Posts filtered by tags: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health[x]


 

Coronavirus vaccines are more extraordinary in the real world than in trials - even in the face of variants

A physician injects a patient with the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine. MediaNews Group/Boston Herald via Getty Images Coronavirus vaccines are proving just as effective in real life as they were in clinical trials. That indicates that the vaccines are holding up well against variants. In Pfizer's case, the shot also seems to yield fewer side effects than in clinical trials. See more stories on Insider's business page. By the time coronavirus vaccines were rolled out to the public, tens o...
Tags: UK, Science, News, Cdc, Israel, US, Trends, Qatar, Spain, South Africa, Pfizer, Baltimore, Centers For Disease Control And Prevention, University Hospital, Johnson & Johnson, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health


The Yankees' 'breakthrough' COVID-19 infections are a case study in how the virus can spread among vaccinated people

Yankee shortstop Gleyber Torres. Butch Dill-USA TODAY Sports Eight members of the Yankees organization have tested positive for COVID-19 after being vaccinated. These kinds of "breakthrough infections" are usually mild or asymptomatic. Relaxed restrictions and the spread of variants may have increased the risk of an outbreak. See more stories on Insider's business page. The Yankees provided an important lesson in epidemiology this week: Even if you've been fully vaccinated, it'...
Tags: Usa, UK, Science, News, Cdc, Kentucky, New York City, US, Sports, Trends, Spain, South Africa, New York Times, Brazil, Mlb, Baseball


Vaccinated people can ditch masks and distancing, the CDC says. Experts think the guidance is overdue but may be too broad.

A woman adjusts her face mask. Getty Images Fully vaccinated Americans no longer have to mask up or distance at indoor or outdoor gatherings. The new CDC rule is overdue, experts said, but there are still circumstances that warrant caution. If you live in a hotspot or have unvaccinated kids, you may not want to ditch your mask yet. See more stories on Insider's business page. For the first time in more than a year, Americans have a green light to participate in any kind of activity - l...
Tags: Science, News, Colorado, Cdc, White House, Masks, US, Trends, Public Health, New Mexico, Vaccines, Baltimore, Centers For Disease Control And Prevention, Gurley, Reuters, Wilmington Delaware


Coronavirus vaccines are exceeding expectations in the real world - even in the face of variants

A physician injects a patient with the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine. MediaNews Group/Boston Herald via Getty Images Coronavirus vaccines are proving just as effective in real life as they were in clinical trials. That indicates that the vaccines are holding up well against variants. In Pfizer's case, the shot also seems to yield fewer side effects than in clinical trials. See more stories on Insider's business page. By the time coronavirus vaccines were rolled out to the public, tens o...
Tags: UK, Science, News, Cdc, Israel, US, Trends, Qatar, Spain, South Africa, Pfizer, Baltimore, Centers For Disease Control And Prevention, University Hospital, Johnson & Johnson, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health


Herd immunity in the US could be around the corner - but maintaining it is likely to be a perpetual battle

Kristine Ko, right, waits in line for her vaccine in Los Angeles on April 8, 2021. Al Seib/Los Angeles Times/Getty Images The US could reach herd immunity in a matter of weeks or months, but the metric is a moving target. Vaccines bring the US closer to that goal. More contagious variants make it harder to reach. Maintaining herd immunity could require annual booster shots. See more stories on Insider's business page. Scientists want you to know that the threshold for herd immunity isn...
Tags: Science, News, Cdc, US, Los Angeles, Trends, Atlanta, Cnn, United States, New York Times, University Of Chicago, Pfizer, Anthony Fauci, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, The Food and Drug Administration, Anaheim California


The US and UK lead the world's coronavirus vaccinations - but they may struggle to reach herd immunity if they reopen too soon

People in England flock back to pubs and restaurants as lockdown restrictions were eased on April 12, 2021. Pietro Recchia/SOPA Images/LightRocket/Getty Images The US and UK are relaxing restrictions as their vaccinations continue to ramp up. But scientists worry the countries are developing a false sense of security. More contagious variants and vaccine skepticism could still pose a barrier to herd immunity. See more stories on Insider's business page. Countries that have vaccinated ...
Tags: UK, England, Science, London, News, California, Cdc, Israel, US, Trends, Spain, United States, South Africa, Liverpool, Chile, United Kingdom


Telehealth consults increased more than 50-fold among privately insured working-age patients during first phase of the pandemic

A study co-authored by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that telehealth consults among privately insured working-age patients accounted for almost 24 percent of outpatient consults with health care providers during the early phase of the pandemic.
Tags: Science, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health


The US hasn't authorized AstraZeneca's vaccine for 2 main reasons. That could change in April.

French Health Minister Olivier Veran receives the AstraZeneca-Oxford COVID-19 vaccine on February 8, 2021. THOMAS SAMSON/AFP via Getty Images The US hasn't authorized AstraZeneca's vaccine because its trial is still going. Vaccine experts have also questioned inconsistencies in the company's global studies. AstraZeneca's US trial results will likely clear up confusion in April. See more stories on Insider's business page. After more than a dozen countries paused the us...
Tags: UK, Science, News, US, Trends, United States, South Africa, Brazil, World Health Organization, Astrazeneca, Fda, Pfizer, Pascal Soriot, Reuters, Copenhagen Denmark, Senate Finance Committee


Weddings could be safe this spring and summer, experts say - here's how to go about it

Lindsey and Danny Chase with their full wedding party. Kristen Gardner Photography The CDC still advises against large events, but there are ways to keep weddings relatively low-risk. Experts recommend a local, outdoor ceremony. Buffet-style meals and group transportation should be avoided. See more stories on Insider's business page. By August of last year, Lindsey and Danny Chase knew it was time to abandon their dream of a church wedding with 200 guests. Coronavirus cases were on th...
Tags: Florida, Science, Marriage, News, Cdc, Virginia, Trends, Maine, Wedding, World Health Organization, University of Florida, Dc, Centers For Disease Control And Prevention, Alexandria, Lindsey, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health


How convalescent plasma could be used to treat new variants of the coronavirus - especially where vaccines are scarce

A medical worker shows convalescent plasma taken from a recovered COVID-19 patient at the Indonesian Red Cross, Surabaya City. Patrik Cahyo Lumintu / Opn Images/Barcroft Media via Getty Images Convalescent plasma could still be a crucial coronavirus treatment, says an immunology professor. Plasma is donated by recovered patients, providing an injection of virus-fighting antibodies. "Most patients - even in very poor countries - can make plasma," Dr. Arturo Casadevall said. Visit the Busine...
Tags: UK, Science, News, US, Trends, Philippines, Food And Drug Administration, Argentina, Fda, Navajo Nation, Oxford University, Donald Trump, Antibodies, Charles Davis, Johns Hopkins, Trump


Women reported worse side effects from the COVID-19 vaccine than men, CDC study shows

lechatnoir/Getty Images More women reported they experienced side effects from the COVID-19 vaccine, a CDC study showed. The survey conducted by the CDC analyzed more than 13 million vaccine recipients as of January 13. Women made up nearly 80% of the 7,000 recipients who reported side effects. Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories. Women made up a majority of those reporting adverse effects from the COVID-19 vaccine, a study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevent...
Tags: Science, Cdc, Women, Trends, Pennsylvania, The Times, The New York Times, Vaccines, Centers For Disease Control And Prevention, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Klein, State College, Coronavirus, Lauren Frias, COVID-19, Covid-19 Vaccine


Hardly anyone is following the CDC guidelines perfectly. Here's how to stay safe even while bending the rules.

Seven-year-old Jacquie Carney runs to hug her grandma, Donna Vidrine, upon arrival in Los Angeles, California on November 23, 2020. Allen J. Schaben/Los Angeles Times/Getty Images As pandemic fatigue sets in, many Americans have stopped following CDC rules as closely. Experts shared tips for how to hug, see friends, and take trips while keeping your risk of infection low. Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories. Emily Gurley, an epidemiologist at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg ...
Tags: Science, News, Maryland, Cdc, White House, US, Los Angeles, Trends, University of Florida, Illinois, Centers For Disease Control And Prevention, Gurley, Reuters, Don, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Los Angeles California


Mandatory public health measures to combat COVID-19 are more effective, says study

In a new study, researchers at Lundberg Health Advocates and the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in the U.S. compared mandatory and voluntary implementations of shelter-in-place policies. They assessed their respective bearings on COVID-19 mortality, equity, and economic outcomes.
Tags: Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Lundberg Health Advocates


AstraZeneca's missteps and murky data sewed worldwide confusion that undermined trust - but don't rule the shot out yet

A medical staffer vaccinates a colleague with the AstraZeneca vaccine at the South Ile-de-France Hospital Group in Melun, France on February 8, 2021. Thomas Samson/AFP/Getty Images AstraZeneca's coronavirus vaccine could be anywhere from 22% to 90% effective, depending on the parameters. Doses might be more effective given 12 weeks apart. Experts say inconsistency in AstraZeneca's trials and data might be undermining trust in the shots. Visit the Business section of Insider for more storie...
Tags: Europe, UK, Science, London, News, Sweden, US, Trends, European Union, South Africa, Washington Dc, Italy, Belgium, Brazil, World Health Organization, Astrazeneca


Nearly one-third of Israelis have been vaccinated, and very few of them have gotten sick - a sign of light at the end of the tunnel

Israeli Prime Minister Minister Benjamin Netanyahu gets his second dose of the coronavirus vaccine on January 9, 2021. MIRIAM ALSTER/POOL/AFP via Getty Images Israel has vaccinated more people per capita than any other country: nearly a third of Israelis have gotten at least their first shot. Only 63 out of 428,000 Israelis — less than 0.02% — contracted the coronavirus after receiving their second doses. Experts expected to see Israel's new daily cases drop by now, but like many countries...
Tags: UK, Science, News, Israel, US, Jerusalem, Trends, Getty Images, United States, West Bank, United Nations, Pfizer, Benjamin Netanyahu, East Jerusalem, Biden, Disneyland


Sprawl made Los Angeles’ pandemic problem worse, not better

In April 2020, a mere month into the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, things were looking pretty good for Los Angeles. As the virus ravaged metropolitan New York City, Los Angeles County went largely unaffected—as of April 24, the City of Angels posted a mere 850 cases, compared to the Big Apple’s 16,646. Anti-urban pundits were quick to claim victory. In the pages of the Los Angeles Times, Joel Kotkin proclaimed: “Angelenos love their sprawl. The coronavirus proves them right.” Fast forward to ear...
Tags: New York, Opinion, New York City, America, Los Angeles, Sport, Joe Biden, Chicago, Soccer, New York Times, New Jersey, Andrew Cuomo, Long Island, Los Angeles Times, City Of Angels, Big Apple


A new COVID-19 challenge: Mutations rise along with cases

The race against the virus that causes COVID-19 has taken a new turn: Mutations are rapidly popping up, and the longer it takes to vaccinate people, the more likely it is that a variant that can elude current tests, treatments and vaccines could emerge. The coronavirus is becoming more genetically diverse, and health officials say the high rate of new cases is the main reason. Each new infection gives the virus a chance to mutate as it makes copies of itself, threatening to undo the progress mad...
Tags: Health, England, Science, News, Nbc, Cdc, China, Los Angeles, Sport, Joe Biden, Britain, Soccer, United States, South Africa, Harvard University, United Kingdom


We just got some promising early data that shows a one-shot coronavirus vaccine could help protect people from COVID-19

A clinical trial volunteer participates in Johnson & Johnson's study to test a coronavirus vaccine candidate Janssen Johnson & Johnson's coronavirus vaccine generates a promising immune response. It's still not clear if the shot can prevent COVID-19, or how it will compare to rival vaccinations. The drugmaker is set to publish data within weeks that should provide more definitive information about the protection the vaccine provides. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. ...
Tags: Trends, Food And Drug Administration, World Health Organization, Philadelphia, Pfizer, Rio, 288, Johnson Johnson, Carlos, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, New England Journal of Medicine, J J, Durbin, Del Rio, Paul Offit, Emory University School of Medicine


Monoclonal antibody treatments could cut COVID-19 hospitalizations significantly - but doctors aren't using their full supply

Stephen Craib, 42, makes his 15th plasma donation to the NHS Blood and Transplant Convalescent Plasma Program in London. Kirsty O'Connor/PA Images/Getty Images The FDA has authorized two monoclonal antibody treatments for COVID-19. Scientists think the drugs could help reduce hospitalizations. But Moncef Slaoui, the chief advisor of Operation Warp Speed, told CNBC that states are only using 5% to 20% of their available supply. That's likely because doctors have a window of just 10 days...
Tags: UK, Chris Christie, Science, London, News, US, Trends, Washington Dc, Food And Drug Administration, Fda, Npr, Donald Trump, Cnbc, Ben Carson, Antibody, Brooklyn New York


Rich countries buying most of the world's vaccine supply has left the rest 'scrambling for supplies,' campaigners say

The CEO of the The New Jewish Home long-term care facility in New York receives the Pfizer Covid-19 vaccine on December 21, 2020. BRYAN R. SMITH/AFP via Getty Images Wealthier countries like the US and the UK have cleaned out global supplies of coronavirus vaccines, leaving many nations without access to any doses at all. Rich countries have reserved more doses than their populations need, while lower-income countries are relying on a UN-backed acquisition program that may struggle to deli...
Tags: Politics, UK, New York, Science, Nigeria, US, Trends, Eu, Canada, New York Times, News UK, Marriott, Amnesty International, Who, Bangladesh, Un


New report offers recommendations to address opioid epidemic during COVID-19 pandemic

A new report from researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health offers recommendations aimed at federal, state, and local policymakers to address the opioid epidemic during the pandemic, which has seen sharp increases in fatal and nonfatal overdoses.
Tags: Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health


Recommendations for the overdose epidemic in the COVID-19 pandemic

A new report from researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health offers recommendations aimed at federal, state, and local policymakers to address the opioid epidemic during the pandemic.
Tags: Science, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health


EU to bring forward decision on Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine to 21 December – as it happened

This blog is now closed. We’ve launched a new blog at the link below: Coronavirus news – live 11.23pm GMT We’ve launched a new blog at the link below – head there for the latest: Related: Coronavirus live news: Trump will 'absolutely' encourage Americans to take Covid vaccine, says press secretary 10.58pm GMT Nearly one in four people may not get Covid-19 vaccines until at least 2022 because rich countries with less than 15% of the global population have reserved 51% of the doses of ...
Tags: US, Eu, UK News, World news, US news, Asia Pacific, Pfizer, Low, Trump, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Coronavirus


Covid-19 Deaths Rose In US College Towns When Students Returned

The New York Times reports: As coronavirus deaths soar across the country, deaths in communities that are home to colleges have risen faster than the rest of the nation, a New York Times analysis of 203 counties where students compose at least 10 percent of the population has found... [S]ince the end of August, deaths from the coronavirus have doubled in counties with a large college population, compared with a 58 percent increase in the rest of the nation. Few of the victims were college stu...
Tags: US, Tech, New York Times, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Jennifer Nuzzo, Tali Elfassy, University of Miami Read


The 2nd Day of Christmas by Bloomberg & Beto-Backed Texas Lawmakers

On the 2nd day of Christmas, more anti-gun measures from Bloomberg and Beto in Texas. IMG iStock-884200682 U.S.A. -(AmmoLand.com)- ‘Tis the season at the Texas Capitol for extreme gun control bills; lumps of coal stuffed in stockings and hung on mantles for gun owners in advance of the 2021 legislative session.  Pre-filed by anti-gun politicians who were backed by New York billionaire Michael Bloomberg and BETO “Hell Yeah, I'll Take Your Guns” O'Rourke in 2020, these bills are paybacks to thei...
Tags: New York, Texas, Guns, Colorado, California, Bloomberg, New Mexico, Bill, UC Davis, Washington State, Michael Bloomberg, BETO, U S Department of Justice, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Texas Capitol, Texas Legislature


Financial symptoms could be used as early predictors of dementia

A new study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the Federal Reserve Board of Governors found that Medicare beneficiaries who go on to be diagnosed with dementia are more likely to miss payments on bills as early as six years before a clinical diagnosis.
Tags: Health, Medicare, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Federal Reserve Board of Governors


Older adults with dementia exhibit financial 'symptoms' up to six years before diagnosis

A new study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the Federal Reserve Board of Governors found that Medicare beneficiaries who go on to be diagnosed with dementia are more likely to miss payments on bills as early as six years before a clinical diagnosis.
Tags: Science, Medicare, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Federal Reserve Board of Governors


Discovery reveals a fundamental way cells interpret signals from the environment

A basic science discovery by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health reveals a fundamental way cells interpret signals from their environment and may eventually pave the way for potential new therapies.
Tags: Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health


Discovery illuminates how cell growth pathway responds to signals

A basic science discovery by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health reveals a fundamental way cells interpret signals from their environment and may eventually pave the way for potential new therapies.
Tags: Science, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health


9 public-health experts share their own Thanksgiving plans: Most are staying home, but some will gather outdoors with masks

Dr. Anthony Fauci, left, will be skipping an extended family Thanksgiving this year. Al Drago/AFP via Getty Images, filadendron/Getty Images As Thanksgiving approaches, Americans must decide whether to gather with their loved ones amid the dramatic surge in coronavirus cases and hospitalizations. Many public-health experts, including Dr. Anthony Fauci, are tweaking holiday traditions and hunkering down at home with just their immediate families. Here's how nine public-health experts are c...
Tags: Health, Science, News, Thanksgiving, Cbs News, US, San Francisco, Trends, Getty Images, National Institutes of Health, Anthony Fauci, University Of California, Business Insider, Vanderbilt University, Brooklyn New York, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health