Posts filtered by tags: Josh Jones[x]


 

The Recording Secrets of Nirvana’s Nevermind Revealed by Producer Butch Vig

People figured out that I’d tapped into something in making that record; a lot of labels came calling because they wanted to see if I could bring that magic to whatever artists they had. But I found it sorta annoying in some ways, because people thought I had a formula, that I could take a folk artist or a blues guitarist and make them sound like Nirvana. The pop cultural phenomenon of Nirvana’s Nevermind caught everyone involved by surprise — from the band, to the label, to Butch Vig, j...
Tags: Facebook, Music, College, Dave, Dave Grohl, Kurt Cobain, Kurt, Josh Jones, Butch, Cobain, Geffen, Billie Eilish, VIG, Krist Novoselic, Durham NC Follow, Butch Vig


How Italian Physicist Laura Bassi Became the First Woman to Have an Academic Career in the 18th Century

The practice and privilege of academic science has been slow in trickling down from its origins as a pursuit of leisured gentleman. While many a leisured lady may have taken an interest in science, math, or philosophy, most women were denied participation in academic institutions and scholarly societies during the scientific revolution of the 1700s. Only a handful of women — seven known in total — were granted doctoral degrees before the year 1800. It wasn’t until 1678 that a female scholar was...
Tags: Facebook, Europe, Gender, Science, College, America, History, Physics, Italy, Benjamin Franklin, Marie Curie, Newton, Stanford University, Bologna, Laura, Josh Jones


Elvis Presley Gets the Polio Vaccine on The Ed Sullivan Show, Persuading Millions to Get Vaccinated (1956)

No one living has experienced a viral event the size and scope of COVID-19. Maybe the unprecedented nature of the pandemic explains some of the vaccine resistance. Diseases of such virulence became rare in places with ready access to vaccines, and thus, ironically, over time, have come to seem less dangerous. But there are still many people in wealthy nations who remember polio, an epidemic that dragged on through the first half of the 20th century before Jonas Salk perfected his vaccine...
Tags: Health, Facebook, Television, College, History, Smithsonian, Elvis Presley, Elvis, Ed Sullivan, Yo Yo Ma, Sullivan, Josh Jones, Walter Winchell, Brody, Jonas Salk, Durham NC Follow


The Roman Colosseum Has a Twin in Tunisia: Discover the Amphitheater of El Jem, One of the Best-Preserved Roman Ruins in the World

Image via Wikimedia Commons When Rome conquered Carthage in the Third Punic War (149-146 BC), the Republic renamed the region Africa, for Afri, a word the Berbers used for local people in present-day Tunisia. (The Arabic word for the region was Ifriqiya.) Thereafter would the Roman Empire have a stronghold in North Africa: Carthage, the capital of the African Province under Julius and Augustus Caesar and their successors. The province thrived. Second only to the city of Carthage in the region, ...
Tags: Facebook, College, Africa, History, Rome, Architecture, Unesco, Algeria, Republic, Tunisia, Pompeii, Tunis, North Africa, Atlas Obscura, Jem, Carthage


What Makes Basquiat’s Untitled Great Art: One Painting Says Everything Basquiat Wanted to Say About America, Art & Being Black in Both Worlds

They wouldn’t have let Jean-Michel into a Tiffany’s if he wanted to use the bathroom or if he went to buy an engagement ring and pulled a wad of cash out of his pocket.  — Stephen Torton, Jean-Michel Basquiat’s studio assistant When Jean-Michel Basquiat’s Untitled (Skull) sold for $110.5 million in 2017 to Japanese billionaire Yusaku Maesawa, the artist joined the ranks of Da Vinci, De Kooning, and Picasso as one of the top selling painters in the world, surpassing a previous record set ...
Tags: Art, Facebook, New York, College, America, Brooklyn, Andy Warhol, Picasso, Christie, Tiffany, Tiffany Co, Jean Michel Basquiat, Josh Jones, Ben Davis, Artnet, Basquiat


Sci-Fi Pioneer Hugo Gernsback Predicts Telemedicine in 1925

If you’ve ever wondered why one of science fiction’s greatest honors is called the “Hugo,” meet Hugo Gernsback, one of the genre’s most important figures, a man whose work has been variously described as “dreadful,” “tawdry,” “incompetent,” “graceless,” and “a sort of animated catalogue of gadgets.” But Gernsback isn’t remembered as a writer, but as an editor, publisher (of Amazing Stories magazine), and pioneer of science fact, for it was Gernsback who first introduced the earth-shaking techno...
Tags: Health, Facebook, Technology, College, Germany, Earth, Cambridge, Smithsonian, Sci Fi, Arthur C Clarke, Hugo Gernsback, Josh Jones, Gernsback, Matt Novak, Durham NC Follow, J G Ballard


William Blake’s 102 Illustrations of The Divine Comedy Collected in a Beautiful Book from Taschen

In his book on the Tarot, Alejandro Jodorowsky describes the Hermit card as representing mid-life, a “positive crisis,” a middle point in time; “between life and death, in a continual crisis, I hold up my lit lamp — my consciousness,” says the Hermit, while confronting the unknown. The figure recalls the image of Dante in the opening lines of the Divine Comedy. In Mandelbaum’s translation at Columbia’s Digital Dante, we see evident similarities: When I had journeyed half of our life’s way, I fo...
Tags: Art, Facebook, Europe, Books, College, Literature, William Blake, Florence, Columbia, Dante, Alejandro Jodorowsky, Blake, Virgil, Josh Jones, Taschen, Mandelbaum


Brushy One String

As his name suggests, Jamaican street musician Brushy One String plays a one-string guitar and, under that constraint, makes some truly beautiful music. Josh Jones wrote about Brushy for Open Culture: When Jamaican musician Andrew Chin, better known as Brushy One String first told friends about his vision — “a dream in which he was told to play the one-string guitar” — they responded with mockery — all but one, who “insisted it was fate,” writes Playing for Change, “and that he had to make ...
Tags: Npr, Jason Kottke, Josh Jones, Brushy, Gasper Nali, Andrew Chin


Darth Vader’s Voice: The Original Voice Versus the Vocals of James Earl Jones

The hulking black-caped figure, “a walking iron lung,” as George Lucas called him in 1977, Darth Vader more than rightly tops a list of the 50 best movie villains of all time as the “gold standard of villainy,” but it took more than inspired costuming to make him so. Vader is a composite creation of several different talents. The quality by which we most know (and fear) him – the booming voice that commands and kills from afar — came, of course, from James Earl Jones. As one of the 20th ...
Tags: Facebook, UK, Film, College, Orson Welles, Npr, James Earl Jones, Darth Vader, George Lucas, Jones, Lucas, Vader, Josh Jones, Ben Burtt, David Prowse, Prowse


A Restored Vermeer Painting Reveals a Portrait of a Cupid Hidden for Over 350 Years

Botched art restorations make good headlines, but rarely are we asked to consider if a posthumous change to a great master’s work represents an improvement. And yet, when images of a restored Girl Reading a Letter at an Open Window by Jan Vermeer circulated recently, the world had the chance to compare the restored original painting, at the left, with an unknown painter’s revision, long thought to be Vermeer’s work. (Click here to view the paintings side by side in a larger format.) Several peo...
Tags: Google, Art, Facebook, College, Rembrandt, Van Gogh, Delft, Vermeer, Josh Jones, Durham NC Follow, Jan Vermeer, My Modern Met, The National Gallery, Complete Works of Vermeer, Stephan Koja


The First Air Raid Happened When Austria Dropped Bombs on Venice from Pilotless Hot-Air Balloons (1849)

We surround the phrase “ahead of its time” with a mystical aura. But just because an idea shows up earlier than we expect does not mean it was ever a good idea for human progress. Take, for example, the idea to rain incendiary devices on the heads of civilian populations in wartime. Recent iterations of this technology — unmanned drones surgically bombing weddings and funerals — may be an improvement over Hiroshima or napalm-happy helicopter pilots like Apocalypse Now’s Bill Kilgore. But drones...
Tags: Facebook, College, Time, History, Austria, Venice, Hiroshima, Pompeii, Edison, Josh Jones, Monash University, Holman, Marco Polo Airport, Durham NC Follow, Brett Holman, Bill Kilgore


Hear Charlie Watts Inimitable Isolated Drum Tracks on “Gimme Shelter,” “Beast of Burden,” and “Honky Tonk”

When I was a kid in New Jersey, if you were looking for work, there’d be ads for musicians. In the mid-60s and 70s, they would invariably say: “Wanted: Charlie Watts type drummer” — Max Weinberg Since Charlie Watts passed away last month, tribute upon tribute has poured in to celebrate his style, his austere simplicity, his role as the calm, steady eye of the Rolling Stones’ roiling storm. “Drumming is often ugly,” Amanda Petrusich wrote at The New Yorker, “but Watts looked so beautiful ...
Tags: Facebook, Music, College, James Brown, New Jersey, Martin Scorsese, Al Jackson, Keith, Watts, Springsteen, Mick, Charlie, Rolling Stones, Stewart Copeland, Charlie Parker, Josh Jones


Meet Brushy One String, the One String Guitar Player Who Will Blow Your Mind

When Jamaican musician Andrew Chin, better known as Brushy One String first told friends about his vision — “a dream in which he was told to play the one-string guitar” — they responded with mockery — all but one, who “insisted it was fate,” writes Playing for Change, “and that he had to make that dream come true.” So Brushy set out to do just that, playing on streetcorners and in the market, “in a big broad hat and sunglasses,” he says. The music came to him naturally. He is no ordinary...
Tags: Facebook, Music, Japan, Mississippi, College, Npr, Eddie, Keith Richards, Tina Turner, Robert Johnson, New Orleans Jazz Heritage Festival, Shabba Ranks, Josh Jones, Bo Diddley, Teddy Pendergrass, UNITAR


The Evolutionary History of Fat: Biologists Explain Why It’s Necessary for Our Survival & Why We’re Biased Against It

The Fat Acceptance movement may seem like a 21st century phenomenon, rising to public consciousness with the success of high-profile writers, actors, filmmakers, and activists in recent years. But the movement can date its origins to 1967, when WBAI radio personality Steve Post held a “fat-in” in Central Park, bringing 500 people together to protest, celebrate, and burn diet books and photos of Twiggy. “That same year,” notes the Center for Discovery, “a man named Llewelyn ‘Lew’ Louderba...
Tags: Health, Google, Facebook, Biology, College, Harvard University, Central Park, Josh Jones, Lieberman, WBAI, Durham NC Follow, Sandra Aamodt, Daniel Lieberman, Center for Discovery, Leiberman, Steve Post


What Makes Rodin’s The Thinker a Great Sculpture: An Introduction to Rodin Life, Craft & Iconic Work

Auguste Rodin’s The Thinker exists in about 28 full-size bronze casts, each approximately 73 inches high, in museums around the world, as well as several dozen castings of smaller size and plaster models and studies. The Thinker also exists as one of the most copied and parodied artworks in world history, perhaps because of its ubiquity. “Unfortunately,” Joseph Phelan writes at the Artcyclopedia, “there is a side of Rodin’s work that has become kitsch through cheap reproductions and comm...
Tags: Art, Facebook, College, Paris, Dante, Rodin, Gates Of Hell, Plato, Josh Jones, Auguste Rodin, Kant, Rodin Museum, Durham NC Follow, Museum of Decorative Arts, Joseph Phelan, Artcyclopedia


Chinese Youth Announce That They’re “Lying Flat” and Resisting the Pressures of Modern Life

The “Lying Flat” movement taking hold among young people in China involves doing exactly what it suggests: working little, resting a lot, and cultivating the most minimalist lifestyle possible. Unlike Timothy Leary’s 1960’s mantra, “turn on, tune in, drop out,” lying flat, or tang ping (??), takes no stance on a countercultural ethos or the consumption of mind-altering drugs. But it has caused the authorities alarm, even among English-language observers. Consider the Brookings Institute ...
Tags: Facebook, Politics, College, China, Economics, Beijing, Current Affairs, Goldman Sachs, Party, Baidu, Brian Eno, Xinhua, Li, Josh Jones, Japan Korea, Rosenblum


An Archaeologist Creates the Definitive Guide to Beer Cans

Image via Wikimedia Commons As a beverage of choice and necessity for much of the population in parts of the ancient world, beer has played an important role in archaeology. Beer cans, on the other hand, have not. Unlike millennia-old recipes, beer cans seem like no more than trash, even in a field where trash is highly treasured. This is a mistake, says archeologist Jane Busch. “The historical archaeologist who ignores the beer can at his site is like the prehistoric archeologist who ignores h...
Tags: Facebook, College, History, Canada, United States, Food & Drink, Maxwell, Atlas Obscura, Josh Jones, Wikimedia Commons, Rodney Dangerfield, Gingrich, David Maxwell, Durham NC Follow, Jim Rock, Nicola Jones


Watch Lost Studio Footage of Brian Wilson Conducting “Good Vibrations,” The Beach Boys’ Brilliant “Pocket Symphony”

After Brian Wilson created what Hendrix called the “psychedelic barbershop quartet” sound of the Beach Boys’ Pet Sounds, he moved on to what he promised would be another quantum leap beyond. “Our new album,” Smile, he claimed, “will be as much an improvement over Sounds as that was over Summer Days.” But in his pursuit to almost single-handedly surpass the Beatles in the art of studio perfectionism, Wilson overreached. He famously scrapped the Smile sessions, and instead released the has...
Tags: Facebook, Music, College, Brian Wilson, Brian, Wilson, Hendrix, Josh Jones, Lyle Ritz, Durham NC Follow, Derek Taylor, Bruce Golden, Hal Blaine, Carol Kay, George Martin Break Down, Smiley Smile


An 18-Year-Old Spends a Year Alone Building a Log Cabin in the Swedish Wilderness: Watch from Start to Finish

Henry David Thoreau has at times been upbraided by critics for “everyone’s favorite incriminating biographical factoid,” writes Donovan Hohn at The New Republic: “During the two years he spent at Walden Pond, his mother sometimes did his laundry.” The author who became “America’s original nature boy “played at rugged self-sufficiency,” it is said, “while squatting on borrowed land, in a house built with a borrowed axe”; he played at rugged individualism while relying on friends and famil...
Tags: Facebook, College, Life, America, Michigan, Frank Lloyd Wright, Lincoln Logs, New Republic, Henry David Thoreau, Walden, Josh Jones, Thoreau, Walden Pond, Durham NC Follow, Donovan Hohn, Erik Grankvist


17th Century Scientist Gives First Description of Alien Life: Hear Passages from Christiaan Huygens’ Cosmotheoros (1698)

Astrobiologists can now extrapolate the evolutionary characteristics of possible alien life, should it exist, given the wealth of data available on interplanetary conditions. But our ideas about aliens have drawn not from science but from what Adrian Horton at The Guardian calls “an engrossing feedback loop” of Hollywood films, comics books, and sci-fi novels. A little over three-hundred years ago — having never heard of H.G. Wells or the X-Files — Dutch scientist Christiaan Huygens answ...
Tags: Facebook, Astronomy, Hollywood, Science, College, Earth, Sci Fi, Isaac Newton, Saturn, Jupiter, Carl Sagan, Newton, Richard Feynman, The Hague, Horton, Galileo


Medieval Scribes Discouraged Theft of Manuscripts by Adding Curses Threatening Death & Damnation to Their Pages

I’ve concluded that one shouldn’t lend a book unless one is prepared to part with it for good. But most books are fairly easy to replace. Not so in the Middle Ages, when every manuscript counted as one of a kind. Theft was often on the minds of the scribes who copied and illustrated books, a laborious task requiring literal hours of blood, sweat and tears each day. Scribal copying took place “only by natural light — candles were too big a risk to the books,” Sarah Laskow writes at Atlas Obscura...
Tags: Facebook, Books, College, France, Germany, Religion, History, Paris, British Library, University Of Colorado, Josh Jones, Maranatha, Durham NC Follow, Vatican Library, Rebecca Romney, Sarah Laskow


Saying Goodbye to Charlie Watts (RIP), the Engine of the Rolling Stones for Half a Century

Charlie Watts, the Rolling Stones’ iconic drummer since 1962, passed away yesterday from unspecified causes at the age of 80. His death is a great loss for rock and roll. “When Charlie Watts dies, the beat stops,” Rob Harvilla writes at the Ringer, “never to be played again with such mesmerizing force, with such ultra-suave propulsion, with such casually indomitable radness.” These are not technical terms, and Watts was not a technical drummer. “I’m not a paradiddle man,” he said in 2000...
Tags: Facebook, Music, London, College, Mtv, Paris, Ronnie Wood, Martin Scorsese, Jagger, Watts, Charlie, Richards, Rolling Stones, Keef, Charlie Parker, Josh Jones


The Wicked Scene in Amadeus When Mozart Mocked the Talents of His Rival Antonio Salieri: How Much Does the Film Square with Reality?

Pity the ghost of Antonio Salieri, “one of history’s all-time losers — a bystander run over by a Mack truck of malicious gossip,” writes Alex Ross at The New Yorker. The rumors began even before his death. “In 1825, a story that he had poisoned Mozart went around Vienna. In 1830, Alexander Pushkin used that rumor as the basis for his play ‘Mozart and Salieri,’ casting the former as the doltish genius and the latter as a jealous schemer.” The stories became further embellished in an opera...
Tags: Facebook, Music, Film, College, History, Vienna, Ross, Mozart, Simon Callow, Alex Ross, Abraham, Shaffer, Wolfgang, Josh Jones, Marriage of Figaro, Pushkin


360 Degree Virtual Tours of the Hagia Sophia

Last year, when Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdo?an announced that Hagia Sophia would be reconverted into a mosque, he assured a concerned UNESCO that changes to the 1,500-year-old former cathedral-turned-mosque would have “no negative impact” on its status as World Heritage Site. “A state must make sure that no modification undermines the outstanding universal value of a site listed on its territory,” the world body has said. Claims to the contrary notwithstanding, the “universal val...
Tags: Travel, Art, Facebook, College, Turkey, History, Bbc, Architecture, Unesco, Khan Academy, Istanbul, Reuters, Sophia, Constantinople, Josh Jones, Hagia Sophia


Hear Philip K. Dick’s Famous Metz Speech: “If You Find this World Bad, You Should See Some of the Others” (1977)

A newspaper article about this speech could well be titled: AUTHOR CLAIMS TO HAVE SEEN GOD BUT CAN’T GIVE ACCOUNT OF WHAT HE SAW. — PKD In 1977, cult writer Philip K. Dick arrived at a science fiction convention in Metz, France to deliver a speech called, “If You Find this World Bad, You Should See Some of the Others.” (Read an edited transcript here.) The audience would leave bewildered, mystified. His talk ranged widely across such topics as cosmological time, the possibility of the un...
Tags: Facebook, College, Germany, India, Earth, Literature, Philosophy, Sci Fi, Nazi, Philip K Dick, Metz, Dick, Eden, Delphi, Rumi, Lewis


Songs That Use “Word Painting”: The Art of Creating Music That Sounds Like the Lyrics

“There’s no love song finer, but how strange the change from major to minor, everytime we say goodbye.” In the line above from Cole Porter’s “Every Time We Say Goodbye,” we’re moved from the happiness of love to the sadness of parting, and so too do the chords change, from major to minor, thus subtly changing the mood of the song. The technique is a clever example of a songwriting method called “word painting,” or prosody, when lyrics are accompanied by a rhythmic, melodic, or harmonic s...
Tags: Facebook, Music, College, Jimi Hendrix, David Bowie, Cole Porter, Leonard Cohen, Bennett, Tom Petty, Josh Jones, William S Burroughs, Billie Eilish, David Bennett, Jackson Five, Jill Sobule, Durham NC Follow


How Doctor Who First Started as a Family Educational TV Program (1963)

Those who grew up with the BBC sci-fi series Doctor Who watched from “behind the sofa,” a popular phrase associated with the show for the rubbery, bug-eyed monsters it held in store each week for loyal viewers. Although it may be hard for those who didn’t experience it in their formative years to understand, Doctor Who has frequently been voted the scariest TV show of all time, over grislier, big-budget series like The Walking Dead, and has done so without losing its sense of humor, a te...
Tags: Facebook, London, Television, Education, College, Bbc, Sci Fi, John F Kennedy, Daleks, Newman, Ian, Barbara, Josh Jones, Charlie Jane Anders, Tardis, GALLIFREY


Brian Eno Day: Hear 10 Hours of Radio Programming Featuring Brian Eno Talking About His Life & Career (1988)

Image via Wikimedia Commons Brian Eno kept busy during last year’s pandemic, telling the L.A. Times this past January about one of his latest ideas, an open source Zoom alternative, just one of any number of projects he’s kicking around at any given time. One of the most prolific and influential artists, musicians, producers, and thinkers of the past several decades, Eno is such a cultural institution, he warrants his own appreciation day. That’s just what he got on February 12, 1988 when KPFA ...
Tags: Facebook, Music, College, David Bowie, Guardian, Times, Brian Eno, Canon, Eno, Berkeley CA, Stockhausen, Josh Jones, KPFA, Pachelbel, Durham NC Follow, Brian Eno Himself Brian Eno


Listen to Plato Invent the Myth of Atlantis (360 B.C)

Myths emerge from the murky depths of human prehistory, leaving their sources shrouded in mystery. But on rare occasions, we can trace them to a single point of origin. The myth of Atlantis, for example, the ancient civilization that supposedly sank into the sea, has one and only one source — Plato — who told the story in both the Timaeus and Critias, sometime around 360 BC, as an allegory for corruption and civilizational decay. Plato puts the tale of Atlantis nesos, the “island of Atla...
Tags: Facebook, Asia, College, History, Egypt, Athens, Philosophy, Libya, Francis Bacon, Kafka, National Geographic, Heracles, Albany, Plato, Josh Jones, Thomas More


Hear 45 Minutes of Funky Old Soundtracks from 1960s-70s Japanese Films & TV Shows

The life of a Japanese film composer in the 1960s and 70s was very different from their American counterparts. “For Hollywood movies, there is a three-month period to write the music after the film has been finished,” says legendary film and television composer Chumei Watanabe. When Watanabe first began working for Shintoho studios, “at first, they gave us five days. Of course, it would usually be shortened…. One time, there was a Toei movie being filmed in Kyoto. The next day was the re...
Tags: Facebook, Music, Japan, Hollywood, Television, Film, College, Quentin Tarantino, Tarantino, Hunter, Kamen, Josh Jones, Watanabe, Toei, Durham NC Follow, Kikuchi