Posts filtered by tags: In Science[x]


 

Incoming Visitor From the Oort Cloud Could Be Among the Largest Comets Ever Documented

An object of unusual size will make its closest approach to the Sun in 2031, during which time it will swing past the orbit of Saturn and possibly turn into an exceptionally large comet. Astronomers are already looking forward to the potential “fireworks” display.Read more...
Tags: Spacex, Science, Kindle, Comets, Asteroid, Coma, Solar System, Meg Schwamb, Heavens Gate, Minor Planets, Oort Cloud, In Science, Vera Rubin Observatory, Samantha Lawler, Astronomical Objects, Great Comets


The 9 Best Photos of This Morning's Sunrise Eclipse

Full disclosure: I slept through this morning’s solar eclipse, which is a real shame because watching the Sun rise over the horizon while being partially blotted out by the Moon is objectively one of the coolest things anyone is likely to see this year. I mean, I paid actual money to see Cruella, but I couldn’t get…Read more...
Tags: Astronomy, Science, Environment, Time, Solar Eclipse, Eclipse, Eclipses, Cruella, Lunar Eclipse, In Science, Technology Internet, Units Of Time, Solar Eclipse Of January 15, Solar Eclipse Of June 21


Extremely Delayed James Webb Space Telescope Delayed Again, Again

The upcoming James Webb Space Telescope, already seven years behind schedule, will not launch on Halloween as planned, which is just as well, given the ominous date and this project’s history of bad luck. For once, the delay is not due to the telescope, but rather the rocket that will deliver it to space.Read more...
Tags: Spacex, Science, Nasa, European Space Agency, Spaceflight, James Webb Space Telescope, Spacecraft, James Webb, Goddard Space Flight Center, Arianespace, Sunshield, Ariane, Thomas Zurbuchen, In Science, Ariane 5, Technology Internet


13 Spectacular Pics of the 'Super Blood Moon' Eclipse From Around the World

In the wee hours of Wednesday morning on the East Coast of the United States, Earth’s shadow enveloped the Moon in darkness, marking the first lunar eclipse since January 2019 and one of two lunar eclipses we’ll witness in 2021. Not only that, but this eclipse took place during a “Super Blood Moon”—making it…Read more...
Tags: Astronomy, Science, East Coast, Eclipse, Eclipses, Lunar Eclipse, Physical Sciences, Space Science, In Science, Magnitude Of Eclipse, Time In Astronomy, February 2009 Lunar Eclipse, United States Earth


How to Watch Tomorrow's ‘Super Blood Moon’ Eclipse

On Wednesday, May 26, the Moon will move into Earth’s shadow, resulting in the first total lunar eclipse in nearly two and a half years. Here’s how to see it, regardless of where you live in the world.Read more...
Tags: Science, Time, Earth, Moon, Solar Eclipse, Eclipse, Eclipses, Lunar Eclipse, Diana Hannikainen, In Science, Contemporary history, Units Of Time, Lunar Observation, April 2014 Lunar Eclipse, Solar Eclipse Of July 22, Solar Eclipse Of March 29


Scientists Look in an Ancient Meteorite and Find Evidence of CO2-Laced Water

A team of researchers recently took a close look at an ancient meteorite and determined that it contained carbon dioxide-rich water, a discovery that has implications for the theory that water (and thus, life) first arrived on Earth by way of these rocks.Read more...
Tags: Science, Environment, Earth, Geology, Geophysics, Astrobiology, Planetary Science, Applied Sciences, Tagish Lake, Superconductor, Meteorite, Origin Of Life, In Science, Chondrite, Carbonaceous Chondrite, Akira Tsuchiyama


Russian Scientists Drop a Telescope Into the Deepest Lake on Earth

On Saturday, a team of Russian researchers dropped a brand-new telescope into frigid Lake Baikal, the deepest lake on Earth. It wasn’t an accident; the instrument took the plunge to give the scientists a better shot at detecting neutrinos, elusive subatomic particles that are extremely difficult to spot, since they…Read more...
Tags: Science, Earth, Physics, Particle physics, Dark Matter, Lake Baikal, Deepest Lake, IceCube Neutrino Observatory, Bair, Physical Sciences, Neutrinos, In Science, Technology Internet, Baikal Deep Underwater Neutrino Telescope, Antarctic Muon And Neutrino Detector Array, Dmitry Naumov


Hackers Are Swarming Microsoft Exchange

Those Microsoft Exchange security flaws you may have heard about are really getting pummeled. If ever there was a time for cybersecurity reporters to trot out metaphors involving phrases like “blood in the water” and “deranged swarm of piranhas,” it might be right now. Read more...
Tags: Science, Microsoft, Vulnerability, Advanced Persistent Threat, Cybercrime, Hacking, Computing, Cyberwarfare, Data Security, Computer Security, Microsoft Exchange, ESET, In Science, Security Hacker, Hafnium


Recovery of Rare Meteorite a ‘Dream Come True’ for UK Scientists

A chunk of black rock dating back to the earliest days of the solar system has fallen onto a residential driveway in the UK. Read more...
Tags: UK, Science, Environment, Geology, Geophysics, Astrobiology, Planetary Science, Applied Sciences, HANNAH, Meteorite, Ashley King, Richard Greenwood, In Science, Chondrite, Rob Wilcock, Nininger Meteorite Award


Earth's Inner Core Is Solid, But Squishier Than Previously Thought (slashdot)

brindafella writes: Earthquakes are telling scientists more about the core of the Earth, specifically that it is squishier than previously thought (by about 2.5%.) Associate Professor Hrvoje Tkali & Thanh-Son Pham of the Australian National University have made sense of data collected by seismographs around the world to put new numbers on the density and pressure of the core. In Science magazine, they show that the pressure is 167.4 +/- 1.6 gigapascals (GPa) in Earth's center. For reference, sta...
Tags: News, Earth, Australian National University, BeauHD, Hrvoje Tkali Thanh Son Pham, In Science


Earth's Inner Core Is Solid, But Squishier Than Previously Thought

brindafella writes: Earthquakes are telling scientists more about the core of the Earth, specifically that it is squishier than previously thought (by about 2.5%.) Associate Professor Hrvoje Tkali & Thanh-Son Pham of the Australian National University have made sense of data collected by seismographs around the world to put new numbers on the density and pressure of the core. In Science magazine, they show that the pressure is 167.4 +/- 1.6 gigapascals (GPa) in Earth's center. For reference, sta...
Tags: Tech, Earth, Australian National University, Hrvoje Tkali Thanh Son Pham, In Science