Posts filtered by tags: Human body[x]


 

Space toilets: How astronauts boldly go where few have gone before

When nature calls in micro-gravity, astronauts must answer. Space agencies have developed suction-based toilets – with a camera built in to ensure all the waste is contained before "flushing".Yes, there have been floaters in space. The early days of space exploration were a learning curve!Amazingly, you don't need gravity to digest food. Peristalsis, the process by which your throat and intestines squeeze themselves, actually moves food and water through your digestive system without gravity at ...
Tags: Space, Science, Technology, Biology, Nasa, Innovation, Sanitation, Human body, Rocket Science, Ask an astronomer


Can the keto diet help treat depression? Here’s what the science says so far

The keto diet is known to be an effective tool for weight loss, however its effects on mental health remain largely unclear.Recent studies suggests that the keto diet might be an effective tool for treating depression, and clearing up so-called "brain fog," though scientists caution more research is necessary before it can be recommended as a treatment.Any experiments with the keto diet are best done in conjunction with a doctor, considering some people face problems when transitioning to the lo...
Tags: Health, Food, Mental Health, Depression, Harvard University, Innovation, Keto, Ketogenic Diet, Human body, Susie Neilson, Georgia Ede


Your body’s full of stuff you no longer need. Here's a list.

An evolutionary biologist got people swapping ideas about our lingering vestigia.Basically, this is the stuff that served some evolutionary purpose at some point, but now is kind of, well, extra.Here are the six traits that inaugurated the fun. Evolutionary anthropologist and Boston College post-doc, Dorsa Amir, started the whole thing with a series of eight tweets, and boy did she start something fun. Amir laid out a list of weird, once-useful details of the human anatomy that we continue to c...
Tags: Science, History, Nature, Innovation, Evolution, Darwin, Physiology, Boston College, Amir, Ancient World, Bann, Human body, Dorsa Amir, Sabre Tooth, Stephen Roughley


Jillian Michael's 6 health keys to conquer aging

Getting older is inevitable. But with diet, exercise, and some insight into how the human body works, you can do your best to keep your body from aging prematurely. Meal timing, combined with 12 hours of fasting, can actually do more for your body than you might realize. Did you know stress can literally alter your DNA? And did you know that biological ways to combat the stress can even be passed down to your kids? The 6 Keys: Unlock Your ...
Tags: Food, Biology, Dna, Aging, Innovation, Jillian Michael, Human body, Ageless Strength Health


These new keto diet tortillas are made of 100% cheese

To help keto dieters stay the course, Lotito Foods has developed the Folios cheese wrap, a tortilla made entirely of cheese.These cheese wraps can be part of a healthy diet, but only if eaten in extreme moderation and alongside low-fat, low-salt foods. Research shows that replacing grains and fiber with fat and salts in the long term can be dangerous. None Now they've gone and done it. Keto diet enthusiasts have concocted all manner of unsettling dishes to kick the carbs: coffee with butter inst...
Tags: Health, Cancer, Happiness, Choice, Public Health, Medical Research, Innovation, Agriculture, Disease, Keto, European Society of Cardiology, Bonnie Taub Dix, Taub Dix, Jaha, Human body, Keto Diet


Scientists are still fascinated by Phineas Gage. Here's why.

Phineas Gage is considered to be Patient Zero for traumatic brain injury.The story of Gage at the time was that his damaged brain rendered him a different, monstrous person. This wasn't true.Recent studies demonstrate that an injured brain can see an increase in connection in areas associated with touch and learning. Phineas Gage was a railroad foreman in the 19th century. In 1848, while blasting through rock as part of the construction of the Rutland Railroad line in Vermont, Gage set an expl...
Tags: Neuroscience, History, Medical Research, Innovation, Men, South America, Npr, Vermont, Phineas Gage, Gage, Brodmann, Human body, Rutland Railroad, J M Harlow


The continued relevance of Phineas Gage

Phineas Gage is considered to be Patient Zero for traumatic brain injury.The story of Gage at the time was that his damaged brain rendered him a different, monstrous person. This wasn't true.Recent studies demonstrate that an injured brain can see an increase in connection in areas associated with touch and learning. Phineas Gage was a railroad foreman in the 19th century. In 1848, while blasting through rock as part of the construction of the Rutland Railroad line in Vermont, Gage set an expl...
Tags: Neuroscience, History, Medical Research, Innovation, Men, South America, Npr, Vermont, Phineas Gage, Gage, Brodmann, Human body, Rutland Railroad, J M Harlow


Sparkling water: Healthy alternative or millennial fad?

Sparkling waters are en vogue as a healthy, refreshing alternative to soft drinks and alcohol.Some claim sparkling water has injurious effects, such as reducing bone mineral density, but research shows such claims are overstated or outright myths.Not all sparkling waters are created equal, though. While some are just as hydrating as plain water, others can be unhealthy if not consumed in moderation. None Sparkling waters are the latest in health chic, providing all the fizzy refreshment of a sof...
Tags: Health, Food, Water, Chemistry, Medical Research, Atlantic, Innovation, Food And Drug Administration, Disease, Starbucks, Illness, Pepsi, Heart Association, Birmingham Alabama, American Dental Association, American Journal of Clinical Nutrition


You can be buried or cremated. Soon there will be a third option.

Recomposition is the process of turning human bodies into soil. Recompose founder Katrina Spade dreamed up her company after learning about livestock being composted. Washington might be the first state in the nation to legally add this as a viable option for the deceased. None Funerals are rarely joyous occasions. This is a matter of culture, not an unalterable fact of death. The ceremony, as presented in America, is mostly an opportunity for the living to contemplate their own mortality. Our ...
Tags: Death, Identity, Washington, Senate, America, Nature, Innovation, Jamaica, Bob, Marley, Bob Marley, Seattle, Public Spaces, Self, Derek, Katrina Spade


Why be buried or cremated when you could become a tree?

Recomposition is the process of turning human bodies into soil. Recompose founder Katrina Spade dreamed up her company after learning about livestock being composted. Washington might be the first state in the nation to legally add this as a viable option for the deceased. None Funerals are rarely joyous occasions. This is a matter of culture, not an unalterable fact of death. The ceremony, as presented in America, is mostly an opportunity for the living to contemplate their own mortality. Our ...
Tags: Death, Identity, Washington, Senate, America, Nature, Innovation, Jamaica, Bob, Marley, Bob Marley, Seattle, Public Spaces, Self, Derek, Katrina Spade


Don’t believe the keto hype

Keto diets have attracted a lot of media attention lately, and are becoming quite the rage in wellness circles. But while it might make you lose weight in the short term, it's doing one heck of a number on your body.Fitness expert and all-around great person Jillian Michaels walks us through whey keto might be a no-no. The 6 Keys: Unlock Your Genetic Potential for Ageless Strength, Health, and Beauty by now at amazone --> ...
Tags: Food, Death, Video, Biology, Innovation, Jillian Michaels, Human body, Ageless Strength Health


Does manual labor boost happiness?

Working with your hands affects brain chemistry in a positive way. Automation technologies can strip away a sense of agency and meaning in our lives. Using your hands connects you with your environment in a way that most technologies cannot. None Violence has become such a part of the fabric of American society that many stories pass without much commentary. Mass shootings need to be bigger and grander than ever to stay in the headlines; solo homicides rarely receive a glance. We pass over news...
Tags: Psychology, Health, Work, Happiness, Neuroscience, Innovation, Brazil, Cbs, Tim Ferriss, Derek, Carl Jung, Crawford, Lambert, Chandler, Kevin Kelly, Century City


How your brain makes you overeat

The brain's reward system releases dopamine when tasting food.Researchers at Max Planck discovered a second dopamine release in the stomach, affecting higher cognitive functions. The more we desire a food, the weaker the second release, which might lead to overeating. None As if losing weight wasn't hard enough. A new study from researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Metabolism Research reveals that we're rewarded twice when eating. The first dopamine kick occurs when tasting food; the sec...
Tags: Health, Food, Biology, Obesity, Neuroscience, Innovation, Addiction, Derek, Max Planck, Max Planck Institute for Metabolism Research, Human body, Marc Tittgemeyer, Heiko Backes


CBD makes glaucoma worse, researchers find

For decades, marijuana has been touted as providing glaucoma relief. A study out of Indiana University shows that while THC reduces eye pressure, CBD does the opposite. Of the 18 mice tested, females were less responsive to marijuana than males. None While glaucoma has been the butt of many well-intentioned, wink-wink weed jokes for decades, the disease is quit serious. In fact, glaucoma is the leading cause of blindness in people above sixty. Glaucoma is insidious as well. Abnormally high pres...
Tags: Biology, Aging, Innovation, Disease, Physiology, Derek, Indiana University, Blindness, Human body, Alex Straiker, Straiker


9 most common New Year’s resolutions — and how to make them happen

The top three New Year's resolutions for 2018 were to eat healthier, get more exercise, and save more money. Care to guess what the top three are this year?We check in with experts to devise strategies for tackling the most common New Year's resolutions.Knowing exactly what you want to accomplish and how you will do it can help increase your chances of success in 2019.With New Year's rounding the corner, everyone is sharing their 2019 resolutions, and it's giving us that auld déjà vu. According...
Tags: Health, Motivation, Facebook, Cdc, Failure, Happiness, Stephen King, Choice, Netflix, Maine, Innovation, Literature, Yougov, Harvard Business Review, Personal Growth, Goal-setting


How to brain hack your New Year's resolution for success

Every New Year people resolve to improve their lives, only to peter out during the "February Fail."Studies have shown that people who employ cognitive-behavioral processes, or brain hacks, can increase their chances of success. We look at how hacking the habit loop, setting SMART goals, and silencing your inner perfectionist can help make 2019 your year.The new year approaches and with it comes our annual habit of self-promises in the form of New Year's resolutions. Statistically speaking, thoug...
Tags: Productivity, Motivation, Japan, California, Failure, Success, Innovation, Personal Growth, Goal-setting, Paterson, Charles Duhigg, Duhigg, Potential, Decision-making, Human body, Randy J Paterson


Always tired? Your immune system may be overactive.

Chronic fatigue syndrome affects millions of people worldwide, but scientists still aren't quite sure what causes it.A new study tracked people suffering from Hepatitis C (HCV) as they underwent a treatment course.The results showed that people with overactive immune responses developed chronic fatigue months following the treatment, and that the fatigue persisted even after their immune responses returned to normal. None A new study builds upon previous research showing that an overactive immun...
Tags: Health, London, Sleep, Medical Research, Innovation, University of Oxford, King s College, Sharpe, Human body, Michael Sharpe


Consciousness, panpsychism, and AGI: What is it like to be a hat?

Panpsychism is the idea that there is an element of consciousness in everything in the universe. The theory goes like this: You're conscious. Ben Goertzel is conscious. And his hat is conscious too. What if consciousness isn't about the brain at all, but it's as inherent to our universe as space-time?"Now, panpsychism, to me, is not even that interesting, it's almost obvious — it's just the foundation, the beginning for thinking about consciousness... " says Goertzel. It's what comes after that ...
Tags: Science, Future, Computers, Brain, Robots, Innovation, Consciousness, Philosophy, Ai, Mind, Sophia, Ben Goertzel, Goertzel, Human body


Opioids not much better than placebos at treating pain, study says

The study examined more than 26,000 people experiencing chronic pain.Opioids were only marginally better than placebos at treating pain and improving physical functioning.It's estimated that at least 2 million Americans have opioid use problems. None Opioids are only slightly more effective than placebos at treating pain, according to a new study.The study tracked the more than 26,000 people, all of whom who were experiencing chronic, noncancer pain, as they took either real opioids or placebos....
Tags: Health, Innovation, Pharmaceuticals, Pain, American Medical Association, Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Human body


What's worse than drug addiction? The cruelty of drug treatments.

Many drug treatment centers are run as for-profit institutions. Making a buck off of treating people's addictions often runs counter to actually helping addicts. Some Chinese drug centers are experimenting with removing an addict's nucleus accumbens, which saps them of their ability to feel pleasure. The solution to drug addiction may be creating better drugs to be addicted to, says author and journalist Maia Szalavitz. Unbroken Brain: A R...
Tags: Compassion, Innovation, Addiction, Health Care, Pharmaceuticals, Maia Szalavitz, Human body


Is James Bond an alcoholic?

A new study analyzes the possibility that Bond has a problem. The lethal super spy generally rocks a killer blood-alcohol level. What's actually so cool about this guy? Sure, Ian Fleming's James Bond is always suave and sort of in control. However, through various actors and reimaginings, alcohol remains one of the few constants. A dry martini, usually, depending on the Bond actor, "shaken, not stirred." Experts from New Zealand's University of Otago actually counted up 007's drinks and found t...
Tags: Health, Fashion, Film, Australia, Sex, Innovation, New Zealand, James Bond, Ian Fleming, Bond, Fleming, Science And Art, University of Otago, Human body, American Psychiatric Associations DSM


Is wasp venom the next healthcare revolution?

Researchers are looking at the venom of wasps, bees, and arachnids to develop life-saving medical therapies.Researchers at MIT created synthetic variants of a peptide found in wasp venom that proved an effective antibiotic.With the "post-antibiotic era" looming, synthetic peptides could provide a way to maintain global health initiatives.Two of the most common phobias are the fear of insects and fear of needles, so it's little wonder that people with apiphobia and spheksophobia aren't keen for ...
Tags: Health, Animals, Mit, Bacteria, Public Health, Medical Research, Innovation, Disease, World Health Organization, Illness, Insects, AMP, AMR, Molecular Biology, Pseudomonas, Timothy Lu


Cushioned shoes aren't good for your feet

A new study from Helsinki found that the more you cushion your feet, the more likely you'll get injured. This follows previous studies showing that cushioned shoes leave you more susceptible to pain and injury. A few million years of evolutionary design has been usurped by shoe marketing campaigns. None A lot happened to our feet in the transition from being quadrupeds to exclusively bipedal. While the upright organization of our limbs and organs resulted in many benefits in our communication s...
Tags: Health, Biology, Marketing, Harvard, Innovation, Anthropology, Helsinki, Derek, Biomechanics, Bowman, Lieberman, Christopher McDougall, Daniel Lieberman, Human body, Katy Bowman


Scientists create 10-minute test that can detect cancer anywhere in the body

Australian researchers find 3D nanostructures that are unique to cancer cells.These markers can be identified using technology that may be available on cell phones.Human clinical trials are next for the team. None Australian researchers claim in a new study that they developed a 10-minute test that's capable of finding cancer cells at any location in the body. If further testing achieves the same results, this accomplishment could be a real breakthrough in fighting cancer.The potential for quick...
Tags: Health, Medicine, Dna, Chemistry, Medical Research, Innovation, Disease, Illness, University Of Queensland, Nature Communications, Sina, Johns Hopkins University, Tau, Human body, Trau, Matt Trau


How hands-on learning fires up your brain

Learning is a mental and physical pursuit, says retired astronaut Leland Melvin. Recalling his childhood, Melvin explains how working with his dad to turn a $500 bread truck into a family RV camper ultimately made him a better astronaut, able to maneuver the $2-billion dollar Columbus Laboratory out of the payload bay of a shuttle and attach it to the International Space Station. Experiential learning — like hands-on DIY, engineering kits, and Duplo games — wires your brain for problem solvi...
Tags: Space, Science, Technology, Learning, Education, Parenting, Children, Nasa, Play, Brain, Creativity, Engineering, Innovation, Mind, Melvin, Leland Melvin


First baby born to mother with uterus transplanted from deceased woman

The healthy baby girl was born to a 32-year-old woman in Brazil who received a uterus transplant from a deceased woman.It marks the first successful transplant from a deceased donor. A handful of transplants from living donors have proven successful so far.Deceased donations would greatly expand the pool of potential donors, considering it's relatively difficult to find living donors willing to undergo the procedure. None A baby born to a mother who received a uterus transplanted from a deceased...
Tags: Health, Women, Bbc, Medical Research, Innovation, Brazil, Imperial College London, Cleveland Clinic, Center for Disease Control and Prevention, University of São Paulo, Human body, Dani Ejzenberg, MRKH, Srdjan Saso


Why are girls hitting puberty earlier? The answer could lie in the medicine cabinet.

American girls have been hitting puberty at earlier ages compared to past decades.Chemicals found in common cosmetic products could be responsible for the changes, according to the results of a nearly 20-year study, which found that boys didn't seem to be affected by the same chemicals.It's still unclear whether these chemicals cause early puberty, but it might be worth avoiding products containing them until the research is conclusive. None It's still something of a mystery why American girls h...
Tags: Health, Parenting, Women, Medical Research, Innovation, Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Human body, Breast Cancer Action


Antidepressant foods: Study discovers which foods help fight depression

Leafy greens, cruciferous vegetables, and oysters top the list of depression-fighting foods.Organ meats are also near the top of nutrient-dense food sources that should be included in your diet.Researchers focus more on what to eat rather than what to remove from the standard diet. None Michael Pollan was onto something when he added two words to conventional wisdom, writing, "You are what what you eat eats." The nutrients your meal consumes becomes part of you as well, whether it's a cow munch...
Tags: Health, Nutrition, Biology, Mental Health, Innovation, Plants, Epa, University of Toronto, Columbia, Derek, Michael Pollan, Joe Rogan, DHA, Human body, Chris Kresser, Drew Ramsey


The first list of antidepressant foods restructures the "standard" American diet

Leafy greens, cruciferous vegetables, and oysters top the list of depression-fighting foods.Organ meats are also near the top of nutrient-dense food sources that should be included in your diet.Researchers focus more on what to eat rather than what to remove from the standard diet. None Michael Pollan was onto something when he added two words to conventional wisdom, writing, "You are what what you eat eats." The nutrients your meal consumes becomes part of you as well, whether it's a cow munch...
Tags: Health, Nutrition, Biology, Mental Health, Innovation, Plants, Epa, University of Toronto, Columbia, Derek, Michael Pollan, Joe Rogan, DHA, Human body, Chris Kresser, Drew Ramsey


Musical training improves vision, researchers say

Drummers and brass players have stronger visual timing sensitivity than flag spinners in the Color Guard.The three groups took part in over 67,000 temporal order judgment (TOJ) trials.The finding, while counterintuitive, fits into the complex nature of sensory perception. None "Seeing is believing" is not only a metaphor for discerning truth, but also a visual reality for many. Watching someone perform an act opens the door to mimicry, one of the most efficient ways to learn. In group fitness, ...
Tags: Music, Brown University, Neuroscience, Brain, Innovation, Sound, Derek, Oliver Sacks, Cognitive Science, Human body, Denison University, Leslie Welch, Nestor Matthews, Elena Festa, David Huron