Posts filtered by tags: Kenshu Shimada[x]


 

Megalodon babies ate their shark siblings in the womb, leading them to be the size of adult humans at birth

A prehistoric megalodon alongside a great white shark. Victor Habbick Visions/Science Photo Library/Getty Megalodons were more than 6.5 feet long at birth. As adults, the huge, prehistoric sharks reached lengths of 50 feet and had . That's far bigger than any other meat-eating shark, living or extinct.  A new study suggests the sharks grew to such large sizes because megalodon babies ate each other in the womb. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. A megalodon's .The prehis...
Tags: Hollywood, Science, News, Cannibalism, Animals, Trends, Atlantic, Sharks, Megalodon, Meg, DePaul University, Shimada, Kenshu Shimada, Megs, Aylin Woodward, Florida Museum


Megalodons may have grown to the size of school buses by eating their shark siblings in the womb, new research suggests

An illustration of a megalodon. Shutterstock Megalodons — huge, prehistoric sharks — reached lengths of 50 feet, with . The predators are super-sized compared to other sharks, both living and extinct. But how megalodons achieved that massive size is a mystery. A new study suggests the sharks' size could be explained in part by the fact that they ate each other in the womb. Scientists aren't sure how megalodons hunted, but a decline in prey and an increase in competitors may have caused thei...
Tags: UK, Hollywood, Science, News, Animals, Trends, Sharks, Fossils, Pacific Ocean, Megalodon, Benton, Paleontology, Meg, DePaul University, Shimada, Victor Perez


Texas fish of dinosaur era found to be new species

A 90-million-year-old fossil fish, which has been on display at the Perot Museum of Nature and Science in Dallas, turns out to be a new species. Research conducted by Kenshu Shimada, Ph.D., professor at DePaul University in Chicago and research associate of the Sternberg Museum in Kansas, reveals the 5.5-foot-long fossil fish to possess a tuna-like body with a unique 'hook-shaped sail' on its back. The fish has been given a new species name, Pentanogmius fritschi, in honor of Joseph Fritsch, a l...
Tags: Texas, Chicago, Kansas, Dallas, Archaeology & Fossils, DePaul University, Perot Museum of Nature and Science, Kenshu Shimada, Sternberg Museum, Joseph Fritsch, Kris Howe


Texas fish of dinosaur era, at Perot Museum of Nature and Science, found to be new species

A 90-million-year-old fossil fish, currently on display at the Perot Museum of Nature and Science in Dallas, turns out to be a new species. Research conducted by Kenshu Shimada, Ph.D., professor at DePaul University and research associate of the Sternberg Museum, reveals the 5.5-foot-long fossil fish to possess a tuna-like body with a unique 'hook-shaped sail' on its back. The fish's new species name, Pentanogmius fritschi, is in honor of local amateur collector Joseph Fritsch.
Tags: Texas, Dallas, DePaul University, Perot Museum of Nature and Science, Kenshu Shimada, Sternberg Museum


Muppet-Faced Fish Swam Alongside Dinosaurs

A Muppet-faced fish with a lanky body more than 6 feet long gulped down plankton in Earth's ancient oceans about 92 million years ago, a new study finds. "Based on our new study, we now have three different species of Rhinconichthys from three separate regions of the globe, each represented by a single skull," study co-researcher Kenshu Shimada, a paleobiologist at DePaul University in Chicago, said in a statement.
Tags: Earth, Chicago, DePaul University, Muppet Faced Fish Swam Alongside Dinosaurs, Kenshu Shimada