer of the Beiwe data platform, J.P. Onnela, tol...
Tags: Apple, News, Brigham, Harvard T H Chan School of Public Health, Hartley Charlton, Onnela


Researchers Struggle to Use Apple Watch in Studies Due to Sudden Algorithm Changes

Researchers are rethinking plans to use the Apple Watch in studies after finding inconsistencies in the data gathered by the device (via The Verge). Inconsistencies in the Apple Watch's heart rate variability data are reportedly caused by Apple tweaking the device's algorithms, meaning that data from the same time period can change without warning. Associate professor of biostatistics at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and developer of the Beiwe data platform, J.P. Onnela, told ...
Tags: Apple, Apple Watch, Brigham, Harvard T H Chan School of Public Health, Apple Watch SE, Onnela


Methodology from GWAS accurately flags more deadly SARS-CoV-2 variant

Using genome-wide association studies (GWAS) methodology to analyze whole-genome sequencing data of SARS-CoV-2 mutations and COVID-19 mortality data can identify highly pathogenic variants of the virus that should be flagged for containment, according to Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and MIT researchers.
Tags: Science, Mit, Harvard T H Chan School of Public Health, GWAS


WTTC And Harvard T.H. Chan School Of Public Health Release Insight Papers To Help Drive Sustainability In Travel & Tourism

The World Travel & Tourism Council (WTTC), which represents the global Travel & Tourism private sector, and faculty and scientists of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, today release four research insight papers to support the pursuit of sustainability in Travel & Tourism.
Tags: Travel, Travel Tourism, Wttc, Harvard T H Chan School of Public Health, World Travel Tourism Council WTTC


50 years of progress in women's health

Cynthia A. Stuenkel, MD, clinical professor of medicine at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, and JoAnn E. Manson, MD, DrPH, professor of epidemiology at Harvard T.H. Chan School Of Public Health, review 50 years of progress in women's health in a perspective article publishing the New England Journal of Medicine.
Tags: Science, Harvard T H Chan School of Public Health, Cynthia A Stuenkel, JoAnn E Manson


What You Should And Shouldn’t Wear To Bed

In terms of sleepwear, not all have the same preferences. While others love wearing cozy pajama sets, some might feel best when using silk sleepwear. As a matter of fact, some individuals even sleep commando and there’s nothing wrong with that. However, did you know that there are some things you should and should not wear to bed? Some of your bedtime practices might actually hurt you in the long run. The following are what you should and shouldn’t wear to bed. What You Shou...
Tags: Fashion, Sleep, Sleep Disorders, Sleeping, Sleep Routine, Health & Fitness, Sleepwear, Sleep Problems, Harvard T H Chan School of Public Health, Sleep Habits, Sleep Solutions


WTTC And Harvard T.H. Chan School Of Public Health Release Two Innovative Case Studies On The Importance Of Sustainability Leadership In Travel & Tourism

The World Travel & Tourism Council (WTTC), which represents the global Travel & Tourism private sector, and faculty and scientists of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, today release two vital case studies on Sustainability Leadership by The Travel Corporation (TTC) and Intrepid Travel.
Tags: Travel, Wttc, Harvard T H Chan School of Public Health, World Travel Tourism Council WTTC, Travel Corporation TTC, Harvard T H Chan School Of Public Health Release


The case for embedding equity into incident command

In a new editorial published in AJPH, Clark and Goralnick, both from the Brigham, and their co-author Richard Serino, NREMT-P, from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, make the case for why a structural change is needed in the national HICS guidelines to ensure inclusion of an Equity Officer and subject matter experts in health care equity on Incident Command boards.
Tags: Science, Brigham, Harvard T H Chan School of Public Health, AJPH Clark, Goralnick, Richard Serino NREMT


Apple Highlights Women's Health Study Data to Help 'Destigmatize Menstruation'

In 2019, Apple partnered with the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and the NIH's National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences to launch a Women's Health Study through its Research app on the iPhone and Apple Watch. Apple today highlighted preliminary data from the study, offering insights on women and their menstrual symptoms. Among the first 10,000 participants to enroll in the study and respond to a demographics survey, the most frequently tracked symptoms were abdominal cra...
Tags: Apple, Alabama, Nebraska, Puerto Rico, Harvard T H Chan School of Public Health, Apple Watch Apple, Apple Research, Sumbul Desai Apple, Health Harvard Chan, Research app Apple, Women s Health Study, Apple Research This


Moderna vaccine reduces viral spread by at least 60 percent, finds study

An interesting new study by researchers at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in the U.S. suggests that the currently used Moderna vaccine reduces viral shedding by about 60%.
Tags: Health, Harvard T H Chan School of Public Health