Posts filtered by tags: Johannes Kepler[x]


 

A 16th-Century Astronomy Book Featured “Analog Computers” to Calculate the Shape of the Moon, the Position of the Sun, and More

Pop-up book enthusiasts like Ellen Rubin will know what volvelles are; you and I may not, but if you’ve ever moved a paper wheel or slider on a page, you’ve used one. The volvelle first emerged in the medieval era, not as an amusement to liven up children’s books but as a kind of “analog computer” embedded in serious scientific works. “The volvelles make the practical nature of cosmography clear,” writes Katie Taylor at Cambridge’s Whipple Library, which holds a copy of Cosmographia. “Read...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Books, Astronomy, College, History, Cambridge, Seoul, Atlas Obscura, Facebook Twitter, Johannes Kepler, Katie Taylor, Colin Marshall, Ellen Rubin, 21st Century Los Angeles, Whipple Library


SpaceX can't wait even one second for bad weather to pass for a rocket launch with people because it could endanger their entire mission

SpaceX's Crew Dragon spaceship sits atop a Falcon 9 rocket in preparation for the launch of Crew-1 at the Kennedy Space Center on November 13. SpaceX via Elon Musk/Twitter SpaceX and NASA launched their Crew-1 mission on Sunday: the longest and most ambitious US human spaceflight to date. Poor weather near the launchpad, or any other delays, at the moment of planned launch would have caused mission managers to call off an attempt; SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket can't wait another second. Fal...
Tags: Transportation, Weather, Space, Spacex, Science, News, US, Trends, Fuel, Nasa, Earth, International Space Station, Isaac Newton, Astronauts, Demo, Rocket Launch


SpaceX can't wait even 1 second for bad weather to pass for a rocket launch with people because it could endanger their entire mission

SpaceX's Crew Dragon spaceship sits atop a Falcon 9 rocket in preparation for the launch of Crew-1 at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida, November 13, 2020. SpaceX via Elon Musk/Twitter SpaceX and NASA are attempting to launch their Crew-1 mission on Sunday: the longest and most ambitious US human spaceflight to date. Poor weather near the launchpad, or any other delays, at the moment of planned launch will cause mission managers to call off an attempt; SpaceX's Falcon...
Tags: Transportation, Weather, Space, Spacex, Florida, Science, News, US, Trends, Fuel, Nasa, Earth, International Space Station, Isaac Newton, Astronauts, Iss


An Academic Argument for Astrology

In an article recently posted to AtlasObscura, Alexander Boxer makes a compelling case for the efficacy of astrology. Boxer is the author of who makes the intriguing case that astrologers were immersed in data and using data, were able to accurately predict many major life and world events. He credits astrology with helping to inform the establishment of Baghdad as a nation's capital. He writes, "Astrology’s insistence on linking earthly events with celestial causes in this way may see...
Tags: Europe, Books, England, Paris, Mars, Saturn, Jupiter, Shakespeare, Baghdad, Astrology, New York Yankees, Boxer, Elizabeth, Pierre, Copernicus, Antichrist


When Astronomer Johannes Kepler Wrote the First Work of Science Fiction, The Dream (1609)

The point at which we date the birth of any genre is apt to shift depending on how we define it. When did science fiction begin? Many cite early masters of the form like Jules Verne and H.G. Wells as its progenitors. Others reach back to Mary Shelley’s 1818 Frankenstein as the genesis of the form. Some few know The Blazing World, a 1666 work of fiction by Margaret Cavendish, Duchess of Newcastle, who called her book a “hermaphroditic text.” According to the judgment of such experts as Is...
Tags: Google, Astronomy, Science, College, Religion, Literature, Sci Fi, William Gibson, Kepler, Carl Sagan, Facebook Twitter, Galileo, Frankenstein, Wells, Copernicus, Jules Verne


The scientific mysteries that led to Einstein’s E=mc^2 equation

Scientists deal with mysteries. As Richard Feynman once commented:  “Science must remain a continual dialog between skeptical inquiry and a sense of inexplicable mystery”.Three examples: it is profoundly mysterious as to why mathematics can so accurately describe our physical world, and even predict events, such as the motion of the planets or the propagation of radio waves from earth to spacecraft.  The theorems of mathematics are not normally thought to derive from properties of the real world...
Tags: Books, London, Featured, Physics, Paris, Maxwell, Isaac Newton, Albert Einstein, Einstein, Kelvin, Kepler, Newton, Speed Of Light, Richard Feynman, Galileo, Copernicus


A Theory of Everything (That Matters): A Brief Guide to Einstein, Relativity, and His Surprising Thoughts on God by Alister McGrath- Part 3 and Chapter 2- The Old World: Newton’s Clockwork Universe

A Theory of Everything (That Matters): A Brief Guide to Einstein, Relativity, and His Surprising Thoughts on God by Alister McGrath- Part 3 and Chapter 2- The Old World: Newton’s Clockwork Universe We are reviewing Alister McGrath’s new book, “A Theory of Everything (That Matters): A Brief Guide to Einstein, Relativity, and His Surprising Thoughts on God”.  Chapter 2 is entitled: “The Old World: Newton’s Clockwork Universe”.  McGrath starts the chapter by pointing out how even though science is...
Tags: Religion, Uncategorized, Earth, Isaac Newton, Albert Einstein, Mars, Einstein, Kepler, Neptune, Mercury, Newton, Mcgrath, Alexandria, Bern, Copernicus, Urbain Le Verrier


My Journey With Bird Songs

For the past 11 years, I have been working on incorporating bird songs into my music. When I say “my music”, I am talking about my improvisations, because all of the music I compose starts with improvisation, which I then sculpt into compositions. To me, this is a more “natural“ way to go, but then again, that’s been my approach my entire life. When the composition is set, I leave space for improvisations based on the bird songs, as well as motifs created from the surrounding soundscape. Six of ...
Tags: Facebook, New York, Minnesota, California, New York City, Religion, Americas, US, Los Angeles, New Jersey, Jazz, Ornette Coleman, Piano, Columns, Kepler, Robin


range & inefficiency

An innovation system should preserve range and inefficiency, concludes the book Range—Why generalists triumph in a specialized world, by David Epstein. Focusing deep yields efficiencies and incremental innovation. But a broad base of learning and experience can produce radical innovation. Many (most?) of our research and education practices are designed for ‘kind’ environments where the rules and parameters are relatively clear. Playing chess is one example. But the world, and most fields of hum...
Tags: Books, Learning, United States, Complexity, eLearning, Epstein, Johannes Kepler, Karl Weick, David Epstein, Kevin Dunbar, Cathryn Barnard


Johannes Kepler Theorized That Each Planet Sings a Song, Each in a Different Voice: Mars is a Tenor; Mercury, a Soprano; and Earth, an Alto

Johannes Kepler determined just how the planets of our solar system make their way around the sun. He published his innovative work on the subject from 1609 to 1619, and in the final year of that decade he also came up with a theory that each planet sings a song, and each in a different voice at that. Mars is a tenor, Mercury is a soprano, and Earth, as the BBC show QI (or Quite Interesting) recently tweeted, " is an alto that sings two notes Mi and Fa, which Kepler read as 'Miseriam & Famem', ...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Europe, Astronomy, Music, Science, College, America, Nasa, Earth, Bbc, Switzerland, Fa, Mars, Seoul, Kepler


Vernal Equinox

Sometimes, you just can’t trust your lying eyes. If you observe the sky, for example, you might see the Sun rising and setting every day and conclude that it circles around Earth. And that’s what most people thought until about five centuries ago. They were wrong, of course — their eyes deceived them. Not everyone agreed with that idea, though. More than 2400 years ago, a Greek philosopher proposed that Earth, Sun, Moon, and planets all orbit the “central fire” of the universe. And a century lat...
Tags: Space, Earth, Sun, Damond Benningfield, Samos, Johannes Kepler, Vernal Equinox, Earth Sun Moon


NASA releases the “last light” image taken by Kepler before it retired last year

NASA Kepler space telescope’s “last light” image NASA has released the final view taken by Kepler in September, shortly before the space telescope was retired after nearly a decade of unprecedented discoveries about the universe beyond our solar system. “It bookends the moment of intense excitement nine and a half years earlier when the spacecraft first opened its eye to the skies and captured its ’first light’ image,” wrote NASA Ames Research Center public affairs officer Alison Hawkes. “Ke...
Tags: TC, Astronomy, Space, Tech, Nasa, Earth, Hawkes, Kepler, Exoplanet, Tess, Johannes Kepler, NASA Ames Research Center, Alison Hawkes


Close to the Sun

Nicolaus Copernicus revolutionized our understanding of the universe. He demonstrated that Earth and the other planets orbit the Sun. And he proposed that their orbits were perfect circles. Decades later, German astronomer Johannes Kepler tried to prove those ideas mathematically. He used observations made by his mentor, Tycho Brahe, to try to plot the orbit of Mars. But he found that Copernicus was off a bit. To explain what’s happening, he devised what are now known as Kepler’s laws of planeta...
Tags: Space, Earth, Sun, Kepler, Copernicus, Nicolaus Copernicus, Johannes Kepler, Tycho Brahe, Damond Benningfield Keywords


Science history: Kepler’s optics and orbits

In a time of witch trials, Johannes Kepler was a champion of reason. Jeff Glorfeld reports.
Tags: Space, Kepler, Johannes Kepler, Jeff Glorfeld


Paradigms lost, wisdom gained

Tycho Brahe lived with a hand-crafted nose made of brass after his real one was sliced off in a duel. Mr. Brahe was a renowned 16th-century Danish astronomer and a great empirical scientist whose data were used to formulate Johannes Kepler’s three laws of planetary motion. But for our purposes, Tycho Brahe is especially interesting for something other than his prosthetic schnoz or his contributions to astronomy, but for a notable mistake.Confronted with his own irrefutable evidence that the know...
Tags: Books, Featured, Knowledge, Belief, Earth, Freud, Social Sciences, Milton, Adam, Johannes Kepler, Tycho Brahe, Science & Medicine, David P. Barash, Brahe, Scientific Method, War On Science


The flow of physics

Galileo was proud of his parabolic trajectory. In his first years after arriving at the university in Padua, he had worked with marked intensity to understand the mathematical structure of the trajectory, arriving at a definitive understanding of it by 1610—just as he was distracted by his friend Paolo Sarpi who suggested he improve on the crude Dutch telescopes starting to circulate around Venice. This distraction lasted 20 years, only to end under his house arrest, when he finally had time to ...
Tags: Europe, Books, Featured, Venice, Kepler, Newton, Hamilton, Galileo, Padua, Lorenz, James Gleick, LaGrange, Galileo Galilei, Johannes Kepler, Science & Medicine, Physics & Chemistry


Visiting Astronomers

Many of the features on the Moon are named after astronomers. So are features on Mars and other planets and moons. And hundreds of asteroids also are named for astronomers. You won’t find many features named for astronomers here on Earth, though. Quite a few streets and schools are named for them, but when it comes to major features, like mountains or cities, the list is pretty thin -- especially in the United States. One of the few on the list is Mount Langley, a 14,000-foot summit in Californi...
Tags: Space, Australia, California, United States, Queensland, New South Wales, Antarctica, New Zealand, Brisbane, Mars, Ross, Australia New Zealand, Galileo Galilei, Johannes Kepler, James Ross, Damond Benningfield Keywords


Nothing's as Amazing as a Musical

I've written nine musicals -- book, music, and lyrics -- and all but one have been produced. My earlier shows are respectable efforts, but I wouldn't want anyone of them to be produced today. After all, I wrote my first show the summer before senior year in high school. It wasn't bad for a seventeen-year-old with no training, writing his first musical, but that's not really saying much.But I really like my later shows, particularly three of them (Attempting the Absurd, In the Blood, and Johnny ...
Tags: Amazon, New York, London, Musicals, Scotland, Marijuana, Theatre, Vampires, America, Los Angeles, Live, Gay, Harvard University, House, Stage, Broadway


Are The Best Ideas Beautiful? How Science Has Tried To Make The Case

I think it’s time we take a lesson from the history of science. Beauty does not have a good track record as a guide for theory-development. Many beautiful hypotheses were just wrong, like Johannes Kepler’s idea that planetary orbits are stacked in regular polyhedrons known as ‘Platonic solids’, or that atoms are knots in an invisible aether, or that the Universe is in a ‘steady state’ rather than undergoing expansion. And other theories that were once considered ugly have stood the test of time....
Tags: Art, Ideas, Johannes Kepler, 07.12.18


The Kepler Luminaire by Innermost

Innermost’s Kepler luminaire is an innovative, ultra-thin light made of polycarbonate, steel, and micro-weave fabric. Named for Johannes Kepler, the German scientist who discovered the Supernova, Kepler definitely has a space-age, ethereal quality. Its thin silhouette and carefully placed pattern of stealthy LEDs make it appear like a lunar or extra-stellar body, as it seems to defy gravity while radiating light in all directions. Released this spring, Kepler participated in last month’s Darc...
Tags: Books, Led Light, Lighting, Kepler, Johannes Kepler, Innermost, Luminaire, Pendant Lights, Pendant Light, Darc Awards, Innermost Kepler Luminaire, Polycarbonate Light, Kepler Luminaire, Supernova Kepler, Triac Lutron


The Pull of Love

Psalm 8:4 When I consider your heavens, the work of your fingers, the moon and the stars you have set in their courses, What are we that you should be mindful of us, mere mortals that you should seek us out? — from the St. Helena Psalter   Today in the calendar of the saints we remember Nicolaus Copernicus and Johannes Kepler, who added to our knowledge of the heavens and in particular of how celestial objects moved relative to each other. Although born nearly a century apart, t...
Tags: Religion, Earth, Missouri, St Louis, Kepler, Copernicus, Nicolaus Copernicus, Johannes Kepler, Christ Church Cathedral, Speaking to the Soul, St Helena Psalter Today, Hans Brinker Copernicus, Rev Leslie Scoopmire


How Warren Buffett Won His Multi-Million Dollar Long Bet

This year, Warren Buffett won his multi-million dollar, decade-long Long Bet. F rom the preacher warning that the day of reckon ing is nigh, to the sports analyst  prognosticating  about the outcome of next week’s big game, to the fortune teller calling for hard times in Mercury retrograde, predictions are pervasive, but accountability is rare. That the vast majority of predictions fail to come true is hardly a deterrent; we tend to remember the few that do. This is a story about a p...
Tags: Amazon, UK, London, Stanford, Future, US, Sale, Bloomberg, Earth, United States, Alan Turing, Warren, Berkshire Hathaway, Omaha, Warren Buffett, Getty


Occult Based Novels

For those who may be interested in fiction regarding the occult, there are two book that may be of interest. Wolf on a String is, according to Publishers Weekly, a brooding, atmospheric whodunit set in 16th-century Prague. Christian Stern, the bastard son of the Prince-Bishop of Regensburg, has arrived in that city in the hopes of winning the favor of Rudolf II, the ruler of the Holy Roman Empire, and obtaining a place among the court’s learned men, such as astrologer Johannes Kepler and Tycho...
Tags: Europe, Prague, Regensburg, Bishop, Kepler, Astrology, Wolf, Stern, Magdalena, Johannes Kepler, Tycho Brahe, John Banville, That's Entertainment, Benjamin Black, Banville, Shopping List


In-Depth: A Ulysse Nardin Tellurium Johannes Kepler, One Of The Three Original Trilogy Of Time Watches From The 1990s

A very big blast from a very cosmic past.
Tags: Watches, Johannes Kepler


Johannes Kepler's obsession with Mars

It took Johannes Kepler eight years to solve the the “Martian problem” laying the foundations for modern astronomy in the process. 
Tags: Space, Mars, Johannes Kepler


Winter Solstice

If you don’t like winter and you live in the northern hemisphere, then give a little thanks to the laws of orbital mechanics. Because of Earth’s lopsided path around the Sun, winter is the shortest season north of the equator — several days shorter than summer. Earth’s orbit around the Sun isn’t a perfect circle. Instead, it’s an ellipse, which looks like a flattened circle, with the Sun slightly away from the center. That means our distance to the Sun changes. And that’s where the laws of orbit...
Tags: Space, Earth, Sun, Damond Benningfield, Sun Earth, Johannes Kepler


Kepler's Trial the Opera

The trial in which the famous astronomer, Johannes Kepler, defended his mother from accusations of witchcraft has been turned into an opera, following new research into the original 17th-century legal proceedings. The opera was conceived by Cambridge historian Dr Ulinka Rublack, a fellow of St John’s College. It made its debut in October as part of Cambridge University’s Festival of Ideas. A film of Kepler’s Trial the Opera is now available online. Born in 1571, Johannes Kepler is one of...
Tags: Europe, College, Cambridge, Cambridge University, Kepler, Stuttgart, Philip Glass, St John, Watts, Creative Commons Attribution, Katharina, Copernicus, Royal College, Hindemith, Johannes Kepler, St John 's College


Kepler's Trial: An Opera

The trial in which the famous astronomer, Johannes Kepler, defended his mother from accusations of witchcraft has been turned into an opera, following new research into the original 17th-century legal proceedings. The opera was conceived by Cambridge historian Professor Ulinka Rublack, a fellow of St John’s College. It made its debut in October as part of Cambridge University’s Festival of Ideas. A film of Kepler’s Trial: An Opera is now available online. Born in 1571, Johannes Kepler is...
Tags: Europe, College, Cambridge, Cambridge University, Kepler, Stuttgart, Philip Glass, St John, Watts, Creative Commons Attribution, BBC Radio, Katharina, Copernicus, Royal College, Hindemith, Johannes Kepler


There's something mysterious about Jupiter's many moons

When it comes to moons, Earthlings have it easy — just one moon to keep track of. And except for cloudy days and new moons it's usually not too hard too spot. That's nothing like the headache of trying to keep track of Jupiter's moons, which seem to multiply mysteriously all the time — and occasionally even disappear. Lately, our largest neighbor has been picking up satellites so quickly that astronomers haven't even been sweating over giving them real names (hope S/2000 J11 rolls off your tongu...
Tags: Trends, Nasa, Earth, European Space Agency, Saturn, Jupiter, Europa, New England, Galileo, Medici, Galileo Galilei, Ganymede, Callisto, Johannes Kepler, Scott Sheppard, Europa Ganymede


Kepler laid the groundwork for this amazing science joke 400 years ago — and it finally paid off

Even in the space age, a little knowledge of the classics comes in handy sometimes. If you're a fan of Greco-Roman mythology and NASA, you may have noticed that the space probe now orbiting Jupiter has a name with a familiar ring: Juno. In myth, Jupiter (Zeus for the Greeks) was king of the gods, and Juno/Hera was his queen. Their marriage was a troubled one, mostly because of Jupiter's rampant infidelity. When a Renaissance astronomer named Simon Marius claimed that he had discovered that the ...
Tags: Trends, Nasa, Jupiter, Kepler, Juno, Hera, Johannes Kepler, Matthew Smith