Posts filtered by tags: James IV[x]


 

Video Game Technology Helps Recreate Sound Of 16th-Century Scotland’s Chapel Royal

“Researchers have captured how they believe choral music would have sounded when played and sung in the now-ruined chapel at Linlithgow Palace, west Lothian, which was the birthplace of Mary Queen of Scots and where James IV visited for Easter celebrations around 1512. … Gaming technology … allow[s] specialists to model how acoustics would have been affected by long-destroyed interior details, such as the curve of an alabaster sculpture or an oak roof beam.” – The Guardian
Tags: Art, Music, Scotland, Mary Queen of Scots, James IV, Linlithgow Palace, 04.05.21


Gaming technology recreates 16th-century music in Scottish chapel

Researchers capture how choral music would have sounded in birthplace of Mary Queen of ScotsThe sounds of an Easter concert performed for James IV in a Scottish chapel have been recreated using gaming technology alongside groundbreaking recording techniques that allow specialists to model how acoustics would have been affected by long-destroyed interior details, such as the curve of an alabaster sculpture or an oak roof beam.Researchers have captured how they believe choral music would have soun...
Tags: Music, Science, Scotland, UK News, Culture, Heritage, Archaeology, Mary Queen of Scots, James IV, Linlithgow Palace, Mary Queen of ScotsThe


Gaming technology recreates C16th music in a Scottish chapel

Researchers capture how choral music would have sounded in birthplace of Mary Queen of ScotsThe sounds of an Easter concert performed for James IV in a Scottish chapel have been recreated using gaming technology alongside groundbreaking recording techniques that allow specialists to model how acoustics would have been affected by long-destroyed interior details, such as the curve of an alabaster sculpture or an oak roof beam.Researchers have captured how they believe choral music would have soun...
Tags: Music, Scotland, UK News, Culture, Heritage, Mary Queen of Scots, James IV, Linlithgow Palace, Mary Queen of ScotsThe


One of the Earliest Known Uses of the “F-word” Discovered: It Appears in a 1568 Anthology Compiled During a Plague

"Wan fukkit funling": as an insult, these words would today land a minor blow at most. Not so in Scotland of the early 16th century, in which William Dunbar and Walter Kennedy, two of the land's well-known poets, faced off before the court of King James IV in a contest of rhyme. The event is memorialized in the poem "The Flyting of Dunbar and Kennedie," one of 400 anthologized in what's known as the Bannatyne Manuscript. Compiled in 1568 by an Edinburgh merchant named George Bannatyne, stuck at...
Tags: Google, Facebook, College, Scotland, Ars Technica, History, Bbc, Language, Ferguson, Edinburgh, Seoul, Kennedy, Steven Pinker, Highland, Facebook Twitter, Dunbar


Did a Scottish Poet Invent the F-Word? A 1568 Anthology Compiled Under Plague Quarantine Suggests So

"Wan fukkit funling": as an insult, these words would today land a minor blow at most. Not so in Scotland of the early 16th century, in which William Dunbar and Walter Kennedy, two of the land's well-known poets, faced off before the court of King James IV in a contest of rhyme. The event is memorialized in the poem "The Flyting of Dunbar and Kennedie," one of 400 anthologized in what's known as the Bannatyne Manuscript. Compiled in 1568 by an Edinburgh merchant named George Bannatyne, stuck at...
Tags: Google, Facebook, College, Scotland, Ars Technica, History, Bbc, Language, Ferguson, Edinburgh, Seoul, Kennedy, Steven Pinker, Highland, Facebook Twitter, Dunbar


​Find over 3,000 witches on this map of Scotland

This map provides the location for people accused of witchcraft in Scotland between 1563 and 1736.It includes data on others, such as sheriffs, ministers and 'witch-prickers' – a most curious profession.The map also covers the infamous North Berwick Witch Trials, presided over by King James; his subsequent book on demonology inspired Shakespeare's Macbeth. Proof of godliness Looking for a witch but don't know where to find one? This map will help. It pins more than 3,000 people accused of witc...
Tags: England, London, Scotland, Religion, Women, History, Britain, Innovation, Violence, Denmark, Christian, Westminster, Parliament, Map, Shakespeare, North Sea


The Oldest Cathedral In Scotland Says A Lot About Glasgow

The Glasgow Cathedral, completed by 1136, is a prideful building that’s seen two religions, survived the Reformation, and where classes of the University of Glasgow began. You don’t normally associate the word tough with a cathedral but in Glasgow, Scotland, it couldn’t be more appropriate. In 1502 the Cathedral was the place where King James IV signed the Treaty of Perpetual Peace with England. Somewhat ironically, the Glasgow Cathedral was then used to house artillery during the Battle of Gla...
Tags: Travel, England, Scotland, Culture, Glasgow, Pictures And Video, Glasgow Scotland, University of Glasgow, Glasgow Cathedral, James VI, James IV, Catholic Glasgow Cathedral, Gavin Dunbar


Language deprivation — "The Forbidden Experiment."

From Wikipedia:According to Herodotus, the Egyptian pharaoh Psamtik I carried out such an experiment, and concluded the Phrygian race must antedate the Egyptians since the child had first spoken something similar to the Phrygian word bekos, meaning "bread"....An experiment allegedly carried out by Holy Roman Emperor Frederick II in the 13th century... encouraged "foster-mothers and nurses to suckle and bathe and wash the children, but in no ways to prattle or speak with them; for he would have l...
Tags: Law, Scotland, Wikipedia, History, Yale, Language, Evolution, Walter Scott, Nicholas Christakis, Frederick II, Joe Rogan, Rogan, Christakis, Ann Althouse, Psamtik, James IV


Why there really isn’t an off-season for Edinburgh

For centuries, Edinburgh, Scotland’s elegant and lively seat of power, has been admired by native sons and foreigners alike. “Half a capital and half a country town, the whole city leads a double existence,” Robert Louis Stevenson remarked. Visitors of all stripes imagined themselves living there. Charlotte Bronte loved it. So did Joseph Goebbels, Hitler’s propaganda minister, who wrote in 1938 that the city “will make a delightful summer capital when we invade Britain.” Up Helly Aa Vikings ...
Tags: Travel, Scotland, Sport, David, Things To Do, Canada, Britain, Soccer, Harry Potter, Edinburgh, Catholic, Charlotte Brontë, Seattle, British Royals, Robert Louis Stevenson, Edmonton