Posts filtered by tags: Human Evolution[x]


 

We Can Thank Agriculture and Soft Food for the 'F' Word, Claims Provocative New Study

Humans couldn’t always easily produce “f” and “v” sounds, according to a surprising new study. The reason we can now enjoy words like “flavor” and “effervescent,” say the researchers, has to do with changes to the ancestral human diet and the introduction of soft foods—a development that altered the way we bite, and…Read more...
Tags: Science, Anthropology, Human Speech, Paleontology, Human Evolution, Ancient Humans, Human Diet


Neanderthals and Denisovans Shared a Siberian Cave for Thousands of Years, New Research Suggests

Denisova cave in southern Siberia was home to Neanderthals and Denisovans for thousands of years, but questions remain about the timing of their stay. A pair of new studies traces the history of archaic human occupation at the site, showing who lived there and when—including a possible era during which the two…
Tags: Science, Siberia, Neanderthals, Paleontology, Denisova Cave, Denisova, Denisovans, Human Evolution, Ancient Humans


AI Finds Traces of a Lost Species in Human DNA

Buried deep within the DNA of Asian individuals is a genetic clue pointing to the existence of an unknown human ancestor. Remarkably, it wasn’t a human who reached this startling conjecture, but rather an artificially intelligent algorithm. Welcome to archaeology in the 21st century.Read more...
Tags: Science, Artificial Intelligence, Genetics, Ai, Neanderthals, Denisovans, Human Evolution, Early Humans


The human body is "full of evolutionary leftovers that no longer serve a purpose"

People have a little pink band in the inside corner of their eye. "This is the plica semilunaris," says Dorsa Amir, an evolutionary anthropologist. "It used to be a third eyelid that would blink horizontally." Amir posted a fascinating Twitter thread of other " evolutionary leftovers that no longer serve a purpose" in the human body. Did you know the human body is full of evolutionary leftovers that no longer serve a purpose? These are called vestigial structures and they’re fascinating. (1/8) ...
Tags: Post, News, Amir, Human Evolution, Dorsa Amir


Human Evolution: Focus On Africa

In a lecture delivered to the American Society for Human Genetics, paleo-anthropologist John Hawks gives a lucid summary of the African record of human evolution.  The divergence of the hominin lineage from other apes took place in Africa between 5 and 10 million years ago. Hominins began dispersing out of Africa in pulses beginning 2 million years ago. The vast majority of hominins though continued to live and evolve in Africa. Yet, popular stories of human evolution focus on people leaving Afr...
Tags: Africa, Seo, American Society for Human Genetics, Human Evolution, Suvrat Kher, John Hawks, Hominins


The Human Origin Story Has Changed Again, Thanks to New Discovery in Algeria

The discovery of 2.4-million-year-old stone tools and butchered bones at a site in Algeria suggests our distant hominin relatives spread into the northern regions of Africa far earlier than archaeologists assumed. The find adds credence to the newly emerging suggestion that ancient hominins lived—and evolved—outside a…Read more...
Tags: Science, Biology, Africa, Algeria, Human Evolution, Early Humans, Stone Tools, Human Origins


Neanderthals Weren't the Violent Brutes We Thought, New Research Finds

The stereotype of a typical Neanderthal life is that it was extraordinarily difficult, violent, and traumatic. But a comparative analysis of the remains left behind by Neanderthals and contemporaneous humans is finally overturning this unwarranted assumption.Read more...
Tags: Science, Neanderthals, Human Evolution, Human Origins, Neanderthal Behavior


Analysis of Neanderthal Teeth Reveals Unexpected Exposure to Lead

Around 250,000 years ago, two Neanderthal children were exposed to excessive levels of lead in what is now France, according to new research. It’s the oldest known case of lead exposure in hominin remains—a discovery that’s presenting an obvious question: How could this have possibly happened so long ago?Read more...
Tags: Science, France, Breastfeeding, Neanderthals, Human Evolution, Lead Exposure


Neanderthals Survived in Ice Age Europe Thanks to Effective Healthcare

Neanderthals cared for their sick and wounded, and new research suggests this well-documented behavior was more than just a cultural phenomenon or an expression of compassion—it really did help them survive.Read more...
Tags: Europe, Science, Biology, Healthcare, Neanderthals, Human Evolution, Effective Healthcare


Archaeologists Have Found the World's Oldest Known Drawing in a South African Cave

Some 73,000 years ago in what is now South Africa, an early human used a red ochre crayon to draw a cross-hatched pattern onto a smooth flake, according to new research published today. It’s now considered the earliest evidence of drawing in the archaeological record.Read more...
Tags: Art, Science, South Africa, Anthropology, Human Evolution, Ochre, Early Humans, Early Human Art, Rock Drawings, Ochre Drawings, Early Human Behavior


Humans Didn’t Evolve From a Single Ancestral Population

In the 1980s, scientists learned that all humans living today are descended from a woman, dubbed “Mitochondrial Eve,” who lived in Africa between 150,000 to 200,000 years ago. This discovery, along with other evidence, suggested humans evolved from a single ancestral population—an interpretation that is not standing…Read more...
Tags: Science, Africa, Genetics, Anthropology, Archaeology, Evolution, Human Evolution, Early Humans, Human Origins, Population Biology


A Toddler Who Lived 3 Million Years Ago Could Walk Upright and Capably Climb Trees

A re-analysis of a three-million-year-old fossil suggests Australopithecus afarensis, an early hominid, had children who were as capable on two feet as they were in the trees—an important discovery that’s shedding new light on this critical stage in hominid evolution.Read more...
Tags: Science, Anthropology, Archaeology, Evolution, Paleontology, Human Evolution, Early Humans, Australopithecus Afarensis


How Did Homo Sapiens Evolve?

Here is a very good summary of our evolving understanding of this question.How did Homo Sapiens Evolve? - Julia Galway-Witham and Chris StringerExcerpt: Over the past 30 years, understanding of Homo sapiens evolution has advanced greatly. Most research has supported the theory that modern humans had originated in Africa by about 200,000 years ago, but the latest findings reveal more complexity than anticipated. They confirm interbreeding between H. sapiens and other hominin species, provide evid...
Tags: Africa, Seo, Morocco, Homo, Homo Sapiens, Human Evolution, Suvrat Kher, Chris Stringer, Julia Galway Witham, Chris StringerExcerpt


Stunning Discovery Shows Early Humans Were Hunting Rhinos in the Philippines Over 700,000 Years Ago

Our species, Homo sapiens, weren’t the first humans to leave Africa—not by a long shot. The remarkable discovery of a 709,000-year-old butchered rhino fossil in the Philippines shows that so-called archaic humans were romping around the islands of southeast Asia a full 400,000 years before our species even existed.Read more...
Tags: Asia, Science, Africa, Philippines, Anthropology, Archaeology, Paleontology, Human Evolution, Human Migrations, Early Humans, Archaic Humans


Does The Human Body Replace Itself Every Seven Years?

While the vast majority of cells would be replaced every seven to ten years, some cellular outliers make such a statement pointedly false.
Tags: News, Anatomy, Cells, Human Evolution, Cell Regeneration, Science Facts


Did Neanderthals Go Extinct Because of the Size of Their Brains?

Using computers and MRI scans, researchers have created the most detailed reconstruction of a Neanderthal brain to date, offering new insights into the social and cognitive abilities of these extinct humans. But as to whether these characteristics were responsible for their ultimate demise remains an open question.Read more...
Tags: Science, Anthropology, Brains, Neanderthals, Paleontology, Human Evolution, Early Humans, Early Modern Humans, Neanderthal Behavior, Computational Anatomy, Neanderthal Brains, Neanderthal Intelligence


Rare Mutation Among Bajau People Lets Them Stay Underwater Longer

The Bajau people of Malaysia and the Philippines are renowned for their free-diving abilities, often working eight-hour shifts in search of fish and other sea critters. Underwater sessions can last upwards of two minutes, with accumulated daily totals of breath-holding often reaching five hours. New research suggests…Read more...
Tags: Science, Biology, Dna, Genetics, Philippines, Malaysia, Evolution, Swimming, Physiology, Human Evolution, Waterworld But For Real, Spleens


88,000-Year-Old Middle Finger Found in Saudi Arabia Could Rewrite Human History

It’s just a lone, boney middle finger, but the scientists who found it say it’s the oldest directly dated fossil of our species to ever be found outside of Africa and the Levant, a region that today comprises Israel, Syria, Lebanon, and Jordan. But the new discovery is not without its critics, who say older evidence…Read more...
Tags: Science, Saudi Arabia, Africa, Anthropology, Archaeology, Jordan, Fossils, Paleontology, Levant, Homo Sapiens, Human Evolution, Ancient Humans, Early Humans, Early Human Migrations, Human Fossils, Israel Syria Lebanon


Why Neanderthals Had Faces That Were So Different From Ours

Compared to modern humans, Neanderthals had heavy eyebrows, huge noses, and large, long faces that bulged forward. Using 3D computer models, an international team of scientists has analyzed these facial features in detail, uncovering some likely explanations for these dramatic physical differences. Read more...
Tags: Science, Biology, Anthropology, Archaeology, Evolution, Neanderthals, Physiology, Paleontology, Human Evolution, Computer Models, Neanderthal Physiology, Neanderthal Faces, Neanderthal Behavior


Ancient Climate Swings Forced Early Humans to Get Their Shit Together and Innovate

Our species made its debut some 300,000 years ago. During the preceding millenniums, our continent of origin underwent environmental shifts that very likely influenced the trajectory of human evolution. Archaeologists working in Kenya have uncovered new clues to support this assertion, showing the surprising extent to…Read more...
Tags: Science, Anthropology, Archaeology, Kenya, Humans, Human Evolution, Ancient Humans, Stone Tools, Human Origins, Stone Age Culture, Tool Making


Climate Change Forced Early Humans to Get Their Shit Together and Innovate

Our species made its debut some 300,000 years ago. During the preceding millenniums, our continent of origin underwent environmental shifts that very likely influenced the trajectory of human evolution. Archaeologists working in Kenya have uncovered new clues to support this assertion, showing the surprising extent to…Read more...
Tags: Science, Anthropology, Archaeology, Kenya, Humans, Human Evolution, Ancient Humans, Stone Tools, Human Origins, Stone Age Culture, Tool Making


Ancient Human Groups Mated With the Mysterious Denisovans at Least Twice

Genetic analysis suggests two populations of Denisovans—an extinct group of hominids closely related to Neanderthals—existed outside of Africa during the Pleistocene, and that both of these populations interacted and interbred with anatomically modern humans.Read more...
Tags: Science, Biology, Africa, Genetics, Homo Sapiens, Denisovans, Human Evolution, Ancient Humans, Human Origins, Early Modern Humans, Archaeogenetics


These Early Humans Prospered During What Should Have Been a Devastating Volcanic Winter

Around 74,000 years ago, a massive caldera erupted on the Indonesian island of Sumatra, triggering a prolonged and devastating volcanic winter. Scientists have speculated that the Toba eruption pruned back human populations to a considerable degree, but new research published today suggests at least one group of…Read more...
Tags: Science, Geology, Volcanoes, Archaeology, Earth Sciences, Paleontology, Sumatra, Human Evolution, Volcanic Eruptions, Ancient Humans, Resilient Humans, Supervolcanoes, Toba Volcano


Turns Out the First British People Were Actually Black

A DNA sample from a 10,000-year-old skeleton discovered in Gough Cave near Cheddar Gorge, England, offers a remarkable revelation: the first modern British people had “dark brown to black skin.” According to recent analysis, they also had dark curly hair and blue eyes. In other words, whiteness in Europe is a much…Read more...
Tags: Europe, Science, Archaeology, Paleontology, Homo Sapiens, Human Evolution, Human History, Early Humans, Human Origins, Cheddar Man, Mesolithic Period, First British People Were Actually Black, Gough Cave, Cheddar Gorge England


Some Thoughts On The Middle Paleolithic Stone Tools From India Story

Early Middle Palaeolithic culture in India around 385–172 ka reframes Out of Africa models - Kumar Akhilesh, Shanti Pappu, Haresh M. Rajapara, Yanni Gunnell, Anil D. Shukla and Ashok K. SinghviFrom a site in Tamil Nadu, South India, stone tools made using a  strategy named Levallois were dated to be 385 ka -172 ka (ka-thousand years). Previous estimates for the arrival of this technology in India was thought to be around 125 ka or later, introduced by migrating Homo sapiens.So, who made these ol...
Tags: Asia, Europe, India, Africa, Israel, Seo, Morocco, Evolution, Fossils, Africa Europe, Homo, Denisovans, Paleolithic, Human Evolution, Human Migrations, Suvrat Kher


Before Our Species Left Africa, Now-Extinct Humans Made These Fancy Tools in India

Archaeologists have discovered sophisticated stone tools in India dating back some 385,000 years. That’s all sorts of incredible, because Homo sapiens like you and me didn’t leave Africa until about 175,000 years ago. The discovery is resetting what we know about so-called “archaic” humans and the dramatic extent to…Read more...
Tags: Science, India, Africa, Anthropology, Archaeology, Paleontology, Human Evolution, Paleolithic Era, Paleolithic Humans, Early Humans, Archaic Humans


Stunning Fossil Discovery Pushes First Human Migration Out of Africa Back 50,000 Years

Archaeologists in Israel have uncovered the partial jawbone from what appears to be a modern human. Dated to between 175,000 to 200,000 years old, the fossil is 50,000 years older than any other human fossil found in the region, suggesting humans left Africa far earlier than previously thought.Read more...
Tags: Science, Africa, Israel, Archaeology, Paleontology, Homo Sapiens, Human Evolution, Early Humans, Human Origins


Are the gods indifferent?

It’s an old question, at least as old as Prometheus. Are the gods indifferent or is there something in the scheme of things that cares? The ancient tale of Prometheus neatly parses its reply – yes and no. Zeus is indifferent to humanity; we are small change. But not Prometheus. His concern for our plight leads him to give us fire, which as Aeschylus explains is more than the warming flames of the hearth. It is both science and technology, which moves us beyond victimhood and gives us agency. Jum...
Tags: Books, Featured, Long, Noah, Britain, Cambridge, Charles Darwin, Humanity, Newton, Darwin, Darwinism, Buffon, Disraeli, Aeschylus, Kant, Sedgwick


9.7 MYA Teeth from the Miocene Force Archaeologists to Rewrite Human History! Or not.

In the last week, the interwebs have been all abuzz for me about the 9.7 million year old teeth that were recovered in Eppelsheim, Germany. [...] The post 9.7 MYA Teeth from the Miocene Force Archaeologists to Rewrite Human History! Or not. appeared first on Archaeology Review.
Tags: Anthropology, Archaeology, Human Evolution, Paleoanthropology, Eppelsheim Germany, 9.7 Mya, Hominid, Hominid Evolution, MYA Teeth


Neanderthals With Disabilities Survived Through Social Support

A re-analysis of a 50,000 year old Neanderthal skull shows that, in addition to enduring multiple injuries and debilitations, this male individual was also profoundly deaf. Yet he lived well into his 40s, which is quite old by Paleolithic standards. It’s an achievement that could have only been possible with the help…Read more...
Tags: Science, Anthropology, Archaeology, Neanderthals, Paleontology, Human Evolution, Early Humans