Posts filtered by tags: Human body[x]


 

How tiny bioelectronic implants may someday replace pharmaceutical drugs

Bioelectronic medicine is an emerging field that focuses on manipulating the nervous system to treat diseases.Clinical studies show that using electronic devices to stimulate the vagus nerve is effective at treating inflammatory diseases like rheumatoid arthritis.Although it's not yet approved by the US Food and Drug Administration, vagus nerve stimulation may also prove effective at treating other diseases like cancer, diabetes and depression. Could a tiny electronic device treat some diseases...
Tags: Health, New York, Science, Technology, Biology, Medicine, Medical Research, Amsterdam, Innovation, Illness, Owens, US Food and Drug Administration, Tracey, Crohn, Northwell Health, Human body


Inception is here: Researchers “talk” to lucid dreamers for the first time

Four research teams in four countries independently communicated with sleeping volunteers.A total of 36 participants correctly responded to questions 18.6% of the time.Researchers believe this could open up new avenues for treating anxiety, depression, and trauma. From Leonardo DiCaprio to Freddie Krueger, pop culture has long been fascinated with the idea of entering someone else's dreams to influence their thoughts—or steal their souls. Of course, dreams have a much longer track record than ...
Tags: Psychology, Facebook, Sleep, Neuroscience, Depression, Anxiety, United States, Innovation, Leonardo Dicaprio, Lucid, Aristotle, Derek, Morse, Evan Thompson, France Germany the Netherlands, Freddie Krueger


Drinking coffee while pregnant alters the fetal brain

Neuroregulating caffeine easily crosses the placental barrier.A study finds that the brains of children born to mothers who consumed coffee during pregnancy are different.The observed differences may be associated with behavioral issues. As one human body gives birth to another, so many things have to, and usually do, go right. It's known that substances a mother ingests can influence the success of fetal development. Modern mothers are careful regarding the consumption of alcohol, associated w...
Tags: Nutrition, Pregnancy, Discovery, Brain, Medical Research, Innovation, Caffeine, Joe, Christensen, University of Rochester, John Foxe, Human body, Foxe, Zachary Christensen, Del Monte Institute for Neuroscience


They don’t come as pills, but try these 6 underprescribed lifestyle medicines for a better, longer life

The majority of Americans are stressed, sleep-deprived and overweight and suffer from largely preventable lifestyle diseases such as heart disease, cancer, stroke and diabetes. Being overweight or obese contributes to the 50% of adults who suffer high blood pressure, 10% with diabetes and additional 35% with pre-diabetes. And the costs are unaffordable and growing. About 90% of the nearly $4 trillion Americans spend annually for health care in the U.S. is for chronic diseases and mental health ...
Tags: Health, Medicine, Public Health, Innovation, Health Care, Michael Parkinson, Human body, Harvard University CC BY NC Whole


Grapes are 'edible sunscreen' according to a new study

The skin of study participants who consumed lots of grapes developed an increased resistance to UV light.Grapes contain polyphenols, good stuff for repairing skin and fighting inflammation.After their grape adventure, biopsies revealed less skin-cell damage from UV light. The sun's ultraviolet rays can be punishing to human skin. Sunblock can mitigate the potential damage, but when it comes to protecting our body's largest organ, more help is always appreciated. A new study from researchers at ...
Tags: Health, Food, California, Cancer, Discovery, Innovation, Uab, Grapes, Human body, UAB School of Medicine, University of Alabama Birmingham UAB, Craig Elmets


Eating grapes can reduce UV damage from the Sun

The skin of study participants who consumed lots of grapes developed an increased resistance to UV light.Grapes contain polyphenols, good stuff for repairing skin and fighting inflammation.After their grape adventure, biopsies revealed less skin-cell damage from UV light. The sun's ultraviolet rays can be punishing to human skin. Sunblock can mitigate the potential damage, but when it comes to protecting our body's largest organ, more help is always appreciated. A new study from researchers at ...
Tags: Health, Food, California, Cancer, Discovery, Innovation, Uab, Grapes, Human body, UAB School of Medicine, University of Alabama Birmingham UAB, Craig Elmets


Selfish sperm genes 'poison' the competition for the win

The t-haplotype alleles play dirty when it comes to reaching the egg first.In order for their nefarious scene to work, just the right amount of a certain protein has to be present.Experiments with mouse sperm reveal the whole complicated story. In the life-or-death scramble to fertilize an egg, not all sperm are alike. A new study of mice by researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics (MPIMG) in Berlin identifies a genetic factor called "t-haplotype," whose tag-team act wit...
Tags: Biology, Berlin, Competition, Genetics, Innovation, Reproduction, Sperm, Egg, Hermann, Human body, Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics MPIMG, Alexandra Amaral, Jan Niklas Runge Anna K Lindholm, Bernhard Herrmann


Do we really need to walk 10,000 steps a day?

When it comes to being fit and healthy, we're often reminded to aim to walk 10,000 steps per day. This can be a frustrating target to achieve, especially when we're busy with work and other commitments. Most of us know by now that 10,000 steps is recommended everywhere as a target to achieve – and yet where did this number actually come from?The 10,000 steps a day target seems to have come about from a trade name pedometer sold in 1965 by Yamasa Clock in Japan. The device was called “Manpo-kei",...
Tags: Health, Japan, Sports, Rome, Public Health, Innovation, World Health Organization, Self, University of Texas, Harvard Medical School, Human body, Yamasa Clock, Fitbit Research


Talking with your hands alters the perception of your words

A team of researchers from the Netherlands found that hands gestures, when used strategically, influence how certain words are heard. Participants were 20% more likely to hear and interpret the words being spoken when accompanied by a matching hand gesture, and 40% as likely to hear the wrong word when the gestures did not match.Previous research has suggested that certain hand gestures can signal extraversion and dominance, and that speaking with gestures in general tends to lead to being evalu...
Tags: Psychology, Communication, Netherlands, Innovation, Speech, Royal Society, Evolutionary Psychology, University of Vienna, Human body, Carol Goman, TiCC Tilburg University, Markus Koppensteiner, Koppensteiner


Why You Shouldn't Use Lipstick as Eyeshadow, or Vice Versa

You’re running out and forget to bring eye shadow or blush; instead of picking some up from the corner store, you grab your matte lipstick and blend it in on your cheekbones and eyelids. Anyone who wears makeup has done it at some point: took a cosmetic meant for one thing and used it for another. It’s all meant for…Read more...
Tags: Anatomy, Lipstick, Lifehacks, Cosmetics, Rouge, Lip Liner, Lip Gloss, Eye Liner, Eye Shadow, Aesthetics, Lip, Human body, Acne Cosmetica


You can take Steven Pinker’s Harvard intro to psych class for free

Harvard University professor Steven Pinker is offering free lectures from his Harvard psych course online.Pinker is a celebrated thinker, author, experimental cognitive psychologist, and linguist.The lectures are being shared via Twitter and you can start on one right now. Steven Pinker, the noted Canadian-American cognitive psychologist and linguist, is offering lectures from his spring Harvard psych course for free online. If you ever wanted to get into psychology, now is your chance, as Pink...
Tags: Psychology, Education, Intelligence, Mit, Brain, Harvard, Harvard University, Innovation, Mind, Steven Pinker, Great Britain, Cognition, Better Angels, Pinker, Human body


Were there "early warning signs" of COVID-19 on Twitter?

The first human cases of COVID-19 (subsequently named SARS-Cov-2) were first reported by officials in Wuhan City, China, in December 2019. The first cases of the virus in Europe were discovered at the end of January 2020.Although there were really no preventative measures that could have completely stopped the pandemic, a new study takes a retrospective look at the months preceding the rapid spread of this virus. Researchers suggest that, in a successive phase of the pandemic (or any pandemic), ...
Tags: Health, Europe, Media, Internet, China, Social Media, Computers, Medical Research, United States, Italy, Innovation, Statistics, Health Care, Illness, WHO World Health Organization, Human body


Spinal cord injury breakthrough makes paralyzed mice walk again

Researchers from Germany use a designer protein to treat spinal cord damage in mice.The procedure employs gene therapy to regenerate damaged nerve fibers that carry signals to and from the brain.The scientists aim to eventually apply the technique to humans. When spinal cord injuries result in paralysis, science hasn't so far been able to provide a way to repair the damage and reverse the condition. Now a team of researchers from Germany used a designer protein to help paralyzed mice to walk ag...
Tags: Health, Biology, Medicine, Germany, Medical Research, Innovation, Health Care, Fischer, Human body, Dietmar Fischer


Scientists confirm quantum response to magnetism in cells

Scientists suspect quantum effects are behind animals' ability to perform geomagnetic navigation.Geomagnetic navigation is believed to be light-based.Researchers watch as magnet-induced quantum changes affect cells' luminescence. We know at this point that there are species that can navigate using the Earth's magnetic field. Birds use this ability in their long-distance migrations, and the list of such species keeps getting longer, now including mole rats, turtles, lobsters, and even dogs. But ...
Tags: Animals, Earth, Discovery, Physics, Medical Research, Birds, Innovation, University Of Tokyo, Klaus Schulten, Magnetism, Human body, Jonathan Woodward, Max Planck Institute Schulten, Shulten, Noboru Ikeya


Why do males need to recharge after sex? It's not why you think, says science

Men and other male creatures need time to recover between ejaculations, and scientists have assumed it has to do with an increase in the hormone prolactin after coitus.A new study finds that manipulating prolactin levels in mice makes no difference in their sexual behavior.The authors suspect more complex interactions may be at the heart of the wait for round two. For some time, scientists have suspected the reason men require recovery time between ejaculations has to do with the hormone prolac...
Tags: Sex, Medical Research, Innovation, Portugal, Reproduction, Lima, Intercourse, Human body, Coitus, Champalimaud Research Center, Susan Lima


Why do men need to recharge after sex? Scientists make surprising discovery.

Men and other male creatures need time to recover between ejaculations, and scientists have assumed it has to do with an increase in the hormone prolactin after coitus.A new study finds that manipulating prolactin levels in mice makes no difference in their sexual behavior.The authors suspect more complex interactions may be at the heart of the wait for round two. For some time, scientists have suspected the reason men require recovery time between ejaculations has to do with the hormone prolac...
Tags: Sex, Medical Research, Innovation, Portugal, Reproduction, Lima, Intercourse, Human body, Coitus, Champalimaud Research Center, Susan Lima


Control group outperforms mediums in psychic test

A control group outperformed professional mediums in a psychic test. This contradicted previous research the team performed in which mediums scored above chance levels. For this study, every volunteer had to guess the cause of death after being given three choices. Magician and renowned skeptic James Randi passed away in October. In 1996, he famously offered $1,000 to anyone that could prove they had paranormal abilities. Over time, the prize money grew to $1,000,000. Even with that kind of mo...
Tags: Psychology, Facebook, Neuroscience, Brain, Innovation, Consciousness, Senses, Derek, William James, La Jolla, Randi, James Randi, Human body, Petumula, JB Rhine, Arnaud Delorme


Michio Kaku: 3 mind-blowing predictions about the future

Carl Sagan believed humanity needed to become a multi-planet species as an insurance policy against the next huge catastrophe on Earth. Now, Elon Musk is working to see that mission through, starting with a colony of a million humans on Mars. Where will our species go next?Theoretical physicist Michio Kaku looks decades into the future and makes three bold predictions about human space travel, the potential of 'brain net', and our coming victory over cancer."[I]n the future, the word 'tumor' wil...
Tags: Space, Science, Technology, Biology, Cancer, Future, Neuroscience, Brain, Physics, Innovation, Universe, Disease, Planets, Illness, Mars, Mind


In rhythm with the sun: The body’s biological clock

As with almost all life on Earth, human beings also function in cycles of light and dark. Look what happens to the human organism (and psyche) every day.2am: Highest level of lymphocytes. The body heals well overnight.3am: Blood flow through the brain is at its greatest at night.4am: Growth hormone is secreted at night. It is responsible for tissue regeneration in adults and growth in children. The level of vasopressin is also raised, thanks to which we don't have to run to the bathroom for a pe...
Tags: Health, Sleep, Biology, Time, Earth, Innovation, Senses, Indra, Human body, Annie JaroszewiczReprinted, Michel Siffre, Garland Sutra


Chemists discover the mix that likely originated life on Earth

New study shows that RNA and DNA likely originated together.The mixture of the acids produced Earth's first life forms.The molecules were created with the help of a compound available in planet's early days. How did life on Earth originate? Chemists claim to have found the exact ingredients of the primordial soup that resulted in the plethora of creatures we see in the world today. A new study shows that the compound diamidophosphate (DAP) possibly mixed together the strands of the original...
Tags: Biology, Animals, Dna, Earth, Chemistry, Innovation, Evolution, Krishnamurthy, Scripps Research, Human body, Ramanarayanan Krishnamurthy, Coronavirus


Did early humans hibernate?

Neanderthal bone fragments discovered in northern Spain mimic hibernating animals like cave bears. Thousands of bone fragments, dating back 400,000 years, were discovered in this "pit of bones" 30 years ago. The researchers speculate that this physiological function, if true, could prepare us for extended space travel. Humans have a terrible sense of time. We think in moments, not eons, which accounts for a number of people that still don't believe in evolutionary theory: we simply can't imagi...
Tags: Facebook, Space, Spain, Nasa, Innovation, Anthropology, Archaeology, Iberia, Anthropologie, Physiology, Derek, Sima, Atapuerca, Democritus University of Thrace, Ancient World, Human body


Hues of our own: How we perceive color

Each of us lives in our own multi-colored universe. And there's scientific proof of it.I'm basking inside the sun. It's hot and stuffy – and that's putting it lightly. Everything around me is bathed in a storm of UV- and X-rays, masses of plasma roll all around, white-hot from nuclear fusion. The temperature is two million degrees Celsius, but the gas is almost a proper gas by now, its density has dropped to bearable fractions of a kilo per millilitre – not like deeper inside, on the edge of the...
Tags: Art, Neuroscience, Earth, Brain, Innovation, Senses, Sight, Human body, Jacek Malczewski, Low Beskids, Żydowskie, Magura National Park, Zosia Krasodomska JonesReprinted


Microplastics have been found in human placenta

Italian researchers have discovered microplastic particles in human placenta.Out of six collected placentas, four contained colored plastic microparticles.That petrochemical pollutants are present in such a critically important organ is alarming. For the last few years, researchers have become increasingly alarmed at the degree to which microplastics—bits of plastic that are smaller than 5 millimeters in length—have invaded, well, basically everywhere and everything. In 2018, a small sampling o...
Tags: Health, Parenting, Environment, Rome, Pollution, Plastic, Innovation, Ragusa, Microplastics, Human body, Antonio Ragusa, San Giovanni Calibita Fatebenefratelli hospital, Elizabeth Salter Green


How to have a constructive conversation with vaccine skeptics

In his book, "Anti-vaxxers," science educator Jonathan Berman aims to foster better conversations about vaccines. While the anti-vax movement in America has grown, more Americans now say they'll get a COVID-19 vaccine. In this Big Think interview, Berman explains why he's offering an ear to the anti-vax movement. As two COVID-19 vaccines roll out in America, Pew Research reported a rare glimmer of hope in the ongoing saga of vaccine disinformation: the number of citizens willing to get a vacci...
Tags: Facebook, Biology, America, Medical Research, Innovation, Neil Degrasse Tyson, Pfizer, Vaccines, Richard Dawkins, Bill Nye, Trump, Derek, Christopher Hitchens, Berman, Christiane Northrup, Andrew Wakefield


Your body image can be influenced by smells and sounds

Researchers find that there are smells that make us feel thinner and lighter, and other smells that do the opposite.The sounds of our footsteps can have a similar effect.The researchers suggest that sensory stimuli play a part in our self-image and may be subject to beneficial manipulation. Who we see in the mirror is more than a matter of lighting or angle. Our self-image is a subjective interpretation of our actual physical characteristics. It's affected by our feelings and by comparisons we ...
Tags: Obesity, Innovation, Emotions, Madrid, Sound, Senses, Smell, Self, Obrist, Human body, SCHI, Brianza, Giada Brianza, Universidad Carlos III UC3M, 179th Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America, Marianna Obrist


Mind uploading: Can we become immortal?

Technology has evolved to a point where humans have overridden natural selection. So what will our species become? Immortal interstellar travelers, perhaps.Scientists are currently mapping the human brain in an effort to understand the connections that produce consciousness. If we can re-create consciousness, your mind can live on forever. You could even laser-port your consciousness to different planets at the speed of light, download your mind into a local avatar and explore those worlds.But i...
Tags: Space, Science, Life, Future, Neuroscience, Brain, Robots, Innovation, Consciousness, Mind, Self, Physiology, David Eagleman, Steven Kotler, Jason Silva, Michio Kaku


Trial of a universal flu vaccine shows promise

A new study has demonstrated the effectiveness of a potentially universal flu vaccine. By focusing on a nearly unchanging part of the virus, a single shot could be effective against a wide variety of strains. It will be at least another few years before you can get one. While there are insinuations that the flu is a mild disease not to be worried about, it is in fact a disease that kills hundreds of thousands a year and can cause a variety of complications. This is despite the existence of the ...
Tags: Health, Nbc, Medical Research, Innovation, Illness, Vaccines, University Of California, Nature Medicine, James Cherry, Human body, Florian Krammer


Serotonin plays a key role in patience and impulse control, research says

Prior research has suggested a possible link between a lack of serotonin receptors in the brain and impulsive behaviors.A recent study from the Neural Computation Unit at the OIST explored this further, resulting in evidence that there is in fact a neurological factor to the brain's ability to control impulses and manage patience.This research could reveal more data on how serotonin impacts regions of the brain, which could eventually lead to the development of new drug treatments for conditions...
Tags: Psychology, Decision Making, Health, Learning, Biology, Dna, Neuroscience, Choice, Brain, Depression, Genetics, Medical Research, Innovation, Emotions, Miyazaki, OIST


DeepMind AI solves 50-year-old biology problem in breakthrough advance

Scientists have long been puzzled by how specific chains of amino acids go on to form three-dimensional proteins.DeepMind developed a system that's able to predict "protein folding" in a fraction of the time of human experiments, and with unprecedented accuracy.The achievement could greatly improve drug research and development, as well as bioengineering pursuits. In 1994, a group of scientists created a competition to solve one of the most perplexing problems in biology: how do proteins fold t...
Tags: Google, Biology, Medical Research, Innovation, Ai, Biotech, Deepmind, MSA, Anfinsen, Human body, AlphaFold, Casp, John Moult


Zebrafish give new insight to sound sensitivity in autism

Fragile X syndrome is a genetic disorder caused by changes in a gene that scientists call the "fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1)" gene. People who have FXS or autism often struggle with sensitivity to sound. According to the research team, FXS is caused by the disruption of a gene. By disrupting that same gene in zebrafish larvae, they can examine the effects and begin to understand more about this disrupted gene in the human brain.Using the zebrafish, Dr. Constantin and the team were able t...
Tags: Health, Dna, Neuroscience, Intelligence, Fish, Brain, Genetics, Medical Research, Innovation, Mind, Sound, Senses, Autism Spectrum Disorder, Constantin, Cognitive Science, Ethan Scott