Posts filtered by tags: Internal Medicine[x]


 

Masks are Effective, Despite One Flawed Study From Denmark

"I think the overwhelming body of evidence suggests that masks are effective," the lead author of a study recently cited by America's Center for Disease Control told the Washington Post. They were responding to another (very controversial) outlier study whose findings "conflict with those from a number of other studies," according to the New York Times, citing numerous experts. "Critics were quick to note [that] study's limitations, among them that the design depended heavily on participants re...
Tags: Post, Washington Post, America, Tech, New York Times, Denmark, Columbia University, The Washington Post, Center for Disease Control, Internal Medicine, Angela Rasmussen, Henning Bundgaard, Bundgaard


COVID-19 News from Annals of Internal Medicine

Ethical and Scientific Considerations Regarding the Early Approval and Deployment of a COVID-19 Vaccine.
Tags: Science, Internal Medicine


Coronavirus: 8 things we got wrong — at first — about the deadly pandemic

A lot of our early assumptions about the new coronavirus have flip-flopped. This is normal. That’s how science works — it’s a process of being less and less wrong over time. COVID-19 is new, so there’s lots of uncertainty. And the pandemic’s size and scale caught us by surprise. As we learn more, our understanding of the virus continues to change. Here’s what we now know: Masks are useful after all. TOKYO, JAPAN – APRIL 08: A statue of a small boy is pictured with a face mask on April 8, 2020 ...
Tags: Health, South Korea, Utah, Politics, New York, Science, News, Medicine, California, Cdc, China, California News, Sport, Soccer, Shinzo Abe, Italy


Trudeau Acts Unilaterally to Ban “Assault Weapons” in Canada

Trudeau Acts Unilaterally to Ban “Assault Weapons” in Canada U.S.A. –-(Ammoland.com)- Trudeau acts, apparently unilaterally, and with speed, to ban “Assault Weapons” in Canada. On April 30, 2020, the Hill reported that: “Canada’s government is set to announce a ban on assault-style weapons following a deadly shooting in Nova Scotia this month that killed 22 people. Officials told The Associated Press on Wednesday that Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's administration will announce the ban before...
Tags: England, Guns, Australia, US, Toronto, Bbc, Canada, United States, New Zealand, Associated Press, Nova Scotia, Liberal party, Parliament, Globe, Quebec, Ottawa


Cancer care in the time of COVID-19

Below please find link(s) to new coronavirus-related content published today in Annals of Internal Medicine. All coronavirus-related content published in Annals of Internal Medicine is free to the public. A complete collection is available at https://annals.org/aim/pages/coronavirus-content
Tags: Science, Internal Medicine


UMass Amherst biostatistician lends expertise to white house coronavirus task force

A new study in the Annals of Internal Medicine calculates that the median incubation period for COVID-19 is just over 5 days and that 97.5% of people who develop symptoms will do so within 11.5 days of infection.
Tags: Science, UMass Amherst, Internal Medicine


New COVID-19 content from Annals of Internal Medicine

Histopathologic Changes and SARS-CoV-2 Immunostaining in the Lung of a Patient With COVID-19
Tags: Science, Internal Medicine


New COVID-19 content from Annals of Internal Medicine

Below please find links to new coronavirus-related content published today in Annals of Internal Medicine. All coronavirus-related content published in Annals of Internal Medicine is free to the public. A compete collection is available at https://annals.org/aim/pages/coronavirus-content.
Tags: Science, Internal Medicine


People who vape show DNA changes similar to smokers and that are linked to cancer

A University of Southern California study has found that vapers exhibit similar chemical modifications to people who smoke cigarettes – modifications commonly found in nearly all types of human cancer. In an email sent to BI, the study's lead researcher, Ahmad Besaratinia, said the study "demonstrates, for the first time, biologically important molecular changes in blood cells of vapers, similarly to smokers." Experts told BI that research into the physiological effects of vaping is often hind...
Tags: UK, US, Trends, Fda, Usc, Imperial College London, Juul, University Of Southern California, Internal Medicine, Watch Google, Lion Shahab, Ahmad Besaratinia, Berasantinia, Barnaby Page, ECigIntelligence, Alan Boobis


When should you prescribe statins for older adults?

Although I have never been a big fan of modeling studies, viewing their appropriate role as hypothesis-generating rather than clinical decision-supporting, a study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine deserves kudos for trying to do what neither the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association nor the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force did in their respective guidelines on primary prevention of cardiovascular […] Find jobs at Careers by KevinMD.com. Search thousands of phys...
Tags: Health, U S Preventive Services Task Force, Internal Medicine, Cardiology, Meds, PA NP, CRNA


HIV epidemic stubbornly persists despite proven tool to prevent spread

A new survey of more than 200 Internal Medicine residents indicates that more than half rated their knowledge of a proven medication to prevent the spread of HIV as only poor or fair.
Tags: Science, Internal Medicine


The nutrition study the $30B supplement industry doesn’t want you to see (ars technica)

Enlarge (credit: Getty | Roberto Machado Noa) A decade-long observational study of more than 30,000 people finds that certain vitamins and minerals may help extend your life and keep you from dying of cardiovascular disease—but only if you get those beneficial nutrients from foods, not supplements. The study, published this week in the Annals of Internal Medicine, is yet another to find that taking supplemental vitamins and minerals—either individually or in multivitamins—offers no discernible...
Tags: News, Beth Mole, Internal Medicine, Roberto Machado Noa


Excessive consumption of some dietary supplements can reduce life expectancy

A new study demonstrates the ineffectiveness of dietary supplements in reducing the risk of death. Some may even have the opposite effect. Published in The Annals of Internal Medicine, this research was carried out on 30,899 adult Americans aged 20 and over who participated in a national survey on health and nutrition between 1999 and 2010.
Tags: News, Internal Medicine


Benefits of landmark HIV drug outweigh risks of birth defects, study shows

A landmark treatment for HIV can be taken by women who wish to conceive despite the risk it may lead to birth defects in their unborn children, researchers have said. The antiretroviral drug dolutegravir, taken in conjunction with other drugs to suppress an HIV patient’s viral load and to stop them passing the virus to others, is considered one of the best HIV drugs available and has become the cornerstone of treatment in many richer countries since it was first introduced in the United States i...
Tags: Science, United States, South Africa, World Health Organization, Botswana, Massachusetts General Hospital, University of Cape Town, Internal Medicine, Linda Gail Bekker, Caitlin Dugdale


Massive new study debunks a vaccination-autism link

A massive new study finds absolutely no link between MMR vaccination and autism. Some question the expenditure of yet more research money on convincing conspiracy theorists. There are already 206 measles cases this year in the U.S., and the disease is up by 30% globally, despite previous near-eradication. None Measles were eliminated in the U.S. in 2000. Those were the days. Now it's back, with 206 cases in 11 states already confirmed this year. Measles' return is due to an increasing number ...
Tags: Facebook, UK, Washington Post, Public Health, Autism, Medical Research, Innovation, Protests, MMR, Reddit, Disease, World Health Organization, Denmark, Vaccinations, Health Care, U S Senate


Vaccines in no way cause autism, massive new study finds

A massive new study finds absolutely no link between MMR vaccination and autism. Some question the expenditure of yet more research money on convincing conspiracy theorists. There are already 206 measles cases this year in the U.S., and the disease is up by 30% globally, despite previous near-eradication. None Measles were eliminated in the U.S. in 2000. Those were the days. Now it's back, with 206 cases in 11 states already confirmed this year. Measles' return is due to an increasing number ...
Tags: Facebook, UK, Washington Post, Public Health, Autism, Medical Research, Innovation, Protests, MMR, Reddit, Disease, World Health Organization, Denmark, Vaccinations, Health Care, U S Senate


New at-home test can tell you if you have colon cancer

Early detection is paramount to effect treatment of life-threatening diseases like cancer, but going to the doctor for a screening can be time-consuming and, for some, a bit scary. At-home tests for cancer aren't exactly common, but a new study suggests a novel at-home screening may be suitable for some specific types of cancers, specifically in the colon.As LiveScience reports, the study was a meta-analysis of dozens of research efforts that focused on the effectiveness of what is called a ...
Tags: Science, United States, Internal Medicine


E-cigarette company Juul is now doing health research, but its first study could bring more questions than answers

On Saturday, for the first time in its roughly two-year history, e-cigarette company Juul presented some data from a clinical trial of its devices. The company has a reputation for aggressively marketing its dessert-flavored nicotine products to , some of whom, research suggests, may now be at a higher risk of using regular cigarettes. But Juul, which is now partially owned by Marlboro maker Altria, is now conducting scientific research. In general, that research is considered a key step towa...
Tags: Instagram, US, Trends, Food And Drug Administration, Silicon Valley, Fda, Marlboro, Juul, Don, American Medical Association, Altria, University of California San Francisco, Internal Medicine, Glantz, American Journal of Epidemiology, Stanton Glantz


Flare promotes Gebremedhin to partner

Flare Capital Partners has promoted Dan Gebremedhin to partner. Gebremedhin joined the healthcare tech-focused venture firm in 2015. PRESS RELEASE BOSTON–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Flare Capital Partners, a market leading healthcare technology venture capital firm, today announced the promotion of Dan Gebremedhin to Partner. Dr. Gebremedhin joined Flare Capital in 2015 prior to the final closing of the firm’s first $200M venture fund. Dr. Gebremedhin’s new role leverages his more than ten years of healthca...
Tags: Massachusetts, Trends, People, Healthcare, Baker, University Of California San Diego, Massachusetts General Hospital, Dan, Charlie Baker, Harvard Medical School, Chai, Internal Medicine, Joseph Kennedy, Morehouse School of Medicine, Gebremedhin, Flare Capital Partners


Annals of Internal Medicine embargoed news; Catheter ablation superior to standard drug

A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials found that catheter ablation was superior to conventional drug therapy alone for patients with atrial fibrillation and heart failure. Findings are published in Annals of Internal Medicine.
Tags: Science, Internal Medicine


Editorial: Stop allowing beliefs to get in the way of treating opioid use disorder

Patients face unnecessary barriers to evidence-based treatment from government regulations as well as providers' own beliefs that are not grounded in science, researchers from the Grayken Center for Addiction at Boston Medical Center (BMC) said in an Annals of Internal Medicine editorial.
Tags: Internal Medicine


Women may have a higher risk of breast cancer after giving birth: study

New research has found that younger women who have a child may have a higher risk of breast cancer after giving birth than women who do not have children. The researchers investigated whether there was an elevated breast cancer risk after childbirth in women younger than 55, as well as taking into account other factors such as whether the women breastfed and a family history of breast cancer. The results, published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, showed that the risk of breast cancer was a...
Tags: Science, Internal Medicine


Retraction of article “Joy of cooking too much” from journal

In a short notification, the editors of the Annals of Internal Medicine have announced that they are retracting a letter called “The Joy of Cooking Too Much: 70 Years of Calorie Increases in Classic Recipes”. The article in question was published in 2009.
Tags: Health, Internal Medicine


Women aren’t to blame because the workplace isn’t accommodating

A study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine explored the gender roles of career-oriented academic MDs in the workplace juxtaposed with domestic responsibilities. Dr. Jolly and colleagues hypothesized that by examining a specific cohort of younger physicians, more likely exposed to dual-income households, that there would be few, if any, differences in time spent on nonprofessional activities. The paper titled, “Gender Differences in Time Spent on Parenting and Domestic Responsibilities ...
Tags: Health, Nih, Practice Management, Jolly, Internal Medicine, Physician


Vaping every day could double your risk of a heart attack, new research suggests

The true effects of e-cigarettes on human health are just beginning to emerge. Risks of vaping include inhaling toxic metals like lead and potentially doubling one's risk of a heart attack, according to a new study published by UCSF researchers. Despite these emerging health concerns, e-cig companies like Juul, the Silicon Valley startup recently valued at $15 billion, are booming. Smoking kills. No other habit has been so strongly tied to death. In addition to inhaling burned tobacco and ta...
Tags: England, Israel, US, America, San Francisco, Trends, Silicon Valley, Morgan Stanley, Juul, Boston Children s Hospital, UCSF, Campaign for Tobacco Free Kids, Johns Hopkins University, University of California San Francisco, Big Tobacco, California Department of Public Health


Pivotal bioVenture Partners recruits Preston as managing partner

Pivotal bioVenture Partners, a life sciences venture firm, has appointed Dr. Heather Preston as a managing partner. Previously, Preston worked at TPG Biotech where she was a firm partner and managing director. Pivotal is backed by the Nan Fung Group. PRESS RELEASE SAN FRANCISCO, Aug. 8, 2018 /PRNewswire/ — Pivotal bioVenture Partners, today announced the appointment of the accomplished biotechnology venture capital executive, Heather Preston, M.D., as a Managing Partner. Preston joins Managing P...
Tags: Hong Kong, New York, China, Massachusetts, US, San Francisco, Trends, People, Healthcare, Preston, University of Oxford, New Enterprise Associates, Pivotal, UCSF, McKinsey Co, Hopfner


The wildly popular e-cig startup Juul is valued at $15 billion, but it faces a growing backlash of lawsuits and investigations

For a slim device that looks like a USB stick, the Juul e-cig packs a powerful punch. But despite the skyrocketing popularity of its devices, Juul Labs — which was recently valued at $15 billion — faces a growing backlash. State and federal regulators are probing Juul to see whether it unfairly marketed its products to teens, several lawsuits have been filed against the company, and San Francisco recently banned flavored tobacco products. For a slim device that looks like a USB stick, the J...
Tags: Facebook, London, Instagram, China, Boston, Massachusetts, US, San Francisco, Trends, Chicago, Food And Drug Administration, Silicon Valley, Fda, Morgan Stanley, Michael Bloomberg, Juul


Internal Medicine

So I have started my placement on internal medicine now. There are a lot more patients and a wider variety of conditions so it's been really interesting. This will probably just be a really long post about the most interesting things I've seen and learned
Tags: Travel, Internal Medicine


Methadone and buprenorphine reduce risk of death after opioid overdose

A National Institutes of Health-funded study found that treatment of opioid use disorder with either methadone or buprenorphine following a nonfatal opioid overdose is associated with significant reductions in opioid related mortality. The research, published today in the Annals of Internal Medicine, was co-funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) and the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, both parts of NIH.
Tags: Science, National Institutes of Health, National Institute on Drug Abuse NIDA, Internal Medicine


PE-backed Select Dermatology invests in Mindful Dermatology

Select Dermatology, which was formed to acquire and operate North American dermatology practices, has made an undisclosed investment in Dallas-based Mindful Dermatology PLLC, a provider of dermatology physician services. Select was launched by Welsh, Carson, Anderson & Stowe and Riata Capital Group. PRESS RELEASE Select Dermatology, LLC (“Select”), a company formed to acquire and operate North American dermatology practices, is pleased to announce its first investment in dermatology physician se...
Tags: Trends, Healthcare, M&a, Dallas, North America, Cather, University of Texas, Carlyle, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Coward, Sheridan, Dallas TX, Magna Cum Laude, Internal Medicine, Welsh Carson Anderson Stowe, John Carlyle