Posts filtered by tags: Josh Jones[x]


 

Hear Mary Oliver (RIP) Read Five of Her Poems: “The Summer Day,” “Little Dog’s Rhapsody in the Night,” “Many Miles” and “Night and the River”

Poets get to have strong opinions about what poetry should be and do, especially poets as well-loved as Mary Oliver, who passed away yesterday at the age of 83. “Poetry, to be understood, must be clear,” she told NPR in an interview, “It mustn’t be fancy…. I always feel that whatever isn’t necessary should not be in the poem.” Oliver’s Zen approach to her art was to cut right to the heart of things, to honor natural, unpretentious expression. “I don’t know exactly what a prayer is,” she ...
Tags: Google, College, Poetry, New York Times, Ohio, Npr, Gwyneth Paltrow, Oliver, Sylvia Plath, Garner, Facebook Twitter, Emerson, Maria Shriver, Franklin, Josh Jones, Ostriker


Behold Moebius’ Many Psychedelic Illustrations of Jimi Hendrix

The 1995 release of posthumous Jimi Hendrix compilation Voodoo Soup has divided fans and critics for over two decades now. But whatever its merits, its cover art should hold an honored place in every Hendrix fan’s collection. Drawn by the legendary cult comic artist Moebius from a photograph of Hendrix eating soup in France , it captures the sound Hendrix was moving toward at the end of his life—his head exploding in flames, or mushroom clouds, or pink psychedelic bronchial tubes. The image com...
Tags: Google, Art, Music, College, France, Electric Ladyland, Jimi Hendrix, Alejandro Jodorowsky, Facebook Twitter, Hendrix, Moebius, Josh Jones, Jimi, Linda McCartney, Durham NC Follow, Comics/Cartoons


America at War: Infographic Reveals How the U.S. Military Is Operating in 40% of the World’s Nations

Earlier this month, NBC reporter and analyst William Arkin ended a 30-year career as a journalist, announcing in a “scathing letter,” Democracy Now! reports, that “he would be leaving the network. Arkin accuses “the media of warmongering while ignoring the, quote, ‘creeping fascism of homeland security.’” He does not equivocate in a follow-up interview with Amy Goodman. “The generals and the national security leadership" are also now, he says, “the commentators and the analysts who populate the...
Tags: Google, Maps, Politics, Nbc, College, Africa, America, Cnn, Fox, Current Affairs, Middle East, Army, Smithsonian, Cornell, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones


Stephen Fry Narrates Two Animated Videos Explaining How Fear, Loathing & Misinformation Drove the Brexit Campaign

For millions watching in the UK and around the world, anticipating the looming Brexit deadline over the past two years has been like watching the slowest train wreck in history. But for those not following the coverage daily, the impending UK secession from the European Union is mystifying. Just how many trains are there, and where are they coming from, and how fast, exactly, are they going? From the future of food and drug imports, to the status of the “currently invisible” border betwe...
Tags: Google, Politics, UK, College, US, Eu, European Union, Atlantic, George Orwell, Theresa May, Current Affairs, NHS, Republic Of Ireland, Northern Ireland, Stephen Fry, Brexit


Complex Math Made Simple With Engaging Animations: Fourier Transform, Calculus, Linear Algebra, Neural Networks & More

In many an audio engineering course, I’ve come across the Fourier Transform, an idea so fundamental in sound production that it seems essential for everyone to know it. My limited understanding was, you might say, functional. It’s some kind of mathematical reverse engineering machine that turns waveforms into frequencies, right? Yes, but it’s much more than that. The idea can seem overwhelming to the non-mathematically-inclined among us. The Fourier Transform, named for French mathematic...
Tags: Google, Math, College, Animation, Khan Academy, Facebook Twitter, Sanderson, Josh Jones, Durham NC Follow, Jean Baptiste Joseph Fourier, Grant Sanderson


Making Sense of White Paintings: A Short Art History Lesson on Minimalism and the All-White Painting

“I could do that” goes the refrain of philistines at modern art galleries, sometimes followed by a “Hell, my dog/cat/baby/elephant could do that!” Sophisticates smirk knowing smirks. Oh no, sir or madam, they most certainly could not. But maybe everyone, at some level, comes across Agnes Martin’s White Stone or Jo Baer’s Untitled (White Square Lavender) and thinks it looks like someone “just took a tube of white paint and spread it on a canvas.” It's tempting to imagine, notes Vox in the...
Tags: Google, Art, New York, College, Harvard, Vox, Sherman, Whitney Museum, Frank Stella, Facebook Twitter, Josef Albers, White Stone, Josh Jones, Agnes Martin, Delacroix, Yasmina Reza


The Artistry Behind an All-White Painting: A Short Art History Lesson on Minimalism and the All-White Painting

“I could do that” goes the refrain of philistines at modern art galleries, sometimes followed by a “Hell, my dog/cat/baby/elephant could do that!” Sophisticates smirk knowing smirks. Oh no, sir or madam, they most certainly could not. But maybe everyone, at some level, comes across Agnes Martin’s White Stone or Jo Baer’s Untitled (White Square Lavender) and thinks it looks like someone “just took a tube of white paint and spread it on a canvas.” It's tempting to imagine, notes Vox in the...
Tags: Google, Art, New York, College, Harvard, Vox, Sherman, Whitney Museum, Frank Stella, Facebook Twitter, Josef Albers, White Stone, Josh Jones, Agnes Martin, Delacroix, Yasmina Reza


The Strange Dancing Plague of 1518: When Hundreds of People in France Could Not Stop Dancing for Months

If you find yourself thinking you aren’t a victim of fashion, maybe take another look. Yes, we can consciously train ourselves to resist trends through force of habit. We can declare our preferences and stand on principle. But we aren't consciously aware of what's happening in the hidden turnings of our brains. Maybe what we call the unconscious has more control over us than we would like to think. Inexplicable episodes of mass obsession and compulsion serve as disquieting examples. Mass panics...
Tags: Psychology, Google, Science, College, France, History, Bbc, Strasbourg, Rhine, Moselle, Facebook Twitter, Alsace, Josh Jones, Waller, St Vitus, Oliver Sacks


Philip Glass Finishes His David Bowie Trilogy, Debuting His Lodger Symphony

Sometimes I feel The need to move on So I pack a bag And move on Move on --David Bowie, “Move On” We might have been calling it the Lake Geneva Trilogy, given David Bowie’s recuperative sojourn in Switzerland after the emptiness he felt in L.A. The first album in the Berlin Trilogy, Low, was mostly recorded in France, and the last album of the trilogy, Lodger, in Montreaux in 1979. But they were almost all written in, around, and about Berlin, where Bowie found what he was looking for—a ...
Tags: Google, Music, London, College, France, Berlin, Los Angeles, David Bowie, Switzerland, John Adams, Times, Gary Oldman, Low, Los Angeles Times, Philip Glass, Bowie


The Getty Digital Archive Expands to 135,000 Free Images: Download High Resolution Scans of Paintings, Sculptures, Photographs & Much Much More

J. Paul Getty was not a billionaire known for his generosity. But since his death, the Getty Trust and complex of Getty museums in L.A. have carried forth in a more magnanimous spirit, ostensibly adhering to values that transcend their founder: “service, philanthropy, teaching, and access.” A collection first gathered for private investment and consumption (sometimes under a cloud of scandal) has expanded into galleries that millions pass through every year; a Conservation Institute dedicated t...
Tags: Google, Art, Photography, College, Getty, West Coast, Dorothea Lange, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, Research Institute, Roehampton, Paul Getty, Durham NC Follow, Andrea Mantegna, Paul Gaugin, Thomas Gaehtgens


The Hu, a New Breakthrough Band from Mongolia, Plays Heavy Metal with Traditional Folk Instruments and Throat Singing

Maybe you’re jaded, maybe you think it’s time for heavy metal to finally hang up its spikes, maybe you think there’s nowhere else for the world’s most theatrically angry music to go but maybe bluegrass…. Or maybe Mongolia, where folk metal band The Hu have been inventing what they call “Hunnu Rock,” a style combining Western headbanging with instruments like the horsehead fiddle (morin khuur) and Mongolian guitar (tovshuur). “It also involves singing in a guttural way,” Katya Cengel poin...
Tags: Google, Music, College, Npr, Mongolia, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, Genghis Khan, Ronnie James Dio, Hu, Durham NC Follow, The Beatles Red Hot Chili Peppers Metallica, Katya Cengel, Mongolia Plays Heavy Metal, Temka, University of Wisconsin Kip Hutchins


Classic Illustrations of Edgar Allan Poe’s Stories by Gustave Doré, Édouard Manet, Harry Clarke, Aubrey Beardsley & Arthur Rackham

What do you see when you read the work of Edgar Allan Poe? The great age of the illustrated book is far behind us. Aside from cover designs, most modern editions of Poe’s work circulate in text-only form. That’s just fine, of course. Readers should be trusted to use their imaginations, and who can forget indelible descriptions like “The Tell-Tale Heart”’s “eye of a vulture—a pale, blue eye, with a film over it”? We need no picture book to make that image come alive. Yet, when we first discover ...
Tags: Google, Art, College, Edgar Allan Poe, Brooklyn, Literature, Clarke, Alice, Poe, édouard Manet, Manet, Don Quixote, Harry Clarke, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, Daniel Horowitz


The “David Bowie Is” Exhibition Is Now Available as an Augmented Reality Mobile App That’s Narrated by Gary Oldman: For David Bowie’s Birthday Today

Maybe it’s too soon to divide pop music history into “Before David Bowie” and “After David Bowie,” but two years after Bowie’s death, it’s impossible to imagine pop music history without him. Yet, if there ever did come a time when future generations did not know who David Bowie is, they could do far worse than hear Gary Oldman tell the story. Luckily for them, and us, Oldman narrates the new David Bowie augmented reality app, which launches today on what would have been the legend’s 72n...
Tags: Google, Fashion, Music, Technology, Film, College, Dave, David Bowie, South London, Rolling Stone, Gary Oldman, Brixton, Bowie, Gary, Facebook Twitter, Julian Schnabel


The Bustling Streets of Mumbai, India Captured with Early Sound Cameras in 1929

“Though hardly a cinematic masterpiece,” film critic Andre Soares writes, “or even a good film,” Al Jolson’s 1927 The Jazz Singer will forever bear the distinction of “the first time in a feature film that synchronized sound and voices could be heard in musical numbers and talking segments.” What usually goes unremarked in film history is that Indian cinema was never far behind its U.S. counterpart. The country’s first feature sound film appeared just four years after The Jazz Singer. No...
Tags: Google, New York, Hollywood, Film, College, India, New York City, Fox, Broadway, Mumbai, St Louis, Bombay, Charles Lindbergh, Al Jolson, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones


Free: Download Thousands of Ottoman-Era Photographs That Have Been Digitized and Put Online

“Turkey is a geographical and cultural bridge between the east and the west,” writes Istanbul University’s Gönül Bakay. This was so long before Constantinople became Istanbul, but after the rise of the Ottoman Empire, the region took on a particular significance for Christian Europe. “The Turk” became a threatening and exotic figure in the European imagination, “shaped by a considerable body of literature, stretching from Christopher Marlowe to Thomas Carlyle.” Images of Ottoman Turkey were lon...
Tags: Google, Europe, Photography, Congress, College, New York City, Turkey, History, Venice, Getty, Archives, Istanbul, Mediterranean, Facebook Twitter, Constantinople, Josh Jones


11,000 Digitized Books From 1923 Are Now Available Online at the Internet Archive

Whether your interest is in winning arguments online or considerably deepening your knowledge of world cultural and intellectual history, you will be very well-served by at least one government agency from now into the foreseeable future. Thanks to the expiration of the so-called "Micky Mouse Protection Act," the U.S. Copyright Office will release a year’s worth of art, literature, scholarship, photography, film, etc. into the public domain, starting with 1923 this year then moving through the ...
Tags: Google, Books, Congress, College, Archives, Mussolini, James Joyce, Facebook Twitter, William Butler Yeats, Leonardo da Vinci, Josh Jones, Brewster Kahle, Thom, Nietzsche, U S Copyright Office, Haussmann


An Illustrated and Interactive Dante’s Inferno: Explore a New Digital Companion to the Great 14th-Century Epic Poem

Medieval conceptions of hell may have little effect on the laws and social mores of our secular age. But they sure as hell did in the late 15th century, when the first illustrated editions of Dante’s Inferno appeared. A 1481 edition contained art based on a series of unfinished illustrations by Renaissance master Sandro Botticelli. In 1491, the first fully-illustrated edition of the Inferno arrived. As were most printed works at the time, these books were elaborate and expensive, reflecting the...
Tags: Google, Design, College, Literature, Dante, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Botticelli, Durham NC Follow, Sandro Botticelli, Interactive Dante, New Digital Companion, Alberto Martini


How the Inventor of Dynamite, Alfred Nobel, Read an Obituary That Called Him “The Merchant of Death” and Made Amends by Creating the Nobel Prize

No one can ever fully predict the consequences of their actions. Still, some warning bells should be hard to ignore. Take Alfred Nobel, for instance, the founder of the Nobel Prize. For most of his life, he had a different reputation—as the inventor of dynamite, one of the most destructive technologies of the age. Though he maintained his motives were pure, Nobel had no shortage of signs telling him his creation might do at least as much harm as good. He persevered and lived to regret it...
Tags: Google, Europe, Sweden, College, France, Life, History, Italy, Toni Morrison, Albert Camus, Nobel, Grant, Alfred, Preet Bharara, Wharton School, Facebook Twitter


Why Is English So Hard to Learn?: The Ingenious Poem, “The Chaos,” Documents 800 Irregularities in English Spelling and Pronunciation

In 1920, Dutch writer and traveler Gerard Nolst Trenité, also known as Charivarius, published a textbook called Drop Your Foreign Accent: engelsche uitspraakoefeningen. In the appendix, he included a poem titled “The Chaos,” a virtuoso, tongue-twisting demonstration of somewhere around 800 irregularities in English spelling and pronunciation. No one now remembers the textbook, and the poem might have disappeared too if it were not for efforts of the Simplified Spelling Society, which tra...
Tags: Google, Europe, Youtube, College, Poetry, Turkey, English Language, Facebook Twitter, Durham NC, Josh Jones, Lindybeige, Gerard Nolst Trenité, France Canada Denmark Germany, Netherlands Portugal Spain Sweden, Journal of the Simplified Spelling Society JSSS


Public Domain Day Is Finally Here!: Copyrighted Works Have Entered the Public Domain Today for the First Time in 21 Years

Earlier this year we informed readers that thousands of works of art and entertainment would soon enter the public domain—to be followed every year by thousands more. That day is nigh upon us: Public Domain Day, January 1, 2019. At the stroke of midnight, such beloved classics as Robert Frost’s “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening” and “Yes! We Have No Bananas” will become the common property of the people, to be quoted at length or in full anywhere when the copyright expires on work produced ...
Tags: Google, Art, Film, College, History, Creativity, Atlantic, Winston Churchill, Smithsonian, Literature, James Joyce, Walt Disney, Virginia Woolf, Harlem, First Time, Mickey Mouse


How Nirvana’s Iconic “Smells Like Teen Spirit” Came to Be: An Animated Video Narrated by T-Bone Burnett Tells the True Story

Credited with igniting the 90s grunge craze and putting Pacific Northwest punk and indie scenes on the map, Nirvana’s “Smells Like Teen Spirit” has eclipsed hundreds of rock hits as “the most iconic song of all time”—at least according to the analytics of computer scientists from the University of London. Whatever that designation means, it’s without a doubt the most iconic Nirvana song of all time, a tune whose influence may be impossible to measure. Kurt Cobain might have grown weary of i...
Tags: Google, Music, College, Seattle, Pacific Northwest, Kurt Cobain, Facebook Twitter, Kurt, BURNETT, Hanna, Bone Burnett, Josh Jones, Cobain, Kathleen Hanna, Durham NC Follow, Michael Azerrad


Isaac Asimov Predicts in 1983 What the World Will Look Like in 2019: Computerization, Global Co-operation, Leisure Time & Moon Mining

Painting of Asimov on his throne by Rowena Morill, via Wikimedia Commons “It’s difficult to make predictions,” they say, “especially about the future.” The witticism has been variously attributed. If Yogi Berra said it, it's adorable nonsense, if Mark Twain, dry plainspoken irony. If Niels Bohr, however, we have a statement that makes us wonder what exactly “the future” could mean in a radically uncertain universe. If scientists can’t predict the future, who can? Science fiction writers, of cou...
Tags: Google, Science, College, New York Times, Literature, Clarke, Sci Fi, Mark Twain, Philip K Dick, Facebook Twitter, Yogi Berra, Josh Jones, Isaac Asimov, Wikimedia Commons, New York World, Niels Bohr


Where Did the Monk’s Haircut Come From? A New Vox Video Explains the Rich and Contentious History of the Tonsure

One might assume from a modern viewpoint that the hairstyles worn by monks arose to deal with male pattern baldness anxiety. As in the school uniform approach, you can’t single out one person’s baldness when everyone is bald. But this, again, would be a modern view, full of the vanity the tonsured—those with religiously shaven heads—ostensibly vowed to renounce. According to the Catholic Encyclopedia, the tonsure (from the Latin verb for “to shear”) began as a “badge of slavery” among Gr...
Tags: Google, College, Religion, History, Rome, Britain, Ireland, David Bowie, Catholic Church, Vox, Baltimore, Mccarthy, Facebook Twitter, Pauline, Trinity College Dublin, Josh Jones


Public Domain Day Is Coming: On January 1st, 2019, Copyrighted Works Will Enter the Public Domain for the First Time in 21 Years

Earlier this year we informed readers that thousands of works of art and entertainment would soon enter the public domain—to be followed every year by thousands more. That day is nigh upon us: Public Domain Day, January 1, 2019. At the stroke of midnight, such beloved classics as Robert Frost’s “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening” and “Yes! We Have No Bananas” will become the common property of the people, to be quoted at length or in full anywhere when the copyright expires on work produced ...
Tags: Google, Art, Film, College, History, Creativity, Atlantic, Winston Churchill, Smithsonian, Literature, James Joyce, Walt Disney, Virginia Woolf, Harlem, First Time, Mickey Mouse


Napoleon’s English Lessons: How the Military Leader Studied English to Escape the Boredom of Life in Exile

When we talk about country club prison sentences, we tend to imagine a marginal amount of time spent on the inside, though the phrase sounds like an extended vacation. Napoleon Bonaparte—exiled to the island of St. Helena for his crimes against Europe—got the full treatment, what some might even call a sweetheart deal. As the Public Domain Review notes, “the British had agreed to provide Le Petit Caporal with plentiful wine, meat, and musical instruments.” He was given his own comfortable lodgi...
Tags: Google, Europe, College, France, History, Napoleon Bonaparte, Napoleon, St Helena, English Language, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, Saint Helena, Durham NC Follow, Public Domain Review, Public Domain Review Related Content, Le Petit Caporal


Jazz Musician Plays Acoustic Guitar While Undergoing Brain Surgery, Helping Doctors Monitor Their Progress

Unlike many colorful expressions in English whose origins are lost to us, the comparison of majorly consequential tasks to brain surgery makes perfect sense. One false move or miscalculation can result in instant death. The chances of irreversible, life-altering damage are high, should a scalpel slip or a surgeon mistake healthy brain tissue for diseased. This can happen more readily than we might like to think. “It can be very difficult to tell the difference between the tumor and norma...
Tags: Health, Google, Science, College, Neuroscience, Spain, South Africa, The New York Times, Facebook Twitter, Schubert, Josh Jones, Oliver Sacks, Carlos Aguilera, Manzini, Robert Alvarez, Durham NC Follow


Watch The Smiths Play Their Last Live Show (December 12th, 1986)

It couldn’t have lasted—a flame burning twice as bright, and so on. One of the best bands to emerge from the explosion of British new wave and post-punk in the 1980s, The Smiths built a template for thousands of mope-rock bands who followed. Longstanding animosity has meant that their brief time together contains their total legacy. No reunion shows or albums—despite rumors over the decades since they broke up in 1987; no ersatz version of the band, missing key members but limping ever o...
Tags: Google, Music, London, College, Smiths, Morrissey, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, Marr, Mark E Smith, Strangeways, Andy Rourke, Durham NC Follow, Brixton Academy, Craig Gannon, Smith Gannon


When Christmas Was Legally Banned for 22 Years by the Puritans in Colonial Massachusetts

Complaints about the commercial-age corruption of Christmas miss one critical fact: as a mass public celebration, the holiday is a rather recent invention. Whether we credit Charles Dickens, Bing Crosby, or Frank Capra—men not opposed to marketing—we must reckon with Christmas as a product of modernity. That includes the sacred ideas about family, piety, and gratitude we attach to the season. The Puritans of the Massachusetts Bay Colony “despised Christmas,” notes Boing Boing. They assoc...
Tags: Google, New York, College, Massachusetts, History, David Lynch, Frank Capra, New England, Brooks, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, Pogues, Durham NC Follow, Massachusetts Bay Colony, Colonial Massachusetts, Charles Dickens Bing Crosby


New Digital Archive Will Feature the Complete Works of Egon Schiele: Start with 419 Paintings, Drawings & Sculptures

If you’ve ever mistaken an Egon Schiele for a Gustav Klimt, you can surely be forgiven—the Austrian modernist don served as a North Star for Schiele, who sought out Klimt, apprenticed himself, and received a great deal of encouragement from his elder. But he would soon strike out on his own, developing a grotesque, exaggerated, yet elegantly sensual style that shocked his contemporaries and made him a leading figure of Austrian Expressionism. Now, a century after his death in 1918 at age 28, a ...
Tags: Google, Art, New York, College, Paul Klee, Archives, Martinique, Edvard Munch, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, Gustav Klimt, Klimt, Schiele, Durham NC Follow, Galerie St Etienne, Meilan Solly


Researchers Recreate the Sounds Worshippers Heard in the Mosque of Cordoba Over 1,200 Years Ago

As we know from conversations in subway tunnels or singing in the shower, different kinds of spaces and building materials alter the quality of a sound. It’s a subject near and dear to architects, musicians, and composers. The relationship between space and sound also centrally occupies the field of “Acoustic Archeology." But here, an unusual problem presents itself. How can we know how music, voice, and environmental sound behaves in spaces that no longer exist? More specifically, writes Eurek...
Tags: Google, Technology, College, History, Architecture, Cordoba, David Byrne, Sofia, Atlas Obscura, Facebook Twitter, Sophia, Josh Jones, Hester, Durham NC Follow, University of Seville, Atlas Obscura Related Content