Posts filtered by tags: History[x]


 

Space Oddity

If Nikon's Pronea 6i looked like a prototype of the future consumer-grade DSLR and Canon's EOS IX looked like a Nineties sci-fi movie prop, Minolta's Vectis S-1 looked like...well, it looks normal now. If I'm walking around with the Hasselblad Lunar or the Fuji X-E1, someone inevitably asks "Oh, is that a film camera?" Despite it actually being a film camera, it's unlikely anyone will ask that about the Vectis.It looks pretty much like a generic digital MILC or Bridge Camera from about ten yea...
Tags: Guns, History, ISO, Sony, Nikon, Dslr, Canon, Tam, APS, Minolta, Roberts, Canon EOS Rebel, Neat-o, Pickcher Takin, Hasselblad Lunar, Pronea


Once Again, My Miracle on Ice Story

18 years ago today (February 22, 2002), I wrote a blog post about being in the arena for the “Miracle on Ice”: the USA vs. USSR Olympic match on February 22, 1980. That first post was written on the 22nd anniversary of the match. And today (2.22.20) is the 40th anniversary of the match. That’s a miracle to me. Ten years ago, I updated that second post slightly. To keep you from having to click again, here’s the post from 18 years ago with some slight time-related changes. I remember exactly whe...
Tags: Usa, Abc, Washington, New York City, Marketing, Los Angeles, History, Tennessee, Jimmy Carter, Finland, Espn, Salt Lake City, Ussr, Copenhagen, Michael Jackson, ANN


what i'm reading: ali: a life by jonathan eig

Ali: A Life is an extraordinary book about an extraordinary person. It's an epic page-turner at more than 500 pages. This is simply a fascinating book about an utterly fascinating person.If Muhammad Ali hadn't existed, you couldn't make him up. No fiction character on this scale would be believable. It would be a cartoon.The only athlete who comes close is Babe Ruth -- but Babe Ruth never aligned himself with an outlaw counterculture and made shocking pronouncements about the U.S., imperialism,...
Tags: Travel, US, America, History, South Africa, New York Times, Philadelphia, Muhammad Ali, Ali, Harlem, Clay, Madison Square Garden, Robinson, Parkinson, Babe Ruth, Zaire


what i'm reading: working by robert caro

Fans of Robert Caro rejoiced when we learned that Caro, author of nonfiction histories, was writing a book about his writing process. When the book was published, I'm sure I wasn't the only one surprised by its brevity. At a slim 207 pages, Working: Researching, Interviewing, Writing is the equivalent of a post-it note for Caro, whose books are often described as tomes.I read Working over the course of a weekend, and I enjoyed every minute of it. Not only is the subject fascinating, but Caro's ...
Tags: Travel, New York, Texas, New York City, US, History, United States, Martin Luther King Jr, Robert, Caro, LBJ, Robert Moses, Robert Caro, What I'm Reading, Lyndon Baines Johnson, Laura K


what i'm reading: the library book by susan orlean

I've been on a "books about books" run lately, beginning with Syria's Secret Library, then Robert Caro's Working, and now I'm finishing the wonderful The Library Book by Susan Orlean.Orlean is a writer for The New Yorker, which generally means excellent nonfiction. Her book about the canine movie star Rin Tin Tin has been on my List since it was published in 2011. Her 1998 book The Orchid Thief is considered a modern classic. (I read The New Yorker story that led to the book, but have not yet r...
Tags: Travel, Los Angeles, Syria, History, Orleans, Los Angeles Public Library, Robert Caro, What I'm Reading, Laura K, Becoming A Librarian, Books About Books, Los Angeles Central Library, Orlean, Susan Orlean Orlean


help nominate tommy douglas as the face of the next $5 bill

There's a movement to put the face of Tommy Douglas on the next Canadian $5 bill. Wouldn't that be wonderful?And wouldn't it be a kick in the pants to those who seek to privatize our health care system?Go here to nominate Tommy Douglas. [Author: laura k]
Tags: Travel, History, Socialism, Health Care, Tommy Douglas, Laura K, Canadian Culture, Privatization Doesn't Work


what i'm reading: the library book by susan orlean

I've been on a "books about books" run lately, beginning with Syria's Secret Library, then Robert Caro's Working, and now I'm finishing the wonderful The Library Book by Susan Orlean.Orlean is a writer for The New Yorker, which generally means excellent nonfiction. Her book about the canine movie star Rin Tin Tin has been on my List since it was published in 2011. Her 1998 book The Orchid Thief is considered a modern classic. (I read The New Yorker story that led to the book, but have not yet r...
Tags: Travel, Los Angeles, Syria, History, Allan, Orleans, Los Angeles Public Library, Robert Caro, What I'm Reading, Becoming A Librarian, Books About Books, Los Angeles Central Library, Orlean, Susan Orlean Orlean


what i'm reading: working by robert caro

Fans of Robert Caro rejoiced when we learned that Caro, author of nonfiction histories, was writing a book about his writing process. When the book was published, I'm sure I wasn't the only one surprised by its brevity. At a slim 207 pages, Working: Researching, Interviewing, Writing is the equivalent of a post-it note for Caro, whose books are often described as tomes.I read Working over the course of a weekend, and I enjoyed every minute of it. Not only is the subject fascinating, but Caro's ...
Tags: Travel, New York, Texas, New York City, US, History, United States, Martin Luther King Jr, Allan, Robert, Caro, LBJ, Robert Moses, Robert Caro, What I'm Reading, Lyndon Baines Johnson


help nominate tommy douglas as the face of the next $5 bill

There's a movement to put the face of Tommy Douglas on the next Canadian $5 bill. Wouldn't that be wonderful?And wouldn't it be a kick in the pants to those who seek to privatize our health care system?Go here to nominate Tommy Douglas. [Author: allan]
Tags: Travel, History, Socialism, Health Care, Allan, Tommy Douglas, Canadian Culture, Privatization Doesn't Work


A reborn Persian Empire captured Rome’s lands—and its emperor

Inspired by their powerful ancestors, the Sassanian dynasty restored Persia to imperial glory, ruling lands that stretched from Turkey to Pakistan. By Miguel Ángel Andrés-Toledo | National Geographic Alexander the Great conquered Persia in 331 B.C. and ended the Achaemenid Empire founded by Cyrus the Great. For the next five centuries, the Iranian plateau became ruled by other empires, until a new Persian dynasty took power. Fiercely proud of their roots, these new kings—the Sassanians—restor...
Tags: Silk Road, Asia, Europe, Life, China, India, Church, Jerusalem, Turkey, Iran, Syria, History, Rome, Egypt, Heritage, Pakistan


Lord Chelmsford, Viceroy of India at Jamshedpur.

Our dear friend and eminent Parsi historian Marzban Giara writes… Lord Chelmsford the Viceroy of India visited the Tata Steel plant in 1919 after the First World War. Sakchi Village in Bihar was named Jamshedpur in memory of its enterprising and foresighted founder Jamshedji Nusserwanji Tata and the Kalimati railway station as Tatanagar. During the First World War M/s Tata Iron & Steel Co. Ltd. provided the Government three lakh tons of iron and benefitted the Indian Treasury by Rs.6 crores. ...
Tags: Life, India, History, Kaiser, Tata Steel, East Africa, Bihar, Jamshedpur, Chelmsford, Parsi, Mesopotamia, Sakchi, Egypt Palestine, Marzban Giara, Tata Iron Steel Co Ltd, Chelmsford Viceroy of India


How the National Bureau of Standards helped make “radio”

This was originally published on the National Institute of Science and Technology’s blog, Taking Measure. NIST’s Role in the Early Decades of Radio (1911-1933) Even if you weren’t able to watch the recent Super Bowl on TV, you could still listen to the play-by-play commentary on the radio. But radio does more than just broadcasting sporting events or playing music. It plays a major role in emergency response, navigation and science. The word “radio,” however, didn’t become part of our regula...
Tags: London, History, Radio, New Jersey, Thomas Edison, Percival Lowell, Lowell, U S Army, U S Navy, NIST, Department of Commerce, Newark Airport, College Park Maryland, Nbs, Dunmore, Rhodes College


‘You Never Find Quiet Except Under a Tyranny.’ Congress Has Always Been Partisan and That’s a Good Thing.

In the throes of the worst crisis in American history, the Civil War, Democrats in Congress repeatedly attacked Abraham Lincoln as a “tyrant” and even his fellow Republicans questioned his competence and investigated his generals. Beleaguered though he often felt, Lincoln never claimed that Congress lacked the authority to challenge his actions or declined to answer legislators’ requests for information. Even in the midst of all-out war, Lincoln recognized Congress as the primary repository...
Tags: News, Supreme Court, Congress, White House, Uncategorized, America, History, Ideas, House Of Representatives, Social Security, Lincoln, Donald Trump, Madison, Mccarthy, Abraham Lincoln, Franklin Roosevelt


The Enduring Mystery of Malcolm X’s Assassination

Friday marks 55 years since Malcolm X, one of the 20th century’s most important black figures, was assassinated at age 39 while speaking at the Audubon Ballroom in Harlem, New York, on Feb. 21, 1965. In the more than half a century since, what happened that day has remained the subject of debate. Three members of the Nation of Islam (NOI) — Talmadge Hayer or Thomas Hagan (a.k.a Mujahid Abdul Halim), Norman Butler (a.k.a Muhammad Abdul Aziz) and Thomas Johnson (a.k.a Khalil Islam) — were con...
Tags: New York, News, Senate, New York City, Uncategorized, America, Los Angeles, History, Fbi, Netflix, United States, New York Times, Queens, Islam, Manhattan, John F Kennedy


Austin Rocks: The LBJ Library and Museum

(Part of the Austin Rocks series of posts by a local about things to do and see in Austin, Texas) President Johnson said that he wanted his Lyndon Baines Johnson Library and Museum to show his Presidency and times “with the bark off,” and it does a pretty good job of that. My reaction to visiting the LBJ Library was similar to the one I had while exploring the Truman Library in...Read the whole entry... »          Related Stories Austin Rocks: Callahan’s General StoreAustin Rocks: Dazed and ...
Tags: Travel, Texas, History, Austin, Johnson, Presidential Libraries, Us Travel, City Or Urban Travel, Sheila Projects, Austin Texas, Callahan, Austin TX, LBJ Library, Truman Library, LBJ Presidential Library, Austin Rocks series


Pop-up book of classic Sega arcade cabinets

Sega Arcade: Pop-Up History [Read Only Memory] is a beautifully-illustrated hardcover book about six classic Sega "body sensation" arcade cabinets – Hang-On, Space Harrier, Out Run, After Burner, Thunder Blade and Power Drift – complete with pop-up cardboard models. Accompanying this 3D showcase is a written history from Guardian games writer and best-selling novelist, Keith Stuart, punctuated by specially restored production artwork and beautifully reproduced in-game screens. The book features...
Tags: Post, Books, Games, News, History, Sega, Yu Suzuki, Keith Stuart, Power Drift


The story of "Lift Every Voice and Sing"

Written as a poem by James Weldon Johnson around 1900, "Lift Every Voice and Sing" tells a haunting story of spiritual survival.The hymn is considered by many to be the black national anthem and has seen a resurgence lately in popular culture.Music has a way of helping us feel others' story. Modern memories tend to be short, particularly in America. It's been said that if you ask a European where their people come from, the answer will be a list of countries dating back generations. Ask someone...
Tags: Music, New York, Beyonce, Race, America, Communication, History, United States, Innovation, Slavery, Lincoln, Coachella, Performance, Inequality, Jacksonville, Black


Powerful Iwo Jima WWII footage shot by marines in combat and never seen publicly

Today is the 75th anniversary of the beginning of the Battle of Iwo Jima, when the US Marines and Navy invaded and captured the island from the Imperial Japan Army. Almost 7,000 Allied troops and 18,000 Japanese soldiers were killed. The University of South Carolina's Moving Image Research Collections is now helping the History Division of the Marine Corps digitize and make public mostly unseen film footage shot by marines in combat during the battle. There are 14,000 cans of film undergoing t...
Tags: Video, News, Film, Navy, History, Preservation, Marine Corps, Marines, World War Ii, Wwii, Liang Zhao, War Is Hell, Computer Vision Lab, College of Engineering and Computing, Imperial Japan Army, From the University of South Carolina


Powerful Iwo Jima WWII footage shot by marines in combat and never publicly available before

Today is the 75th anniversary of the beginning of the Battle of Iwo Jima, when the US Marines and Navy invaded and captured the island from the Imperial Japan Army. Almost 7,000 Allied troops and 18,000 Japanese soldiers were killed. The University of South Carolina's Moving Image Research Collections is now helping the History Division of the Marine Corps digitize and make public mostly unseen film footage shot by marines in combat during the battle. There are 14,000 cans of film undergoing t...
Tags: Video, News, Film, Navy, History, Preservation, Marine Corps, Marines, World War Ii, Wwii, Liang Zhao, War Is Hell, Computer Vision Lab, College of Engineering and Computing, Imperial Japan Army, From the University of South Carolina


The City of Nashville Built a Full-Scale Replica of the Parthenon in 1897, and It’s Still Standing Today

Photo by Mayur Phadtare, via Wikimedia Commons A recent executive order stating that “the classical architectural style shall be the preferred and default style” for federal buildings in the U.S. has reminded some of other executives who enforced neoclassicicism as the state’s official aesthetic dogma. In the case of the U.S., however, neoclassical building does not draw from ancient sources, but from “a 19th century interpretation of what people were doing in Rome and Athens millennia ago,” as...
Tags: Google, Texas, Greece, Congress, College, America, Nike, History, Rome, Architecture, Athens, Parthenon, Nashville, Las Vegas, Venice, Memphis


What is classical liberalism? | Classical Liberalism

The moral and political philosophy known as classical liberalism is built around a number of core concepts, including, perhaps most importantly, human dignity and individual liberty. Emily Chamlee-Wright, president of the Institute for Humane Studies, introduces these two principles as forces that shape the liberal notion of justice. This applies to both individuals' treatment of others, as well as the government's treatment of individuals.This just conduct contributes to the liberal ideal: the ...
Tags: Politics, Media, Government, Society, History, Policy, Peace, United States, Innovation, Protests, Philosophy, Speech, Institute for Humane Studies, Emily Chamlee Wright


Nine books to read for Black History Month [reading list]

The month of February has been officially designated Black History Month since 1976 in order to, in President Gerald Ford’s words, “seize the opportunity to honor the too-often neglected accomplishments of black Americans in every area of endeavor throughout our history.” In keeping with this tradition, we have gathered the below titles, which all engage in the crucial political work of investigating and preserving the history of African Americans’ accomplishments and culture in the face of oppo...
Tags: Books, Featured, US, America, History, Oxford, South Carolina, Black History Month, Columbia, Murray, Cincinnati, Martin, Kent State, Allen, Jefferson, Gerald Ford


New Digital Archive Will Bring Medieval Chants Back to Life: Project Amra Will Feature 300 Digitized Manuscripts and Many Audio Recordings

Among historians of European Christianity, it long seemed a settled question that Irish Catholicism, the so-called “Celtic Rite,” differed significantly in the middle ages from its Roman counterpart. This despite the fact that the phrase Celtic Rite “must not be taken to imply any necessary homogeneity,” notes the Catholic Encyclopedia, “for the evidence such as it is, is in favour of considerable diversity.” Far from an insular religion, Irish Catholicism spread to France, Germany, Switzerland...
Tags: Google, Europe, Music, College, Religion, History, Vienna, Ireland, Dublin, Northern Spain, Patrick, Facebook Twitter, Buckley, Trinity College, Continental Europe, Durham NC Follow


Cute Llamas vs. Alpacas: a Vermont Hike Debate

... Do click the title to see the full, beautiful article!
Tags: Travel, Kids, Animals, History, Humor, Vermont, Usa: New England


This Is What NASCAR Was, Is, And Always Will Be

On Sunday, President Donald Trump gave the command to the “gentlemen” to start their engines at the Daytona 500. Around the same time, a story broke about a Trump administration policy in which the words given in confidential therapy sessions would be used to deport children. Despite what we may want to think, the two…Read more...
Tags: Science, History, Racing, Donald Trump, Nascar, Trump, Daytona


The History Guy explores our 5,000 year love affair with chocolate

In this video, The History Guy looks at our 5,000-year-plus love affair with chocolate. Some really interesting things that I was not aware of. Like the fact that for most of chocolate's history, it has been a bitter, often fermented drink. The Spanish word, chocolate, is a translation of an Aztec word which may have meant "bitter drink." The sweet and milk chocolate candies that we know today are a surprisingly modern invention, coming into their own in the late 19th and early 20th centurie...
Tags: Post, Video, News, History, Choclolate


On the Visual Thesaurus: The language of suffrage

This year marks the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment to the US Constitution, which gave women the right to vote. My February column for the Visual Thesaurus looks at the linguistic legacy of the long, persistent effort that led to the amendment. Full access to the column is paywalled for three months. A subscription is still just $19.95 a year; if you’re hesitating, here’s an excerpt: Pronouns played a surprising role in the right-to-vote fight. For centuries, grammar guides had i...
Tags: UK, Women, US, History, Linguistics, Baron, Words, Susan B Anthony, Dennis Baron, Nancy Friedman, Visual Thesaurus


Disputed Rembrandt is real, say experts

This 1632 portrait of a young woman was painted by the Dutch master Rembrandt van Rijn, says Allentown Art Museum, contrary to the judgement of the Rembrandt Research Project, which long-ago determined the painting was by an assistant or student. Earlier X-ray analyses had led some historians to question the authenticity of the brushwork on the subject's face. The apparent lack of clarity in her clothing further fueled doubts, while additional concerns were raised over the artist's signature, wh...
Tags: Art, Post, News, History, Rembrandt, Rembrandt Van Rijn, Allentown Art Museum, Rembrandt Research Project, Shan Kuang, NYU s Institute of Fine Arts, Museum 's Kress Gallery


Bertrand Russell’s Prison Letters Are Now Digitized & Put Online (1918 – 1961)

Boethius, Henry David Thoreau, Antonio Gramsci, Martin Luther King, Jr…. It’s possible, if one tried, to draw other comparisons between these disparate figures, but readers familiar with the work of all four will immediately recognize their most obvious literary commonality: all wrote some of their most impassioned and persuasive work while unjustly confined to a cell. In the case of Bertrand Russell, however, perhaps one of the most famous figures in 20th century philosophy and intellectual li...
Tags: Google, Politics, London, College, History, Philosophy, Colette, Brixton, Frank, Lawrence, Facebook Twitter, Russell, McMaster, Josh Jones, The Nation, McMaster University


Image and History In Temple Bar

Temple Bar, in Dublin, is quite a busy place. The streets are often filled with tourists checking out the area’s attractions as an arts quarter, with area residents stopping in at restaurants, cafes, shops, and grocers, and of an evening, revelers of all sorts spilling out of pubs. There is a quiet place in the midst of all this, however. A place in the midst of all this where you may learn and...Read the whole entry... »          Related Stories Social Bite Scotland: Great Food, Good CauseS...
Tags: Travel, Photography, Scotland, History, Ireland, Museums, Dublin, Europe Travel, City Or Urban Travel, Kerry Projects, Temple Bar, Art and Art Museums, National Library of Ireland, Dublin Cultural Quarter, Ireland history, National Photographic Archive Ireland