Posts filtered by tags: Josh Jones[x]


 

Hear an Excerpt from the Newly-Released, First Unabridged Audiobook of James Joyce’s Finnegans Wake

Need one go so far in digging out strata of meaning? Only if one wishes to; Finnegans Wake is a puzzle, just as a dream is a puzzle, but the puzzle element is less important than the thrust of the narrative and the shadowy majesty of the characters… and when our eyes grow bewildered with strange roots and incredible compounds, why, then we can switch on our ears. It is astonishing how much of the meaning is conveyed through music: the art of dim-sighted Joyce is, like that of Milton, mai...
Tags: Facebook, New York, College, Literature, Anthony Burgess, Rolling Stone, Samuel Beckett, James Joyce, Milton, Adam, Burgess, Joyce, Josh Jones, McGovern, Giordano Bruno, Howth Castle


Watch Franz Liszt’s “Un Sospiro” Played with the Mesmerizing “Three-Hand Technique”

“Piano education is important for teaching polyphony, improving sight-reading, consolidating the knowledge of harmony and gaining much more musical abilities,” write Turkish researchers in the behavioral sciences journal Procedia. The student of the piano can advance solo or with another player in duets, playing what are called “four-hand pieces.” But learning “to gain the attitudes of duet playing” poses a challenge. Researchers Izzet Yucetoker and Koksal Apaydinli suggest a possible in...
Tags: Facebook, Music, College, Rome, Paris, Morrison, Carthage, Josh Jones, Franz Liszt, Liszt, Paul Barton, Durham NC Follow, Thalberg, Izzet Yucetoker, Koksal Apaydinli, Sigismond Thalberg


Hear The Velvet Underground’s “Legendary Guitar Amp Tapes,” Which Showcases the Brilliance & Innovation of Lou Reed’s Guitar Playing (1969)

What was the Velvet Underground? A Kim Fowly-like art project that outlived its impresario’s interest? A main vehicle for Lou Reed, rock’s egomaniac underdog (who was no one’s ingénue)? Was it three bands? 1. The Velvet Underground and Nico; 2. The Velvet Underground with John Cale; and 3. The Velvet Underground with Doug Yule after Cale’s departure. (Let’s pass by, for the moment, whether VU without Reed warrants a mention…) Each iteration pioneered essential underground sounds — dirgy ...
Tags: Facebook, Music, New York, College, Andy Warhol, Ornette Coleman, Lou Reed, Nico, Morrison, John Cale, Reed, Cale, Coleman, Boston MA, Josh Jones, Royal Trux


Watch an Accurate Reconstruction of the World’s Oldest Computer, the 2,200 Year-Old Antikythera Mechanism, from Start to Finish

There’s nothing like an ancient mystery, especially one as seemingly insoluble as the origins of “the world’s first computer,” the Antikythera mechanism. Discovered off the coast of the Greek island of Antikythera in 1901, the corroded collection of gears and dials seemed fake to scientists at first because of its ingeniousness. It has since been dated to 100 to 150 BC and has inspired decades of research and speculative reconstruction. Yet, no one knows who made it, and more importantly...
Tags: Facebook, Astronomy, Science, Youtube, College, History, World, Smithsonian, Josh Jones, Antikythera, Durham NC Follow, University College of London, Freeth, Tony Freeth, Adam Wojcik, Antikythera Mechanism Research Project


Hear the Amati “King” Cello, the Oldest Known Cello in Existence (c. 1560)

The Stradivari family has received all of the popular acclaim for perfecting the violin. But we should know the name Amati — in whose Cremona workshop Antonio Stradivari apprenticed in the 17th century. The violin-making family was immensely important to the refinement of classical instruments. “Born around 1505,” writes Jordan Smith at CMuse, founder Andrea Amati “is considered the father of modern violinmaking. He made major steps forward in improving the design of violins, including t...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Music, College, France, History, Yale, Josh Jones, Charles IX, Cremona, Jordan Smith, Limoges, Zeller, Amati, Durham NC Follow, Antonio Stradivari


Ethan Hawke Explains How to Give Yourself Permission to Be Creative

The most creative people, you’ll notice, throw themselves into what they do with absurd, even reckless abandon. They commit, no matter their doubts about their talents, education, finances, etc. They have to. They are generally fighting not only their own misgivings, but also those of friends, family, critics, financiers, and landlords. Artists who work to realize their own vision, rather than someone else’s, face a witheringly high probability of failure, or the kind of success that com...
Tags: Art, Facebook, New York, College, Poetry, America, Creativity, Ethan Hawke, David Lynch, Ginsberg, Hawke, Buckley, William F Buckley, Josh Jones, Krishna, Allen Ginsberg


A Data Visualization of Every Italian City & Town Founded in the BC Era

Ancient people did not think about history the way most of us do. It made no difference to contemporary readers of the popular Roman historian, Livy (the “JK Rowling of his day”), that “most of the flesh and blood of [his] narrative is fictitious,” and “many of the stories are not really Roman but Greek stories reclothed in Roman dress,” historian Robert Ogilvie writes in an introduction to Livy’s Early History of Rome. Ancient historians did not write to document facts, but to illustrate moral...
Tags: Facebook, College, Wikipedia, Data, History, Rome, Italy, Padua, Josh Jones, Livy, Durham NC Follow, Livy the `` JK Rowling, Robert Ogilvie, Livy 's Early History of Rome Ancient, Antenor, Pompeii Milan


Why Most Ancient Civilizations Had No Word for the Color Blue

In an old Zen story, two monks argue over whether a flag is waving or whether it’s the wind that waves. Their teacher strikes them both dumb, saying, “It is your mind that moves.” The centuries-old koan illustrates a point Zen masters — and later philosophers, psychologists, and neuroscientists — have all emphasized at one time or another: human experience happens in the mind, but we share reality through language and culture, and these in turn set the terms for how we perceive what we e...
Tags: Psychology, Facebook, Japan, College, China, Berlin, Literature, Josh Jones, Hokusai, Davidoff, Kanagawa, Loria, Sassi, Durham NC Follow, Kevin Loria, Jules Davidoff


How Egyptian Papyrus Is Made: Watch Artisans Keep a 5,000-Year-Old Art Alive

In 2013, French Egyptologist Pierre Tallet discovered in an excavation site near the Red Sea “entire rolls of papyrus, some a few feet long and still relatively intact, written in hieroglyphics as well as hieratic, the cursive script the ancient Egyptians used for everyday communication,” Alexander Stille writes at Smithsonian. The scrolls contained the “Diary of Merer,” the journals of an official who led a transportation crew, and who observed the building of the largest of the pyramid...
Tags: Art, Facebook, College, History, Egypt, Smithsonian, Pliny, Red Sea, Josh Jones, Durham NC Follow, Pierre Tallet, Tallet, Harvard 's Digital Giza Project, Alexander Stille, University of Michigan Libraries


What Happened During the 1921 Tulsa Massacre, One of the Worst Episodes of Racial Violence in U.S. History

In February 1915, Thomas Dixon, author of popular novel The Clansman, and D.W. Griffith, the director who adapted the book into the film Birth of a Nation, lobbied then-president Woodrow Wilson for a screening at the White House. The two were sure their story would get a warm reception from the “well documented racist” and onetime scholar who produced a five-volume History of the American People, in which he portrayed the South as “overrun by ex-slaves who were undeserving of freedom,” a...
Tags: Facebook, Congress, College, Washington, White House, History, House, Npr, Vox, Naacp, National Geographic, Jim Crow, South, Wilson, Arkansas River, Ku Klux Klan


The Origin of the Rooftop Concert: Before the Beatles Came Jefferson Airplane, and Before Them, Brazilian Singer Roberto Carlos (1967)

When did the first rooftop concert happen? Probably not long after construction of the first rooftop. How could early humans resist such an opportunity to project sound over the heads of a crowd? But if we’re talking about a Rooftop Concert, we’re talking about a special genre of gig defined by The Beatles’ farewell rooftop show in London on January 30, 1969. Since that historic moment, each time musicians take to a rooftop, they inevitably face comparisons with the Fab Four, even if the...
Tags: Facebook, Music, New York, London, Bono, College, New York City, America, House, Paul Mccartney, Brazil, Elvis Presley, Martin Luther King, Frank Sinatra, Beatles, Latin America


Who Designed the 1980s Aesthetic?: Meet the Memphis Group, the Designers Who Created the 80s Iconic Look

For those who remember the 1980s, it can feel like they never left, so deeply ingrained have their designs become in the 21st century. But where did those designs themselves originate? Vibrant, clashing colors and patterns, bubbly shapes; “the geometric figures of Art Deco,” writes Sara Barnes at My Modern Met, “the color palette of Pop Art, and the 1950s kitsch” that inspired designers of all kinds came from a movement of artists who called themselves the Memphis Group, after Bob Dylan’...
Tags: Art, Facebook, Fashion, Design, Milan, College, Architecture, Bob Dylan, David Bowie, Vox, Brian Eno, Memphis, Memphis Tennessee, Dada, Josh Jones, Ettore Sottsass


When Salvador Dalí Created a Surrealist Funhouse at New York World’s Fair (1939)

Only the violence and duration of your hardened dream can resist the hideous mechanical civilization that is your enemy, that is also the enemy of the ‘..pleasure-..principle’ of all men. It is man’s right to love women with the ecstatic heads of fish. — Salvador Dalí, “Declaration of the Independence of the Imagination and the Rights of Man to His Own Madness”  Whatever organizers of the 1939 New York World’s Fair thought they might get when Salvador Dalí was chosen to design a pavilion...
Tags: Art, Facebook, New York, College, Salvador Dalí, Coney Island, Alice Cooper, Dali, Josh Jones, New York World, Taschen, Durham NC Follow, Julien Levy, Boticelli, Messy Nessy, Montse Aguer Director


Keith Richards Shows Us How to Play the Blues, Inspired by Robert Johnson, on the Acoustic Guitar

To me Robert Johnson’s influence — he was like a comet or a meteor that came along and, BOOM, suddenly he raised the ante, suddenly you just had to aim that much higher.  As Keith Richards tells it, the first time he met Brian Jones, the two “went around to his apartment crash-pad,” where all Jones had was “a chair, a record player, and a few records, one of which was Robert Johnson.” Jones put on the record, and the moment changed Richards’ life. He wasn’t so much interested in . The f...
Tags: Facebook, Music, College, New York Times, Johnson, Keith Richards, Bobby Womack, Jones, Ry Cooder, Keith, Robert Johnson, Richards, Brian Jones, Keef, Josh Jones, Guitar World


The World’s First Bass Guitar (1936)

Image via Ebay The big, stand-up double bass or “bull fiddle,” as it’s been called, dates to the 15th century. The design has evolved, but its four strings and EADG tuning have remained standard features of basses for several hundred years of classical and, later, jazz, country, and early rock and roll. Its booming tone and unwieldy size notwithstanding, the venerable instrument is a member of the violin family. So, when did the four-string bass become a bass guitar? Leo Fender’s 1951 Precision...
Tags: Facebook, Music, College, Ebay, Seattle, Lorraine, Josh Jones, Seattle Post Intelligencer, Rickenbacker, Durham NC Follow, James Jamerson, Carol Kaye, Leo Fender, Audiovox, Museum of Pop Culture, Clarence Leo Fender


Bass Sounds: One Song Highlights the Many Different Sounds Made by Different Bass Guitars

If you’re a seasoned bass player, the diversity of bass sounds in the “Bass Sounds” videos here will hardly surprise you. Most other people — including many musicians — have little understanding of the range of the bass, an instrument thought to just hold down the low end. Yes, it does do that, but it doesn’t always do it with bass frequencies. Bass tones and overtones fall anywhere in the range of 40hz — a low rumble more felt than heard — to a snappy 4000hz, the high-midrange frequency...
Tags: Facebook, Music, London, College, Paul Mccartney, Lemmy Kilmister, Gibson, Josh Jones, Kevin McDonald, Durham NC Follow, Jaco Pastorious, Bruce McCulloch, Joel McIver, Bart Soeters, Joris Holtackers Basses, Fender Jazz


Behold the Astronomicum Caesareum, “Perhaps the Most Beautiful Scientific Book Ever Printed” (1540)

Art, science, and magic seem to have been rarely far apart during the Renaissance, as evidenced by the elaborate 1540 Astronomicum Caesareum — or “Emperor’s Astronomy” — seen here. “The most sumptuous of all Renaissance instructive manuals, ” the Metropolitan Museum of Art notes, the book was created over a period of 8 years by Petrus Apianus, also known as Apian, an astronomy professor at the University of Ingolstadt. Modern-day astronomer Owen Gingerich, professor emeritus at Harvard Universi...
Tags: Art, Facebook, Books, Science, College, Harvard University, Getty, Charles, Metropolitan Museum Of Art, Ferdinand, Lund University, Halley, Josh Jones, Charles V, Durham NC Follow, Gingerich


Meet the Linda Lindas, the Tween Punk Band Who Called Out Racism & Misogyny and Scored a Record Deal

“Sticks and stones may break my bones,” we chanted as kids, but “words will never hurt me.” The saying seems to both invite physical violence and deny the real effects of verbal abuse. Maybe this was once effective as a stock playground retort, but it’s never been true, as anyone who’s been picked on as a child can attest. When the taunts are racist, the damage is exponentially multiplied. Not only are kids being singled out and mocked for immutable characteristics, but their family and ...
Tags: Facebook, Gender, Music, Youtube, College, Karen O, Radiohead, Netflix, K-12, David Bowie, Npr, Thom Yorke, Epitaph Records, Josh Jones, Los Angeles Public Library, GIRLSCHOOL LA


Learn to Play Senet, the 5,000-Year Old Ancient Egyptian Game Beloved by Queens & Pharaohs

Senet gaming board inscribed for Amenhotep III with separate sliding drawer, via Wikimedia Commons Games don’t just pass the time, they enact battles of wits, proxy wars, training exercises…. And historically, games are correlated with, if not inseparable from, forms of divination and occult knowledge. We might point to the ancient practice of “astragalomancy,” for example: reading one’s fate in random throws of knucklebones, which were the original dice. Games played with bones or dice date ba...
Tags: Facebook, Games, College, History, Egypt, Queens, Tutankhamun, Metropolitan Museum Of Art, Ouija, Storer, Josh Jones, Tut, Brandeis University, Nefertiti, Colin Barras, Durham NC Follow


Watch 1000 Musicians Play the Foo Fighters’ “Learn to Fly,” Nirvana’s “Smells Like Teen Spirit,” Queen’s “We Will Rock You,” and David Bowie’s “Rebel Rebel”

In the 1980s, avant-garde composer, guitarist Glenn Branca began writing symphonies for electric guitars — dozens of them, all playing at once, creating unprecedented psychoacoustic effects — sometimes beautiful harmony, sometimes unsettling dissonance — that reduced Branca himself to tears. “I remember one rehearsal where I actually had to stop and cry,” he once said. “I could not believe that I was getting this sound.” Branca brought together hundreds of electric guitarists and percuss...
Tags: Facebook, Music, College, Earth, Dave, Paris, Italy, David Bowie, Poland, Dave Grohl, Kate Bush, Ac Dc, CANBERRA Australia, Angus Young, Josh Jones, Brian Johnson


Watch the Building of the Eiffel Tower in Timelapse Animation

“They didn’t want it but he built it anyway” — The Pixies, “Alec Eiffel” When the Eiffel Tower — gateway to the Paris World’s Fair and centennial marker of the Revolution — was first designed and built, it was far from beloved. Its creator, Alexandre Gustave Eiffel, an engineer known for building bridges, faced widespread condemnation, both from the city’s creative class and in the popular press. French writer Guy de Maupassant summed up the prevailing sentiment when he called Eiffel “a ...
Tags: Facebook, College, Washington, Architecture, Washington Dc, Paris, Eiffel Tower, Eiffel, Josh Jones, Pixies, Gustave Eiffel, Architizer, Guy de Maupassant, Alexandre Gustave Eiffel, Lumiere Brothers, Timelapse Animation


A Young Janis Joplin Plays a Passionate Set at One of Her First Gigs in San Francisco (1963)

From her early, unhappy teen years in Port Arthur, Texas, Janis Joplin seemed to know she wanted to be a blues singer. She once said she decided to become a singer when a friend “loaned her his Bessie Smith and Leadbelly records,” writes biographer Ellis Amburn. “Ten years later, Janis was hailed as the premier blues singer of her time. She paid tribute to Bessie by buying her a headstone for her unmarked grave.” She was devoted to the blues, from her earliest encounters with the music i...
Tags: Facebook, Music, Texas, College, Washington, San Francisco, Austin, Janis Joplin, Levis, Jefferson Airplane, Mercedes Benz, South Bay, University of Texas, Dylan, Joplin, Janis


The Great Wave Off Kanagawa by Hokusai: An Introduction to the Iconic Japanese Woodblock Print in 17 Minutes

When woodcut artist Katsushika Hokusai made his famous print The Great Wave off Kanagawa in 1830 — part of the series Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji — he was 70 years old and had lived his entire life in a Japan closed off from the rest of the world. In the 19th century, however, “the rest of the world was becoming industrialized,” James Payne explains above in his Great Art Explained video, “and the Japanese were concerned about foreign invasions.” The Great Wave shows “an image of Japa...
Tags: Art, Facebook, Europe, Japan, College, Berlin, Tokyo, Nagasaki, Goya, Monet, Claude Debussy, Vincent Van Gogh, Josh Jones, Mount Fuji, Kanazawa, Hokusai


An Interactive Visualization of the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

2020 was “a year for the (record) books in publishing,” wrote Jim Milliot in Publisher’s Weekly this past January, a surge continuing into 2021. Yet some kinds of print books have so declined in sales there may be no reason to keep publishing them, or buying them, since their equivalents online are superior in almost every respect to any version on paper. As I finally conceded during a recent, aggressive spring cleaning, I personally have no reason to store heavy, bulky, dusty reference books, ...
Tags: Facebook, College, Stanford, Data, Philosophy, Josh Jones, Durham NC Follow, Jim Milliot, Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, Justin Weinberg, Nikhail Sonnad, Edward Zalta, American Library Association 's Booklist, Joseph DiCastro


How to Take the Perfect Nap, According to Cognitive Scientist Sara Mednick

Napping is serious business, despite the fact that when some of us think of naps, we think about preschool. We’ve been taught to think of naps as something to outgrow. Yet as we age into adulthood, so many of us find it hard to get enough sleep. Millions currently suffer from sleep deprivation, whose effects range from memory loss to, well… death, if we credit the dire warnings of neuroscientist Matthew Walker. “Sleep,” Walker says, “is a non-negotiable biological necessity.” In light of...
Tags: Health, Facebook, College, Neuroscience, Salk Institute, UCI, Walker, Josh Jones, Weil, Sara Mednick, Matthew Walker, Durham NC Follow, University of California Irvine UCI, Mednick


Wildlife Is Now Thriving Again in Chernobyl–Even If Humans Won’t for Another 24,000 Years

In Andrei Tarkovsky’s 1979 sci-fi film Stalker, a mysterious artifact renders a landscape called the Zone inhospitable for humans. As critics have often pointed out, a tragic irony may have killed the director and some of the crew a few years later. Shooting for months on end in a disused refinery in Estonia exposed them to high levels of toxic chemicals. Tarkovsky died of cancer in 1986, just a few months after the disaster at Chernobyl. “It is surely part of Stalker’s mystique,” Mark L...
Tags: Facebook, Hbo, UK, Washington Post, College, Life, Ukraine, Nature, Estonia, Chernobyl, George Monbiot, Soviet Union, Tarkovsky, Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Josh Jones, Monbiot


Watch Accurate Recreations of Medieval Italian Longsword Fighting Techniques, All Based on a Manuscript from 1404

Given recent events, the prospect of hundreds of young men meeting on Facebook, then traveling from around the country to a central U.S. location might sound like reasonable cause for alarm. Yet a recent convention fitting that description had nothing to do with political violence but, rather, a celebration and appreciation of the name “Josh” (full disclosure: this writer did not attend). The gathering of the Joshes this past April in Nebraska could not have been more peaceful, including...
Tags: Facebook, Books, College, France, History, Nebraska, Lincoln, Josh, Josh Jones, Hema, Battaglia, Durham NC Follow, Josh Vinson Jr, Wiktenauer, Fiore de'i Liberi, Akademia Szermierzy


A 5-Hour Walking Tour of Paris and Its Famous Streets, Monuments & Parks

&start=20 “We’ll always have Paris,” Bogart tells Bergman in the final scene of Casablanca, a line and film inseparable from the grand mythology of Paris. The city still inspires non-Parisians to purchase Belle Epoque poster art by the shipload and binge Netflix series in which Paris looks like a “city where the clouds part, your brain clears, and your soul finds meaning,” Alex Abad-Santos writes at Vox. It’s also a place in such media where one can seem to find “success without much sacr...
Tags: Travel, Facebook, College, France, Netflix, Paris, Eiffel Tower, Vox, Casablanca, Parks, Gertrude Stein, Montmartre, Belle Epoque, Hemingway, Les Halles, James Baldwin


The Utopian, Socialist Designs of Soviet Cities

Modernist architecture transformed the modern city in the 20th century, for good and ill. Nowhere is this transformation more evident than the former Soviet Union and its former republics. There, we find truth in the western stereotypes of the Soviet city as cold, faceless, and soul-crushingly nondescript — so much so that the plot of a 1975 Russian TV film called The Irony of Fate, or Enjoy Your Bath!, hinges on a man drunkenly traveling to Leningrad by mistake and falling asleep in a s...
Tags: Facebook, College, Bloomberg, Architecture, Moscow, Joseph Stalin, Soviet Union, Leningrad, Josh Jones, Le Corbusier, Brezhnev, Durham NC Follow, Byrnes, Vladimir Tatlin, Alexander Rodchenko Constructivists, Mark Byrnes


The Utopian Socialist Designs of Soviet Cities

Modernist architecture transformed the modern city in the 20th century, for good and ill. Nowhere is this transformation more evident than the former Soviet Union and its former republics. There, we find truth in the western stereotypes of the Soviet city as cold, faceless, and soul-crushingly nondescript — so much so that the plot of a 1975 Russian TV film called The Irony of Fate, or Enjoy Your Bath!, hinges on a man drunkenly traveling to Leningrad by mistake and falling asleep in a s...
Tags: Facebook, College, Bloomberg, Architecture, Moscow, Joseph Stalin, Soviet Union, Leningrad, Josh Jones, Le Corbusier, Brezhnev, Durham NC Follow, Byrnes, Vladimir Tatlin, Alexander Rodchenko Constructivists, Mark Byrnes