Posts filtered by tags: History[x]


 

The forest of unread books: A future library in Norway

She was walking down the forest path with a roll of white cloth in her hands. It was trailing behind her like a long veil. It was sweeping needles, leaves and soil lumps, drawing a pattern on the sandy pathway. The whiteness of the cloth contrasted with her black attire and the dark thick forest. As the path went up and down, the crowd following the woman at a distance would lose sight of her, only to see her again in a short while, like a white signpost. Once the procession reached the clearing...
Tags: Books, New York, India, Future, US, History, Nasa, Earth, Library, Pakistan, Sociology, Innovation, Dubai, Literature, Amazon Rainforest, Norway


The Sims 4 Developers Censor “Rising Sun” & Bowing to Shrines

Yet another developer has caved to the complaints of whining individuals as this time the people in charge of The Sims 4 have announced they will disallow players from having their Sims bow at shrines, in addition to removing the patterns on some clothing. The “controversy” began with the release of a trailer advertising the […]
Tags: Games, Politics, Internet, Censorship, History, Korea, Anime, Simulation, Pc Gaming, The Sims


The Japanese Traditions of Sashiko & Boro: The Centuries-Old Craft That Mends Clothes in a Sustainable, Artistic Way

//www.youtube.com/watch?v=H464u4q_JGk The state of our troubled planet dictates that disposables are out. Reusables are in. And anyone who’s taught themselves how to mend and maintain their stuff has earned the right to flaunt it! A quick scroll through Instagram reveals loads of visible mending projects that highlight rather than disguise the area of repair, drawing the eye to contrasting threads reinforcing a threadbare knee, frayed cuff, ragged rip, or moth hole. While some practi...
Tags: Google, Art, Fashion, Japan, Instagram, College, Life, History, Philosophy, Metropolitan Museum Of Art, Facebook Twitter, Edo, Ayun Halliday, How to Learn for Free, Atsushi, Austin Bryant


This is not the end. Apocalyptic comfort from ancient Iran

At its height, around 620 CE, the Sasanian empire ruled over a territory stretching from Jerusalem in the west to Samarkand in the east. The royal court at the ancient city of Ctesiphon, near present-day Baghdad, was the political heart of this vast realm, and its official religion was the ancient Iranian faith, Zoroastrianism. In royal iconography, the king of the Sasanians was likened to Ohrmazd, the good creator God: just as Ohrmazd vanquishes the evil spirit Ahriman, so, too, does the king ...
Tags: Life, China, Jerusalem, Iran, History, Afghanistan, Islam, Baghdad, Samarkand, Persia, Caspian Sea, Judaism Christianity, Mesopotamia, Zoroaster, Ahriman, Umar ibn Al Khattab


Saint Crispin's Day

On this day six hundred and five years ago, the French got their crepes folded at Agincourt by a force of English yeoman archers and dismounted knights & men-at-arms.The pre-battle speech Shakespeare put in the mouth of Hank the Fifth is one of the most epic locker room pep talks of all time, and Branagh's delivery of it in his cinematic adaptation of the play is pitch perfect. Better even...and it pains me as a good American to say this...than George C. Scott's famous speech in Patton. . [Auth...
Tags: Guns, History, Shakespeare, Agincourt, Tam, George C Scott, Patton, Branagh, Crispin, Vidjo, Flicks


Hetalia World Stars Manga Receiving Anime Adaptation

The chaotic anthropomorphic nation comedy that is Hetalia will finally be returning to Japanese TV as an adaptation of the Hetalia World Stars manga was formally announced, instilling excitement in its fans whilst bound to soon be the subject of even more nonsensically political controversies. The Hetalia World Stars manga began in 2014 after the […]
Tags: Politics, Comedy, Parody, History, Anime, Announcements, Geography, Studio Deen, Continuations, Hetalia, Hetalia World Stars


America of the 1930s saw thousands of people become Nazi

During the 1930s, thousands of Americans sympathized with the Nazis, holding huge rallies. The rallies were organized by the American German Bund, which wanted to spread Nazi ideology. Nazi supporters also organized summer camps for kids to teach them their values. Having radical fringe groups tearing at the seams of America is not a new phenomenon. Less than a 100 years ago, the Nazis were gathering for big rallies on U.S. soil, running youth camps, their numbers growing by tens of thousands.I...
Tags: Politics, New York, Children, Germany, Nazis, America, Society, History, Racism, United States, Innovation, Manhattan, Nazi, Hitler, Gizmodo, National Archives


Thousands of Nazis held big rallies in America less than 100 years ago

During the 1930s, thousands of Americans sympathized with the Nazis, holding huge rallies. The rallies were organized by the American German Bund, which wanted to spread Nazi ideology. Nazi supporters also organized summer camps for kids to teach them their values. Having radical fringe groups tearing at the seams of America is not a new phenomenon. Less than a 100 years ago, the Nazis were gathering for big rallies on U.S. soil, running youth camps, their numbers growing by tens of thousands.I...
Tags: Politics, New York, Children, Germany, Nazis, America, Society, History, Racism, United States, Innovation, Manhattan, Nazi, Hitler, Gizmodo, National Archives


Light it up! Restoration of Sierra Madre Playhouse’s marquee is complete

The Sierra Madre Playhouse celebrated the completion of its marquee restoration project with a relighting ceremony in Sierra Madre, on Friday, Oct. 23, 2020. Funds for the project were approved by city council members, while additional financial support was provided by private donations. (Photo by Trevor Stamp, Contributing Photographer) The Sierra Madre Playhouse celebrated the completion of its marquee restoration project with a relighting ceremony in Sierra Madre, on Friday, Oct. 23, 2020....
Tags: News, Sport, History, Things To Do, Soccer, City Council, Sierra Madre, David Gordon, Alice Hoffman, Magic Lessons, Top Stories LADN, Top Stories SGVT, Top Stories PSN, San Fernando Valley LA, Sierra Madre Playhouse, Christian Lebanon


Why American public transport is so bad

This video explainer from Vox looks into why most Americans have to drive everywhere to get anything done. It's a grim history, but a grimmer future as environmental catastrophe threatens. This sealed the country's fate as a car culture, and today we're seeing the results. — Read the rest
Tags: Post, Video, News, History, Mistakes, Vox


Daisugi, the 600-Year-Old Japanese Technique of Growing Trees Out of Other Trees, Creating Perfectly Straight Lumber

Image by Wrath of Gnon We’ve all admired the elegance of Japan’s traditional styles of architecture. Their development required the kind of dedicated craftsmanship that takes generations to cultivate — but also, more practically speaking, no small amount of wood. By the 15th century, Japan already faced a shortage of seedlings, as well as land on which to properly cultivate the trees in the first place. Necessity being the mother of invention, this led to the creation of an ingenious solution: ...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Japan, College, History, Nature, Architecture, Seoul, Kyoto, Facebook Twitter, China Japan, Jessica Stewart, Colin Marshall, Wrath, Tamago, 21st Century Los Angeles


The history of the Airbus A220, the controversial plane Boeing tried to keep out of the US

The first CSeries aircraft in its new Airbus colors. Regis Duvignau/Reuters The Bombardier CSeries was meant to be a game-changing aircraft. Produced by the Canadian aircraft manufacturer, it was its first foray in the 100-to-150-seat market. Though initially successful with sales to major airlines, the program was turned upside following a trade dispute with Boeing. The aircraft program was taken over by Airbus as a result, with the aircraft renamed the Airbus A220.  Bombardier has pulled...
Tags: Travel, Transportation, Europe, UK, England, Life, Air Canada, Planes, Global, US, Los Angeles, Trends, History, Features, Canada, Paris


Black futures in the age of apocalypse

Curating the End of the World deploys Afrofuturism to respond to Covid-19, anti-black violence and capitalism The post Black futures in the age of apocalypse appeared first on The Mail & Guardian.
Tags: Art, Science, Technology, History, Culture, Philosophy, Friday, Apocalypse, Afrofuturism, Blackness, Google Arts And Culture, Red Spring, Stacey Robinson, Sheree Renée Thomas, pan-Africanism, Black Speculative Arts Movement


An Animated Video Shows the Building of Prague’s Charles Bridge in the 14th Century: 45 Years of Construction in 3 Minutes

Without massive feats of engineering we rarely notice anymore because they seem so commonplace, the built environments we navigate each day wouldn’t exist. When we do turn our attention to how the buildings get made, we are met with surprises, curiosities, puzzles, moments of wonder. How much more is this the case when learning about fixtures of cities that are hundreds or thousands of years old, constructed with what we would consider primitive methods, producing results that seem super...
Tags: Google, Youtube, College, History, Architecture, Prague, Charles Bridge, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, Durham NC Follow, Stone Bridge, Vltava Moldau, Peter Parler, Praha Archeologicka


The Data of Long-lived Institutions

The following transcript has been edited for length and clarity.  I want to lead you through some of the research that I’ve been doing on a meta-level around long-lived institutions, as well as some observations of the ways various systems have lasted for hundreds of thousands of years.  Long Now as a Long-lived Institution This is one of the early projects I worked with Stewart Brand on at Long Now. We were trying to define our problem space and explore the ways we think on ...
Tags: Apple, Europe, Japan, Colorado, Ebay, Russia, Future, Economics, Barcelona, History, Rome, Culture, Unesco, Canada, Taliban, Oxford


Eighth century pagan temple to Old Norse gods unearthed in Norway

A 1,200-year-old temple to the Old Norse gods including Thor and Odin has been unearthed in Norway by a team of archaeologists. It was likely used for worship and sacrifices to gods during the midsummer and midwinter solstices, and other fertility festivals. Icelanders are officially practicing the Old Norse pagan religions again; the first temple to the Norse gods in 1000 years is currently being constructed in the City of Reykjavík. A 1,200-year-old temple to Norse gods like Thor, Odin, and F...
Tags: Sweden, Religion, History, Innovation, Anthropology, Archaeology, Denmark, Norway, Ose, Thor, Odin, Ancient World, Thor Odin, Freyer, Freyr, Uppåkra


africans were involved in the slave trade. why do you think that matters?

The statementIf you are exposed to any bigoted, right-wing media or social media -- whether by misfortune, sport, or a delusion that you must counter their arguments -- and someone raises the subject of slavery, you will doubtless see on this trope. They were sold by their own people.Africans sold other Africans.Slavery began in Africa, and was imported to the new world. In fact, you might hear or see some version of this any time racism is mentioned. Or as a complete non sequitur. It appears ...
Tags: Travel, Google, Africa, Time, Americas, US, History, Canada, Arizona, Ethiopia, Manhattan, Indigenous Peoples, Alberta, Black, Joe, Northern Europe


Take a Digital Drive Along Ed Ruscha’s Sunset Boulevard, the Famous Strip That the Artist Photographed from 1965 to 2007

Ed Ruscha has lived nearly 65 years in Los Angeles, but he insists that he has no particular fascination with the place. Not everyone believes him: is disinterest among the many possible feelings that could motivate a painting like The Los Angeles County Museum on Fire? Nevertheless, the plainspoken Oklahoma-born artist has long stuck to his story, perhaps in order to let his often cryptic work speak for itself. Originally trained in commercial art, Ruscha has painted, printed, drawn, an...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Photography, Japan, College, Sacramento, Los Angeles, History, Architecture, Vw, Billy Joel, Andy Warhol, Ed Ruscha, Oklahoma, Seoul, Pacific Ocean


The Dorothea Lange Digital Archive: Explore 600+ Photographs by the Influential Photographer (Plus Negatives, Contact Sheets & More)

Shortly before her death in 1965, one of the New Deal’s most famous photographers, Dorothea Lange, spoke at UC Berkeley. “Someone showed me photos of migrant farmworkers they had just taken,” she said. “They look just like what I made in the ‘30s.” We can see the same conditions Lange documented almost 60 years later, from the poverty of the Depression to the internment and demonization of immigrants. Only the clothing and the architecture has changed. “Her work could not be more relevant to w...
Tags: Google, Photography, College, Walmart, History, Army, Ansel Adams, Archives, UC Berkeley, Thompson, Bay Area, Lange, Dorothea Lange, Facebook Twitter, Gordon, Paul Taylor


Moral failings of leaders collapsed even the best societies, finds study

Researchers found a commonality between the collapse of ancient empires.Even the best-run nations fell apart because of leaders who undermined social contracts.The scientists found that societies that had good governments broke up even worse than those with dictators. As America chooses its next President, a new study says that even the most powerful and best-run empires have collapsed under leaders who broke social contracts.The anthropology study took a deep dive into 30 pre-modern societies ...
Tags: Politics, Elections, Government, America, Society, History, Chicago, Innovation, Anthropology, MacArthur, Feinman, Purdue University, Blanton, Ancient World, Gary Feinman, Richard Blanton


Moral failings of leaders collapsed even the best societies, study finds

Researchers found a commonality between the collapse of ancient empires.Even the best-run nations fell apart because of leaders who undermined social contracts.The scientists found that societies that had good governments broke up even worse than those with dictators. As America chooses its next President, a new study suggests that even the most powerful and best-run empires have collapsed under leaders who broke social contracts.The anthropology study took a deep dive into 30 pre-modern societ...
Tags: Politics, Elections, Government, America, Society, History, Chicago, Innovation, Anthropology, MacArthur, Feinman, Purdue University, Blanton, Ancient World, Gary Feinman, Richard Blanton


Are there still human remains in Titanic wreckage?

NORFOLK, Va. — People have been diving to the Titanic’s wreck for 35 years. No one has found human remains, according to the company that owns the salvage rights. But the company’s plan to retrieve the ship’s iconic radio equipment has sparked a debate: Could the world’s most famous shipwreck still hold remains of passengers and crew who died a century ago? Lawyers for the U.S. government have raised that question in an ongoing court battle to block the planned expedition. They cite archaeologis...
Tags: England, New York, Science, News, Sport, Ap, History, Atlantic, Britain, Soccer, Smithsonian, Associated Press, North Atlantic, Richmond, Gettysburg, Air France


A mammoth find near Mexico City

A team of scientists has discovered the largest collection to date of mammoth skeletons in one place, just outside Mexico City. The researchers have counted more than 200 individual mammoths to date—and believe there are still more to discover.In 2018, the government announced the development of a new Mexico City airport at the Santa Lucía Air Force Base, north of the city. People have found mammoth remains in the northern part of the city and the wider region since the 1970s. So, Pedro Francisc...
Tags: Science, Mexico, Animals, History, Nature, Canada, United States, Mexico City, Innovation, Evolution, Siberia, Archeology, ND, Valley, Sánchez, Sapiens


"They will not pass. Obscurantism and the violence that goes with it will not win. They won’t divide us."

Said French President Emmanuel Macron — at the crime scene — quoted in "Teacher in Paris suburb decapitated, allegedly after showing cartoons of prophet Muhammad in class" (WaPo).  What exactly is "Obscurantism"? Wikipedia says:  Obscurantism and Obscurationism describe the practice of deliberately presenting information in an imprecise, abstruse manner designed to limit further inquiry and understanding. There are two historical and intellectual denotations of Obscurantism: (1) the delibera...
Tags: Murder, Law, Washington Post, Youtube, France, Wikipedia, History, Judaism, Paris, Christianity, Islam, Cartoons, Moscow, Chechnya, Free Speech, Charlie Hebdo


Age of Empires III: Definitive Edition Removes Various “Offenses” to Native Americans

Age of Empires III: Definitive Edition has predictably been forced to comply to the game industry’s ever corrupt agenda as the developer’s hired cultural expert and consultant has changed several depictions of Native Americans due to being “problematic”. The cultural expert and consultant for World’s Edge (a subsidiary for Xbox Games Studios), Anthony Brave, discussed […]
Tags: Games, Politics, Usa, Censorship, Strategy, History, Anime, Age of Empires, Xbox Games Studios Anthony Brave


How a 14th-century bridge in Prague was built

This animation shows how the 14th-century Charles Bridge was built in Prague.Here's the video description, machine-translated: The digital model "Charles Bridge – construction of a pillar and vaulted field in the 14th century" was created for the project of the virtual exhibition Prague of the time of Charles IV. — Read the rest
Tags: Post, News, History, Prague, Charles Bridge, Building Sites


Chinese government demands Genghis Khan museum exhibit not use words "Genghis Khan"

Nantes, France's Château des ducs de Bretagne museum of history delayed its exhibition about Genghis Khan after the Chinese government insisted that the words "Genghis Khan" not appear anywhere in the show. Same goes for "Empire" and "Mongol." From The Guardian: The exhibit was planned in collaboration with the Inner Mongolia Museum in Hohhot, China. — Read the rest
Tags: Post, News, China, Censorship, History, Museums, Genghis Khan, Nantes France, Inner Mongolia Museum, Hohhot China


The Spuhr Stock – A History

Over the last few years, one of the most interesting accessories developed for Heckler & Koch’s venerable roller-delayed weapons is the Spuhr Stock. Developed by Swedish firearms inventor and toolmaker Håkan Spuhr, the Spuhr Stock offers a more comfortable and adjustable stock in place of the factory butt used on Heckler & Koch’s classic 7.62x51mm battle rifle. […] Read More … The post The Spuhr Stock – A History appeared first on The Firearm Blog.
Tags: Accessories, Guns, Defense, History, Editorial, Koch, Heckler & Koch, Rifles, Shooting Accessories, H&K, G3, Spuhr, Heckler and Koch, Swedish Army, Håkan Spuhr, Firearms Customization


Chinchani & India’s First Arab Governor

On the 28th of June 1955, The Times of India (Mumbai) carried a very interesting story of the discovery, by a farmer, of 9 inscribed copper plates from his field in the village of Chinchani near Dahanu, in the Palghar district of Maharashtra. Little did he know that what he had ‘dug’ up was a peep into the history of the region, stretching back over 900 years – a time when the area was under the Rashtrakutas and their Arab governor, who oversaw the region. Article by Kurush Dalal | Live History ...
Tags: Life, India, History, Heritage, Mumbai, Arab, Gujarat, Rajasthan, Jodhpur, Arabian Sea, Ganesh, Krishna, Kannada, Shaka, Palghar, Devi


Explore the Roman Cookbook, De Re Coquinaria, the Oldest Known Cookbook in Existence

Western scholarship has had “a bias against studying sensual experience,” writes Reina Gattuso at Atlas Obscura, “the relic of an Enlightenment-era hierarchy that considered taste, touch, and flavor taboo topics for sober academic inquiry.” This does not mean, however, that cooking has been ignored by historians. Many a scholar has taken European cooking seriously, before recent food scholarship expanded the canon. For example, in a 1926 English translation of an ancient Roman cookbook, Joseph ...
Tags: Google, College, History, Rome, Food & Drink, Atlas Obscura, Facebook Twitter, Project Gutenberg, Durham NC Follow, Imperial Rome, Reina Gattuso, Joseph Dommers Vehling, Vehling, Cook Real Recipes, Yale Harvard Josh Jones