Posts filtered by tags: Homo[x]


 

Modern humans split from Neanderthals far earlier than thought: study

Scientists seeking to unlock the mysteries of human evolution have in recent years relied on increasingly sophisticated DNA techniques that provide "molecular clocks" to date the remains of our ancient ancestors. The study by Aida Gomez-Robles from University College London proposes that the two species' last common ancestor may have lived 800,000 years ago, entering a debate that is hotly contested among anthropologists. The new timeline is between 200,000 to 400,000 years earlier than curren...
Tags: Science, University College London, Homo, Aida Gomez Robles


Modern humans diverged from Neanderthals much sooner than believed: study

Neanderthals and modern humans diverged at least 800,000 years ago, significantly earlier than currently thought, according to new study based on analyzing how the teeth of ancient fossils evolved instead of relying on genetic techniques. The proposed new timeline is around 300,000 years earlier than current estimates, and would in turn mean that Homo heidelbergensis, another extinct human species, cannot be the last common ancestor between our species and our Neanderthal cousins, as many anthr...
Tags: Science, University College London, Homo, Aida Gomez Robles


Scientists have discovered the oldest human footprint ever seen in the Americas

Archaeologists have discovered the oldest footprint ever found in the Americas. The 15,600-year-old print was first found in southern Chile in 2011, but now scientists have finally determined that it likely belonged to a human. According to a new study, this footprint is evidence that humans were present in the Americas before 12,000 years ago — earlier than scientists previously thought. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. About 15,600 years ago, a barefoot man traversed the ...
Tags: Russia, Americas, Trends, Chile, Alaska, South America, North America, Moreno, Homo, Monte Verde, Clovis, Bering Land Bridge, Karen Moreno, Osorno Chile, Pilauco


Ancient human relative explains mountain gene mutation

A jawbone dating from at least 160,000 years ago of a Denisovan -- a now-extinct branch of humanity -- is the first of its kind discovered outside of southern Siberia, and experts believe it holds the key to understanding how some modern-day humans have evolved to tolerate low-oxygen conditions. Contemporaries of the Neanderthals -- and like them, possibly wiped out by anatomically modern man, Homo sapiens -- the Denisovans first came to light a decade ago. "To have beings, even if a little ar...
Tags: Science, Siberia, Homo, Jean Jacques Hublin, Max Planck Institute s Department


Is There Purpose in Biology?  The Cost of Existence and the God of Love. By Denis Alexander, Chapter 2: Biology’s Grand Narrative

Is There Purpose in Biology?  The Cost of Existence and the God of Love. By Denis Alexander Chapter 2: Biology’s Grand Narrative We are reviewing the book: Is There Purpose in Biology?  The Cost of Existence and the God of Love. By Denis Alexander.  Chapter 2 is Biology’s Grand Narrative.  In this chapter Alexander asks the question: “What happens when we look at the general features of biological evolution – the overall “grand narrative” – in the light of the claim that it is necessarily purpo...
Tags: Cats, Religion, Dolphins, Cambridge, Darwin, Alexander, University of Wisconsin Madison, Gould, Homo, Dawkins, Stephen Jay Gould, Herron, Sean Carroll, Faith & Science, Mike the Geologist, Tiktaalik


New fossils suggest human ancestors evolved in Europe, not Africa

The jaw bones of an 8-million-year-old ape were discovered at Nikiti, Greece, in the '90s. Researchers speculate it could be a previously unknown species and one of humanity's earliest evolutionary ancestors. These fossils may change how we view the evolution of our species. None Homo sapiens have been on earth for 200,000 years — give or take a few ten-thousand-year stretches. Much of that time is shrouded in the fog of prehistory. What we do know has been pieced together by deciphering the fos...
Tags: Europe, Greece, Biology, Australia, Germany, Dna, Africa, History, Genetics, Nature, Innovation, Evolution, Charles Darwin, Primates, Apes, University of Toronto


Your expressive face tells the story of human evolution — conveying emotion was essential

A panel of eight experts in the evolution of the human face have collaborated on a new summary of how we've changed. Their paper promotes the importance of social interaction as a factor in the structure of our visages. We can visually express more than 20 categories of emotion. Early humans not so much. None Your face is not yours alone — written there are traces of your parents, grandparents, and ancestors. Now a paper published in Nature Ecology and Evolution makes an even broader case. You...
Tags: Face, Communication, Innovation, Anthropology, Evolution, University Of Arizona, Archeology, Forensics, Paleontology, Homo, Higgins, University of York, Human body, Paul O Higgins, William Kimbell


The return of the 'stoned ape' theory

Terence McKenna first proposed psychedelic mushrooms as the trigger for our rapid cognitive evolution. McKenna's theory was called the "Stoned Ape Hypothesis." The hypothesis is being revisited as a possible answer to a vexxing evolutionary riddle. None There seems to have been a profound difference in cognitive abilities between early Homo sapiens and our immediate predecessor, Homo erectus. Sure, erectus stood upright — a big, um, step forward — but with the emergence of Homo sapiens, we see...
Tags: Africa, Intelligence, Language, Innovation, Reddit, Consciousness, Evolution, Archeology, Mushrooms, Apes, Evolutionary Psychology, McKenna, Homo, Paul Stamets, Psilocybin, Terence McKenna


Welcome your new ancestor to the Homo family tree; boffins have discovered a new tiny species of human

Homo luzonensis spotted underneath layers and layres of clay in a Filopino cave A team of archeologists has pieced together bone fragments to reveal what is, apparently, a new species of human.…
Tags: Software, Homo


Scientists may have discovered a new human species. It lived on a tiny island in the Philippines at the same time as Homo sapiens.

Anthropologists may have discovered a new human relative in the Philippines. Named Homo luzonensis after the island it was discovered on, this ancient hominin lived between 50,000 and 67,000 years ago. A new study discusses how H. luzonensis shares traits with both older human ancestors like Australopithecus and Homo erectus, and also modern-day humans.  Not all anthropologists are convinced it is a new species, but the discovery indicates this time period in our evolutionary history was far m...
Tags: Asia, Africa, Trends, South Africa, Philippines, Detroit, Flores, Ontario, Dartmouth College, Homo, Luzon, Phillippines, Jeremy DeSilva, Liang Bua, Matthew Tocheri, Lakehead University


A Tool for Forest Renewal

This runs long, but please bear with me: this topic deserves the space If you have ever donated money to a cause or even just signed an on-line petition, I’m sure that your inbox, like mine, is flooded with email solicitations.  Mine mainly relate to environmental causes, and I find that they really help to keep me up to date.  One I received the other day, though, concerned me. The message came from the Global Justice Ecology Project, and it celebrated the fact that two board members of the Mas...
Tags: Gardening, North America, New England, Homo, CC BY SA, Gardening on the Planet, Ministry of Controversy, Science Says, American chestnut, GMO trees, Transgenic Trees, Global Justice Ecology Project


Post-Neolithic Fricatives.

People keep pointing me to this story (thanks, Bonnie, John, Frank, and anyone I’m forgetting!), so I’m posting it, despite my inherent skepticism. There’s a new Science article, “Human sound systems are shaped by post-Neolithic changes in bite configuration” by D. E. Blasi, S. Moran, S. R. Moisik, P. Widmer, D. Dediu, and B. Bickel, that supports an old conjecture of Hockett’s; here’s the abstract, which begins: Linguistic diversity, now and in the past, is widely regarded to be independent of...
Tags: Uncategorized, Linguistics, Ny Times, Homo, Moran, Bickel, Mark Liberman, Blasi, Hockett, Bonnie John Frank, Widmer D Dediu, Ray Jackendoff


Human sound systems are shaped by post-Neolithic changes in bite configuration

Linguistic diversity, now and in the past, is widely regarded to be independent of biological changes that took place after the emergence of Homo sapiens. We show converging evidence from paleoanthropology, speech biomechanics, ethnography, and historical linguistics that labiodental sounds (such as "f" and "v") were innovated after the Neolithic. Changes in diet attributable to food-processing technologies modified the human bite from an edge-to-edge configuration to one that preserves adolesce...
Tags: Science, Homo


A Review of Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind by Yuval Noah Harari

A Review of Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind, by Yuval Noah Harari Chaplain Mike gifted me with a copy of Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind by Yuval Noah Harari, a sprawling tour-de-force summary of the human race from pre-humans to… well… what he speculates are post-humans.  It’s a combination of rigorous science, scholarly history, and breezy, humorous pop culture.  I’m sure the author would make a fascinating conversational partner over a few beers. A conversation, that, would no do...
Tags: Asia, Europe, Australia, India, Africa, Religion, Earth, Hawaii, New Zealand, Argentina, South America, Tasmania, University of Oxford, North America, Pacific Ocean, Central America


Stone Age Cave Symbols May All Be Part of a Single Prehistoric Proto-Writing System

While studying some of the oldest art in the world found in caves and engraved on animal bones or shells, paleoanthropologist Genevieve von Petzinger has found evidence of a proto-writing system that perhaps developed in Africa and then spread throughout the world. The research also reveals that modern humans were using two-thirds of these signs when they first settled in Europe, which creates another intriguing possibility. “This does not look like the start-up phase of a brand-new invention...
Tags: Europe, Africa, South Africa, Simon, Jason Kottke, Homo, Francesco, Blombos, Errico, Genevieve von Petzinger, Petzinger, Von Petzinger, University of Bordeaux France Nonetheless


Hominin/Hominid.

I’m editing an anthropological text on early forms of humanity and am thus having my nose rubbed in a change I had vaguely noticed in recent years but tried to ignore: nobody talks about hominids any more, it’s all “hominins,” a word I find ugly (because it’s new to me). Wikipedia: By convention, the adjectival term “hominin” (or nominalized “hominins”) refers to the tribe Hominini, while the members of the Hominina subtribe (and thus all archaic human species) are referred to as “hominan” (“ho...
Tags: Wikipedia, Uncategorized, Linguistics, Mann, Weiss, Homo, Panina, Hominini, Hominina, Australopithecus Ardipithecus


How a new species of ancestors is changing our theory of human evolution | Juliet Brophy

In 2013, a treasure trove of unusual fossils were uncovered in a cave in South Africa, and researchers soon realized: these were the remains of a new species of ancient humans. Paleoanthropologist Juliet Brophy takes us inside the discovery of Homo naledi, explaining how this mysterious ancestor is forcing us to rethink where we come from -- and what it means to be human. [Author: [email protected] (TED)]
Tags: South Africa, Higher Education, Speaking, Homo, Juliet Brophy


Seafaring Pets

A fascinating article by Vittoria Traverso From war to exploration to pleasure cruising, pets have often accompanied us on the oceans. It gets hard to tell when you go back that far, but humans—Homo erectus in this case—probably crafted the first seaworthy vessel some 800,000 years ago. Since then, our ability to build boats and take to the seas has been critical to many of the most important human processes, from migration and commerce to exploration and, of course, war. But we did n...
Tags: Asia, Europe, New York, Australia, Pets, BBC News, United States, Egypt, United Kingdom, Antarctica, Vikings, Wellington, Monique, Parma, Brittany, Shackleton


AI Study of Human Genome Finds Unknown Human Ancestor (slashdot)

Zorro shares a report from the Smithsonian: A recent study used machine learning technology to analyze eight leading models of human origins and evolution, and the program identified evidence in the human genome of a "ghost population" of human ancestors. The analysis suggests that a previously unknown and long-extinct group of hominins interbred with Homo sapiens in Asia and Oceania somewhere along the long, winding road of human evolutionary history, leaving behind only fragmented traces in mo...
Tags: Asia, News, Siberia, Oceania, Nature Communications, Homo, Denisova, BeauHD


AI Study of Human Genome Finds Unknown Human Ancestor

Zorro shares a report from the Smithsonian: A recent study used machine learning technology to analyze eight leading models of human origins and evolution, and the program identified evidence in the human genome of a "ghost population" of human ancestors. The analysis suggests that a previously unknown and long-extinct group of hominins interbred with Homo sapiens in Asia and Oceania somewhere along the long, winding road of human evolutionary history, leaving behind only fragmented traces in mo...
Tags: Asia, Tech, Siberia, Oceania, Nature Communications, Homo, Denisova


Human family tree just gained a new member as scientists confirm a 'missing link'

A new ‘missing link’ between our ape-like ancestors and early humans has been identified, showing that we were still swinging from the trees less than two million years ago. The first fossils of Australopithecus sediba were discovered in Malapa, South Africa, ten years ago, but experts were unsure if they were unique or just examples of already known species. Now after a decade of a research experts have confirmed they do belong to a unique species which slots into the human family tree between ...
Tags: Science, Lucy, Matthew, Lee, Homo, Scott Williams, Jeremy DeSilva, Lee Berger, Malapa, Matthew Berger, Malapa South Africa, Dartmouth College New Hampshire, Elisabeth Daynes


Human family tree gains new member as scientists confirm 'missing link'

A new ‘missing link’ between our ape-like ancestors and early humans has been identified, showing that we were still swinging from the trees less than two million years ago. The first fossils of Australopithecus sediba were discovered in Malapa, South Africa, ten years ago, but experts were unsure if they were unique or just examples of already known species. Now after a decade of a research experts have confirmed they do belong to a unique species which slots into the human family tree between ...
Tags: Science, Lucy, Matthew, Lee, Homo, Scott Williams, Jeremy DeSilva, Lee Berger, Malapa, Matthew Berger, Malapa South Africa, Dartmouth College New Hampshire, Elisabeth Daynes


A world map of Marian apparitions

For centuries, the Virgin Mary has appeared to the faithful, requesting devotion and promising comfort.These maps show the geography of Marian apparitions – the handful approved by the Vatican, and many others.Historically, Europe is where most apparitions have been reported, but the U.S. is pretty fertile ground too. None The divine is supernatural, but religion is very much of this world. The way people worship even has an impact on their physical surroundings. Here's a telltale sign that y...
Tags: Europe, Mexico, France, Germany, Nazis, Africa, Israel, Church, Religion, Americas, Jerusalem, Eu, Spain, European Union, Ukraine, Rome


A world map of Virgin Mary apparitions

For centuries, the Virgin Mary has appeared to the faithful, requesting devotion and promising comfort.These maps show the geography of Marian apparitions – the handful approved by the Vatican, and many others.Historically, Europe is where most apparitions have been reported, but the U.S. is pretty fertile ground too. None The divine is supernatural, but religion is very much of this world. The way people worship even has an impact on their physical surroundings. Here's a telltale sign that y...
Tags: Europe, Mexico, France, Germany, Nazis, Africa, Israel, Church, Religion, Americas, Jerusalem, Eu, Spain, European Union, Ukraine, Rome


Why big brains took a bite out of our ability to chomp

If you have ever struggled to gnaw your way through a fatty chunk of Aberdeen Angus or a forkful of fibrous kale, then take heart. It is your large brain which is causing the problem. While other omnivores evolved powerful biting muscles as they increased in body size, humans instead poured their developmental resources into more cerebral matters. In the space where muscles critical for hard biting should be housed, humans grew bigger brains and with the extra thinking capacity, invented cooking...
Tags: Science, Rex, Lincoln, Galapagos, Homo, Sakamoto, Manabu Sakamoto, Aberdeen Angus, Abbie Trayler Smith, Dr Chris Venditti University of Reading


What are we really doing here? 10 quotes from Yuval Noah Harari

In Sapiens, Yuval Noah Harari investigated the last half-million years to understand how we've arrived here.In Homo Deus, he speculated on how our present course will influence the future of humanity.Harari's insights are strongly influenced by his thoughts on religion, sexuality, and animal rights. None Israeli historian Yuval Noah Harari made his mark investigating the transition from Neanderthals to Homo sapiens. His 2014 book, Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind, is that rare history book...
Tags: Animals, Religion, Society, History, United States, Innovation, Anthropology, Trump, Derek, Siddhartha Gautama, Humankind, Yuval Noah Harari, Harari, Homo, Ancient World, Esther perel


Homo for the holidays: 25 tweets about being gay at Christmas

'Tis the season for ugly Christmas sweaters and awkward family get togethers.
Tags: Twitter, Family, Life, Christmas, Lifestyle, Tweets, Gay, Ad Friendly, Queerty, Homo


How humans evolved to live in the cold

According to some relatively new research, many of our early human cousins preceded Homo sapien migrations north by hundreds of thousands or even millions of years.Cross-breeding with other ancient hominids gave some subsets of human population the genes to contend and thrive in colder and harsher climates.Behavioral and dietary changes also helped humans adapt to cold climates.Humans emerged from a tropical environment. For the most part, our bodies are not well adapted to the cold. You might ...
Tags: Europe, Weather, New York, Africa, Genetics, Nature, Beijing, Innovation, Evolution, Siberia, Eurasia, Homo, Tapper, University of California Irvine, Denisovans, Human body


Perot Museum leaders, paleoanthropologist Lee Berger unveil Dinaledi virtual reality app

(Perot Museum of Nature and Science) Renowned paleoanthropologist Professor Lee Berger and Perot Museum of Nature and Science leaders, in partnership with University of the Witwatersrand, today announced a world-first virtual reality app to view some of the most famous ancient human fossils in scientific history. Experience the South African cave where a team led by Berger discovered Homo naledi, a new species of ancient human relative. Search Perot Museum for free download in the Google Play an...
Tags: Berger, Homo, University of the Witwatersrand, Lee Berger, Perot Museum of Nature and Science, Perot Museum, Dinaledi, Perot Museum of Nature and Science Renowned