Posts filtered by tags: Human body[x]


 

Is there an optimal time of day to exercise?

Research at the Weizmann Institute of Sciences declares evening to be the best time for an exercise session.Not so fast, says a new study at UC Irvine, which replies that late morning is the optimal workout time. Both studies involved mice on treadmills and measured different markers to produce their results. None We know timing is everything, but does everything rely on timing? When it comes to when you exercise, the answer might be yes.Two complementary studies were recently published in the ...
Tags: Biology, Human body, Productivity, Obesity, Goal-setting, Health


Meet the Bajau sea nomads — they can reportedly hold their breath for 13 minutes

The Bajau people travel in small flotillas throughout the Phillipines, Malaysia, and Indonesia, hunting fish underwater for food.Over the years, practicing this lifestyle has given the Bajau unique adaptations to swimming underwater. Many find it straightforward to dive up to 13 minutes 200 feet below the surface of the ocean.Unfortunately, many disparate factors are erasing the traditional Bajau way of life. None Picture yourself holding your breath. How long can you last underwater? A minute? ...
Tags: Asia, Indonesia, Philippines, Innovation, Anthropology, Bajau, Human body, World cultures, Phillipines Malaysia, Imran Lahassan, Saluan, Saluan Spleens


Your expressive face tells the story of human evolution — conveying emotion was essential

A panel of eight experts in the evolution of the human face have collaborated on a new summary of how we've changed. Their paper promotes the importance of social interaction as a factor in the structure of our visages. We can visually express more than 20 categories of emotion. Early humans not so much. None Your face is not yours alone — written there are traces of your parents, grandparents, and ancestors. Now a paper published in Nature Ecology and Evolution makes an even broader case. You...
Tags: Face, Communication, Innovation, Anthropology, Evolution, University Of Arizona, Archeology, Forensics, Paleontology, Homo, Higgins, University of York, Human body, Paul O Higgins, William Kimbell


19th-century medicine: Milk was used as a blood substitute for transfusions

Prior to the discovery of blood types in 1901, giving people blood transfusions was a risky procedure.In order to get around the need to transfuse others with blood, some doctors resorted to using a blood substitute: Milk.It went pretty much how you would expect it to. None For the bulk of human history, medical science has been a grim affair. Modern innovations in the scientific process and medical techniques mean that we can determine with a good deal of accuracy what's going to work and what ...
Tags: Science, Medicine, Animals, Toronto, Medical Research, Innovation, Vatican, Disease, North America, Don, Howe, Human body, Karl Landsteiner, Denys, Baptiste Denys, Baron Gustaf Bonde


Do calories even count? Research counters a longstanding assumption.

In a new article in 1843, Peter Wilson argues that counting calories is an outdated form of weight management. Research shows that labels are up to 20 percent off true caloric totals; 70 percent in frozen processed foods. Not all digestive systems are created equally; humans process foods at different rates under varying conditions. None Quantifying workouts has resulted in an increasingly suspect trend in the fitness industry. The gamification of exercise is one thing — if hitting 10,000 daily...
Tags: Psychology, Health, New York, Biology, Obesity, Germany, Public Health, Innovation, Wilson, Derek, Don, Peter Wilson, Atwater, Wilbur Atwater, Human body, NBC News Energy


The 12-hour rule: A guide to healthier headspace

There's no shortage of good advice in the world. But how to actually follow it? When it comes to your own wellbeing, learn to schedule your 'me time' with precision. Only this way, says Jillian Michaels, can you center yourself and retain a sense of joy. The 6 Keys: Unlock Your Genetic Potential for Ageless Strength, Health, and Beauty by now at amazone --> List Price: $28.00 New From: $13.78...
Tags: Health, Happiness, Choice, Innovation, Jillian Michaels, Self, Personal Growth, Decision-making, Human body, Ageless Strength Health


'Swallowing sperm' linked to lower risk of recurring miscarriage, researchers say

A new study finds a relationship between how often women gave their partners oral sex and the number of miscarriages they'd endured. While it demonstrates correlation, the study does not prove causation.The study will undoubtably be the catalyst for further studies into this area. A new study, published in Journal of Reproductive Immunology on March 27, suggests that woman who more frequently gave their partners oral sex, and swallowed the semen, were less likely to suffer recurring miscarriages...
Tags: Sex, Pregnancy, Innovation, Clark, Human body


Top 5 strangest fad diets

It's perfectly normal to want a healthy body. But like everything in life, moderation is the key.Some people want the ideal body so bad, they're willing to make any number of bizarre changes to their lives. And pop nutritionists, dietitians, and public figures are more than happy to sell ill-advised diets to them.Here's just 5 of some of the strangest fad diets through history. None Everybody wants to be slim. There's nothing wrong with that. But some people are downright obsessed with slimness,...
Tags: Psychology, Food, Hollywood, Society, Atlantic, Beauty, Innovation, Berger, Peterson, Human body, Jordan Peterson, Jack Gilbert, Mikhaila Peterson, Sumiko Watanabe, Immune Power Diet According, Stuart Berger


Is the blood type diet real?

Diet plans are immensely popular and commercially successful, including the blood type diet.The diet asserts that people with different blood types need to modify their diets to eat the foods that work best for their blood type.While the diet pays lip service to science to justify its claims, it seems to rely on pseudoscience and cannot be considered evidence-based medicine. None It just takes a quick glance at some of the most popular blogs or The New York Times's bestseller list to realize tha...
Tags: Health, Science, Biology, Medicine, Medical Research, New York Times, Innovation, Adamo, Bastyr University, Human body, Peter D Adamo, D Adamo


Woman with rare gene mutations feels no pain, anxiety

A woman in Scotland was found to feel virtually no pain and report zero trace of any anxiety or depression.Her body also seems to heal injuries very quickly, leaving little or no scarring.Humans feel pain as a warning before serious injury occurs, so it's not necessarily desirable to feel absolutely no pain. None When 66-year-old Jo Cameron was about to undergo a typically painful hand surgery a few years ago, she informed the doctor that she didn't feel pain and wouldn't need anesthesia."I disr...
Tags: Science, Medicine, Scotland, Medical Research, Yale, New York Times, Innovation, Cameron, Pain, Srivastava, Raigmore Hospital, England Cameron, Human body, British Journal Of Anaesthesia, Jo Cameron, Devjit Srivastava


The keto diet helps men – not women – lose weight, new research suggests

Medical professionals and dieters have long noticed differences in the efficacy of the keto diet between the sexes.A new study suggests that estrogen plays a role in preventing women from losing weight on the keto diet.More research is needed before scientists know exactly how the keto diet's effects vary between the sexes. None It's long been observed that men seem to have an easier time than women in terms of losing weight on the keto diet. The results of a new study on the keto diet's effects...
Tags: Health, Food, Science, Harvard, Innovation, Brigham, University of Iowa, Endocrine Society, Cochran, Keto, Department of Nutrition, Human body, Sara Gottfried, Jesse Cochran, Ann Fernholm, Dietary Science Foundation


Why health care should start long before you reach the hospital

The average American spends about 24 hours a year at the doctor's office. What you do the other 364 days a year mostly determines your health.Michael Dowling discusses Northwell's focus on environmental, social, economic and other social determinants of health.
Tags: Health, Food, Medicine, Life, Innovation, Community, Health Care, Human body, Northwell, Michael Dowling


Eggs are again linked to heart problems — though the study has problems

A new study at Northwestern University found a link between egg consumption and cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality. The research relied on self-reporting at the beginning of observation, with no follow-up reporting. Correlation is likely, not causation, as larger studies have found the opposite to be true. None Here we go again.Few foods have taken a beating like eggs. (Sorry, it was wide open.) From the world's "perfect food" to leading one down a certain path to a heart attack, eg...
Tags: Health, Biology, Harvard, Innovation, Agriculture, Disease, Derek, Northwestern University, Lee, JAMA, CVD, Gary Taubes, Human body, Bruce Y Lee, Norrina Allen


Why humans struggled to make 'f' and 'v' sounds until farming came along

A new study suggests that the f and v sounds were made easier to pronounce by the change in our diets the invention of farming made possible. The idea isn't a new one, but is only now being taken seriously.Even today, many hunter-gather cultures lack labiodentals in their languages. The Neolithic Revolution fundamentally changed how humanity went about the business of surviving. With the rise of farming, humans no longer had to travel into inclement climates following the migration of animals, ...
Tags: Language, Innovation, Anthropology, Agriculture, University of Bristol, Physiology, University of Zurich, Ancient World, Sean Roberts, Human body, Steven Moran, Hockett, Charles Hockett, Balthasar Bickel Steven Moran Damián Blasi


A pleasure to burn: Why do people like spicy foods?

Humans are the only animals known to willingly eat foods that cause irritation, discomfort, and even pain.Theories for why range from thrill-seeking behavior to an evolutionary adaptation for seeking foods that reduce pathogens.Taste results from an interplay of genes, culture, memory, and personality, a complex design that scientists are only now beginning to understand. None If a Martian anthropologist found its way to a Clifton Chili Club Chili Eating Contest, it would discover one the univer...
Tags: Psychology, Food, Europe, Earth, Bacteria, Nature, Birds, Innovation, Evolution, University of Pennsylvania, Sherman, University Of Southern California, Evolutionary Psychology, Microbes, Biomechanics, Padron


Is the keto diet safe for everyone? Probably not.

The keto diet might be a fad diet, but it's unique in that involves putting the body into an alternate and natural metabolic state.However, the diet likely isn't safe for everyone, particularly when it's implemented poorly.Children, pregnant women, breastfeeding women and those at risk for heart disease should understand the risks of the keto diet before experimenting with it. None People experiment with all kinds of crazy, unhealthy diets to lose weight: eating cotton balls soaked in orange jui...
Tags: Health, Food, New York City, Medical Research, Innovation, Philadelphia, Edwards, Mount Sinai Hospital, American Pregnancy Association, Amber Edwards, Human body, Suzanne Steinbaum, Charles Seltzer, Laura Schoenfeld, Romper Elizabeth Ward, Jessica McGee


Why doesn't the heart shape look like an actual heart?

If our real hearts looked anything like the symbol that represents them, we'd all probably have a much harder time pumping blood through our bodies.The reason why the heart symbol looks nothing like the anatomical heart has its roots, oddly enough, in the economy of a Roman city called Cyrene.Cyrene's heart symbol became associated with love through a strange confluence of botany, philosophy, and sex. None It doesn't take a surgeon to note the pretty major discrepancy between how we draw our hea...
Tags: Sex, Love, Pregnancy, Rome, Innovation, Libya, Pliny the Elder, Pliny, Alexandria, Aristotle, North Africa, BCE, Northern Africa, Cyrene, Human body, Cyrene Cyrene


Behold, new research suggests the munchies are real

Researchers noticed a spike in sales of ice cream, cookies, and chips after the legalization of marijuana. They studied 2,000 U.S. counties over the course of a decade, focusing on data from Colorado, Oregon, and Washington.While research is confirming the medical benefits of marijuana, obesity is an unintended consequence of legalization. None Cause and effect. There are many unintended consequences to every action, and actions, as we know, result in the manifestation of other forces, even if ...
Tags: Science, Obesity, California, Washington, Neuroscience, Sociology, Innovation, Addiction, Derek, Don, University of Connecticut, Chong, Baggio, Colorado Oregon, Social Science Research Network, Human body


For second time ever a patient has been cured of HIV, scientists report

The New York Times reports that a team of scientists plan to announce tomorrow that a patient in London has been effectively cured of HIV.The cure reportedly was the result of a bone-marrow transplant that came with a genetic mutation that naturally blocks HIV from spreading throughout the body.This approach isn't quite practical to implement on a large scale, but the knowledge gained from it will likely help scientists develop more scalable approaches. None In 2007, Timothy Ray Brown became the...
Tags: Science, London, China, Berlin, Aids, Hiv, Medical Research, New York Times, Netherlands, Innovation, Times, Seattle, Anthony Fauci, University College London, The Associated Press, Hodgkin


Keto diet: 5 of the biggest food plan mistakes

The high-fat, low-carb keto diet involves putting your body into a natural metabolic state called ketosis.When done responsibly, the keto diet can yield a wide range of benefits, most notably weight loss.Some people have less luck than others on the keto diet because they make a few common mistakes, including failing to drink enough water, eating too many unhealthy fats, and not realizing which foods might kick them out of ketosis. None The gist of the keto diet is simple: Eat less carbs and mor...
Tags: Health, Food, Medical Research, Innovation, Heart Association, Bailey, Keto, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Melissa Bailey, Human body, Carol Johnston, ASU Now Glycogen, Kristen Kizer, Houston Methodist Medical Center


Harvard: Men who can do 40 pushups have a 'significantly' lower risk of cardiovascular disease

Men who can perform 40 pushups in one minute are 96 percent less likely to have cardiovascular disease than those who do less than 10. The Harvard study focused on over 1,100 firefighters with a median age of 39.The exact results might not be applicable to men of other age groups or to women, researchers warn. None Quantifying workouts feeds our love for both math and goal-setting. While elite powerlifters aim at incremental increases that will award them the coveted one repetition at maximum w...
Tags: Health, Aging, Harvard, Medical Research, Innovation, Men, Physiology, Derek, Harvard T H Chan School of Public Health, Department of Environmental Health, Hiss, Stefanos Kales, Human body, Justin Yang


It takes very little to successfully disguise yourself

We're not as good at facial recognition as you might think. Who needs Mission Impossible latex masks? You can change your hair or make up and pass for someone else. None Maybe Lois Lane wasn't so stupid after all. A brilliant reporter, yes, but of all the implausibilities of the Superman story, her inability to tell that Clark Kent and Superman were the same person thanks to a pair of glasses strained credulity. Now, though, a study's been published in APA PsycNET that shows it's amazingly eas...
Tags: Psychology, Photography, UK, Identity, Superman, Surveillance, Innovation, Presentation, University of Huddersfield, Clark Kent, Lois Lane, Rob Jenkins, Noyes, Cognitive Science, Human body, Cesare Battisti


5 of the worst keto diet side effects

In addition to weight loss, there are a few well-known side effects of the keto diet, some of which can be unpleasant.Some side effects of the keto diet are bound to occur, though others only happen when the diet is implemented poorly.The keto diet doesn't have to lead to a host of negative side effects, but anyone considering undertaking the diet over the long term should be especially careful. None The keto diet is often called a fad diet. Make no mistake: it is. But unlike other trendy diets,...
Tags: Health, Science, Diet, Medicine, Los Angeles, Innovation, Clark, Keto, Human body, Edwina Clark, Nancy Rahnama, Scott Keatley, Kim Yawitz


Why are people sexually attracted to cartoons? Evolution.

According to Pornhub's annual statistics, "hentai" and "cartoons" were among the most popular categories in 2018.Such pornography is a supernormal stimulus, an artificial object that triggers an animal's instinctual response more intensely than natural analogs.Supernormal stimuli not only explain our heightened response to pornography, but also art, junk food, and social media.Every year Pornhub, the world's largest pornography website, releases annual statistics detailing the trends in online p...
Tags: Google, Art, Japan, Marriage, Sex, Women, Bbc, Brain, Harvard, United States, Innovation, Men, Playboy, Pornhub, Pacific, Tijuana


The science of expansion: Andromeda, gravity, and the ‘Big Rip’

The Andromeda Galaxy and our Milky Way are on a collision course that will obliterate life on Earth 4.5 billion years from now.The universe is expanding in all directions, all at once – so why are Andromeda and the Milky Way drawing nearer? The gravity between them is a stronger force than expansion.The rate of expansion is accelerating. If it continues to speed up, its force may become strong enough pull things apart that are currently held together by superior forces: Our galaxy, the solar sys...
Tags: Death, Astronomy, Space, Science, Nasa, Innovation, Universe, Big Bang, Cosmos, Andromeda, Human body, Andromeda Galaxy, Ask an astronomer


Stimulating this part of the brain causes ‘uncontrollable urge to laugh’

In a study of epilepsy patients undergoing electrical stimulation brain mapping, scientists discovered that the stimulation of the cingulum bundle reliably produced laughter, smiles and calm feelings.The findings could someday help scientists develop better treatments for anxiety, depression and chronic pain.One obstacle preventing this kind of treatment from becoming accessible is that it requires invasive surgery, though improved technology could someday change that. None Electrically stimulat...
Tags: Happiness, Mental Health, Anxiety, Medical Research, Innovation, National Institutes of Health, Nih, Human body, Jon T Willie


Animals feel pain. Why do people believe they don't?

As part of the EU Withdrawal Bill, British MPs refused to recognize animal sentience. Yet it is well-documented that animals feel a range of emotions, including pain. The delusional idea that only humans experience emotions has lead to a variety of catastrophic problems. None As a child I loved Rick Raccoon. He was the only stuffed animal I owned of the Shirt Tales crew. The show was necessary Saturday Morning television before I left the cartoon-watching age. Many years later, I returned home ...
Tags: Europe, Australia, Animals, America, Eu, Compassion, Vulnerability, Innovation, New Zealand, Emotions, Tories, Pain, Derek, Robyn, Jersey City, Human body


3 of the most speculative benefits of the keto diet

The keto diet is generally an effective method for weight loss.Still, many of the diet's other supposed health benefits aren't as well supported by the research.Claims that the keto diet can help with acne, cancer and mental clarity are speculative, but there's reason to suggest they're worth investigating. None It's no secret the keto diet can help people lose weight by switching the body's primary fuel source from sugar to fat. What's less clear is whether the diet can reliably produce other h...
Tags: Cancer, Mental Health, Medical Research, Innovation, Disease, Boston College, University of South Florida, Keto, Warburg, Seyfried, Thomas Seyfried, Human body, Franziska Spritzler, Angela Poff, Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Barbara Gower


Smoking weed linked with higher sperm counts, says Harvard

Marijuana research in the past has found that using the drug is linked to lower testicular health.New research from Harvard, however, suggests the opposite: Marijuana users have more and better quality sperm.These unexpected findings highlight how poorly we understand marijuana's effect on the human body. None The opening crawl for the 1936 film Reefer Madness reads "[Marijuana's] first effect is sudden violent, uncontrollable laughter, then come dangerous hallucinations — space expands — time s...
Tags: Health, Gender, Harvard, Innovation, Men, Human body, Nassan, Feiby Nassan, Massachusetts General Hospital Fertility Clinic, Jorge Chavarro


2019 already boasts more measles cases than all of 2010

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention has recorded 79 measles cases in 2019.Three outbreaks are responsible for the high number of cases, particularly an outbreak in Washington State that's affected at least 50 people so far.The measles vaccine is effective, though vaccine hesitancy and the virus' extremely contagious nature put some communities at risk. None Americans reported more measles cases in the first weeks of 2019 than all of 2010, according to the Center for Disease Control and...
Tags: New York, Science, Washington Post, Cdc, Washington, New York City, New York Times, Innovation, Disease, Illness, Houston, Portland Oregon, Vaccines, Washington State, Mayo Clinic, Portland Trailblazers