Posts filtered by tags: Josh Jones[x]


 

Winston Churchill Praises the Virtue of “Brevity” in Memos to His Staff: Concise Writing Leads to Clearer Thinking

George Orwell and Winston Churchill didn’t agree on much. For example, while Orwell wrote with deep sympathy about coal miners in The Road to Wigan Pier, Churchill, as home secretary, brutally crushed a miner’s strike in Wales. Orwell’s early years as “an apparatchik in the last days of the empire… left him with a hatred of authority and imperialism,” writes Richard Eilers. Churchill was a committed imperialist all his life, instrumental in prolonging a famine in British India that killed “at l...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Politics, UK, Writing, Wales, College, Nazis, India, George Orwell, Winston Churchill, Times, Orwell, Churchill, Cormac Mccarthy, Kurt Vonnegut


View 250,000 British Paintings & Sculptures Free Online

A little over four years ago, discriminatory and arbitrarily confusing travel bans descended on the U.S., tearing refugee families apart and leaving thousands in diplomatic limbo. This seemed nightmarish enough at the time. But it took a viral pandemic to bring travel bans and restrictions down on the entire world, more or less, with countries appearing on bulletins that vaguely look like lists of enemies on governing bodies’ websites, including the CDC's. Likewise, almost all 27 countries that...
Tags: Google, Art, UK, Cdc, College, European Union, Paris, Northern Ireland, Croatia, Rodin, Edward Hopper, Great Britain, Facebook Twitter, Mark Brown, Harlow, Goodwin


A Physicist Examines the Scientific Accuracy of Physics Shown in Major Movies: Batman, Gravity, Contact, Interstellar, Star Trek & More

Ever had a friend who cannot bring themselves suspend disbelief? It’s not a moral failing, but it can be a tedious quality in situations like, say, the movies, or the cinema, or whatever you call it when you’ve paid your day’s wages for a giant tub of carcinogenic popcorn and a three-hour distraction. (These days, maybe, an overpriced streaming new release and Grubhub.) Who doesn’t love a big-screen science fiction epic—science be damned? Who wants to listen to the seatmate who mutters "...
Tags: Google, Science, Film, College, Harvard, Jurassic Park, Clarke, Kubrick, Batman, Ron Howard, Carl Sagan, Facebook Twitter, Jeff Goldblum, Josh Jones, Durham NC Follow, Dominic Walliman


Seriously Awesome Ukulele Covers of “Sultans of Swing,” “Sweet Child O’ Mine,” “Thunderstruck,” and “Smells Like Teen Spirit”

The ukulele has gotten a bad rap, thanks to some well-meaning musicians who turned the small, guitar-like Hawaiian lute into a novelty instrument. Chief among the offenders is Tiny Tim. Exploding into fame in the early sixties with his ukulele version of the ‘20s ditty “Tiptoe Thru’ the Tulips,” he became so famous, wrote Roger Ebert, “The Beatles asked him to sing ‘Nowhere Man’ on a bootleg Christmas recording. He did a night at Royal Albert Hall.” His marriage to Vicki Budinger on John...
Tags: Google, Music, Minneapolis, College, George Harrison, Jimi Hendrix, Roger Ebert, Npr, Ac Dc, Pee Wee Herman, Ukulele Orchestra of Great Britain, Facebook Twitter, Harrison, Josh Jones, Royal Albert Hall, Johnny Carson


How Scholars Finally Deciphered Linear B, the Oldest Preserved Form of Ancient Greek Writing

In the early 1900s, British archaeologist Sir Arthur Evans unearthed almost 3,000 tablets on the island of Crete, inscribed with a language he had never seen before. The discovery began a decades-long race to read the language of Europe’s oldest civilization. And the final deciphering of the script, which Evans called Linear B, ended up overturning an accepted history of ancient Greek origins as we learn in the TED-Ed video above scripted by classics professor Susan Lupack. The tablets, ...
Tags: Google, Europe, New York, Greece, College, History, Evans, New Mexico, Crete, Facebook Twitter, Rutgers University, Knossos, Josh Jones, Hunter College, Pylos, Arthur Evans


A Virtual Tour of Ancient Rome, Circa 320 CE: Explore Stunning Recreations of The Forum, Colosseum and Other Monuments

If you’re a regular reader of this site, you’re likely familiar with the simulation hypothesis, the idea that conscious experience is nothing more than a computer program. This concept has many sci-fi implications, from Matrix-like scenarios to the radical idea that everything in the universe is software, run by incomprehensible beings who might as well be gods. One of the more plausible versions suggests that we are living in an “ancestor simulation,” designed by future human societies ...
Tags: Google, Technology, College, History, Rome, Architecture, Egypt, Smithsonian, University Of Virginia, Facebook Twitter, Solly, Josh Jones, Baalbek, Hadrian, Durham NC Follow, Bernard Frischer


The Iconic Album Covers of Hipgnosis: Meet “The Beatles of Album Cover Art” Who Created Unforgettable Designs for Pink Floyd, Led Zeppelin, Peter Gabriel & Many More

Try calling to mind Nirvana’s Nevermind without its naked, swimming baby; or London Calling without Paul Simenon smashing his bass. Think of Sgt. Pepper’s or Abbey Road without thinking about their sleeves. Classic rock albums and classic, unforgettable album covers are inseparably intertwined. Imagine Dark Side of the Moon without its prism…. Hipgnosis, the design team behind the nearly 50-year-old album cover/t-shirt/poster/bumper sticker/coffee mug/etc. completely nailed it, as they say, wit...
Tags: Google, Art, Music, London, College, Pink Floyd, London Calling, Peter, Syd Barrett, Zeppelin, Facebook Twitter, Peter Gabriel, Powell, Josh Jones, Rory Gallagher, Abbey Road


James Baldwin Talks About Racism in America & Civil Rights Activism on The Dick Cavett Show (1969)

There are many reasons, some quite literal, that it can be painful to talk about racism in the U.S. For one thing, it often seems that writers like W.E.B. Du Bois, Ida B. Wells, Angela Davis, Audre Lorde, or James Baldwin, have already confronted questions of racial violence without hedging or equivocation. Yet each time racist violence happens, there seems to be a decorous need in politics and media to pretend to be surprised by what's right in front of us, to pretend to have discovered...
Tags: Google, Politics, Television, College, New Orleans Saints, Drew Brees, America, History, Britain, Ronald Reagan, Npr, Dick Cavett, Gucci, Martin Luther King Jr, Cvs, Henry


Zamrock: An Introduction to Zambia’s 1970s Rich & Psychedelic Rock Scene

The story of popular music in the late 20th century is never complete without an account of the explosive psychedelic rock, funk, Afrobeat, and other hybrid styles that proliferated on the African continent and across Latin American and the Caribbean in the 1960s and 70s. It’s only lately, however, that large audiences are discovering how much pioneering music came out of Kenya, Ghana, Nigeria, and other postcolonial countries, thanks to UK labels like Strut and Soundway (named by The Gu...
Tags: Google, Music, UK, College, Germany, Africa, James Brown, Britain, Zambia, Brian Eno, Orange Juice, Caribbean, David Byrne, Woodstock, Facebook Twitter, Fela Kuti


The Story Behind the Iconic Black Power Salute Photo at the 1968 Olympics in Mexico City

You may know his name, and you definitely know the iconic photo of him standing next to Tommie Smith and Peter Norman on the medals podium at the 1968 Olympics in Mexico City, his black-gloved fist raised next to Smith’s in defiance of racial injustice. But you may know little more about John Carlos. Many of us learned about him the same way students at a Southern California high school, where he worked as a counselor after retiring from running, did: “Man, we see this picture in the his...
Tags: Google, Australia, College, NFL, History, Cnn, Mexico City, Muhammad Ali, Norman, Smith, Ioc, Martin Luther King Jr, Southern California, Oberlin, Facebook Twitter, Carlos


Historic Mexican Recipes Are Now Available as Free Digital Cookbooks: Get Started With Dessert

There are too many competing stories to tell about the pandemic for any one to take the spotlight for long, which makes coming to terms with the moment especially challenging. Everything seems in upheaval—especially in parts of the world where rampant corruption, ineptitude, and authoritarian abuse have worsened and prolonged an already bad situation. But if there’s a lens that might be wide enough to take it all in, I’d wager it’s the story of food, from manufacture, to supply chains, to the t...
Tags: Google, College, Mexico, Food & Drink, Petra, Facebook Twitter, UTSA, Torres, Josh Jones, Durham NC Follow, Laura Esquivel, Atlas Obscura Related Content, Vintage Cookbooks Free, University of Texas San Antonio UTSA, Rico Torres Chef and Co, Mixtli


The Rise & Fall of Silver Apples: The 1960s Electronic Band That Built Their Own Synthesizer, Produced Two Pioneering Albums, and Then Faded into Obscurity

In the late 70s and early 80s, a handful of musical duos emerged who would have tremendous impact on post-punk, alternative, new wave, and experimental electronic music. Bands like Suicide, NEU!, and the Pet Shop Boys made far bigger sounds than their size would suggest. Before them all came Silver Apples, a duo who should rightly get credit as pioneers of electronic experimentation in pop song form. Like many a pioneer, Silver Apples had no idea what they were doing. They also suffered ...
Tags: Google, Music, College, Bbc, Jimi Hendrix, The Guardian, Taylor, Central Park, Karlheinz Stockhausen, Stereolab, Facebook Twitter, Pan Am, Bach, Geoff Barrow, Danny, William Butler Yeats


New Digital Archive Opens Access to Thousands of Digitized African American Funeral Programs (1886-2019)

Funeral rites, burials, and other rituals are held near-universally sacred, not only due to religious and cultural beliefs about death: We preserve our connection to our ancestors through the records of their births and deaths. For many Black Americans in the U.S. south, grief and loss have been compounded by centuries of violence and tragedy, but funerals have still tended to be “celebrations of life” rather than mournful events, says Derek Mosley, archivist at the Auburn Avenue Research Libra...
Tags: Google, New York, College, Life, Stanford, Atlanta, Georgia, History, Yale, Smithsonian, Johnson, Civil rights movement, Jim Crow, Facebook Twitter, Atlanta Georgia, Morehouse College


Comedians Speaking Truth to Power: Lenny Bruce, George Carlin & Richard Pryor (NSFW)

No matter how strenuously people claim to support free speech, hardly anyone believes we should get to say whatever we want, however we want, wherever we want. We all just draw the lines differently between speech we find tolerable and that we find beyond the pale. There are reasonable arguments for establishing legal boundaries, but comedy—goes one line of thought—should never be subject to constraints. Anything goes in stand-up, since the comic’s role is to say the unsayable, to shock ...
Tags: Google, Comedy, College, America, George Carlin, Carlin, Facebook Twitter, Richard Pryor, Lenny Bruce, Josh Jones, Peoria, Pryor, Durham NC Follow, Lenny Bruce George Carlin, John Early, Lenny Bruce George Carlin Richard Pryor


Why Fleetwood Mac’s Peter Green (RIP) Was the Most Underrated Guitarist in British Blues

Debates about whether a guitarist is underrated often involve a lot of posturing and needless name-dropping—they don’t tend to go anywhere, in other words. This is not the case with Peter Green, founder and former singer, songwriter, and guitarist for Fleetwood Mac, who died this past weekend. He is, probably most definitely, “the most underrated guitarist in British Blues,” argues the Happy Bluesman, or at least he became so in the last decades of his life. Green experienced a tragic en...
Tags: Google, Music, College, Green, Metallica, Fleetwood Mac, Carlos Santana, Facebook Twitter, Clapton, Rolling Stones, Jeff Beck, Willie Dixon, Josh Jones, Kirk Hammett, Hammett, Gibson Les Paul


W.E.B. Du Bois Devastates Apologists for Confederate Monuments and Robert E. Lee (1931)

Who won the U.S. Civil War? “The north, of course,” you say… but ah… if you did not know the answer, you would have reason to be confused. Who loses a war and puts up statues of its heroes on the victor's land? In the south, say, in Northern Virginia, you'll find public shrines to Stonewall Jackson, public highways named for Jefferson Davis, and public schools named after Robert E. Lee and J.E.B. Stewart. These are not historical monuments, i.e. preserved battlefields, graveyards, or historic h...
Tags: Google, Congress, College, Washington, History, North Carolina, Sam, Grant, South, Yale University, Carr, Chapel Hill, University Of North Carolina, Southland, Facebook Twitter, Northern Virginia


How Ornette Coleman Freed Jazz with His Theory of Harmolodics

The term free jazz may have existed before Ornette Coleman’s The Shape of Jazz to Come arrived in 1959. Yet, however innovative the modal experiments of Coltrane or Davis, jazz still adhered to its most fundamental formulas before Coleman. “Conventional jazz harmony is religiously chord-based,” writes Josephine Livingstone at New Republic, “with soloists improvising within each key like balls pinging through a pinball machine. Coleman, in contrast, imagined harmony, melody, and rhythm as...
Tags: Google, Music, College, Germany, Jazz, Bird, Ornette Coleman, Thomas Pynchon, Grateful Dead, Melody, New Republic, Garcia, Coleman, Coltrane, Facebook Twitter, Maria Golia


H.R. Giger’s Dark, Surrealist Album Covers: Debbie Harry, Emerson, Lake & Palmer, Celtic Frost, Danzig & More

The work of H.R. Giger is immensely powerful. Giger’s amazing cover for Emerson, Lake and Palmer’s album Brain Salad Surgery portrays a Gothic touch that could fit any heavy metal band at any time. —Jimmy Page Swiss artist Hans Rudolf Giger is a genre unto his own, single-handedly inventing the biomechanical horror of the 1980s with his designs for Ridley Scott’s 1979 Alien, the film that launched him into international prominence and turned Debbie Harry on to his work. Meeting him the followin...
Tags: Google, Art, Music, College, David Cronenberg, Palmer, Tokyo, Harry, Ridley Scott, Alien, Bay Area, Danzig, Allmusic, Blondie, Facebook Twitter, Stevens


The Moment When Bob Dylan Went Electric: Watch Him Play “Maggie’s Farm” at the Newport Folk Festival in 1965

The phrase “when Dylan went electric” once carried as much weight in pop culture history as “the fall of the Berlin Wall” carries in, well, history. Both events have receded into what feels like the distant past, but in the early 1960s, they likely seemed equally unlikely to many a serious Bob Dylan fan in the folk scene. The also seemed equally consequential. To understand the culture of the decade, we must understand the import of Dylan’s appearance at the Newport Folk Festival in 1965...
Tags: Google, Music, College, Berlin Wall, John Lennon, Pete Seeger, America, History, Britain, Bob Dylan, Normandy, Richard, Elvis, Ringo, Gould, Facebook Twitter


When Astronomer Johannes Kepler Wrote the First Work of Science Fiction, The Dream (1609)

The point at which we date the birth of any genre is apt to shift depending on how we define it. When did science fiction begin? Many cite early masters of the form like Jules Verne and H.G. Wells as its progenitors. Others reach back to Mary Shelley’s 1818 Frankenstein as the genesis of the form. Some few know The Blazing World, a 1666 work of fiction by Margaret Cavendish, Duchess of Newcastle, who called her book a “hermaphroditic text.” According to the judgment of such experts as Is...
Tags: Google, Astronomy, Science, College, Religion, Literature, Sci Fi, William Gibson, Kepler, Carl Sagan, Facebook Twitter, Galileo, Frankenstein, Wells, Copernicus, Jules Verne


Dr. Wise on Influenza: Rare Silent Film Shows How They Tried to Educate the Public About the Spanish Flu a Century Ago (1919)

“Pics or it didn’t happen,” says the Internet, a phrase typically “used in jest,” writes Erin Ratelle at Space and Culture, as “a counter to an outrageous claim of events. However, its root is predicated on the notion that media is integral to being or existence," that we must record everything. Such implicit understanding was only in its infancy in 1918, when the influenza outbreak known as the Spanish Flu began, which perhaps goes some way toward explaining why a viral pandemic that ki...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Utah, UK, Film, College, Edgar Allan Poe, Spain, History, Boris Johnson, BFI, Florence, Bram Stoker, Brown, Facebook Twitter, Dixon


Hear an Enchanted Medieval Cover of Dolly Parton’s Classic Ode to Jealousy, “Jolene”

Dolly Parton’s “Jolene” is an endlessly renewable resource of beautiful sadness, and many a modern-day bard has a “Jolene” in their quiver. The White Stripes turned it into garage rock, Olivia Newton John did it as disco, and Norah Jones as cabaret jazz. There is the obligatory house remix. Slow it down to 33rpm and Dolly’s gender begins to blur, while her voice loses none of its plaintive mystique. “Jolene” set a standard for melancholy few, if any, tunes can meet. So, you know, there’s...
Tags: Google, Music, Wtf, Hollywood, College, Norah Jones, Dolly Parton, Link, Facebook Twitter, Parton, Dolly, Josh Jones, Newton John, Jolene, Durham NC Follow, Ayun Halliday


How Cannonball Adderley Shared the Joy of Jazz

Jazz has always had big personalities. In the mid-20th century, an explosion of major players became as well known for their personal quirks as for their revolutionary techniques and compositions. Monk’s endearing oddness, Miles Davis’ brooding bad temper, Charles Mingus’ exuberant shouts and rages, Ornette Coleman’s cryptic philosophizing, Coltrane’s gentle mysticism…. These were not only the jazz world’s greatest players; they were also some of the century’s most interesting people. Th...
Tags: Google, Music, New York, College, Washington Dc, Davis, Manhattan, Jazz, Miles Davis, Herbie Hancock, Ornette Coleman, Npr, Charles Mingus, Albert, Coltrane, Facebook Twitter


What Happened When Americans Had to Wear Masks During the 1918 Flu Pandemic

Medical professionals have had a particularly difficult time getting people in the United States to act in unison for the public good during the pandemic. This has been the case with every step that experts urge to curb the spread of COVID-19, from closing schools, churches, and other meeting places, to enforcing social distancing and wearing masks over the nose and mouth in public spaces. The resistance may seem symptomatic of the contemporary political climate, but there is ample precedent fo...
Tags: Health, Google, College, US, Los Angeles, San Francisco, History, United States, Current Affairs, Paris, Manchester, Portland, Oakland, University Of Michigan, Facebook Twitter, Ewing


The Only Surviving Script Written by Shakespeare Is Now Online

Four years ago, when the world commemorated the 400th anniversary of William Shakespeare’s death, some marked the event with reference to a dramatic work hardly anyone’s ever read, and fewer have ever seen performed. Called The Booke of Sir Thomas More, “this late 16th or early 17th-century play,” the British Library notes, “is not always included among the Shakespearean canon, and it was not until the 1800s that it was even associated with the Bard of Avon.” Since then, Sir Thomas More has bec...
Tags: Google, London, College, Literature, Catholic Church, William Shakespeare, Venice, Shakespeare, British Library, Ian Mckellen, Henry Viii, Facebook Twitter, Quartz, Josh Jones, Thomas More, McKellen


Nursing Home Residents Replace Famous Rock Stars on Iconic Album Covers

Deservedly or not, British care homes have acquired a reputation as especially dreary places, from Victorian novels to dystopian fiction to the flat affect of BBC documentaries. Martin Parr gave the world an especially moving example of the care home documentary in his 1972 photo series on Prestwich Asylum, outside Manchester. The compelling portraits humanize people who were neglected and ignored, yet their lives still look bleak in that austerely post-war British institution kind of way. One ...
Tags: Google, Music, England, College, Bbc, Creativity, Current Affairs, Manchester, Npr, Dyson, Elvis, Martin Parr, Springsteen, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, BBC NPR


Emma Willard, the First Woman Mapmaker in America, Creates Pioneering Maps of Time to Teach Students about Democracy (Circa 1851)

We all know Marshall McLuhan’s pithy, endlessly quotable line “the medium is the message,” but rarely do we stop to ask which one comes first. The development of communication technologies may genuinely present us with a chicken or egg scenario. After all, only a culture that already prized constant visual stimuli but grossly undervalued physical movement would have invented and adopted television. In Society of the Spectacle, Guy Debord ties the tendency toward passive visual consumption to “c...
Tags: Google, Art, London, Education, College, Time, America, History, United States, Cornell, Joseph, Facebook Twitter, Willard, Josh Jones, Marshall McLuhan, McLuhan


Watch the Famous James Baldwin-William F. Buckley Debate in Full, With Restored Audio (1965)

When James Baldwin took the stage to debate William F. Buckley at Cambridge in 1965, it was to have “a debate we shouldn’t need,” writes Gabrielle Bellot at Literary Hub, and yet it’s one that is still “as important as ever.” The proposition before the two men—famed prophetic novelist of the black experience in America and the conservative founder of the National Review—was this: “The American Dream is at the Expense of the America Negro.” The statement should not need defending, Baldwin ar...
Tags: Google, Politics, College, US, America, History, Current Affairs, Yale, Cambridge, Berkeley, Jim Crow, James Baldwin, National Review, Facebook Twitter, Literary Hub, Buckley


Vintage Science Face Masks: Conquer the Pandemic with Science, Courtesy of Maria Popova’s BrainPickings

If you don’t floss or brush your teeth, they will rot and fall out. If you don’t eat fruits and vegetables, you will get scurvy or some other horrible disease. If you don’t use protection… well, you know the rest. These are facts of life we mostly accept if we care about ourselves and others because they are beyond disputing. But the idea of wearing a cloth mask when in public during a viral pandemic spread through droplets from the nose and mouth—a practice endorsed by the CDC, the World Healt...
Tags: Health, Google, Europe, Florida, Science, College, US, Current Affairs, Great Barrier Reef, Facebook Twitter, Flora, Josh Jones, Ernst Haeckel, Durham NC Follow, Maria Popova, Popova


Ella Fitzgerald’s Lost Interview about Racism & Segregation: Recorded in 1963, It’s Never Been Heard Until Now

When Ella Fitzgerald took the stage for the first time at the Apollo Theater in Harlem, “we heard a sound so perfect” that the entire theater went silent, says dancer and choreographer Norma Miller. “You could hear a rat piss on cotton.” Fitzgerald was 17 years old, and she had already faced severe racial discrimination. “Everything was race,” says Miller, describing the de facto segregation in Harlem in the 20s and 30s. “You couldn’t go out of your zone… slavery is over, but you don’t h...
Tags: Google, Music, New York, Australia, College, Alabama, New York Times, Sydney, Marilyn Monroe, Usa Today, Louis Armstrong, South, Harlem, Robbins, Miller, Cbc